Cracked Movie Club

Cracked Movie Club

United States

Almost every movie you love is secretly insane. Cracked Movie Club is here to show you why! Join co-hosts Tom Reimann and Abe Epperson (plus special guests) for a journey through the secrets, strangeness, and fan theories behind movies you’ll never see the same way again. And every month focuses on one director’s work, building a case for exactly why Hollywood’s greatest minds are weirder than you ever thought possible.

Episodes

Zero Dark Thirty  

Kathryn Bigelow month continues on Cracked Movie Club! After making her major studio comeback with The Hurt Locker, Kathryn Bigelow was working on a follow-up film with screenwriter Mark Boal about the decade-long unsuccessful hunt for Osama Bin Laden when news broke that Bin Laden had been killed by a team of American operatives. Obviously this was a much better ending for a movie, so Bigelow reworked the entire project into what would become Zero Dark Thirty, a film that challenged Americans with its depiction of the brutality of the biggest manhunt in history, and also gave the world a super-swole Chris Pratt, continuing Bigelow’s tradition of launching obscure actors into lucrative Marvel Studios careers.On this week’s episode, Tom and Abe are joined by comedian Teresa Lee as they discuss the cultural impact of Zero Dark Thirty, whether it condemns or condones the actions taken to track down and eliminate one of the most infamous figures in modern history, and how much Bigelow likes using stray cats as metaphors.

The Hurt Locker  

Kathryn Bigelow month begins on Cracked Movie Club! It seemed like the only movie anyone was talking about in 2009 was James Cameron’s Avatar, but as awards season approached, Cameron’s movie about big blue aliens was struck down by Kathryn Bigelow’s The Hurt Locker – a gritty, tension-filled snapshot of the Iraq war containing breakout performances by its then-unknown stars Jeremy Renner and Anthony Mackie. The film earned Bigelow the Academy Award for Best Director, marking the first time the award has ever been given to a woman, and launched Renner and Mackie into promising careers in the Marvel universe, where they are contractually obligated to remain until they die.This week, Tom and Abe are joined by Abe’s fellow Cracked video director Adam Ganser as they discuss the intense shooting conditions of The Hurt Locker, the numerous ways in which Kathryn Bigelow subverted traditional filmmaking rules to create a mood of constant chaotic tension, and exactly how many dudes Sergeant James tricked into wasting an entire evening looking for a brothel that doesn’t exist.​Don your Richard Nixon mask and luscious blonde Swayze locks. On Saturday, September 9th at 7pm at the UCB Sunset Theatre in Los Angeles, Tom and Abe are joined by Cracked's Soren Bowie and Carmen Angelica for Cracked Movie Club's first ever live show where they will discuss the 1991 bank-robbing, surfer bromance classic Point Break. Tickets are only $7 and available here: https://goo.gl/SnioEt

The Dark Knight Trilogy  

Christopher Nolan month concludes on Cracked Movie Club! In the mid-2000s, Christopher Nolan resurrected a Batman film franchise that had lain dormant since 1997’s Batman and Robin, a movie bad enough to kill any superhero forever. Nolan’s idea of a Batman “grounded in reality” was such a success that his Dark Knight trilogy grossed $3 billion worldwide and simultaneously revived and forever ruined the superhero genre.This week, Tom and Abe are joined by Cracked’s Associate Producer of Video Bridgett Greenberg as they discuss the epic sets, incredible stunts, and ridiculous voices that made the Dark Knight Trilogy such a landmark success, and how Bridgett really just wants to be Catwoman.Next week marks the beginning of September, and thus starts Kathryn Bigelow month on Cracked Movie Club. On Saturday, September 9th at 7pm at the UCB Sunset Theatre in Los Angeles, Tom and Abe are joined by Cracked's Soren Bowie and Carmen Angelica for Cracked Movie Club's first ever live show where they will discuss the 1991 bank-robbing, surfer bromance classic Point Break. Tickets are only $7 and available here: https://goo.gl/SnioEt

Interstellar  

Christopher Nolan month continues on Cracked Movie Club! In 2014, Matthew McConaughey took to the stars to save his family from a life of eating exclusively corn-based meals. The result was Interstellar, a film that’s simultaneously Christopher Nolan’s homage to 2001: A Space Odyssey and his own version of a dense sci-fi epic with cool robots.This week, Tom and Abe are joined by returning guest and recurring master of Cracked podcasts Alex Schmidt as they discuss the incredible lengths Nolan and his crew went to create the effects of Interstellar, the film’s themes of time and permanence, and how many times Alex cried while watching the movie.

Memento  

Christopher Nolan month continues on Cracked Movie Club! Today, Christopher Nolan is one of the most famous commercial filmmakers in the world, but back in the year 2000, nobody knew who the hell he was. That all changed with the release of Memento, a psychological thriller written by Nolan and his brother Jonathan about a man struggling to solve a murder after being stricken with a rare form of amnesia that prevents him from making new memories. The movie's uniquely disjointed narrative structure made it an overwhelming success, and put Christopher Nolan on the map, where he has remained ever since. This week, Tom and Abe are joined by comedian Eric Lampaert of Comedians Cinema Club to discuss Memento's themes of memory as an unreliable force, how much of the film's narrative we can actually trust, and whether or not you would starve to death if you couldn't remember the last time you ate. 

Inception  

In 2010, Christopher Nolan pissed off Batman fans around the world by taking a break in between Dark Knight movies to make an original film about dream thieves. Inception went on to become a genuine phenomenon, grossing only slightly less money than either of Nolan’s Batman sequels and becoming the subject of countless message board arguments that pop up across the internet to this day. And it almost starred James Franco.This week, Tom and Abe are joined by Cracked’s Head of Video Cody Johnston as they dive headfirst into the undeniable creative artistry behind one of the biggest films of all time, the imagery Nolan used to simultaneously connect and separate the dream world from reality, and how to make sense of what is easily the most nonsensical crime thriller ever produced.

The Prestige  

Christopher Nolan month begins on Cracked Movie Club!Magic. Obsession. Fake beards. David Bowie. 2006’s The Prestige is everything you could want from a Christopher Nolan movie, in that it’s a wildly entertaining film whose logic collapses upon repeat viewings. Made just after Nolan had hit the big time with his 2005 Batman reboot Batman Begins, The Prestige pits Hugh Jackman and Cristian Bale against each other as rival magicians in turn of the century London, competing over who can do a superior version of the same trick. Based on a sci-fi/horror novel of the same name, it’s arguably one of Nolan’s most narratively effective films, as well as a showcase of Michael Caine’s formidable ability to deliver expository dialogue in a way that doesn’t feel ridiculous.This week, Tom and Abe are joined by comedian and co-host of The Bechdel Cast Jamie Loftus as they discuss the film’s creatively repeated themes of obsession and duality, the odds of two twins both being super into magic, and Jamie’s mission to wipe all magicians from the face of the earth.

Jaws  

In 1975, a plucky young director named Steven Spielberg saw his first big success with the release of Jaws, a movie about a shark eating a bunch of wealthy beachgoers in a resort town in New England. Paradoxically being the least “Spielberg” of his films while simultaneously being one of the most famous films ever made, Jaws presented a huge early challenge to the director in the form of an intensely difficult shoot due to a number of factors, not the least of which was the fact that most of the movie takes place on the open ocean and features a legendarily unreliable robotic shark. Despite its troubled production and media coverage all too ready to seize on what seemed to be shaping up to be a huge box office dud, Jaws went on to become the biggest movie of all time, creating the “summer blockbuster” genre and forever changing the kinds of films Hollywood bets big on to this day.In this week’s episode, Tom and Abe are joined by comedian Brandie Posey as they discuss the grueling nightmare that was the production of Jaws, a series of calamities that almost derailed Spielberg’s career before it even began. Along the way, they discuss how the shark was basically an underwater RC car (only a fraction as reliable), how the Director of Photography had to invent a brand new piece of technology just to film this cursed picture, and whether a shark from New England would sound like Casey Affleck or Peter Griffin.

E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial  

​In the early 1980s, Steven Spielberg embarked on a mission to tell the story of his parents’ divorce through the lens of a wrinkly alien puppet with skeletal crab fingers and the voice of an old lady dying of emphysema. After being rejected by one studio for being “too Disney” (the early 80s were a time when Hollywood would give a hard pass to the words “Spielberg” and “Disney”), Spielberg finally got to bring his vision to life in 1982 with E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial. The story of a young boy befriended a stranded alien sack of drooping flesh went on to become the number one movie of all time (a record that was not broken until Jurassic Park hit theaters eleven years later), and E.T. became one of the most beloved children’s characters despite the fact that E.T. scares the absolute shit out of most children.In this week’s episode, Abe and Tom are joined by Cracked stand-up and podcasting guru Alex Schmidt as they discuss all the whimsy, technical know-how, and armless children that went into making E.T. an instant classic. Along the way, they discuss how E.T. almost ate fistfuls of M&Ms, how Elliott was nearly scolded at school by Principal Indiana Jones, and how E.T. is apparently a plant. Like, a house plant. From outer space.

Jurassic Park  

Steven Spielberg month continues on Cracked Movie Club! Dinosaurs. Jeff Goldblum. A delightful old man in a linen suit. These are all key elements to the 1993 blockbuster Jurassic Park, the biggest movie of all time (at the time). A movie so successful it changed movies. But Jurassic Park wasn’t the sure-thing success you might expect, because in the early 1990s, computer effects in movies were at a very rudimentary stage (think “cutscene from a Playstation 1 game”). Steven Spielberg and Co. knew that a dinosaur movie could be huge, but they had no idea how to actually createconvincing dinosaurs. And they only had two years and about a quarter of the budget of the latest Transformers movie to figure it out.On this episode of Cracked Movie Club, hosts Tom Reimann and Abe Epperson are joined by Cracked writer David Christopher Bell as they discuss the technical wizardry and near-supernatural ingenuity that went into making Jurassic Park. From the insanely layered sound design of one of the industry’s most famous sound effects creators, to the gigantic robotic dinosaur that encountered a problem eerily reminiscent of the difficulties Spielberg experienced with a certain mechanical shark, to the near-miss casting of Jim Carrey, we cover every aspect of Jurassic Park worth dazzling your friends with at your next party.

Raiders of the Lost Ark  

It’s Steven Spielberg month on Cracked Movie Club! Back in the 1980s, everything George Lucas touched turned to gold (and action figures). As the newly crowned Prince of Hollywood, he had the power to make any movie he wanted. And the movie he wanted to make was… Indiana Smith, a treasure-hunting adventurer created as an homage to early Hollywood film serials like Zorro and Flash Gordon. Rather than direct the movie himself, Lucas went to his friend and fellow filmmaker Steven Spielberg and talked him into making it, leaving Lucas free to kick back and share creative input from safely behind his beard while Spielberg put it all together to form something that could sell tickets (and action figures). 1981’s Raiders of the Lost Ark introduced the world to the strategically renamed hero Indiana Jones, kicking off a franchise that managed to last 27 years before completely embarrassing itself, which is almost certainly some kind of record.On this inaugural episode of Cracked Movie Club, hosts Tom Reimann and Abe Epperson are joined by comedian Daniel Van Kirk as they discuss how poisonous snakes, punishing desert sands, an outbreak of what can only be considered a modern plague, and a grown man pooping his pants all came together to create Raiders of the Lost Ark. Along the way, they question whether Jones was ultimately a better name than Smith, the logistics of maintaining a puzzle tomb in the middle of a jungle, and whether a certain Disney prince made a depressing cameo appearance.

Preview  

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