History Extra podcast

History Extra podcast

United Kingdom

The latest news from the team behind BBC History Magazine - a popular History magazine. To find out more, visit www.historyextra.com

Episodes

The brilliance of Henry James  

In advance of a major new Henry James season on BBC Radio 4, Professor Sarah Churchwell explores the life and work of the great Anglo-American author, whose books offer insights to changes in the USA and in the role of women in the late 19th and early 20th centuries

The English in America  

Historian and author James Evans talks to us about his new book Emigrants, which explains why hundreds of thousands of English people decided to make a new life in the Americas during the 17th century. He also explores the challenges of migrating to the New World

Germany’s World War Two  

In a talk that he delivered at our recent World War Two event in Bristol, Professor Nicholas Stargardt reflects on how the Second World War was experienced by ordinary Germans, both on the front line and back home

Voices of the Cold War  

We are joined by the BBC journalist Bridget Kendall who picks out some of the most fascinating stories that feature in her new book and Radio 4 series on life in the Cold War

A legendary spymaster  

Historical author Henry Hemming discusses the life and career of Maxwell Knight, an eccentric spymaster and nature enthusiast who may have inspired the Bond character M

Hans Sloane and the British Museum  

Author and historian James Delbourgo discusses his new book Collecting the World, which explores the life of the 18th-century natural historian Hans Sloane whose collections went on to form the basis of the British Museum in London

Female flyers in Nazi Germany  

Author and biographer Clare Mulley discusses her new book The Women Who Flew for Hitler, which explores the lives of two remarkable women who became leading aviators in the Third Reich

Children at war  

Historian Emma Butcher reflects on the experiences of child soldiers throughout history, ranging from Ancient Sparta to the Hitler Youth and recent conflicts in Africa

The Second World War  

James Holland discusses the second book in his The War in the West trilogy with John Buckley, focusing on the years 1941-43.

Jane Austen and Tudor London  

Historian and broadcaster Lucy Worsley shares her thoughts on the Georgian novelist who is the subject of her new biography. Meanwhile, Professor Stephen Alford reflects on how the English capital was transformed over the course of the 16th century

Medieval manuscripts and the First World War  

Christopher de Hamel discusses his recent book Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts, which has just won the Wolfson History Prize. Meanwhile, we speak to Jonathan Ruffle, creator of the BBC Radio 4 drama series Tommies, about some of the fascinating wartime incidents that he has researched for the programme

The Six-Day War and the Great Fire of London  

Professor Matthew Hughes reflects on a brief, but hugely-important, Arab-Israeli conflict that began 50 years ago this month and continues to have an impact on the region. Meanwhile, historian and broadcaster Dan Jones joins us to highlight some of the most interesting aspects of the 1666 inferno, which is explored in his new Channel 5 TV series

Civil wars and Restoration England  

Harvard professor David Armitage explores how internal conflicts have changed through history and considers what lessons can be learned for the wars of today. Meanwhile, bestselling popular historian Ian Mortimer guides us through life in England following Charles II’s Restoration – a time of sweeping changes throughout society

England’s bloody Reformation  

As we near the 500th anniversary of the European Reformation, Professor Peter Marshall explores how the events impacted on England. He explains how Henry VIII’s break with Rome led to many decades of violence

Queen Victoria’s dinners and Henry VIII’s niece  

Food historian and broadcaster Annie Gray explores the eating habits of Britain’s second-longest reigning monarch and compares them to the typical Victorian diet. Meanwhile, historian and author Morgan Ring tells the story of Margaret, Countess of Lennox, who had one of the most colourful lives of the Tudor age

Martin Luther and the making of the USA  

Professor Lyndal Roper explores the life of the father of the Reformation and considers his impact on Protestant history. Meanwhile, we speak to Misha Glenny about his new BBC Radio 4 series, which charts key milestones in the development of the United States

The Islamic enlightenment  

Journalist and author Yasmin Alibhai-Brown interviews Christopher de Bellaigue about his new book The Islamic Enlightenment, which considers how the Muslim world has adapted to some of the wider changes of the 19th and 20th centuries

Historical fiction and a US murder scandal  

Philippa Gregory talks to us about her 30-year career as a historical novelist and the history behind bestsellers such as The Other Boleyn Girl and The White Queen. Meanwhile, David Grann, author of The Lost City of Z, discusses his new book, which details the killing of several Native Americans in the 1920s and the subsequent investigation by the FBI

The ‘Father of History’ and India in the British empire  

Professor Paul Cartledge reflects on the work of the Greek author Herodotus, who was born 2,500 years ago and is regarded as the first historian. Meanwhile, we catch-up with Dr Jon Wilson to discuss some of the big questions around the Raj

America in World War One and a naval tragedy  

On the centenary of America’s entry into the First World War, historian Adam IP Smith explores the impact of this momentous decision on both the conflict and the history of the United States. Meanwhile, we speak to archaeologist Graham Scott about the SS Mendi disaster, which saw hundreds of South Africans drown off the coast of England in 1917

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