Carnegie Council Audio Podcast

Carnegie Council Audio Podcast

United States

Listen to events at Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. Speakers and interviewees include distinguished authors, government and UN officials, economists, policymakers, and businesspeople. Topics range from the ethics of war and peace, to the place of religion in politics, to issues at the forefront of global social justice. To learn more about our work and to explore a wealth of related resources, please visit our website at http://www.carnegiecouncil.org.

Episodes

Alexander Klimburg on "The Darkening Web: The War for Cyberspace"  

In the West we view cyber threats as largely a technical issue, while in Russia and China they see it in terms of propaganda, information control, and influencing their domestic affairs, says Alex Klimburg. When we confuse these two narratives, we risk missing other nations' key strategies to push the Internet in unwanted directions. Indeed, almost without realizing it, we are contributing to something approaching an arms race in cyber.

Graham Allison on "Destined for War: Can America and China Escape Thucydides’s Trap?"  

Thucydides's Trap is the dangerous dynamic that occurs when a rising power threatens to displace a ruling power, explains Harvard's Graham Allison. So is war between China and the United States inevitable? No, says Allison, but both nations will have to make "painful adaptations and adjustments" to avoid it, starting with U.S. policy adjustments regarding the South China Sea and the Korean Peninsula.

Isaac Stone Fish: Facts and Fiction on North Korea  

Asia Society's Isaac Stone Fish is working on a novel set in Pyongyang, but he's also looking for the truth in the "world's most opaque country." Why does he think the North Koreans are acting rationally? What are the possible outcomes if tensions continue to rise between Kim and Trump?

Mira Rapp-Hooper on "Subcontracting" U.S. Policy Toward Asia  

The U.S. and China have fundamentally different priorities regarding the Korean Peninsula, explains Asia expert Rapp-Hooper. "So, by subcontracting North Korea policy to China," she says, "I think the United States is evincing some amount of naïveté on how far Beijing is likely to actually be willing to go."

Pankaj Ghemawat on Global Strategy in the Age of Brexit and Trump  

How should companies strategize in the age of "Brump" (shorthand for Brexit and Trump)? Should they think locally rather than globally? Are trade wars inevitable, and if so, how will they affect countries large and small? Don't miss this analysis from economist Pankaj Ghemawat.

Conversation with Raymond Kuo: Can Trump be a Bismarck in Asia?  

"This has happened before where we've had a great power who is essentially the leader of the international system taking a transactional approach. The closest example would be maybe Bismarck in the 1870s until the eve of World War I. There it worked quite well. . . . The drawbacks of this, of course, are that it is highly unstable."

The Earth Institute's Steven Cohen Offers Hope for a Sustainable Future  

"I still believe that we're heading toward a renewable resource-based economy. I think that it's inevitable," declares Steven Cohen. How will we get there? A combination of market forces as renewables become cheaper, better technology, and the sharing economy.

Tom Nichols on the Death of Expertise  

Across the world today, there is active hostility towards experts, says Tom Nichols of the U.S. Naval War College, and this is a very dangerous trend. Donald Trump didn't create this, but he certainly weaponized it politically, just as Brexiteers did in the UK.

Amitai Etzioni on Avoiding War with China  

The result of a war with China? "At best we have to spend hundreds of billions of dollars on weapons nobody will use which are badly in need of nation building at home; at worst, we get into a war with a major power that has nuclear weapons. So, any way you look at it—all I want is a public debate about what should be our China policy. I think we debate already more which bathrooms transgender people should be able to use than our China policy."

Ali Wyne on the Risks of U.S. Disengagement from Asia  

"Unless we are able to overcome our strategic attention deficit disorder (ADD), for lack of a better phrase, and unless we are able to not only compete anew economically in the region, but also shape a constructive economic agenda in the region, I fear that that perception of American disengagement [from Asia] will only intensify," says Atlantic Council Fellow Ali Wyne.

Soldiers and Civilization: How the Profession of Arms Thought and Fought the Modern World into Existence  

The soldier "is at once the most and the least civilized of persons," says Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Reed Bonadonna. In this thoughtful conversation, he discusses his new book; military ethics through the ages; and the relationship between the army, the state, and the culture at large, both past and present.

Waleed Alhariri on the U.S. Covert Use of Lethal Force, and the Crisis in Yemen  

Waleed Alhariri of the Sana'a Center for Strategic Studies discusses the Center's new report on U.S. covert attacks against al Qaeda and other radical groups in Pakistan, Somalia, and Yemen. He then focuses on Yemen, a nation suffering from internal conflict, intervention by a Saudi-led coalition, and a cholera epidemic. Humanitarian assistance is sorely needed, says Alhariri and explains what the general public can do to help.

Global Ethics Forum Preview: Connecting Ethics, the Environment, and Economics with Shalini Kantayya  

Next time on Global Ethics Forum, filmmaker Shalini Kantayya discusses her film "Catching the Sun" and the growing renewable energy industry in America. In this excerpt, Kantayya talks with journalist Stephanie Sy about the positive effect that solar power can have on the middle class in both red states and blue states.

Yvonne Terlingen on the UN Secretary-General Selection Process  

Until very recently, the United Nations selected its secretary-general entirely behind closed doors. Yvonne Terlingen, of the 1 for 7 Billion Find the Best UN Leader campaign, explains how the system has been made much more transparent and democratic: for example, candidates' names and resumes are promptly made available, women are encouraged to apply, and there is even some civil society participation in the process.

Sea Power: The History and Geopolitics of the World's Oceans  

"Oceans dominate the world," says Admiral Stavridis. After all, 70 percent of the globe is covered by water. In this masterly overview of the seven seas, he touches on the maritime battles that changed history; current geopolitics from the South China Sea to the Mediterranean; and the fact that environmentally, the oceans are "the largest crime scene in the world."

Global Ethics Forum Preview: The Intersection of Religion, Identity, and Peacemaking with Rev. Robert Chase  

Next time on Global Ethics Forum, Revered Robert Chase discusses his work with Intersections International, bringing people together across lines of difference. In this excerpt, Reverend Chase tells journalist Randall Pinkston how Barack Obama helped to inspire the founding of Intersections.

James Traub on Immigrants and Refugees  

What happens when Sweden, one of the most welcoming countries on Earth for migrants, simply runs out of beds? What are the unpleasant (and politically incorrect) truths about the difficulties of assimilation in Europe? How can we have honest policy discussions about this? Author James Traub has been spending time in Sweden, France, and Germany and has given these sensitive issues much thought. Don't miss his unflinching analysis.

Shades of Red and Blue: The Next Generation of Leaders: Better Politics for A Better Future  

This discussion brings together some of the brightest minds of the next generation of leaders and places them in the crucible of an imagined future that will test their thinking about the world vision they want to work towards. Hear from Michael Skolnik, Erin Schrode, Adi Sathi, Brandon Washington, David Marcus, and Simon Longstaff. This program is part of the Shades of Red and Blue series, presented by The Ethics Centre, and co-sponsored by Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs and Bard Globalization and International Affairs program. This program was recorded on April 1, 2017.

The Soul of the First Amendment  

In this timely event, Floyd Abrams, a noted lawyer and award-winning legal scholar specializing in First Amendment issues, examines the degree to which American law protects free speech more often, more intensely, and more controversially than is the case anywhere else in the world, including democratic nations such as Canada and England.

The U.S. Navy's View on Security in Asia and Beyond  

Carnegie Council's Devin Stewart talks with Admiral John Richardson, the U.S. Navy's most senior-ranking officer. Topics include strategy; the security challenges the Navy faces today, focusing particularly on the Pacific; and the need for a bigger Navy. Admiral Richardson also discusses the Navy's core values: honor, courage and commitment.

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