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Episodes

The Archers, From T20 to PM  

The Archers' plot of Rob abusing Helen has been a source of constant discussion among the Ambridge faithful. Is it too painful to continue? Is it too important to lose? And, is the depiction of domestic abuse true to life? Polly Neate, CEO of Women's Aid, a charity that advised the programme makers on the reality of abuse, joins Roger Bolton to explain whether she feels that the storyline provides a believable picture of a coercive, controlling relationship. And at 5:30 on 18th March, Radio 4 Longwave listeners were eagerly anticipating the climactic moments of one of English cricket's greatest ever comebacks. But they were whisked away from Mumbai and into the middle of Eddie Mair's PM programme, denying them the game's thrilling finish. Feedback's Rob Crossan finds out why. A recent edition of the Today programme included a feature from the School Report, in which a 12 year old reporter informed the audience about the introduction of Combined Cadet Forces into his school, part of a wider initiative to bring the CCF into more deprived areas. But we hear from listeners who were incensed by the piece. Finally, Roger is joined by Mohit Bakaya to discuss Radio 4's latest foray into using visual accompaniments to its traditional radio programming - The Global Philosopher, a high tech debate format hosted by Michael Sandel. But why should Radio 4 even want to go visual? And does adding a visual element mean accepting compromises in the radio programme? Producer: Kate Dixon. A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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Desert Island discussion, Radio 2 country  

Roger Bolton asks if Desert Island Discs allowed itself to become too political when it invited nuclear scientist Dame Sue Ion to be a castaway. Dame Sue Ion has long been a campaigner for nuclear energy, and some listeners felt that the much loved Radio 4 stalwart Desert Island Discs was the wrong platform for her to talk about that political belief. Editor Rebecca Stratford joins Roger to discuss whether Kirsty Young should have posed stronger challenges to Dame Sue Ion on the subject, and how a programme dedicated to one interviewee can maintain impartiality. A recent episode of Out of the Ordinary on the subject of so-called "Men Going Their Own Way", who claim to have thrown off the shackles of alleged female oppression, received a large listener response. Presenter Jolyon Jenkins discusses whether he dealt fairly with the men he interviewed. And why has country music become so popular that Radio 2 has just organised a pop-up station devoted to it? In these times of cutbacks, how can the BBC afford it? Radio 2 controller Bob Shennan speaks to Roger about the future of country music on his network. Finally, listeners respond to the technical issues raised in last week's programme - one gives Roger a telling off, while another suggests that it's when lines go dead that Radio 4 comes to life. Producer: Kate Dixon A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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US Elections, In Tune  

Roger Bolton asks if the BBC has had too much coverage of the US Presidential election - and if it is anti Donald Trump. The long process of selecting the next President of the United States is well underway, and some listeners are already bored stiff, while others are concerned that BBC reporters have lost their objectivity when it comes to unlikely Republican frontrunner Donald Trump. Roger Bolton puts listeners' concerns and questions to the BBC North America editor Jon Sopel. It's the second year of the scheme to let female composers take over the Radio 3 airwaves on International Women's Day. After tremendous listener response last year, Feedback goes behind the scenes at a live broadcast of the afternoon programme, In Tune, from the Southbank Centre. Why has Radio 3 made such an effort to mark the day? What do these live extravaganzas aim to bring to the listener at home? Phil Pegum, producer on the BBC's Lent Talks, and Cristina Odone who recently recorded her talk at the Tower of London, join Roger Bolton to discuss making Christian programming appeal to non-Christians and the challenges of recording on location. Finally, foul ups on PM and Saturday Live have listeners asking whether technical standards at the BBC are slipping. Producer: Kate Dixon A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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Fear of Flying, Evan Davis  

Roger Bolton discusses audience comments about The Bottom Line with Evan Davis, finds out about Radio 4's new comedy commissions, and hears listener reactions to an explicit drama. It's been ten years since Evan Davis started presenting The Bottom Line, Radio 4's business chat show which aimed to bring senior and expert voices from the City to a broader audience. Evan reflects on the programme with Roger Bolton and addresses listener concerns that the focus of the programme is too narrowly aimed at the City's highest echelons, that business reporting has been trying to gloss over the city's failures in the financial crash, and about the number of women appearing on the programme. Last week, some listeners were shocked to turn on their radios at 10:45am and hear four letter words and explicit content in Fear of Flying, Radio 4 dramatisation of Erica Jong's novel about sexual liberation. Was Radio 4 right to air the drama directly after Woman's Hour? Should radio have a watershed, like TV? Sioned Wiliam is Radio 4's new commissioning editor for comedy and has just released her first full set of commissions. She joins Feedback for the first time since her appointment to discuss the future of comedy on the network. What kind of new voices will she bring to the network? Will she try and put her own stamp on old favourites? And do shrinking budgets mean Radio 4 comedy is under threat? And the Government has recently released a number of reports, ahead of the White Paper expected to outline their plans to reform the BBC. Colin Browne from The Voice of the Listener and Viewer joins Feedback to explain what the reports reveal and what the implications might be for BBC radio. Producer: Kate Dixon A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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EU coverage, Diversity  

Roger Bolton with listener questions and comments on the EU referendum coverage, BBC diversity, stultifying sport and the continued furore over Rob and Helen in The Archers. With the EU referendum date set and the battle between 'leave' and 'remain' set to dominate the headlines until June, the BBC's Chief Political Adviser Ric Bailey joins Feedback to address listeners' questions about how the referendum is being covered. Is the BBC biased on EU membership? Is the story being told too much as a battle in the Conservative party? And should pollsters be trusted now after failures at the general election? Gaile Walters and Keon West first appeared on Feedback 18 months ago, when they were being trained as part of the BBC's Expert Voices scheme, which aimed to get experts from more diverse backgrounds into BBC programmes. They return to the programme this week to discuss how they've faired since the training, and whether the BBC is doing enough to improve the diversity of its radio output. Commentators on radio sport often find themselves in the position of having to keep listeners entertained even when the game is not delivering any action. Feedback reporter Rob Crossan speaks to Test Match Special's Jonathan Agnew and 5 Live football commentator Ian Dennis to discover how they find ways to fill air time even if on field events are not up to scratch. And finally, in last week's programme Roger asked listeners for their views on the ongoing Archers' story about Rob Titchener's abuse of his wife Helen. The response has been enormous, as listeners grapple with the question of whether the story is too important to miss, or too unsettling to air. Producer: Kate Dixon A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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Junior doctors' strike, David Bowie's death  

Feedback returns with the BBC Radio issues that matter most to you - from the coverage of Junior Doctors' debate and David Bowie's death, to a tough listen in The Archers and a documentary that invites you to see with your ears. When David Bowie died, Radio 4's news programmes dedicated much of the day's coverage to the star. Many listeners felt the coverage was disproportionate. Jamie Angus, editor of the Today programme, speaks to presenter Roger Bolton to address complaints that the BBC let emotion override objectivity. Jamie Angus also hears listeners' views on how his programme has been covering the Junior Doctors' contract debate. Listeners on both sides have concerns and question whether the BBC is picking the right people to represent the arguments and whether statements from the BMA and the government are being properly scrutinised. Rob Titchener's relentless abuse of his wife Helen has been captivating many of the Ambridge faithful, but has also been forcing some to turn off their radios. Listeners debate whether the storyline is unmissable drama in the best tradition of the programme, or a subject that is just too painful to return to day in, day out. And stop, stand still and listen. That's what listeners did when journalist Helena Merriman told them to during her documentary Batman and Ethan. The programme featured Ethan, a blind ten year old learning to explore the world through a technique called echolocation, which uses sound to create a picture of his environment. Roger Bolton speaks to Helena about recreating something that only blind people can understand, and asks if highlighting the unusual technique risks creating unrealistic expectations for many blind people. Producer: Katherine Godfrey A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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18/12/2015  

On Wednesday James Naughtie made an emotional sign off on the Today programme as he left the presenter seat after 21 years. What were listeners' favourite Naughtie moments? We hear highlights from two decades of broadcasting, from discussion of Auberon Waugh's nipples to the famous Jeremy Hunt gaff. In the aftermath of the Scottish referendum, and the SNP's success in the general election, BBC Scotland is also having a debate around the extent of its own independence. A committee in Holyrood has called on the BBC to release more budgetary power for BBC Scotland, with more money and services. With that as the backdrop, BBC Radio Scotland introduced a more analytical schedule to suit the new political landscape, but with more live music as well. Is it working for the listeners? Roger Bolton talks to Jeff Zycinski, the head of BBC Radio Scotland. BBC Radio 3 are looking ahead to the New Year with a brand new production of Artist Descending a Staircase, a radio play written over 40 years ago by Sir Tom Stoppard, one of the greatest living dramatists. Roger speaks to Sir Tom about the peculiarities and creative opportunities that come with writing for radio. In the world of The Archers, the Grundy family has had a tough start to the festive season but listeners welcomed an emotional twist in the story this week, ushering in a happier Christmas for 94-year-old Joe. Producer: Katherine Godfrey A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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11/12/2015  

Radio 4's forum for listener comment.

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BBC World Service Soft Power  

The British Government has just allocated £289 million to the World Service for the next five years, in a bid to promote UK soft power. But where will this money go, and what does this mean for the BBC's independence? Roger Bolton talks to the Director of the BBC World Service Group Francesca Unsworth. With the arrival of Advent came a Radio 3 Carol Service, performed by the Choir of St John's College, Cambridge. Some listeners were impressed by the new compositions alongside traditional favourites, but others were put off by some of the more modern works. Should advent be a time for challenging new music or comforting classics? Roger asks the series producer of Radio 3's Choral Evensong, Philip Billson. Radio 2's Friday Night is Music Night has been broadcasting for over 60 years, offering listeners a weekly programme of popular music performed by the BBC Concert Orchestra and a myriad of stars. But can a programme from the 1950s pull in a wide age-range of listeners and can it justify the expense of a full orchestra? Roger Bolton goes behind the scenes, speaking to Strictly Come Dancing judge and guest presenter Craig Revel Horwood and the production team, to find out what goes into making the world's longest-running live orchestral music programme on radio. Last week Glenda Jackson returned to acting, after a 23 year absence, playing Dide in the first season of Blood, Sex and Money on Radio 4. The series is a 'mash-up' of 20 of Zola's novels. Many listeners lapped up the drama. Roger Bolton speaks to Commissioning Editor Jeremy Howe about whether you have to follow the text word-for-word to be faithful to the spirit of the author. Producer: Katherine Godfrey A WhistledownpProduction for BBC Radio 4.

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Local Radio controversy, BBC World Service funding, New comedy double act The Pin  

Roger Bolton airs audience views on BBC radio output, including a controversy in local radio, new funding for the World Service, and the fresh comedy duo The Pin. Earlier this month, presenter Iain Lee hosted a controversial discussion about Christianity and LGBT rights on his BBC Three Counties radio breakfast show. The heated interviews divided listeners and Iain Lee has now left the station. Campaigns across social media, led by fans and LGBT rights groups, have since demanded Iain Lee's reinstatement, but to what extent should a BBC presenter be allowed to take sides in a debate? The Government has announced that it will provide the BBC World Service with an additional £85 million a year, as part of the National Security Strategy and Strategic Defence and Security Review. In the review, the World Service is cited as a way to expand UK 'soft power' and will be required to spend the money expanding services in key global regions. While this additional funding is welcomed by many World Service listeners, others question whether the BBC is becoming an arm of British foreign policy. After ten years on air, Radio 4's Lives in a Landscape is coming to an end. Roger Bolton speaks to the Presenter Alan Dein to look back a decade of remarkable stories told by seemingly everyday people. And BBC Radio has been home to a long line of comedy double acts, from Morecambe and Wise to Mitchell and Webb. Following in that tradition is a new comedy duo called The Pin. Their debut Radio 4 series has just drawn to a close and was enjoyed by many listeners. Roger Bolton speaks to The Pin, aka Ben Ashenden and Alexander Owen, to talk double acts and radio influences. Producer: Katherine Godfrey A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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Paris Attacks Coverage  

On Friday 13th November, Paris became the site of Western Europe's deadliest terrorist attack in over ten years. From the immediate aftermath of the attacks through to the end of the weekend and into this week, the story received heavy coverage across all BBC Radio networks, with BBC Radio 5 Live dedicating a whole day to rolling news about Paris on Saturday. It was a major story, but was BBC Radio's response proportionate? We hear your reaction. As the fight over Britain's membership of the EU intensifies, the upcoming referendum has become ripe territory for BBC Radio 4's satirists. When last Friday's The Now Show took a comedic look at the subject, some listeners were deeply unhappy with what they perceived as a 'staying in' bias. Should the BBC be scrutinising its output for bias already? And is it possible to have truly balanced comedy? Roger Bolton speaks to the BBC's Chief Adviser on Politics, Ric Bailey. This time last year, BBC Radio 5 Live's schedule was overhauled. Three of its biggest presenters, Shelagh Fogerty, Richard Bacon and Victoria Derbyshire, left and, as a consequence or not, so did 10% of the listenership. How has 5 Live fared since? Roger speaks to the network's controller Jonathan Wall to discuss ratings, sports rights and the booming sister station 5 Live Sports Extra. Last week, a brand new DAB station called BBC Music Jazz burst into existence, offering listeners music by all the greats from Gershwin to Gillespie. BBC Music Jazz was a pop up station - a temporary digital channel created in collaboration with Jazz FM. And listeners loved it. We look back at the brief and smoking life of BBC Music's first Jazz pop up. Producer: Katherine Godfrey. A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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Local Radio Special  

High level scrutiny and the need for further savings shines a light on every corner of BBC. This week Roger Bolton is in Sheffield to find out what listeners think about their BBC local radio stations. He speaks to Sheffield listeners and hears how holding local figures to account, local knowledge, companionship and reflecting the local community are key to keeping listeners engaged. But across England, listening figures are in a slow decline. David Holdsworth, who is in charge of all 39 stations, explains why that is and how local radio is moving with the technical times. Is there such a thing as a free lunch? We join 120 lonely older folk at a free fish and chip lunch organised by BBC Radio Sheffield. It was inspired by the late Winnie Blagden, a fan of the station. Having no family, Radio Sheffield asked their listeners if they could send Winnie a card. She received 16,000 - and a pile of chocolates and flowers. And we hear from the BBC Radio Devon's sports department who regularly cover four or five games every Saturday afternoon - and transmit each one of them with individual commentary on an individual transmitter. Presenter: Roger Bolton Producer: Karen Pirie A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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Free speech and Guantanamo reporting  

Roger Bolton hears listeners' views on Vanessa Feltz's interview with a gay man awarded £7,500 by a judge in a landmark case. The man was said to have been a victim of discrimination that was purely non-verbal after he claimed he had been abused by a member of shop staff who used homophobic gestures at him over several months. Some listeners felt that the exchange went too far and forced the man into a distressing situation. Roger speaks to one such listener to debate the line between journalistic rigour and journalistic insensitivity. Also, when Roger Scruton appeared on Radio 4's A Point of View, some listeners found his advocacy of free speech a refreshing antidote to certain modern sensibilities, but others felt that the freedoms he was endorsing could result in abuse of groups such as homosexuals and Muslims. Roger Scruton discusses the balance between free speech and social equality, and the place of political correctness in the modern age. And in the week when the last British resident to be held at Guantanamo Bay Detention Centre, Shaker Aamer, was released after 13 years' imprisonment without charge, some listeners were surprised to hear contribution from a think tank calling his innocence into question. Roger Bolton speaks to the Editor of the Today programme Jamie Angus, to put the concerns to him and discuss the nature of balanced contribution. Producer: Katherine Godfrey A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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30/10/2015  

With violence escalating in recent weeks between Israelis and Palestinians, the conflict is once again high on the news agenda. Coverage of the story is always scrutinised strongly and this week we'll hear from listeners who allege biased reporting about both sides. But can such a long-running and complex conflict be fairly covered in a forty second news bulletin? Roger Bolton speaks to Kevin Connolly, the BBC's Middle East Correspondent. When The Daily Mail's cartoonist Stanley "Mac" McMurtry appeared on Midweek, he discussed the nature of modern satire with Libby Purvis. But during a discussion about political correctness, he used an outdated term to describe ethnic minorities that some consider offensive. Should Libby Purves have stepped in and corrected him on air? When Erica Jong was invited on to Woman's Hour, many listeners expected a steamy listen. And the author did not disappoint. Presenter Jane Garvey's attempt's to reel it in were in vain, so was it a little too much for a morning during half term? Listeners didn't seem to think so. Roger speaks to Jane Garvey about a truly memorable interview and how you know when you've stepped over the line. And last week Radio Solent broadcast an item about love in later life, and a lonely 95 year old local man, Bill Palmer, was one of those to call in. Within an hour of the call, Bill was in the studio, speaking directly to Solent's listeners. His story of elderly isolation touched many - it spread online and quickly went global. Roger speaks to Chris Harris, the executive producer on the day, and Chris Osborn, one of those who called in. Producer: Katherine Godfrey A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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Arthur Miller - Your Reviews  

Actor Martin Jarvis pays homage to Arthur Miller, England Cricketer Vic Marks gives his verdict on The Archers' game, and Radio 4 drama goes underground and avant-garde. In recent weeks, BBC Radio has been host to a theatrical marathon celebrating the centenary of the birth of the great playwright Arthur Miller. With a wealth of plays, features and documentaries across Radio 3 and Radio 4, some critics called it overkill - but listeners couldn't get enough. Roger Bolton puts audience questions to Martin Jarvis, director of Radio 3's A View from the Bridge. When it comes to reporting the news, getting to grips with statistics is vital for any correspondent. Listeners are fed reels of numbers, explaining everything from economic performance and mortality rates, to voting patterns and adultery. But how well do BBC correspondents understand these statistics, and do they risk being partial if they don't use them correctly? Roger speaks to Michael Blastland, one of the founders of Radio 4's chief number crunching programme More or Less. Last week's Radio 4 drama Master Rock was recorded live inside a Scottish mountain - but some listeners wished it had been buried forever. With an experimental electronic soundscape, and a postmodern script, the drama told the story of the subterranean Cruachan Power station, and the people who built it. While some thought it was progressive, artistic, and a unique listen, for others it was an off-putting experience. When the residents of Ambridge played the biggest cricketing fixture of the year, it was bound to be dramatic, and it didn't disappoint. But was the match plausible? Roger speaks to ex-England all-rounder Vic Marks to find out. Producer: Katherine Godfrey. A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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Debating the Past  

When it comes to debate, how combative is too combative? When historian Niall Ferguson and novelist Jane Smiley appeared on Start the Week, a heated discussion took place about the nature of historical truth. But while a few listeners enjoyed the sparku exchange, it was too much for many. Two Feedback listeners hold their own debate, asking whether the exchange made for great radio or an argumentative mess. Roger Bolton is in the chair, but can he mediate? Last week saw BBC Radio 4 celebrating National Poetry Day, with a marathon of live programming hosted by Andrew Marr, exploring British history and identity through poetry. 'We British: An Epic in Poetry', considered verse by the likes of Donne, Tennyson and Tempest, with contribution from a wide array of actors and experts. But how did the programming define British? And was the choice of verse radical enough for our listeners' tastes? Roger puts the listener reaction to the BBC Bristol Arts and Poetry editor, James Cook. Last week, a Radio 4 play took on the difficult subject of Female Genital Mutilation. Many listeners were left shocked and moved. Written by Charlene James, the play told the story of two South London teenagers both affected by FGM. Listeners tell us why they felt they couldn't turn off. And, what on earth is Grass Frost? Listeners have spotted the term popping up on the BBC's recent weather output, but the new terminology has left some listeners baffled. Roger speaks to BBC weather forecaster, Peter Gibbs, for answers on this meteorological phenomenon. And while he's there, where did 'pokey showers' come from? Producer: Katherine Godfrey. A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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Does satire stand the test of time?  

Influential comedy producer John Lloyd speaks to Roger Bolton about radio satire, as one of his earliest programmes comes under scrutiny from listeners. When Radio 4 Extra rebroadcast a 1976 edition of the satirical programme News Huddlines, listeners were taken back to the days of Wilson, Callaghan and the rising star Margaret Thatcher. They were also exposed to an era with very different sensibilities about matters of race, gender and sexuality - and some listeners took offence. So should old comedy, with material many would consider racist and sexist by today's standard, ever be heard again? Roger discusses with John Lloyd and Radio 4 Extra's Head of Planning and Scheduling, Tony Pilgrim. You might balk at the thought of hearing one man talk about themselves, uninterrupted, for an entire hour. But not when that man is John Lennon - according to many listeners. Last week's Archive on 4, John Lennon Verbatim, used the wealth of archive recordings to tell Lennon's story in his own voice, without a presenter or critics to interject. And many listeners loved it. Roger speaks to the programme's producer, Des Shaw, to find out why he thought Lennon was the best man to tell his story. While John Lennon Verbatim was crammed with old material, we've also heard from listeners who think Archive on 4 isn't always living up to its name. Roger speaks to commissioning editor Mohit Bakaya to find out whether it's becoming just another documentary programme. And Radio 4's Jim Naughtie recently suffered a bovine interruption as he recorded an episode of Radio 4's Bookclub at Charleston Farmhouse in Sussex. In a hard-hitting investigation by a listener we find out why the cows came home. Producer: Katherine Godfrey A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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Corbyn Coverage  

From walkouts to bias and booing, we're kicking off a brand new series of Feedback with the biggest stories in BBC Radio. All told by you. By far the most talked about man in the Feedback inbox (rivalled only by the villainous Rob from The Archers) is the newly-elected Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn. Many Feedback listeners say they think BBC Radio has been too quick to dismiss Mr Corbyn's style of politics and has a tendency to focus too much on what some see as trivial aspects of his leadership, such as why he didn't sing the National Anthem. Jeremy Corbyn's victory took many in the media by surprise, so does the BBC's political reporting need to adapt to a new political landscape to suit the mood of the country? Roger Bolton talks to the BBC's Assistant Political Editor Norman Smith and Richard Clarke, Editor of the BBC Radio newsroom. Legendary war correspondent Kate Adie joins Roger to discuss 60 years of From Our Own Correspondent. Feedback listeners have getting in touch with their dispatches about why they think the programme's decades-old format still delivers the goods And BBC Radio 3 have been targeting listeners subliminally, with a special nocturnal broadcast of composer Max Richter's piece 'Sleep'. The piece lasts for the duration of our recommended eight hours of rest and a Feedback listener takes us into his bedroom to tell us whether Radio 3 gave him sweet dreams. Producer: Katherine Godfrey A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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07/08/2015  

Quentin Letts' wry critique of the Met Office has had listeners contacting Feedback in droves. The programme was the first episode of a new series of What is the Point of...? and while a few felt the programme exercised a healthy scepticism about climate science, many more felt it allowed controversial opinions to go unchallenged. Roger Bolton hears some of the reaction. Earlier in the series, Feedback considered the BBC's coverage of migrants and heard concerns about the use of terms such as 'illegal immigrant' and 'swarm' - but now there are suggestions that the Today programme is too soft on migrants. The Editor of Today, Jamie Angus, discusses the BBC's approach to reporting the situation in Calais - and also talks about the future presenter line up on the programme, with Nick Robinson set to replace James Naughtie. The new interview series Flexagon Radio has had some listeners flummoxed. The programme has guests reacting to sounds and archive randmonly generated by a machine, The Flexagon. Does the device provoke intelligent conversation, or has it just provoked the the ire of listeners? Roger speaks to the series producer, Adam Fowler. After last week's Feedback special on religious programming, we hear from listeners who are concerned that humanists and atheists are not represented on Thought for the Day. Christine Morgan, the Head of Religion and Ethics for BBC Radio, answers their criticisms. Producer: Katherine Godfrey A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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31/07/2015  

Roger Bolton explores religious broadcasting on radio. As the UK becomes more spiritually diverse and increasingly secular, how should the BBC approach religious news and worship? Since its birth in the 1920s, the Corporation has always produced religious content, with programmes focussed primarily on Christian worship during the early days. Ninety years later, the religious makeup of the country is far more diverse and complex, so is the BBC keeping up with the times when it comes to spiritual matters? We ask listeners whether they think religion still has a place on the BBC, and how a national broadcaster should reflect faith and worship across different religions. For some Feedback listeners, religious output is extremely important - for others, it is outdated and inappropriate. Roger discusses these views with Religious Affairs correspondent Caroline Wyatt, Editor for Religion and Ethics in BBC Regions, Ashley Peatfield, and Head of Radio for BBC Religion and Ethics, Christine Morgan. The subject of Religion is not just confined to specialist programming. Outside of people's personal worship, religion plays a significant role in social and political affairs both on the international and domestic stage. So how well does the BBC tackle religion when it comes to news and current affairs? Islam is the fastest growing religion in the UK, but while coverage and debate around the Islamic faith is fairly common on Radio 4, Muslim worship is rarely heard. So how well does wider BBC Radio serve its Muslim listeners? Feedback visits BBC Radio Sheffield, which runs Ramadan programmes during the Holy month. Producer: Karen Pirie A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

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