Fareed Zakaria GPS

Fareed Zakaria GPS

United States

Fareed Zakaria GPS takes a comprehensive look at foreign affairs and global policies through in-depth, one-on-one interviews and fascinating roundtable discussions. Full video episodes available in the iTunes store.

Episodes

National Security Adviser Susan Rice on ISIS and Trump Transition, Will Trump Trample on Climate Fixes?, Personalized Medicine from Our Own Genes?  

National Security Adviser Susan Rice on ISIS and Trump Transition, Will Trump Trample on Climate Fixes?, Personalized Medicine from Our Own Genes?

Antony Blinken tells Fareed the coalition is intentionally waiting to atttack ISIS and President-elect Trump and a divided America  

Deputy Secy. of State Antony Blinken tells Fareed the coalition is intentionally waiting to atttack ISIS's capital in order to eventually yield key intel.

An election postmortem and President Elect Trump and his foreign policy challenges  

An election postmortem and President Elect Trump and his foreign policy challenges

Expert panel on Tuesday election, Zbigniew Brzezinski on "The First 7 Days", FiveThirtyEight on the odds  

Expert panel on Tuesday election, Zbigniew Brzezinski on "The First 7 Days", FiveThirtyEight on the odds

FBI letter on Hillary Clinton investigation unprecedented, What does a Trump presidency look like internationally?, Experts take on globalization  

FBI letter on Hillary Clinton investigation unprecedented, What does a Trump presidency look like internationally?, Experts take on globalization

President Trump's first 100 days, Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein on 2016, David Smith of the Guardian  

President Trump's first 100 days, Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein on 2016, David Smith of the Guardian

Bill Maher says, Trump "Che Guevara of deplorables", Chris Hughes on Universal Basic Income, Will robots and automation change our world?  

Bill Maher says, Trump "Che Guevara of deplorables", Chris Hughes on Universal Basic Income, Will robots and automation change our world?

Fantastic panel and Dr. Watson from IBM?  

Fantastic panel and Dr. Watson from IBM?

GOP voters rational or tribal?, Sexism in politics with Julia Gillard, former Australian PM, Brexit leader Nigel Farage  

GOP voters rational or tribal?, Sexism in politics with Julia Gillard, former Australian PM, Brexit leader Nigel Farage and leading a disappearing nation with Hilda Heine.

Poroshenko on Syrian aid convoy attack and Myanmar's leader on "The Future of Freedom"  

Poroshenko on Syrian aid convoy attack. Myanmar's leader on "The Future of Freedom". Ukraine's leader says Russia's denial of involvement in the recent Syrian aid convoy attack is "absolutely" familiar given their behavior towards Ukraine.

Encore: Moonshots for the 21st Century: A Fareed Zakaria GPS Special  

A CNN Special dedicated to the dreamers and scientists that have moved humanity forward through extraordinary acts like sending astronauts to the moon. On this special we focus on 5 moonshots that are likely to impact human history the most: 1 - Sending Astronauts to Mars 2 - 3-D Printing a Human Heart 3 - Creating a Star on Earth - ITER Project 4 - Flying from New York to London in an Hour 5 - Mapping the Human Brain Moonshots are exciting, expensive - are they worth it? The answer is, "Yes." China is on course to pass the United States in spending on research and development and basic research in the coming years.

Memorials and All-star panel discuss the global landscape over the last 15 years 9/11 Attacks  

Memorials and All-star panel discuss the global landscape over the last 15 years since 9/11 Attacks

Special Edition: Obama on Trump, TPP, his legacy and summer reading  

Special Edition: Obama on Trump, TPP, his legacy and summer reading

Global Lessons on Guns  

Defining the problem, Zakaria reports that according to the CDC, there were more than 30,000 gun deaths in America in 2010, the most recent year with complete data – and, more than 19,000 of those were suicides. Perhaps even more alarming, in 2012, among active military personnel, more service personnel died by suicide, than were killed in hostile action. Global Lessons on Guns – A Fareed Zakaria GPS Special debuts Sunday, Dec. 8 at 7:00pm ET on CNN/U.S. In the special, Zakaria takes viewers to Colombia, Switzerland, Japan, Israel, and Australia for policy lessons from other mass gun murders, and suicide prevention – which may work in the U.S.. Japan, a nation with a population of 130 million, spent more money on video games than any other nation in 2012 – except the U.S. Yet, despite the concerns of some in the U.S. of an association between video games and gun violence, in 2012, there were four gun deaths in Japan. The love that the people of Switzerland have for firearms rivals that of Americans. Switzerland ranks third in the world for per capita gun ownership, according to one estimate – behind only Yemen and the U.S. – and Switzerland is also home to the largest marksmanship competition in the world. Yet, Switzerland’s homicide rate is six times lower than that of the U.S. Swiss regulations on firearms are much stricter than in the U.S. For Australia, former Prime Minister Howard speaks about his nation’s gun policy reform efforts in the wake of the Port Arthur massacre. Like the 2012 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School, the Port Arthur massacre ended the lives of children. Howard feels political leadership is essential to curbing gun violence. Leveraging his political capital, Howard describes the political strategy – and consequences – of spearheading a package of reforms including background checks, restrictions on gun ownership, and gun buyback programs. The most moving segment of the special focuses on the U.S. Army’s efforts to reduce gun suicides. On average, every day in America, 100 people die by suicide. Half of these cases involve firearms – and, among active duty military personnel, between 2008 and 2010, nearly two thirds of suicide deaths involved firearms. Zakaria interviewed Gen. (ret.) Peter Chiarelli about the U.S. Army’s efforts to battle lobbyists’ efforts that would block any suicide prevention reforms that include restrictions on firearms. That fight continues, though the U.S. Department of Defense recently reported that suicides for active duty personnel have decreased by 22 percent in 2013, partially due to increased vigilance and suicide prevention programs: “I would be very, very careful in not underestimating the impact of 13 years of war, on an all-volunteer force. I think we were seeing, in those [high] suicide numbers, some of the effect of high stress and trauma,” Gen. Chiarelli says in the documentary, recalling his service as the number two ranking officer assigned to suicide prevention. “This is an area that we, in fact, have to attack.” An essay on what America could learn about gun policies around the world, written by Fareed Zakaria, may be found at www.cnn.com/gps. During the special broadcast, producers of the special will engage viewers with using the hashtag “#globalguns.”

Why they hate us - encore  

The next time you hear of a terror attack -- no matter where it is, no matter what the circumstances -- you will likely think to yourself, "It's Muslims again." And you will probably be right. In 2014, about 30,000 people were killed in terror attacks worldwide. The vast majority of those perpetrating the violence were Muslim but -- and this is important -- so were the victims. Of the some 30,000 dead, the vast, vast majority were Muslims. That's crucial to understand because it sheds light on the question, "Why do they hate us?" Islamic terrorists don't just hate America or the West. They hate the modern world, and they particularly hate Muslims who are trying to live in the modern world. Let's be clear. While the jihadis are few, there is a larger cancer within the world of Islam -- a cancer of backwardness and extremism and intolerance. Most of the countries that have laws that restrict the free exercise of religion are Muslim majority, while those that have laws against leaving the faith are Muslim majority. But are these things inherent in the religion? When experts try to explain that in the 14th century, Islamic civilization was the world's most advanced, or that the Quran was once read as a liberal and progressive document, they're not trying to deny the realities of backwardness today. What they are saying is that it can change. Islam, after all, has been around for 14 centuries. There have been periods of war and of peace. Before 1900, for hundreds of years, Jews fled European pogroms and persecution to live in relative peace and security under the Ottoman Caliphate. That's why there were a million Jews in the Muslim Middle East in 1900. Today, Jews and Christians are fleeing from Iraq and Syria and radical Islamists take control of those lands. It's the same religion then and now. So what is different? It's not theology, it's politics. Radical Islam is the product of the broken politics and stagnant economics of Muslim countries. They have found in radical religion an ideology that lets them rail against the modern world, an ideology that is now being exported to alienated young Muslims everywhere -- in Europe, and even in some rare cases in the United States. How can we bring an end to this? There's really only one way: Help the majority of Muslims fight extremists, reform their faith, and modernize their societies. In doing so, we should listen to those on the front lines, many of whom are fighting and dying in the struggle against jihadis. The hundreds of Muslim reformers I've spoken to say their task is made much harder when Western politicians and pundits condemn Islam entirely, demean their faith, and speak of all Muslims as backward and suspect. But here's another way to think about this. In America, African-Americans make up about 13% of the population, yet they comprise about 50% of homicide offenders, according to a Justice Department study. Now we understand -- I hope we understand -- that when we see a black man on the street, we cannot and must not treat him as a likely criminal. It would be dehumanizing, unfair and racist. In America, of all places, people should be treated as individuals and not as stereotypes from a racial, ethnic or religious group. And remember, the Bangladeshi cabdriver who drives you to the airport has nothing, nothing to do with ISIS, even though he is also a Muslim.

Trump popular in Russia?, J.D. Vance  on understanding Trump's working class support, Shalev warns over Trump camp rhetoric  

Global panel on U.S. election and the perceptions of the race. J.D. Vance on understanding Trump's working class support. Shalev warns over Trump camp rhetoric.

Fareed's take: Trump "BS Artist" and Malcolm Gladwell on electoral perspective and the Olympics  

Fareed offers his take on why Donald Trump fits the definition of a BS artist. Malcolm Gladwell on electoral perspective, the Olympics and his fantastic new podcast.

Exclusive: Fethullah Gulen on Turkey's failed coup, Breaking the banks, Expert panel on Russian DNC hack  

Fethullah Gulen: A rare look at polarizing Turkish exile. From the road, it's easy to miss. A nondescript driveway with a guard gate off a rural Pennsylvania one-lane road. Tucked away in the Poconos lies the compound where Fethullah Gulen, a moderate Turkish Muslim cleric, has been in self-imposed exile from his country since 1999. For years, journalists have tried to get in, but very few have succeeded. This time, reporters have gathered to cover a protest on the road in front of the compound after Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan publicly accused Gulen of organizing a failed coup from nearly halfway around the world. Gulen rarely emerges, we're told, and only for medical appointments. But as the protests wound down outside the complex, his guards emerged, inviting media here to enter for a tour. Beyond the gates is a sprawling complex. Several buildings, a garden, a pond. The grounds are quiet, and few people are here. Journalists are shown around and allowed to take pictures, then taken to a small building with a table and chairs and air conditioning. We're brought coffee and water, and told that if we wait, we might get to talk to Gulen's press aid, and possibly Gulen himself. We're told he's in poor health, and needs to rest, but if we wait, he may talk about the accusations made against him. Textbook case: How to survive a coup Erdogan and Gulen are former allies whose relationship fell into a bitter feud in 2013. Erdogan supporters outside Gulen's Pennsylvania home called him inflammatory names. Gulen's supporters accused Erdogan of scapegoating Gulen after the failed coup in an attempt to grab more power. The former president of Gulen's mosque, Bekir Aksoy, says Gulen, in his late 70s, barely ever leaves his room. "This was the exception," he says, because of the seriousness of the accusations Erdogan made against him on worldwide television.

Conservative Panel Addresses Rise of Tump Nomination  

Conservative panel addresses aise of Donald Tump Nomination as presidential candidate of the Republican party.

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