All In The Mind - ABC Radio National

All In The Mind - ABC Radio National

Australia

All In The Mind is Radio National's weekly foray into the mental universe, the mind, brain and behaviour - everything from addiction to artificial intelligence.

Episodes

The ghost in my brain  

When a professor of artificial intelligence had disturbing brain injury symptoms as a result of a concussion, he lost his former self—but encouraged by the potential of brain plasticity he changed the course of his life.

The mysterious corpus callosum  

The corpus callosum links one side of our brain to the other. It’s not essential for survival, but in some people it’s missing or malformed, causing quite mild to extreme disabilities. The good news is that research is now revealing that it holds intriguing secrets about brain plasticity.

It's a conspiracy  

9/11 was an inside job, Princess Diana was murdered in a government plot, and the Apollo 11 moon landing was faked. There’s a conspiracy theory for just about every major event—but believers aren’t just on the paranoid fringe, wearing tin foil hats.

The Indigenous memory code  

Traditional Aboriginal Australian songlines hold the key to a powerful memory technique used by indigenous people around the world.

Social lives, genes, and our health  

Having a sense of meaning in life can protect against chronic disease—but those who lack social connection are more prone to ill health. We talk with Steve Cole about social genomics.

Healing rhythms  

Rhythmic music can affect how the brain controls our stress response. We discuss how group-based drumming taps into people’s emotions—and when combined with reflective discussion this can be an effective alternative form of therapy.

Emotional CPR  

Psychiatrist Daniel Fisher would like to shift the paradigm of mental health services and empower people to play a strong role in their own recovery—so he’s teaching emotional CPR.

The psychology of money  

As the festive season—and budgets—approach, we discuss how to wise-up to money. Lynne Malcolm and Claudia Hammond talk dollars and sense.

ADHD and overdiagnosis  

Twenty percent of American boys are diagnosed with ADHD by the time they turn 18—is ADHD being overdiagnosed and overtreated? Alan Schwarz, Florence Levy, and Rae Thomas give their perspectives.

Finding consciousness  

To help determine consciousness, a neuroscientist tells jokes to a person in a vegetative state, and scans their brain—Professor Adrian Owen describes his research.

Locked in  

At the age of 12 Martin Pistorius developed a mysterious neurological illness. He fell into a coma and was unable to move or communicate. It was assumed he had no awareness but a couple of years later he began to wake up—yet no-one knew. He was trapped inside his body for almost 10 years until he found a way to communicate. Using computer-generated voice technology he tells us about how he coped with this terrifying ordeal, and how he found the love of his life.

The heritability of mental illness  

Genetic testing for risk of a mental illness could be helpful to its management.

Machines for mental health  

It may be that we don't need to be face to face to provide quality mental health care.

Hooked on social media  

Social media it is compelling—but perhaps we depend on it too much.

My mind was a stranger  

The story of an Irish design engineer who suffers from an extreme form of bipolar disorder—charting his relationship with the illness from an idyllic childhood, through a drink and drug-fuelled adolescence and early adulthood, to relative stability today.

The psychology of hoarding  

We all have different approaches to how much stuff we accumulate. But what happens when your attachment to things becomes so strong that a decision to let go of anything is impossible?

The sound spiral: misophonia  

For some people certain sounds not only annoy them, but send them into panic, anxiety, and even rage. This hyper-sensitivity is a recently discovered condition called misophonia. We discuss the the research trying make sense of it.

Dream sleep  

A good night's sleep is divided into cycles, some of which are REM, or Rapid Eye Movement sleep—and may be important for memory.

Tuning in to autism  

People with autism often have difficulty with social interaction. In a candid and poignant interview, spokesperson John Elder Robison shares his experience of living with autism.

A stroke of reality  

Stroke can happen at any age—knowing the signs and how to act can be vital.

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