FT Big Read

FT Big Read

United Kingdom

An audio version of the best of the Financial Times's Big Reads — in-depth reporting from FT correspondents around the world. Listen to longform stories that explore and explain key themes in world news, science and business. Produced by Anna Dedhar.

Episodes

Beating the billionaires: How Unilever fought off Warren Buffett, 3G and Kraft Heinz  

Warren Buffett and 3G were taken aback by the harsh rejection of the takeover offer they had backed but people close to the Anglo-Dutch group say the deal made no financial or strategic sense for them. Arash Massoudi and James Fontanella-Khan tell a tale of miscalculation and culture divide

Executive pay: Outsize rewards  

The scale of remuneration for CEOs has caused anger and triggered debate about the effectiveness of how it's structured and whether it's time to rein in their huge increases, says Patrick Jenkins in his Big Read report for the FT's Runaway Pay series. Here, Christopher Grimes talks to Patrick and John Gapper about how executive pay became so out of proportion to average wages and what changes we are likely to see

Fighting cancer: Rocky path for immunotherapies  

High hopes that new immunotherapy drugs would prove to have benefits over toxic chemotherapy were dashed by large-scale trials, says David Crow. Pharmaceutical groups are now working on combinations of the immunotherapies and using them with chemo, but some pharma groups have suffered big losses and Wall Street has become sceptical

Nafta: Trade deal in Trump's sights  

The $580bn relationship between Mexico and the US is vulnerable as the new American president picks his targets, say Jude Webber, Shawn Donnan and John Paul Rathbone. But Enrique Peña Nieto does have some negotiating leverage

Indonesia: A trial of tolerance  

The blasphemy case against Jakarta's governor and ally of President Widodo could land Basuki Tjahaja Purnama in jail, says Ben Bland. Religious and ethnic tensions are rising in the Muslim-majority country and critics say the backlash against the Chinese minority — to which Purnama belongs — is being stoked by political rivals

Toshiba: Falling star  

The former leader in Japan's global corporate expansion and technological innovation has faced humiliation after humiliation from soured investments, nuclear disaster and scandal. And after sell-offs, writedowns and a boardroom clear-out Toshiba's troubles do not appear to be over yet, say Leo Lewis and Kana Inagaki.

Wall Street: The path ahead under President Trump  

Donald Trump's promise to lighten financial services regulation has boosted the big banks' spirits. But Ben McLannahan and Barney Jopson's Big Read report 'What Wall Street wants from Trump' asked how realistic their hopes are. Here, Ben, Brooke Masters and Chris Grimes discuss the chances of the Dodd-Frank regulatory regime being dismantled

Martin Wolf: The west's global order unravels  

We are at the end of both an economic era and a geopolitical one, says Martin Wolf. What lies ahead? Will the post-world-war period led by the US descend into deglobalisation and conflict, or will a new order emerge with non-western powers such as China and India playing a bigger role in stability?

Egypt: Sisi's security state  

Since the Tahrir Square popular revolt of 2011 control has only tightened over civil society and the social and economic problems have worsened, says FT deputy editor Roula Khalaf. But President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi believes he can save his country from catastrophe

Japan and Russia braced for an island challenge  

Abe and Putin seek to end the 70-year-old territorial dispute over the Kuril archipelago, report Robin Harding and Kathrin Hille

Breitbart News: from populist fringe to the White House and beyond  

Matthew Garrahan, the FT's Global Media Editor, looks at how the US presidential election has catapulted the conservative website from the fringes and how it now plans to tap into the wave of populism sweeping European politics

MSF and the FT’s 2016 Seasonal Appeal: ‘The hospital is sacred’  

Médecins Sans Frontières, which the Financial Times has chosen as its partner for this year's Seasonal Appeal, is one of the few aid groups to continue working in war zones despite deadly attacks on its facilities. Erika Solomon discovers how the group’s commitment to impartiality helps staff stay on the front lines and in refugee camps in Yemen, Iraq and Syria

Thomas Mair: The making of a neo-Nazi killer  

Tom Burgis looks at the case of Thomas Mair, a white supremacist who on November 23 was given a whole life sentence for the murder of his local Labour MP Jo Cox. What drove the loner from Birstall in West Yorkshire to strike just days before the EU referendum?

Russia: Return of the nuclear threat  

Moscow's willingness to use its nuclear capability to put pressure on the west is raising the spectre of nuclear war 25 years after the world thought the end of the cold war had removed it for good, say Neil Buckley, Sam Jones and Kathrin Hille. Nato is alarmed and Donald Trump's election has brought fresh fears

Migration: Turning round Africa's exodus  

Some sub-Saharan nations and aid agencies are sceptical of the EU's push to tackle the causes that send so many thousands on the dangerous passage across Libya and the Mediterranean to enter Europe via Italy, say Maggie Fick, James Politi and Duncan Robinson

US election: What next for Brand Trump?  

The Republican candidate Donald Trump has a capacity for reinvention after business setbacks, says Gary Silverman. And, whether he gets to the White House or not, he will need his magic after the election to extricate himself from multiple cases of civil litigation and work out the way forward for Trump Inc

Iran: Battle for succession  

The Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has led the Islamic Republic since 1989. But after the nuclear deal with the US, questions have been raised over whether it is necessary to have a senior cleric in charge, says Najmeh Bozorgmehr. Now reformists and hardliners have begun to position themselves for influence over the future of the country

Social media: Talking down the jihadis  

Tech groups and digital media stars are taking the initiative in challenging terrorist propaganda from groups like Isis, say Madhumita Murgia and Hannah Kuchler. They are using 'counter speech' to fight extremists' propaganda with their own chosen tools of persuasion — such as YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Google

Germany: Berlin's battle with gentrification  

A property boom and an influx of new residents have put pressure on the city's affordable rental market, says Guy Chazan. The big fear of officials is that the German capital will see a housing crisis like London's

Gig economy: Corporate consultants break free  

A growing number of business advisers are seeking the flexibility and creativity of working for themselves independent of the big brands, says Andrew Hill, the FT's management editor. But the disruptive edge where McKinsey meets Uber has perils as well as attractions

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