Fugitive Waves with The Kitchen Sisters

Fugitive Waves with The Kitchen Sisters


Fugitive Waves—From the Peabody Award-winning producers, The Kitchen Sisters (NPR’s Lost & Found Sound, Hidden Kitchens, Hidden World of Girls). This show mines the Sisters deep archive of stories, lost recordings and shards of sound, along with new tales from remarkable people around the world. Stories from the flip side of history. Fugitive Waves is produced by the Kitchen Sisters in collaboration with Tom Corwin and mixed by Jim McKee. Fugitive Waves is a proud member of PRX’s Radiotopia.


56 – Operation Hummus and More Stories of War and Peace and Food from Israel and Ramallah  

The "Hummus Wars" and the battle for the Guinness World Record title for the world’s largest plate of hummus and the deeper meanings of this Middle Eastern food war. And more Hidden Kitchens stories of war and peace and food from Israel and Ramallah.

55 – Between Us, Bread and Salt: Lebanon Hidden Kitchens with Kamal Mouzawak  

A road trip through the hidden kitchens of Lebanon, with kitchen activist, Kamal Mouzawak, a man with a vision of re-building and uniting this war-ravaged nation through its traditions, its culture and its food.

54 — Walking High Steel: Mohawk Ironworkers at the World Trade Towers  

Six generations of Mohawk Indian ironworkers, known for their ability to work high steel, have helped shape New York City’s skyline. Hundreds of Mohawks still commute to Manhattan each week from reservations in Canada to work on the city’s skyscrapers and bridges. In September 2001, a new generation returned to the World Trade Center site to dismantle what their elders had helped to build.

53 — Garden Allotments—London’s Kitchen Vision  

A Hidden Kitchens story about London’s long tradition of urban garden allotments — and the story of Manor Garden Allotments, a 100 year old community, that found itself in the path of London’s 2012 Olympics.

52 – Hunting & Gathering with Angelo Garro  

Sometimes it's the kitchen that's hidden, sometimes it's the food itself. Blacksmith Angelo Garro forges and forages, recreating in wrought iron and in cooking the life he left behind in Sicily. The Kitchen Sisters join Angelo along the coast of Northern California as he follows the seasons, harvesting the wild for his kitchen and his friends. And a few words from Werner Herzog about Angelo and his Omnivore's Salt.

51 – Harvest on Big Rice Lake  

Each fall, the Ojibwe tribes of northern Minnesota harvest wild rice by hand. It's a long process that begins with families in canoes venturing into the tall grasses, where rice is poled and gently brushed with knockers into the bed of the canoe. We journey to White Earth Reservation to see how one tribe is supporting itself and changing the diet of its people through community kitchen projects.

50 – An Unexpected Kitchen: The George Foreman Grill  

Sometimes life without a kitchen leads to the most unexpected hidden kitchen of all—The George Foreman Grill. How immigrants and homeless people without official kitchens use The George Foreman Grill, hidden crock pots, and secret hot plates to make a meal and a home. Featuring an interview with boxing champion and grill-master, George Foreman about his life and growing up hungry.

49 – The Cabyard Kitchen  

Many Kitchen Sisters stories are born in taxi cabs. Hidden Kitchens was conceived in the back of a Yellow. Each time The Kitchen Sisters took a cab in San Francisco they noticed the driver was from Brazil, specifically the same town in Brazil, Goiânia. Cab ride conversations led to talk of music and food. That’s when the story of Janete emerged, a woman from their same hometown who came every day after dark to the industrial street outside the cab yard and set up a makeshift, rolling, Brazilian night kitchen.

48 – Kibbe at the Crossroads: Lebanese Cooking in the Mississippi Delta  

We travel to the Mississippi Delta into the world of Lebanese immigrants who began arriving in the 1800s soon after the Civil War. Clarksdale — where barbecue and the blues meet traditional Lebanese meatloaf

47 – The Chili Queens of San Antonio  

For over 100 years, young women came at twilight to the Alamo and the plazas of San Antonio with makeshift tables and big pots of chili to cook over open fires. The plazas teemed with people—soldiers, tourists, cattlemen and the troubadours who roamed the tables, filling the night with music.

46 – Stubb Stubblefield: The Archangel of BBQ  

C.B. “Stubb” Stubblefield, namesake of the legendary club in Austin, Texas, had a mission to feed the world—especially the people who sang in it. When he started out in Lubbock, he generously fed and supported both black and white musicians, creating community and breaking barriers.

45 – Hidden Kitchen Mama  

Stories of mothers and kitchens from playwrite Ellen Sebastian Chang, cookbook author Peggy Knickerbocker, designer Cristina Salas-Porras Cardoza, folklorist and creator/host of American Routes Nick Spitzer, and actress Robin Wright.

44 – Black Chef, White House: African American Cooks in the President’s Kitchen  

Cooking for the founding fathers — the story of Hercules and Hemings — the enslaved chefs of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. And an interview with Zephyr Wright, President Lydon Johnson's cook who worked for the family for 27 years.

43 – Carmen Miranda: The Life and Fate of the Brazilian Bombshell  

Carmen Miranda—Brazil's Ambassador of Samba, the highest paid woman entertainer in the world in the 1940s—her iconic turban piled high with fruit, her rapid fire Portuguese lyrics, her wild lens of samba and rhumba, captured the imagination of the world.

42 – Hidden World of Traveller Girls  

Stories of young Irish Traveller women. Travellers —the people of walking, sometimes called the gypsies of Ireland. Exploring ancient and modern Traveller rituals that cling on the edge of the Celtic Boom.

41 – A Secret Civil Rights Kitchen: Georgia Gilmore and the Club from Nowhere  

In the 1950s, a group of Montgomery, Alabama women baked goods to help fund the Montgomery bus boycott. Known as the Club from Nowhere the group was led by Georgia Gilmore, one of the unsung heroes of the civil rights era. This story comes from Can Do: Portraits of Black Visionaries, Seekers, and Entrepreneurs, hosted by Alfre Woodard.

40 – New Orleans—Cowboys, Indians, Broncos & Boudin  

Convict cooking at the Angola Prison Rodeo, Tootie Montana and the legendary Mardi Gras Indians, Tennessee Williams, Two Sisters Cafe, The Court of Two Sisters, an eloquent ode to the Mint Julep and more stories Kitchen Sisters' stories from New Orleans.

39 – One Big Self: The Hidden World of Deborah Luster & C. D. Wright  

Our show today is in honor of the beloved poet C. D. Wright who unexpectedly passed away recently. We interviewed C. D. in 2009 as part of a story we produced for our Hidden World of Girls series on NPR. And like all of our stories there are hours and hours of tape behind every minute of what you hear in the final piece. So today we’re going to play our original story—a story of family, crime and the power of art to grapple with the unimaginable. And then we’re gonna let it roll. To hear CD read from her work and talk about life, poetry and her longtime collaboration and friendship with Deborah Luster.

38 – Walkin’ Talkin’ Bill Hawkins  

In 1948, Bill Hawkins became Cleveland’s first black disc jockey. He had a jiving, rhyming style. People gathered on the street to watch him broadcast from a glass booth at the front of his record store. His popularity grew rapidly. Over the next decade Hawkins was heard on up to four different stations on the same day. He had plenty of imitators and influenced a whole generation of DJs. Hawkins also had something else – a son he never knew. William Allen Taylor didn’t find out Hawkins was his father until he graduated from college. The two met once when Taylor was a teenager. At the time, Hawkins never hinted at who he was. And Taylor had no idea that he had met his father. Hawkins died before his son got to know him. There are no known tapes of Hawkins. Taylor became an actor and playwright. He lives in San Francisco. But he’s always wished he had a recording of his father’s radio program or even just a snippet of his voice.

37 – Bone Music: A Collaboration with 99% Invisible  

Before the availability of the tape recorder and during the 1950s, when vinyl was scarce, ingenious Russians began recording banned bootlegged jazz, boogie woogie and rock 'n' roll on exposed X-ray film salvaged from hospital waste bins and archives.

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