.NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

United States

.NET Rocks! is an Internet Audio Talk Show for Microsoft .NET Developers.

Episodes

ASP.NET Core 2.0 with Damian Edwards and David Fowler  

Core 2 is coming - are you ready? While at NDC Oslo, Carl and Richard talked to the amazing duo of Damian Edwards and David Fowler about the rapidly approaching release of Core 2. Expectations are huge, but Damian and David are confident that Core 2 will deliver. The conversation dives into the meta side of software development - what didn't make it into Core 2, what had to be pushed to the next version, and what will have to be added at the last minute. Lots of laughs and enthusiasm as the open source reality of .NET is coming true!

Event Tracing for Windows with Dina Goldshtein  

How can ETW help you? While at NDC in Oslo, Carl and Richard talked to Dina Goldshtein about her work instrumenting applications. This leads to a conversation about Event Tracing for Windows, which Dina uses primarily to take measurements of different applications running on Windows machines - but you can have your app add to the ETW stream as well. Monitoring, profiling and debugging are all different tasks that can take advantage of the data provided by ETW, it depends on your needs at the time. Lots of discussion on the impact of measuring as well - nothing is free!

The Azure Platform Landscape with Barry Luijbregts  

There's a lot of stuff in Azure - how to sort through it all? While at NDC in Oslo, Carl and Richard talk to Barry Luijbregts about the huge array of features that exist in the Azure Platform-as-a-Service offerings. Barry runs down the list, helping to categorize what elements are very similar, what are totally different, and how things work together. The platform is where it's at in terms of value, it's well worth your time to figure out what parts can work for you!

The Evolution of Serilog with Nicholas Blumhardt  

Is there more to logging? Yes! While at NDC in Oslo, Carl and Richard talked to Nicholas Blumhardt about his long running logging project called Serilog. Calling back to the earlier .NET Rocks episode on Serilog (2014!), Nicholas talks about how logging is one of those 'bicycle shed' problems - it looks simple on the surface, but the deeper you go, the more you find complexity that needs to be managed well. Don't do it yourself, use a great library like Serilog! The core implementation is simple, but a great abstraction allows you to push those logs wherever you need them, whether that be text files, databases or the huge diversity of existing log tracking.

MSBuild with Daniel Plaisted  

MS Build is cooler than you think! While at NDC Oslo, Carl and Richard sat down with Daniel Plaisted to talk about the latest version of MS Build. But first, a quick conversation about the situation around the reversion back from project files using JSON rather than the traditional XML-driven MS Build files. The good news is that more of what made the JSON project files great is showing up in the MS Build files! The conversation also digs into building complex pipelines for MS Build and more importantly - how to debug them! Structured logging to the rescue!

Azure Cosmos DB with Josh Lane  

Are you ready to go into the cosmos? With apologies to the late Carl Sagan, let's talk about Cosmos DB! While at NDC in Oslo, Carl and Richard talked to Josh Lane about Cosmos DB which was first announced at the Build conference. Cosmos DB is a globally distributed multi-modal database. As of the recording it supported several flavors of document storage (including MongoDB) as well as key-value, graph and columnar stores. Josh digs into the various scenarios for an ultra-fast distributed storage solution like this - a great example of platform-as-a-service!

.NET Summer Hackfest with Jon Galloway  

It's summer in the northern hemisphere, are you ready to get hacking? Carl and Richard chat with the new executive director of the .NET Foundation, Jon Galloway. The conversation starts out talking about the Foundation itself, why it exists and what it does for the .NET open source community as a whole. The Foundation is where .NET Core, C# and more all live, as well as many awesome third party projects. Then to the Summer Hackfest, where the Foundation is providing support to get developers working on open source projects - if you've got one in mind, check out the links below and make a submission!

GraphQL with Steve Faulkner  

How do you make your APIs accessible to everyone? While at NDC is Oslo, Carl and Richard talk to Steven Faulkner about GraphQL, a Facebook open source project for exposing your APIs in a type-safe JSON-like approach. Steven talks about the advantages of having an abstraction over your APIs, allowing you to manage new versions of your API painlessly as well as packaging up multiple calls - saving some round trips! While the reference implementation is React and Javascript focused, the community has built support for many languages including C# - check it out!

TypeScript and Beyond with Anders Hejlsberg  

The father of C# and TypeScript drops by for a visit! While at Build in Seattle, Carl and Richard talked to the one-and-only Anders Hejlsberg about his work on C# and more recently, TypeScript. Anders in his inevitable style talks through why languages work the way they do, the evolution of both C# and JavaScript, and the role that TypeScript has to play in making web development a better place. Great words from the legend!

Windows Containers with Steve Lasker  

How are containers coming along in the Windows world? Carl and Richard talk to Steve Lasker about his work making containers easy to use from within Visual Studio. Most work on containers has been around Linux, but when Windows Server 2016 shipped, Windows containers became real. Should you be using containers in your all-Windows world? Steve talks about the advantages and challenges, it's not all simple, but it is very powerful and worth a look!

The .NET Renaissance with Ian Cooper  

After years of waning, .NET is on the rise - is it time for a renaissance? Ian Cooper says yes! The first of the NDC Oslo shows for 2017 starts out focused on a blog post that Ian published in February 2017 calling for a .NET Renaissance, and what it takes for it to come true. The move to open source has helped a lot, as it opens the door to what people really look for in a thriving community - rather than being a product created by Microsoft, it is a set of tools supporting by Microsoft but with direct community involvement. There's a lot going right, it's time for a renaissance!

The Fluent Design System with James Clarke  

Ready to get fluent? While at the Build conference in Seattle, Carl and Richard talked to James Clarke about the Fluent Design System. Fluent represents the next generation of Windows UI elements, as part of the continuous updating process that Windows 10 is under going these days. James talks about how you can start to experiment with the latest Fluent bits and provide feedback directly to the team as the features evolve. Microsoft is implementing Fluent against Windows and the Microsoft Store, and you can be part of those experiments too - check it out!

New .NET Standards with Mike Harsh and Joe Stegman  

What's up with .NET Standard and the new XAML Standard? While at Build in Seattle, Carl and Richard chatted with Mike Harsh and Joe Stegman about the importance of the new standards and how they will affect .NET development going forward. As Mike and Joe explain, the focus is on making sure that the different versions of .NET (and XAML) that are out there today converge on a common standard. This will make it easier for tool vendors to build tools that work everywhere, and for developers to be able to write code that runs across platforms. It's going to take some time, but standards should make our lives better!

WebAssembly and Blazor with Steve Sanderson  

Is Silverlight back? Carl and Richard talk to Steve Sanderson about a demo he did at NDC Oslo that blew some minds. The demo involved using WebAssembly to put a version of the .NET Runtime and C# into the browser. Yes, that's right, Steve found a way to write C# that runs in the browser with NO PLUGIN. It's only an experiment, and there's no XAML to be found, so it's not really Silverlight, but it certainly gets you thinking - what if you could run any language you wanted in the browser? What would your world be like then?

Project Rome with Vikas Bhatia and Shawn Henry  

We all have multiple devices, how do we make them all work together well? While at Build in Seattle, Carl and Richard sat down with Vikas Bhatia and Shawn Henry to talk about Project Rome. As Vikas explains, Project Rome is all about cross-device experiences utilizing APIs available on multiple platforms and interacting with Microsoft Graph. The goal is to have work and information follow you between devices - with the user always in control. Check it out!

Ideas from Build with Holger Mueller  

More analysis from Build - during Build! While at Build in Seattle, Carl and Richard talked to Holger Mueller about his impressions of the show, shortly after the first keynote. Holger runs the gamut, talking about .NET Core, Visual Studio 2017, Azure, DevOps, Containers and more. A lot happened at Build, here's a view from the early point in the event itself!

Military Spaceplanes Geek Out  

What does the military want with a space plane? Time for a Geek Out! The conversation begins with that question - what space plane? Richard digs into the history of the space shuttle, which did have substantial funding from the US Air Force for specific military missions, none of which ever happened for a variety of reasons. And then off into the various projects to try and build a military space plane, including the DC-X, X-33, X-37B, DARPA RASCAL and the latest attempt, the DARPA XS-1. Each project brought some capabilities to the fore, but there's still a long way to go!

The Azure Mobile App with Jakub Jedryszek and Michael Flanakin  

Want to manage your Azure apps on your smartphone? Carl and Richard talk to Jakub Jedryszek and Michael Flanakin about their work building the Azure Mobile App. Not just a mobile version of the Azure Portal, the app is built with Xamarin Native for iOS and Android, and focuses on using the phone efficiently to let you do what you need to! The discussion dives into the challenges of working on varying form factors and the tools that make things easier. And of course, there are great instrumentation and feedback mechanisms. It's early days for this application yet, so check it out and let them know what you need!

New Great Design Science with Mark Miller  

Are you ready to take your UX design to the next level? Carl and Richard talk to Mark Miller about his latest research into the science of great design - and it's definitely a science! Mark walks through some core concepts related to user interface design and the design of the application as a whole, helping users stay focused on what they need to do without interrupting or confusing them along the way. The discussion also embraces a lot of design decisions in the non-digital world as well - how you walk and drive a car are impacted by the design of a number of things!

Build Recap with Rocky Lhotka  

What happened at Build? Lots! Carl and Richard talk to Rocky Lhotka about his impressions around the various announcements at Build. The conversation ranges over how this Build was somewhat different from others - perhaps more aspirational? Topics covered included the amazing AI/vision system demos that were exciting and frightening at the same time, as well as the XAML and .NET Standards, Hololens, VR, Project Rome and more! So much happened at Build!

Azure Service Fabric and Microservices with James Sturtevant  

Azure Service Fabric is here - should your application take advantage of it? Carl and Richard talk to James Sturtevant about his experiences moving applications into Azure Service Fabric. Yes, it is possible to "lift and shift" your application into Service Fabric via Guest Executables, but that doesn't mean you'll get much of the benefit that Service Fabric can provide. James talks about picking a feature in your application to peel off into a microservice, perhaps as an Azure Function or other serverless strategy - or even into a container! Instrumentation is a key aspect to understanding what will improve your application, and it takes time - all apps are on a continuum of development!

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