History Extra podcast

History Extra podcast

United Kingdom

The latest news from the team behind BBC History Magazine - a popular History magazine. To find out more, visit www.historyextra.com


The Aberfan disaster and women who made history  

As we approach the 50th anniversary of the Aberfan disaster, historian and producer Steve Humphries talks about how the Welsh village has coped with the tragedy. Meanwhile, we are joined by Woman’s Hour presenter Jenni Murray to discuss some of the figures she's chosen for her new book A History of Britain in 21 Women

The Norman Conquest  

As we approach the 950th anniversary of the battle of Hastings, medieval historian Marc Morris tells the story of William the Conqueror’s dramatic victory of 1066 and explores its profound legacy for England

Lenin and the Russian revolutions  

Catherine Merridale recounts the future Soviet leader’s famous 1917 train journey across Europe to Petrograd, where the took command of the Bolsheviks. Meanwhile, we speak to Helen Rappaport about some of the foreign nationals then living in Petrograd who witnessed the year’s revolutionary events

Historical television and the battle of Flodden  

Tony Robinson discusses his long-spanning career and the impact of shows such as Time Team and Blackadder, plus the future of historical television programmes. Meanwhile, Dr Katie Stevenson explores the 1513 battle of Flodden and its consequences for Scotland. Why did England emerge victorious and how grievous a blow was the death of Scottish king James IV?

Women in politics and Robinson Crusoe  

Julie V Gottlieb charts the progression from the Suffragettes to Theresa May and Hillary Clinton, while Andrew Lambert tells the story of a Pacific island connected to the famous Daniel Defoe novel

Cold War summits  

Historians David Reynolds and Kristina Spohr discuss their new book about the postwar meetings between international leaders that aimed to control the nuclear arms race

Poldark and historical TV drama  

As the smash-hit series Poldark returns to our screens, its historical advisor, Hannah Greig and Horrible Histories historian Greg Jenner join us to discuss the growing popularity of historical fiction on TV. The pair also consider the big question of accuracy in historical drama.

The end of the First World War and the Duke of Wellington  

Professor Robert Gerwarth discusses his new book The Vanquished, which shows how Europe continued to be beset by violence long after 1918. Meanwhile, Dr Huw Davies pays a visit to Apsley House, the magnificent London residence of the hero of Waterloo

The Great Fire of London  

As we approach the 350th anniversary of the 1666 blaze, historical author Alexander Larman describes how the inferno devastated London. Meanwhile, we speak to Nicholas Kenyon, director of the Barbican Centre, about the rebuilding of the city that took place after the Great Fire and, later, following the Blitz

The Suez crisis and the north of England  

Historian and author Alex von Tunzelmann reflects on the dramatic events that took place in the middle east and Hungary 60 years ago. Meanwhile, we speak to broadcaster Melvyn Bragg about his new BBC Radio 4 series that charts the fascinating history of the north of England

The 1920s: Roaring or tame?  

Historian, author and broadcaster Kate Williams explores the key developments of the early interwar period, in this talk that was delivered at our 2015 History Weekend event in Malmesbury

The Cold War and the history of philosophy  

Dr Rory Cormac guides us around York Cold War Bunker, which was designed to monitor the fallout of a nuclear attack. Meanwhile, we speak to historian and broadcaster Bettany Hughes about some of the enduring ideas from Ancient Greece

Jacobites and the Ancient World  

Jacqueline Riding describes the events of the 1745 rebellion, while Michael Scott explains how ancient cultures across the globe managed to interact with each other

Two King Edwards  

Richard Davenport-Hines and Piers Brendon, authors of new biographies of Edward VII and Edward VIII, discuss the two kings’ contrasting lives and reigns and their impact on the British monarchy

Paris’s women at war and the Housewives’ League  

Anne Sebba talks to us about her new book, Les Parisiennes, which explores how women of Paris fared under Nazi occupation. Meanwhile, we catch up with Jo Fidgen, presenter of a BBC Radio 4 documentary about housewives in postwar Britain

Britain’s Second World War and the Country House  

Dr Daniel Todman talks to us about his new book: Britain's War: Into Battle, 1937-1941. Meanwhile, we are joined by historian Adrian Tinniswood to discuss the changing nature of English country houses during the interwar years

Battle of the Somme special  

As we approach the centenary of the 1916 clash, we speak to Hugh Sebag-Montefiore, author of Somme: Into the Breach. Meanwhile, Jonathan Ruffle of gbfilms.com joins us to talk about his ongoing BBC Radio 4 series Tommies and how he plans to tackle the Somme anniversary on the programme.

The Radium Girls and the cotton revolution  

Kate Moore describes the tragic story of a group of women who were exposed to radium in 20th-century America, while Terry Wyke visits a key site from Britain’s textile heritage

Wolfson History Prizes: Nazi camps and St Augustine  

Robin Lane Fox and Nikolaus Wachsmann talk about their award-winning books: Augustine: Conversions and Confessions and KL: A History of the Nazi Concentration Camps

Operation Barbarossa  

As we near the 75th anniversary of Nazi Germany’s assault on the Soviet Union, Antony Beevor explores this pivotal moment in the Second World War

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