Outlook

Outlook

Canada

Extraordinary first person stories from around the world

Episodes

The Man Who Jumps Off Tall Buildings  

Chris 'Douggs' McDougall is an Australian base jumper who has risked his life doing more than 3,600 base jumps. It's a lot more dangerous than skydiving because it's done at such a low altitude. Many people have died base jumping and it's illegal in some countries. Douggs tells Outlook why he does it. See Douggs in action on his Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ChrisDouggsMcDougall/ or on his Instagram account: https://www.instagram.com/douggsbase/?hl=en Image and credit: Chris 'Douggs' McDougall

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The Best Friends Who Became a Family  

Natasha Bakht and Lynda Collins are two friends from Canada who have formed an unprecedented family unit. They have been able to use their experience as professors of law to help become the first co-mothers to a little boy - even although they are not romantically involved. Image: Lynda Collins and Natasha Bakht Credit: Lynda Collins and Natasha Bakht

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Writing My Cellmates' Names in Blood  

Mansour Omari spent nearly a year in a Syrian government prison in 2012. We hear his account of life in an underground cell and how, against the odds, he managed to smuggle out the names of his fellow cellmates to their loved ones - by writing them down, using chicken bones and blood on a piece of cloth. Image: Mansour Omari's list of names Credit: Mansour Omari

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Outlook Weekend: Hospital Drama  

Hospitals are places where we go when something out of the ordinary, potentially life-changing is happening. For the staff, the high drama of a hospital is the backdrop of their working lives. But they do not expect this drama to start happening to them. Tricia Seaman was working as an oncology nurse at a hospital in the town of Harrisburg in the American state of Pennsylvania. One day a patient who she barely knew asked her to perform an extreme act of generosity. One October in 1999 in Baghdad, Iraq, junior surgeon Munjed Al Muderis was preparing for a day of scheduled surgeries when three buses pulled up outside the hospital. The passengers were captured army deserters. Officials working for President Saddam Hussein ordered Munjed and his colleagues to mutilate them. He faced a terrible dilemma: carry out the orders, or be shot on the spot. However, Munjed found a third option. Image: Surgeons in theatre at a hospital. Credit: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images.

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The Pinball Champion Defying Expectations  

Last year a 27-year-old Canadian called Robert Gagno won the World Pinball Championship. Robert has autism so taking part in the sport has been a way of building an independent life. Image: Robert Gagno

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"Dr Miracle" restoring sight to 35,000  

The extraordinary life of the woman some in Namibia call "Dr Miracle". Helena Ndume is an ophthalmologist - or eye doctor - who says she's saved the sight of 35,000 people. But given her early life, it's remarkable she survived to carry out her vital work. When Helena was born, Namibia was subject to South Africa's strict apartheid laws. Dr Helena Ndume Credit Steve Bunnell

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Paris' Frozen Zoo  

In Paris, there's an historic taxidermy shop that's been an inspiration for famous artists like Salvador Dali and featured in movies including Woody Allen's Midnight in Paris. Just for the record, all the animals there died of old age or illness. Reporter Saskia Edwards met the owner of the shop Deyrolle, to find out more about this eccentric French man. Image: Louis Albert de Broglie Credit: Credit Fernando Laposse

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Newlyweds Separated by Kidnap Ordeal  

In August 2011 businessman Shahbaz Taseer was on his way to work in Lahore when he was snatched by kidnappers. He spent nearly five years as a hostage, and video updates of his ordeal were regularly sent back to his wife Maheen. They spoke to Anu Anand about their ordeal.

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Outlook Weekend: Planes, Trains And Getaway Cars  

Planes: In October 1972, Pedro Algorta was a 21-year-old student living in Montevideo when he boarded a Uruguayan Air Force plane bound for Chile. The fate of the 45 people on that small plane has inspired countless books, documentaries and a Hollywood film. More than 40 years later, Pedro decided to tell his story. Trains: In August 2015, Californian airman Spencer Stone was enjoying the holiday of a lifetime. The 23-year-old was with a couple of friends travelling around Europe by train. One Friday evening they were making their way from Amsterdam to Paris. As the train was crossing the border into France a man was emerging from a toilet cubicle with an assault rifle and a backpack full of ammunition. What happened next turned Spencer into an international hero. Getaway Cars: Georgia Durante was once one of the most photographed women in America. No one suspected that while she was working as a model in 1970s New York, she was also a getaway driver for the mafia. Image: Car driving over the speed limit is flashed by speed camera. Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images

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From Rio Favela to State Governor  

Benedita da Silva grew up in poverty in a favela in Rio de Janeiro with her 15 brothers and sisters. She tells Matthew Bannister how she overcame this adversity to become the country's first black female Senator Image: Benedita da Silva Credit: JOYCE NALTCHAYAN/AFP/Getty Images

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I Still Talk to my Dead Wife  

Three years ago Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 departed from Kuala Lumpur International Airport with 239 people on board. It was due to arrive in Beijing a few hours later, but contact with the plane was lost less than an hour after take-off and neither it, nor any of its passengers have been seen since. For K S Narendran - known as Naren - this was devastating news. His wife was on board flight MH370 and Naren has spent the last three years trying to get some answers about what happened to the plane. He's now a spokesperson for the families of the missing passengers. Image: KS Nardendran speaking at an event to remember the people lost on flight MH370 Credit: MM Kho

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'Music is never enough - it has to be madness'  

When it comes to Balkan music, one of the biggest names in the business is Goran Bregovic. He's sold more than 15 million albums, and performs all over the world. He's the leader of a 40-strong, energetic brass-band - called the Wedding and Funeral Band - playing a blend of Gypsy music, traditional Balkan rhythms and rock. Goran's story starts in Sarajevo - in what was then Yugoslavia, now Bosnia - where he grew up with a Serbian mother and Croatian father. Image: Musician Goran Bregovic Credit: Ivana Ivanovic/PIXSELL

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Saving a lion in Mosul Zoo  

With the Iraqi Defence Force working to recapture Mosul from so-called Islamic State, Dr Amir Khalil headed a team that travelled to Mosul Zoo to treat the animals still alive there. They performed life-saving medical treatments on Lula the bear and a lion called Simba who had been living in squalid conditions since the conflict began. The Egyptian vet works with the animal charity 'Four Paws'. (Picture credit: Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images.)

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Outlook Weekend: The Things We Do For Love  

Claudia di Maggio from Sydney has always known that her mum, Antonietta, would do anything for her. When she found out she would only be able to have a baby through a surrogate Antonietta stepped in, volunteering to give birth to her own grandson. In 1975 PK Mahanandia was an impoverished art student in Delhi making a bit of cash by sketching tourists. One day he met a young Swedish tourist called Lotta von Schedvin. A year later, he cycled 7,000 miles to Sweden to be reunited with her. Image: a young Tibetan woman carrying her baby at the foot of the Nojing Kangtsang glacier Credit: PETER PARKS/AFP/Getty Images

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The Man Who Fell Off A Skyscraper  

Alcides Moreno and his younger brother Edgar couldn't get a job in Ecuador so they moved to the United States and found work as window cleaners in New York. They were two ordinary guys doing an ordinary job, until in 2007 when they became international news because of a terrible accident. Both of them fell off a skyscraper. Alcides didn't give interviews at the time but he's now living in Arizona. Image and credit: Alcides Moreno.

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Japan's uninsurable rock star  

Yoshiki is one of Japan's biggest stars. He founded the rock band X Japan, which transformed the music scene in Japan. They spawned a whole new style - over the top outfits, wild stage performances - and sold 30 million records. He told us how he managed to express his feelings through music after his father's suicide; and how he lost his childhood friend and lead singer to a cult. (Picture credit: Yoshiki.)

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The dentist delivering babies in Syria  

Mohammed Darwish is running an underground clinic in Madaya, a town under siege in Syria. (Picture: Madaya. Credit: Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images.)

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The truth about my sister's murder  

On 13 March 1964 Kitty Genovese was murdered in Queens, in New York. Kitty was attacked in the early hours of the morning outside her apartment block. It was reported at the time that dozens of neighbours had witnessed that attack but had done nothing to help, and her story led to the identification of a new sociological theory, the bystander effect. Kitty's brother, Bill Genovese, was sixteen back then. He set out to find out what actually happened that night. (Picture: Kitty Genovese. Photo credit: Bill Genovese.)

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Outlook Weekend: This Time It's Personal  

Three stories about taking on bullies, getting your own back and coming out on top. The American DEA agents, Javier Peña and Steve Murphy, who helped bring down the notorious Colombian drug boss Pablo Escobar. Seema Rao is the first woman to train commandos in the Indian army in hand-to-hand combat. But when she was a schoolgirl, she was picked on by bullies. Carrie Goldberg is a New York lawyer who specialises in cases of so-called 'revenge porn', or non-consensual pornography. Carrie was a victim of it herself. Image: traditional fist fighting match in Venda, South Africa Credit: Lefty Shivambu/Gallo Images/Getty Images

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My Hands Were Reattached After Attack  

Simonne Butler is a woman from New Zealand whose boyfriend attacked her with a samurai sword, and cut off both her hands. Doctors managed to reattach them, and she eventually learned how to use them again. Simonne tells Jo Fidgen about her ordeal and how she now helps victims of domestic abuse. Image: Simmone Butler Credit: Calypso Paoli

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