Episodes

Artist Talk: Scott Snibbe  

Media artist and filmmaker Scott Snibbe and his collaborator Lukas Girling discuss their work and its relationship to sound in space, with a particular focus on REWORK_(Philip Glass Remixed) [GLASS MACHINE], which is featured at MoMA Studio.

Yoko Ono and Kara Walker in Conversation  

March 08, 2011 6:30 PM Artists Yoko Ono and Kara Walker, whose work is represented in the exhibition Contemporary Art from the Collection, will engage in a dialogue about their respective practices and share their perspectives on how social, political, and gender issues inform their work. Moderated by MoMA director Glenn D. Lowry. NOTE: Audio has been edited to include only Kara Walker's presentation.

Contemporary Art Forum: Art Speech—A Symposium on Symposia, Day 2  

Saturday, May 21, 2011 9:30 AM This two-day program brings together artists, art historians, scholars, critics, writers, and speech and performance studies experts to discuss possible frameworks for better understanding issues surrounding art speech and methods for being direct and achieving clarity in spoken public presentations in the visual arts. The spoken public presentation is central in the field of the visual arts, particularly in the area of adult learning. Public program departments in museums operate based on a set of conventions regarding the way they present lectures or discussions about art involving artists, art historians, and/or theorists. Yet very little qualitative analysis has been conducted on the effectiveness of these presentations. Often times, public presentations are deemed impenetrable or obscure. What is communicated in writing cannot always be easily grasped when presented on stage. Using a variety of strategies, this year’s forum will seek to anatomize art historians' and artists' habits at the podium. Sessions will include reenactments of famous acts of criticism, critiques of the academic slide show, an investigation of the effects of apparently authoritative presentations, experiments in the effects of stage presence, and analyses of the academic introduction and of the performative. Program Schedule 9:30–10:00 a.m. Coffee and snacks 10:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Session 1 10:00–10:15 James Elkins discusses the philosophical and rhetorical problems with art speech 10:15–10:45 Christophe Cherix, Chief Curator, Department of Prints and Illustrated Books, The Museum of Modern Art, presents a film of Robert Morris's early performance work 21.3 (1964) 10:45–11:45 Donald Preziosi, Professor of Art History, University of California, Los Angeles, deconstructs one of his previous talks, followed by a conversation with James Elkins 11:45–12:30 Anna Kryczka, PhD candidate, Visual Studies, University of California, Irvine, talks about “Our Literal Speed,” with a response by Abbey Shane Dubin on behalf of “Our Literal Speed.” A conversation follows 12:30–12:45 p.m. Coffee break 12:45–1:20 p.m. Respondent's panel discussion Respondents: Charles Altieri, Professor of English, University of California, Berkley; Alexander Alberro, Virginia Bloedel Wright Professor of Art History, Barnard, Columbia University, New York; Pablo Helguera; and James Elkins 1:20–2:00 p.m. Q&A

Contemporary Art Forum: Art Speech—A Symposium on Symposia, Day 1  

Friday, May 20, 2011 1:00 PM This two-day program brings together artists, art historians, scholars, critics, writers, and speech and performance studies experts to discuss possible frameworks for better understanding issues surrounding art speech and methods for being direct and achieving clarity in spoken public presentations in the visual arts. The spoken public presentation is central in the field of the visual arts, particularly in the area of adult learning. Public program departments in museums operate based on a set of conventions regarding the way they present lectures or discussions about art involving artists, art historians, and/or theorists. Yet very little qualitative analysis has been conducted on the effectiveness of these presentations. Often times, public presentations are deemed impenetrable or obscure. What is communicated in writing cannot always be easily grasped when presented on stage. Using a variety of strategies, this year’s forum will seek to anatomize art historians' and artists' habits at the podium. Sessions will include reenactments of famous acts of criticism, critiques of the academic slide show, an investigation of the effects of apparently authoritative presentations, experiments in the effects of stage presence, and analyses of the academic introduction and of the performative. Program Schedule 1:00–1:15 p.m. Opening Remarks Pablo Helguera, Director of Adult and Academic Programs, Department of Education, The Museum of Modern Art; and James Elkins, E.C. Chadbourne Chair in the Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism, School of the Art Institute of Chicago 1:15–2:30 p.m. Session 1: The Slide Talk and Museum Talk Dissected 1:15–1:25 Introduction by Pablo Helguera 1:25–1:40 Carey Young, artist, on her recent work Speechcraft, a mass participative event involving the public-speaking club Toastmasters 1:40–1:55 Monika Szewczyk, Head of Publications, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam, on modes of visual presentation 1:55–2:10 Jonathan Gilmore, Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, Yale University, New Haven, examines the slide lecture 2:10–2:30 Discussion and Q&A 2:30–2:45 p.m. Coffee Break 2:45–4:00 p.m. Session 2: The Art Historical Lecture 2:45–3:00 Introduction by James Elkins 3:00–3:10 Video excerpt of lecture by T. J. Clark 3:10–3:30 Claus Noppeney, Professor, Bern University of the Arts, Bern, Switzerland, discusses video excerpt 3:30–3:45 Ellen Levy, artist and Associate Professor, Pratt Institute, New York, analyzes video excerpt 3:45–4:00 Conclusions 4:00–5:00 p.m. Panel discussion and Q&A Respondents: Marjorie Perloff, Professor Emerita of Humanities, Stanford University; Benjamin Binstock, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Cooper Union, New York; Pablo Helguera; and James Elkins

Artists Present at Noon Part 5  

Discussion with Peter Eleey Monday, May 09, 2011 12:00 PM Join us for Artists Present at Noon, the second in a special two-part series of talks by contemporary artists. In sessions consisting of short and dynamic presentations of 20 images, 25 seconds per image, loosely modeled on an informal Japanese presentation style, artists discuss their work, creative process, and other issues in contemporary art, followed by a moderated discussion. This session will focus on artists who create and present work that moves beyond the object, from publications and events to public talks and writing.

Artists Present at Noon Part 4  

Alexandre Singh Monday, May 09, 2011 12:00 PM Join us for Artists Present at Noon, the second in a special two-part series of talks by contemporary artists. In sessions consisting of short and dynamic presentations of 20 images, 25 seconds per image, loosely modeled on an informal Japanese presentation style, artists discuss their work, creative process, and other issues in contemporary art, followed by a moderated discussion. This session will focus on artists who create and present work that moves beyond the object, from publications and events to public talks and writing.

Artists Present at Noon Part 3  

Matt Keeganr Monday, May 09, 2011 12:00 PM Join us for Artists Present at Noon, the second in a special two-part series of talks by contemporary artists. In sessions consisting of short and dynamic presentations of 20 images, 25 seconds per image, loosely modeled on an informal Japanese presentation style, artists discuss their work, creative process, and other issues in contemporary art, followed by a moderated discussion. This session will focus on artists who create and present work that moves beyond the object, from publications and events to public talks and writing.

Artists Present at Noon Part 2  

Angie Keefer Monday, May 09, 2011 12:00 PM Join us for Artists Present at Noon, the second in a special two-part series of talks by contemporary artists. In sessions consisting of short and dynamic presentations of 20 images, 25 seconds per image, loosely modeled on an informal Japanese presentation style, artists discuss their work, creative process, and other issues in contemporary art, followed by a moderated discussion. This session will focus on artists who create and present work that moves beyond the object, from publications and events to public talks and writing.

Artists Present at Noon Part 1  

Introduction and Alejandro Cesarco Monday, May 09, 2011 12:00 PM Join us for Artists Present at Noon, the second in a special two-part series of talks by contemporary artists. In sessions consisting of short and dynamic presentations of 20 images, 25 seconds per image, loosely modeled on an informal Japanese presentation style, artists discuss their work, creative process, and other issues in contemporary art, followed by a moderated discussion. This session will focus on artists who create and present work that moves beyond the object, from publications and events to public talks and writing.

Disseminating Expressionism: The Role of Prints, 1905–1924  

Friday, May 6, 2011 1:00–5:00 PM This half-day symposium centers on the potential of the print as a medium for the dissemination of art and ideas. We will address the print’s ability to represent formal innovations and aesthetic goals, to communicate issues of war and national pride, and to appear alongside news, commentary, and literature in publications and periodicals. Moderated by exhibition curator, Starr Figura, Associate Curator, Prints & Illustrated Books, MoMA. Held in conjunction with the exhibition German Expressionism: The Graphic Impulse. Program Schedule 
1:05–1:20 p.m. Welcome and introduction, Starr Figura 
1:20–1:45 p.m. Meike Hoffmann, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Freie Universität Berlin, "Early Expressionism between the Artist and the Audience" 
1:45–2:10 p.m. Christian Weikop, Visiting Lecturer, University of Edinburgh, "‘Arboreal Expressionism:’ The Wood Culture of the Brücke Artists" 
2:10–2:35 p.m. Timothy O. Benson, Curator, The Robert Gore Rifkind Center for German Expressionist Studies, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, "Expressionist Periodicals and the Intersection of Literature, Prints, and Politics" 2:35–2:50 p.m. Coffee break, Education and Research Building, mezzanine 
2:50–3:15 p.m. Shulamith Behr, Senior Lecturer in German 20th-Century Art, The Courtauld Institute of Art, "Between Authenticity and the Multiple: Käthe Kollwitz, Graphic Dissemination, and Dealership" 
3:15–3:40 p.m. Peter Jelavich, Professor of History, Johns Hopkins University, "Graphic War" 
3:40–4:05 p.m. Rose-Carol Washton Long, Professor of 19th- and 20th-Century European Art, Department of Art History, The CUNY Graduate Center, "Prints and Politics in the Immediate Postwar Era" 
4:05–4:40 p.m. Moderated discussion 
4:40–5:00 p.m. Q&A 
5:00–6:00 p.m. Reception, Education and Research Building, mezzanine

Artists Present at Noon  

April 04, 2011 12:00 PM Join us for Artists Present at Noon, a special two-part series of talks by 10 artists. In sessions consisting of short and dynamic presentations of 20 images, 25 seconds per image, loosely modeled on an informal Japanese presentation style, artists discuss their work, creative process, and other issues in contemporary art, followed by a moderated discussion. This session will focus on contemporary abstract painters. Presenting artists on April 4 include Keltie Ferris, Jaya Howey, Jacob Kassay, Zak Prekop, and Patricia Treib. Moderated by Peter Eleey, Curator, MoMA PS1.

New Perspectives on Abstract Expressionism: A Young Scholars’ Panel  

February 25, 2011 01:00 PM In conjunction with the exhibition Abstract Expressionist New York, MoMA presents New Perspectives on Abstract Expressionism: A Young Scholars’ Panel. The following four international graduate students have been selected to present their papers which uncover new scholarship, interpretations, approaches, and analysis of Abstract Expressionism: Leanne Carroll, University of Toronto “From Motherwell’s Tragedy, Newman’s Alienation, and Reinhardt’s Isolation to the Minimalist’s Renown: On the Reception of Artist-Writers” Eileen Costello, The University of Texas at Austin “Beyond the Easel: The Dissolution of Abstract Expressionist Painting into the Realm of Architecture” Michelle DuBois, Boston University “New Demarcations for Old: Refining and Redefining Abstract Expressionism Vis-à-vis a Consideration of the Willard Gallery Artists” Valerie Hellstein, Stony Brook University “Abstract Expressionism’s Countercultures: The Club, the Cold War, and the New Sensibility” The panel’s selection committee members, David Anfam, Michael Leja, Katy Siegel, and Ann Temkin, will serve as respondents and moderate a discussion among the four selected scholars.

Modern Poets: The Political Line  

Wednesday, February 2, 2011, 6:00 p.m. Theater 3 (The Celeste Bartos Theater), mezzanine, The Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Education and Research Building Revitalizing Frank O'Hara's legacy and MoMA's historical commitment to poetry, this series invites poets and performers to bring the literary tradition to the Museum's collection. They read historical works and their own work that reflects on modern and contemporary art. Artists throughout the last century have pushed line across the plane and into real space, thus questioning the relation between the art object and the world. The exhibition On Line: Drawing Through the Twentieth Century addresses the transformation of drawing, mark making, and gesture, as well as the role of the political line in art and everyday life. On this special evening, Cecilia Vicuña selects international poets to read their own works about the political line, a theme explored in On Line: Drawing Through the Twentieth Century. In addition to Vicuña, participants include poets Will Alexander, Luljeta Lleshanaku, and Dunya Mikhail, and translator Henry Israeli. In conjunction with the exhibition On Line: Drawing Through the Twentieth Century

Dorothy Miller and Frank O’Hara: Championing Abstract Expressionism at MoMA  

Wednesday, January 26, 2011, 6:00 p.m. Theater 3 (The Celeste Bartos Theater), mezzanine, The Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Education and Research Building Wendy Jeffers, curator, independent scholar and at work on a biography of Dorothy Miller titled Dorothy Miller and the Making of the Americans, and Brad Gooch, Professor of English at William Paterson University and author of City Poet: The Life and Times of Frank O’Hara (1994), explore the roles of two MoMA curators, Dorothy Miller, MoMA’s first curator (1934-1969) and Frank O’Hara, special assistant to the International Program (1955-1960) and curator of Painting and Sculpture (1960-66), who were great champions of the Abstract Expressionist artists. In conjunction with the exhibition Abstract Expressionist New York

Crossing the Line: Drawing and Its Extension (Part 2)  

Part 2 of 2 This half-day symposium, held in conjunction with the exhibition On Line: Drawing Through the Twentieth Century, explores the extended field of drawing by analyzing the development of line throughout the century in two panel discussions. "From On Line to Online,” moderated by Catherine de Zegher, co-curator of the exhibition, features artists Anna Maria Maiolino, Julie Mehretu, Jean Fisher, Professor of Fine Art and Transcultural Studies, Middlesex University and writer on contemporary art, and Luis Camnitzer, Professor Emeritus at University of the State of New York. "The Performative Line,” moderated by Connie Butler, MoMA's Robert Lehman Foundation Chief Curator of Drawings and co-curator of the exhibition, includes Benjamin Buchloh, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Modern Art, Harvard University; Ralph Lemon, artist and choreographer; Nick Kaye, Dean, College of Humanities & Chair in Performance Studies, College of Humanities, University of Exeter, England; and Janet Kraynak, Assistant Professor of Contemporary Art, New School University. In conjunction with the exhibition On Line: Drawing Through the Twentieth Century

Crossing the Line: Drawing and Its Extension (Part 1)  

Part 1 of 2 This half-day symposium, held in conjunction with the exhibition On Line: Drawing Through the Twentieth Century, explores the extended field of drawing by analyzing the development of line throughout the century in two panel discussions. "From On Line to Online,” moderated by Catherine de Zegher, co-curator of the exhibition, features artists Anna Maria Maiolino, Julie Mehretu, Jean Fisher, Professor of Fine Art and Transcultural Studies, Middlesex University and writer on contemporary art, and Luis Camnitzer, Professor Emeritus at University of the State of New York. "The Performative Line,” moderated by Connie Butler, MoMA's Robert Lehman Foundation Chief Curator of Drawings and co-curator of the exhibition, includes Benjamin Buchloh, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Modern Art, Harvard University; Ralph Lemon, artist and choreographer; Nick Kaye, Dean, College of Humanities & Chair in Performance Studies, College of Humanities, University of Exeter, England; and Janet Kraynak, Assistant Professor of Contemporary Art, New School University. In conjunction with the exhibition On Line: Drawing Through the Twentieth Century

Conversations with Contemporary Artists: Reinventing Artist Communities (Andrea Zittel with Peter Reed)  

Wednesday, November 17, 2010, 6:00 p.m. Theater 3 (The Celeste Bartos Theater), mezzanine, The Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Education and Research Building Join leading contemporary artists as they discuss their work, the creative process, and issues in contemporary art. Andrea Zittel and Lisa Anne Auerbach discuss High Desert Test Sites and other alternative spaces for experimental works by both emerging and established artists. Moderated by Peter Reed, Senior Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs.

Henri Matisse in the Twenty-first Century  

Wednesday, September 15, 2010, 6:00 p.m. Matisse's art continues to be popular, but also to be misunderstood as an art of hedonistic pleasure. This lecture, presented by John Elderfield, Chief Curator Emeritus, Department of Painting and Sculpture, and organizer of the exhibition Matisse: Radical Invention, 1913–1917, explores the important lessons that Matisse's art, and his attitudes towards it, continue to teach us more than a century after he burst into public attention. In conjunction with the exhibition Matisse: Radical Invention, 1913–1917

The Original Copy: A Panel Discussion on Photography and Sculpture  

Tuesday, September 14, 2010, 6:00 p.m. This panel discussion is moderated by Roxana Marcoci, curator of the exhibition, The Original Copy: Photography of Sculpture, 1839 to Today. Panelists include George Baker, Associate Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art and Vice Chair, UCLA Department of Art History; Mark Godfrey, Curator, Tate Modern; Sarah Hamill, Assistant Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art, Oberlin College; and Rachel Harrison, artist.

Greater New York 2010: Artists Present: Q & A (7 of 7)  

Part I of a series of talks by ten artists represented in MoMA PS1's Greater New York 2010 , (May 23–October 18), an exhibition of work by artists in the New York metropolitan area who engage in a wide range of art practices and mediums. In sessions consisting of short and dynamic presentations of twenty images, twenty-five seconds per image, loosely modeled on an informal Japanese presentation style, artists discuss their work, their creative process, and other issues in contemporary art. Presenting artists include Xaviera Simmons, David Benjamin Sherry, Pinar Yolaçan, Erin Shirreff, and Michele Abeles. Moderated by Christopher Lew, Manager of Curatorial Affairs, Exhibition Funding Liaison, MoMA PS1.

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