Fugitive Waves with The Kitchen Sisters

Fugitive Waves with The Kitchen Sisters

Canada

Fugitive Waves—From the Peabody Award-winning producers, The Kitchen Sisters (NPR’s Lost & Found Sound, Hidden Kitchens, Hidden World of Girls). This show mines the Sisters deep archive of stories, lost recordings and shards of sound, along with new tales from remarkable people around the world. Stories from the flip side of history. Fugitive Waves is produced by the Kitchen Sisters in collaboration with Tom Corwin and mixed by Jim McKee. Fugitive Waves is a proud member of PRX’s Radiotopia.

Episodes

68 – Tony Schwartz: 30,000 Recordings Later  

Cab drivers, children's jump rope rhymes, folk songs, dialects, controversial TV ads, interviews with blacklisted artists and writers during the McCarthy Era—Tony Schwartz, one of the great sound recordists and collectors of the 20th Century. An audio portrait of a man who spent his life exploring and influencing the world through recorded sound.

67 – The Hidden World of Girls with Tina Fey  

Stories from The Hidden World of Girls with host Tina Fey: Nigerian writer Chris Abani tells about his English-born mother enlisting him at age 8 to be her translator in Nigeria as she travels door to door through the villages teaching women the Billings Ovulation Method of birth control. Plus stories from singer/actress Janelle Monae, […]

66 – Sugar in the Milk: A Parsi Hidden Kitchen  

Niloufer Ichaporia King—a kitchen botanist, a one-of-a-kind cook, a Parsi from Bombay living in San Francisco, and author of "My Bombay Kitchen," prepares an elaborate ceremonial meal for Parsi New Year, the first day of spring.

65 – Sam Phillips, Sun Studio, and the Acoustics of Life  

Sam Phillips— the father of Sun Records, the man who discovered Howlin’ Wolf, Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash…, the creator of WHER, The First All Girl Radio Station in the World — talks about his journey, his adventures and “the acoustics of life.”

64 – Kimchi Diplomacy:  Hidden Kitchens – War and Peace and Food  

Kimchi in space. The Kimchi Bus. Korean government-sponsored chefs and restaurants spreading the word of Kimchi around the globe. A story of “Gastrodiplomacy” — the use of food as a diplomatic tool in helping nations resolve conflict and foster connections between them and spread their “brand.” South Korea is one of the countries most involved in using its food to spread its influence. They call it “Kimchi Diplomacy.”

63 – War and Food and Manga  

Manga, the ubiquitous Japanese comic books written on just about every subject—sports, music, sex, shooting pool—represent about 40% of all books published in Japan. In recent decades ‘food manga’ has exploded. Stories of food and conflict and competition abound in mangas like Soldier of Food, Food Wars, Cooking Papa…The Kitchen Sisters Present—Hidden Kitchens: War and Food and Manga.

62-Black Cake: Emily Dickinson’s Hidden Kitchen  

We enter the secret, steamy, myth-laden world of Emily Dickinson through her kitchen.

61 – Rattlesden  

For five years Davia's father, Lenny Nelson, asked her to go to Rattlesden, England, to visit the Air Force base where he was stationed during WWII and to find an old photograph hanging in the town pub honoring his 8th Air Force squadron. Lenny died on Christmas Eve last year. In his honor, we share the journey with you.

60 – Milk Cow Blues: The Apple Family Farm and the Indiana Cow Share Association  

A journey into the mysterious and controversial world of raw milk.

59 – Weenie Royale: The Impact of the Internment on Japanese American Cooking  

During World War II, in desolate inland internment camps in the US, like Manzanar, Topaz, and Tule Lake some 120,000 Japanese and Japanese Americans lived for the duration of the war — their traditional food replaced by US government commodities and war surplus — hotdogs, ketchup, spam, potatoes — erasing the traditional Japanese diet and family table.

58 – The Kiosk Strategy, Lisbon — Hidden Kitchens: War & Peace & Food  

A story from the plazas of Portugal, where small ornate kiosks that served traditional snacks and drinks once graced the city and brought people together. Neglected by time and pushed into abandonment by a dictator’s regime that suppressed public conversation and gathering, this tradition is now being revived, drawing people back to public space.

57 – War and Peace and Coffee  

“Nobody can soldier without coffee,” a Union calvary man wrote in 1865. Hidden Kitchens looks at three American wars through the lens of coffee: the Civil War, Vietnam and Afghanistan.

56 – Operation Hummus and More Stories of War and Peace and Food from Israel and Ramallah  

The "Hummus Wars" and the battle for the Guinness World Record title for the world’s largest plate of hummus and the deeper meanings of this Middle Eastern food war. And more Hidden Kitchens stories of war and peace and food from Israel and Ramallah.

55 – Between Us, Bread and Salt: Lebanon Hidden Kitchens with Kamal Mouzawak  

A road trip through the hidden kitchens of Lebanon, with kitchen activist, Kamal Mouzawak, a man with a vision of re-building and uniting this war-ravaged nation through its traditions, its culture and its food.

54 — Walking High Steel: Mohawk Ironworkers at the World Trade Towers  

Six generations of Mohawk Indian ironworkers, known for their ability to work high steel, have helped shape New York City’s skyline. Hundreds of Mohawks still commute to Manhattan each week from reservations in Canada to work on the city’s skyscrapers and bridges. In September 2001, a new generation returned to the World Trade Center site to dismantle what their elders had helped to build.

53 — Garden Allotments—London’s Kitchen Vision  

A Hidden Kitchens story about London’s long tradition of urban garden allotments — and the story of Manor Garden Allotments, a 100 year old community, that found itself in the path of London’s 2012 Olympics.

52 – Hunting & Gathering with Angelo Garro  

Sometimes it's the kitchen that's hidden, sometimes it's the food itself. Blacksmith Angelo Garro forges and forages, recreating in wrought iron and in cooking the life he left behind in Sicily. The Kitchen Sisters join Angelo along the coast of Northern California as he follows the seasons, harvesting the wild for his kitchen and his friends. And a few words from Werner Herzog about Angelo and his Omnivore's Salt.

51 – Harvest on Big Rice Lake  

Each fall, the Ojibwe tribes of northern Minnesota harvest wild rice by hand. It's a long process that begins with families in canoes venturing into the tall grasses, where rice is poled and gently brushed with knockers into the bed of the canoe. We journey to White Earth Reservation to see how one tribe is supporting itself and changing the diet of its people through community kitchen projects.

50 – An Unexpected Kitchen: The George Foreman Grill  

Sometimes life without a kitchen leads to the most unexpected hidden kitchen of all—The George Foreman Grill. How immigrants and homeless people without official kitchens use The George Foreman Grill, hidden crock pots, and secret hot plates to make a meal and a home. Featuring an interview with boxing champion and grill-master, George Foreman about his life and growing up hungry.

49 – The Cabyard Kitchen  

Many Kitchen Sisters stories are born in taxi cabs. Hidden Kitchens was conceived in the back of a Yellow. Each time The Kitchen Sisters took a cab in San Francisco they noticed the driver was from Brazil, specifically the same town in Brazil, Goiânia. Cab ride conversations led to talk of music and food. That’s when the story of Janete emerged, a woman from their same hometown who came every day after dark to the industrial street outside the cab yard and set up a makeshift, rolling, Brazilian night kitchen.

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