Masters in Business

Masters in Business

United States

Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz looks at the people and ideas that shape markets, investing and business.

Episodes

Matt Wallaert Is on a 'Chief Behavioral Officer' Mission  

Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz interviews Matt Wallaert, a behavioral scientist who works at the intersection of technology and human behavior. After several years in academia and two successful startups, he joined Microsoft, where he led a team of experts using technology to help people live happier, healthier lives. During his time with Microsoft, he was a director at Microsoft Ventures, the firm’s venture capital arm. He sits on the boards of a variety of startups and nonprofits. Wallaert and Ritholtz discuss the role of behavioral psychology in startups. This interview aired on Bloomberg Radio.

Richard Clarida of Pimco on the New Neutral of Monetary Policy  

Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz interviews Richard Clarida, a global strategic adviser for PIMCO and former assistant secretary of U.S. Treasury. His first day at the Treasury Department was Sept. 11, 2001, and he describes what it was like to start work during such a chaotic period. He also reminds us that during the financial crisis, many were originally concerned with a deflation scare. He gives the Fed high marks for crisis management during the Great Recession, but says that since the recovery has begun, it has been too slow to normalize and not very clear in its communications.

Rich Barton Talks About His Startup Companies  

Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz interviews Rich Barton, the Microsoft engineer who developed Expedia while working for Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer in the 1990s. Barton then co-founded real estate app Zillow and jobs site Glassdoor, and joined the board of directors at Netflix, where he remains to this day. Barton tells Ritholtz that his companies bring transparency to industries that have traditionally lacked it. “Power to the people” says Barton, is not a political slogan, but “a technological one.” This interview aired on Bloomberg Radio.

Alan Shaw Says the Days of Charting Stocks By Hand Are Over  

Alan Shaw, founder of the Market Technicians Association and former managing director of the technical research department at Smith Barney, tells Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz that he's happy he's not working today: It's much more difficult to be a technician and be in institutional sales than it was when he was working.\u0010\u0010(Note: This is a podcast extra which will not air on Bloomberg Radio.)

Jesse Eisinger on Why White-Collar Criminals Get Off  

Jesse Eisinger, the Pulitzer-winning journalist now working at ProPublica, tells Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz how the collapse of Arthur Andersen, Enron and WorldCom led to a neutered Justice Department. The title of his new book, "The Chickenshit Club," comes from a speech that then-Southern District U.S. Attorney James Comey gave to prosecutors saying that if they were never losing, they were only taking on easy cases. This interview aired on Bloomberg Radio.

Why White-Collar Criminals Get Away With It  

Jesse Eisinger, the Pulitzer-winning journalist now working at ProPublica, tells Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz how the collapse of Arthur Andersen, Enron and WorldCom led to a neutered Justice Department. The title of his new book, "The Chickenshit Club," comes from a speech that then-Southern District U.S. Attorney James Comey gave to prosecutors saying that if they were never losing, they were only taking on easy cases. This interview aired on Bloomberg Radio.

Brazilian Justice Has a Long Way to Go: View (Audio)  

Bloomberg View senior executive editor David Shipley presents an editorial arguing that Brazil suffers from the near-immunity of the president and legislators to criminal charges. This editorial aired on Bloomberg Radio.

Ed Thorp, The Man Who Beat The Dealer and The Market  

Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz interviews Ed Thorp, one of the most storied people in finance. A math professor at MIT and UC Ivine, Thorp figured out how to beat Las Vegas at blackjack and baccarat, created statistical arbitrage, and ran a hedge fund that not only beat the market by a wide margin, but never had a losing quarter. He is the author of several books, including "Beat the Dealer" and "Beat the Market"; his latest book is "A Man for All Markets." Thorp tells Ritholtz that the secret to beating the market is having an edge that's specific, definable and mathematical. If you don't, you should be in index funds instead. This interview aired on Bloomberg Radio.

Duff McDonald: How To Fix the Broken Elite Institutions  

Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz interviews Duff McDonald, a journalist and author of two critically acclaimed books, "The Golden Passport: Harvard Business School, the Limits of Capitalism, and the Moral Failure of the MBA Elite" and "The Firm: The Story of McKinsey and Its Secret Influence on American Business." McDonald tells Barry Ritholtz why the elite institutions that feed into government, business and finance are broken, and what must be done to fix them. This interview aired on Bloomberg Radio.

Chris Anderson: Don’t Confuse Valuation With Tech Adaptation  

Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz interviews Chris Anderson, a co-founder and CEO of 3D Robotics, and the founder of DIY Drones. He was with the Economist for seven years before joining WIRED magazine as the editor-in chief. Anderson tells Ritholtz that the dot-com collapse masked the organic growth of the internet by real users. The innovations of the late 1990s are obvious at Amazon, Facebook, Google and Apple, but there is a new crop of disruptive and innovative technologies coming up right behind them. This interview aired on Bloomberg Radio.

Anindya Ghose Sees Life Getting Even Faster With Tech  

Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz interviews Anindya Ghose, a professor of information, operations and management sciences as well as marketing at New York University's Leonard N. Stern School of Business, tells Bloomberg View columnist Barry Ritholtz that technology is changing things even more rapidly than we might have guessed only a few years ago. The future as envisioned in such science fiction films as Philip K. Dick’s “Minority Report” isn’t several decades away -- it's only two or three years away. And it is profoundly changing economies. This interview aired on Bloomberg Radio.

0:00/0:00
Video player is in betaClose