Episodes

The Outside Interview Ep 06: Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell  

“If you’re not at the table, you’re on the menu,” says Sally Jewell. Hopeful, thoughtful, slightly ticked-off, and surprisingly emotional, the outgoing Secretary of the Interior talks with Outside editor Chris Keyes about the presidential election and what it means for the future of public lands. Can environmental protections be dismantled? Will they? Are we … Continue reading "The Outside Interview Ep 06: Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell"

Science of Survival Ep 09: Cliffhanger, Part 3  

Dan and Isaac are back from searching through the wreckage of Eastern Airlines Flight 980 on a remote mountain in Bolivia, but their findings have prompted a whole new set of questions. Will anyone look at the material they brought back to the U.S.? Who hired climber Bernardo Guarachi to get to the crash site … Continue reading "Science of Survival Ep 09: Cliffhanger, Part 3"

Science of Survival Ep 08: Cliffhanger, Part 2  

Since colliding with a Bolivian mountain in 1985, Eastern Airlines Flight 980 has been frozen inside a glacier perched on the edge of a 3,000 foot drop. With wreckage now melting out of the ice at the base of the cliff, Dan Futrell and Isaac Stoner travel to the debris field at 16,000 feet, battling … Continue reading "Science of Survival Ep 08: Cliffhanger, Part 2"

Science of Survival Ep 07: Cliffhanger, Part 1  

It’s one of history’s greatest aviation mysteries: on New Year’s Day in 1985, Eastern Air Lines Flight 980 was carrying 29 passengers and a hell of a lot of contraband when it crashed into the side of a 21,112-foot mountain in Bolivia. For decades conspiracy theories abounded as the wreckage remained inaccessible, the bodies unrecovered, … Continue reading "Science of Survival Ep 07: Cliffhanger, Part 1"

Dispatches Ep 02: National Parks Don’t Need Your Stinkin’ Reverence  

John Muir rhapsodizing about Yosemite is one thing, but Outside contributing editor Ian Frazier has had it with people calling their favorite outdoor spots “cathedrals,” “shrines,” and “sacred spaces.” When he made his case in an issue of Outside, it struck a major nerve with readers. Here, Frazier explains his argument, reacts to reader letters, … Continue reading "Dispatches Ep 02: National Parks Don’t Need Your Stinkin’ Reverence"

Dispatches Ep01: The Sound of Science  

Scientists are compiling huge amounts of data on the impact of global warming, but the story of that data often gets lost. Enter Nik Sawe, a researcher at Stanford who is transforming big data into music.  Two parts science, one art, data sonification turns the numbers we tend to ignore into a very human story, and could potentially help scientists identify new trends and correlations that are easier to hear than to see.

The Outside Interview Ep 05: The Hard Lessons of Climbing Superstar Conrad Anker  

For two decades, Conrad Anker has been at the forefront of climbing, evolving into America’s best all-around alpinist. With skills on rock, ice, and big peaks, he's now something of an elder statesmen and mentor to a new generation of elite athletes. Though perhaps best known for finding the body of legendary British mountaineer George Mallory on Mount Everest in 1999, he is celebrated among climbers for scaling a variety of difficult and dangerous routes on technical peaks around the world. Outside editor Chris Keyes talks to Anker about his long journey from dirt bag to rock star, the critical importance of choosing the right climbing partners, and why some consider bottled oxygen a performance enhancing drug.

The Outside Interview Ep04: The Secret History of Doping  

Author Mark Johnson argues that performance enhancing drugs are hardly a recent phenomenon. In his new book, "Spitting in the Soup," he traces doping all the way back to the 1904 Olympic marathon in St. Louis and shows how doping and sport have been fundamentally intertwined for more than a century. The only thing new, says Johnson, is our increasingly moralistic view of the practice and the demonization of athletes who get caught. Chris Keyes talks to Johnson about the surprising history of doping, America's double standards when it comes to performance enhancement, the trouble with media sensationalism, and the coming era of gene doping that will change sports forever.

The Outside Interview Ep03: Tim Ferriss Overshares  

Tim Ferriss is many things. A bestselling author. A kickboxing champion. A horseback archer. The first American in history to hold a Guinness World Record in tango. He has built an enormous following by doing just about everything—and, more importantly, figuring out how to do it all better than most experts and then sharing what he’s learned with the rest of us. He calls himself a human guinea pig. Outside editor Chris Keyes talks to Ferriss about the origins and evolution of his uniquely aggressive approach to experimentation and his self-improvement.

The Outside Interview Ep02: Jason Motlagh on the Darién Gap  

Jason Motlagh and his crew were the first journalists in years to successfully cross the Darién Gap, a lawless, roadless jungle on the border of Colombia and Panama. Teeming with deadly snakes, drug traffickers, and antigovernment guerrillas, it has become a pathway for migrants whose desperation to reach the U.S. sends them on a perilous journey. He talks to Chris Keyes about the risks and logistics of the assignment, his motivations as a reporter, and the emotional toll of working in conflict zones.

The Outside Interview Ep01: Robert Young Pelton  

Robert Young Pelton has made a career of tracking down warlords and interviewing people in the most dangerous places in the world. He's been kidnapped in Colombia, survived an assassination attempt in Uganda, and joined the hunt for Osama Bin Laden in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Outside editor Chris Keyes wanted to know how spending that much time on the edge has affected him long term. The answer's not what you'd think.

Science of Survival Ep06: In Too Deep  

Michael Proudfoot was SCUBA diving on a shipwreck in Baja, Mexico when his regulator broke. He survived by finding an air pocket in the wreck, where he spent two days eating sea urchins and drinking fresh water from a teakettle before rescuers arrived. It’s one of the most incredible undersea tales of all time—if it’s true.

Science of Survival Ep05: Under Pressure  

When you’re stuck underwater in a submarine, the number of of ways you can die is long and varied—crushing, burning, asphyxiation, exploding, the list goes on and on. Escaping alive requires maintaining calm and focus. Unless your name is Wilhelm Bauer, whose survival story includes the first undersea fist fight.

Science of Survival Ep04: The Devil’s Highway, Part II  

In the spring 2001, a group set out from Mexico to cross the border into Arizona. The tragic result of their journey—and many others like it—helped researchers develop the Death Index, a new model for predicting dehydration fatalities.

Science of Survival Ep03: The Devil’s Highway, Part I  

On a brutal route through the Sonoran Desert in southern Arizona, thousands have died from dehydration and thirst. But one man's journey through hell led to a breakthrough for science.

Science of Survival Ep02 BONUS: Whatever Happens, Happens  

One of the most famous accidents in wingsuit history.

Science of Survival Ep02: Struck by Lightning  

When Phil Broscovak was struck by lightning, his world got turned upside down.

Science of Survival EP01: Frozen Alive  

The cold hard facts of freezing to death.

Science of Survival  

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