Carnegie Council Audio Podcast

Carnegie Council Audio Podcast

United States

Listen to events at Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. Speakers and interviewees include distinguished authors, government and UN officials, economists, policymakers, and businesspeople. Topics range from the ethics of war and peace, to the place of religion in politics, to issues at the forefront of global social justice. To learn more about our work and to explore a wealth of related resources, please visit our website at http://www.carnegiecouncil.org.

Episodes

North Korea: A Conversation between Joel Rosenthal and Devin Stewart  

Carnegie Council President Joel Rosenthal and Senior Fellow Devin Stewart discuss the tense North Korea situation. What does Kim Jong-un want? How should the United States respond? What would the "enlightened realist" do?

Global Ethics Forum Preview: The Nuclear Necessity Principle with Scott D. Sagan  

Next time on Global Ethics Forum, Stanford’s Scott Sagan discusses an ethical approach to America’s nuclear weapon policy. In this excerpt, Sagan talks with journalist Randall Pinkston about the changing role of civilians with regards to control of the U.S. nuclear arsenal.

The Driver in the Driverless Car with Vivek Wadhwa  

What are the social and ethical implications of new technologies such as widespread automation and gene editing? These innovations are no longer in the realm of science fiction, says entrepreneur and technology writer Vivek Wadhwa. They are coming closer and closer. We need to educate people about them and then come together and and have probing and honest discussions on what is good and what is bad.

The Trump Effect in Japan with Robert Dujarric  

"When you have a president like Trump, you do have to ask yourself: 'What will the United States look like in five years or in ten years?' A strong United States is what the government of Japan wants. In that sense, Trump is a threat. It is one that not all, but I feel a lot of Japanese analysts, are oblivious to. And second, what can they do? The answer is they can't do anything."

Making Ethics Matter in 2017  

"What can be said of ethics in public life in this fall season of 2017? One thing is clear: A new era of uncertainty is now upon us.... We enter these uncertain and often overheated days with confidence that it is not only possible, but urgently necessary to show how and why 'Ethics Matter.' This is our charge, which we accept with equal measures of equanimity and resolution."

Heidi Grant on U.S. Air Force Global Partnerships  

George Washington understood that building capable partners during peacetime can actually prevent war, says Heidi Grant. She is deputy under secretary of the Air Force, International Affairs, an organization which works with over a hundred countries to address shared security challenges. This includes selling them military equipment and increasing their capability to conduct their own ISR: intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance.

Joshua Eisenman on "Chinese National Socialism"  

Under Xi Jinping, China is stepping up a crackdown on freedom of expression, including in universites, reports China expert Joshua Eisenman. Is this the beginning of a new Cultural Revolution, as some people fear? If so, we need to understand that this time it will be a Cultural Revolution of the political right, not the left, says Eisenman. "The tactics that they're using are neo-Maoist tactics, but the ideas are neo-fascist."

Scott Kennedy of CSIS: Worst Case Scenarios for China's Economy  

After four decades of stellar growth, where is China's economy headed today? "In the last few years not only has the economy slowed down, but the government's commitment to economic liberalization has waned," warns Scott Kennedy, an expert on China's economy.

Stratfor's Rodger Baker on the Rebalancing of World Politics and Asia  

"I think the biggest impact of Donald Trump's presidency, particularly in Asia-Pacific, has been the concept of uncertainty," says Baker, citing the lack of a clear and concise policy from the administration. "Uncertainty, if the United States were just a small peripheral country, is manageable; uncertainty when the United States is such a large and impactful country becomes very difficult to manage."

Ziad Haider: U.S.-Asia Economic Ties Under Trump  

In this post-TPP world where the U.S. has taken a step back from Asia, the vacuum is being filled by China's initiatives, such as the One Belt One Road, says Ziad Haider, former State Department special representative for commercial and business affairs. Nevertheless, we shouldn't fall into the narrative of "The United States and China are locked into competition." China's actions also offer opportunities for the U.S.

Scott D. Sagan on the Nuclear Necessity Principle  

Major changes must be made if U.S. nuclear war plans are to conform to the principles of just war doctrine and the law of armed conflict, declares Stanford University's Scott Sagan. He proposes a new doctrine: "the nuclear necessity principle."In sum, the U.S. will not use nuclear weapons against any target that could be reliably destroyed by conventional means.

Michele Wucker on when the Gray Rhino Hits Asia  

Michele Wucker describes a gray rhino as the "love child of the black swan and the elephant in the room." In other words, "it's a metaphor for the big, obvious thing that's coming at you that you've got a choice to deal with or not." Why has this concept struck such a chord in China, Taiwan, and Korea, while Americans tend to be more in denial about their gray rhinos?

Amnesty International's Sarah Jackson on the Crisis in South Sudan  

Since South Sudan's civil war broke out in late 2013, soldiers on both sides have been using rape and other forms of sexual violence on a massive scale as a weapon of war, says Amnesty International's Sarah Jackson. The resulting refugee crisis is putting a severe strain on neighboring Uganda, a country with one of the most generous refugee policies in the world. What is at the root of this violence? How can governments and NGOs help?

George Friedman: The End of the International Order and the Future of Asia  

Tired of conventional wisdom? Check out geopolitical forecaster George Friedman. The period that began at the end of World War II was a freak, he says. "We're returning to a more normal structure in which the nation-state is dominant, international trade is intense but managed by states for their own benefit, and where this idea that the nation-state is obsolete goes away." And find out why he's bullish on Japan and thinks we overestimate China.

Meredith Sumpter: The "G-Zero" World Hits Asia  

"First and foremost, a G-zero is a world in which no one country has dominant power or can influence the international system of governance," explains political risk expert Meredith Sumpter. "We are amidst a transition to a multipolar world, a world that is marked by the relative rise and power of other countries, even while the United States continues to be the most powerful country."

General Donald Bolduc on the U.S. War in Afghanistan  

In this inspiring interview, Brig. Gen. Bolduc discusses his time in Afghanistan and his assessment of the situation there as well as in Africa, where he was in charge of countering violent extremism. He also reveals his experiences with PTSD, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and multiple other physical injuries, explaining how he finally got help and how he is working hard to help others with the same issues.

Alexander Klimburg on "The Darkening Web: The War for Cyberspace"  

In the West we view cyber threats as largely a technical issue, while in Russia and China they see it in terms of propaganda, information control, and influencing their domestic affairs, says Alex Klimburg. When we confuse these two narratives, we risk missing other nations' key strategies to push the Internet in unwanted directions. Indeed, almost without realizing it, we are contributing to something approaching an arms race in cyber.

Graham Allison on "Destined for War: Can America and China Escape Thucydides’s Trap?"  

Thucydides's Trap is the dangerous dynamic that occurs when a rising power threatens to displace a ruling power, explains Harvard's Graham Allison. So is war between China and the United States inevitable? No, says Allison, but both nations will have to make "painful adaptations and adjustments" to avoid it, starting with U.S. policy adjustments regarding the South China Sea and the Korean Peninsula.

Isaac Stone Fish: Facts and Fiction on North Korea  

Asia Society's Isaac Stone Fish is working on a novel set in Pyongyang, but he's also looking for the truth in the "world's most opaque country." Why does he think the North Koreans are acting rationally? What are the possible outcomes if tensions continue to rise between Kim and Trump?

Mira Rapp-Hooper on "Subcontracting" U.S. Policy Toward Asia  

The U.S. and China have fundamentally different priorities regarding the Korean Peninsula, explains Asia expert Rapp-Hooper. "So, by subcontracting North Korea policy to China," she says, "I think the United States is evincing some amount of naïveté on how far Beijing is likely to actually be willing to go."

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