Episodes

Science of Survival Ep 15: The Death Blow  

Science can’t fully explain why and how tornadoes form. But on May 31, 2013, all the factors we do understand pointed towards off-the-charts risk in central Oklahoma. Hundreds of amateur storm chasers, professional meteorologists, and thrill-seekers flocked to the area expecting an incredible storm. What actually touched down blew them all away.

XX Factor: A Woman’s Place is on Top  

Back when men still believed the “weaker sex” were inferior climbers, Arlene Blum led an all-women’s ascent of Annapurna, the world’s tenth-highest peak. The 1978 climb put the first women—and first Americans, period—on the summit, but the death of two climbers sparked controversy. Outside contributing editor Florence Williams talks with Blum and Alpinist editor in … Continue reading "XX Factor: A Woman’s Place is on Top"

XX Factor: Beth Rodden Unpacked  

In the 90s, Beth Rodden was a climbing prodigy, celebrated for her athletic gifts and unwavering discipline. Then, while on an expedition in Central Asia in 2000, she and her small team of friends were kidnapped. That terrifying ordeal—and their daring escape—changed her life in ways she has only recently begun to understand. In a … Continue reading "XX Factor: Beth Rodden Unpacked"

Science of Survival Ep 14: After the Crash, Part 2  

Once Joe Stone learned how to use his paralyzed body, he immediately set an audacious goal: he would race in an Ironman triathlon—despite the fact that no quadriplegic athlete had ever attempted the event. And after that? Well, Joe decided he could go much, much bigger.

Science of Survival Ep 13: After the Crash, Part 1  

Joe Stone doesn’t do anything halfway. Back when he was a skater, he went big. When he partied, he went hard. When he took up skydiving and speed-flying, he flew almost every day. Then one day he crashed and became a C7 quadriplegic. What do you do when you’re addicted to adrenaline but confined to … Continue reading "Science of Survival Ep 13: After the Crash, Part 1"

Science of Survival Ep. 12: The Everest Effect  

On the morning of May 25th, 2006, Myles Osborne was poised to become one of the last climbers of the season to summit Mount Everest. The weather was perfect, and it seemed nothing would stop his team. Then a flapping of orange fabric caught Osborne’s eye. He believed it to be a tent—until the fabric … Continue reading "Science of Survival Ep. 12: The Everest Effect"

The Outside Interview Ep 08: Florence Williams on The Nature Fix  

Outside magazine contributing editor Florence Williams speaks with Editor Chris Keyes about the fascinating science behind the restorative power of wild places.

Science of Survival Ep 11: Treed by a Jaguar  

In the summer of 1970, Ed Welch and Bruce Frey put in a canoe at the headwaters of the Amazon and shoved off into the current. Their only plan was to travel downstream until it wasn’t fun anymore. They had a rifle, they had a machete, they had a vague idea of how to survive … Continue reading "Science of Survival Ep 11: Treed by a Jaguar"

Science of Survival Ep 10: Line of Blood in the Sand  

Denmark’s rugged Faroe Islands are known for sheep, rowboats, and a brutal tradition called “The Grind” in which Faroese men butcher hundreds of pilot whales by hand, on the beach, in full view of locals and tourists. Reporter Joel Carnegie traveled to the islands last summer to try to understand the cultural forces that sustain … Continue reading "Science of Survival Ep 10: Line of Blood in the Sand"

The Outside Interview Ep 07: Mark Sundeen on the New Pioneers  

Writer Mark Sundeen spent the last three years chronicling the lives of three couples who have dropped out of mainstream society, trading cars, technology, and electricity for freedom and hard work on the new American frontier. The result is his latest book, The Unsettlers: In Search of the Good Life in Today’s America, a fascinating, … Continue reading "The Outside Interview Ep 07: Mark Sundeen on the New Pioneers"

Dispatches Ep 02: Call of the Wild Things  

Wolf howls, bird songs, , crickets, frogs—soundscapes contain clues to not only what’s going on around us but also who we are. Not just as individuals, but as human beings. Or at least, that’s what Bernie Krause says. Krause is a soundscape artist who’s spent decades collecting the sounds of the natural world and contemplating … Continue reading "Dispatches Ep 02: Call of the Wild Things"

The Outside Interview Ep 06: Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell  

“If you’re not at the table, you’re on the menu,” says Sally Jewell. Hopeful, thoughtful, slightly ticked-off, and surprisingly emotional, the outgoing Secretary of the Interior talks with Outside editor Chris Keyes about the presidential election and what it means for the future of public lands. Can environmental protections be dismantled? Will they? Are we … Continue reading "The Outside Interview Ep 06: Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell"

Science of Survival Ep 09: Cliffhanger, Part 3  

Dan and Isaac are back from searching through the wreckage of Eastern Airlines Flight 980 on a remote mountain in Bolivia, but their findings have prompted a whole new set of questions. Will anyone look at the material they brought back to the U.S.? Who hired climber Bernardo Guarachi to get to the crash site … Continue reading "Science of Survival Ep 09: Cliffhanger, Part 3"

Science of Survival Ep 08: Cliffhanger, Part 2  

Since colliding with a Bolivian mountain in 1985, Eastern Airlines Flight 980 has been frozen inside a glacier perched on the edge of a 3,000 foot drop. With wreckage now melting out of the ice at the base of the cliff, Dan Futrell and Isaac Stoner travel to the debris field at 16,000 feet, battling … Continue reading "Science of Survival Ep 08: Cliffhanger, Part 2"

Science of Survival Ep 07: Cliffhanger, Part 1  

It’s one of history’s greatest aviation mysteries: on New Year’s Day in 1985, Eastern Air Lines Flight 980 was carrying 29 passengers and a hell of a lot of contraband when it crashed into the side of a 21,112-foot mountain in Bolivia. For decades conspiracy theories abounded as the wreckage remained inaccessible, the bodies unrecovered, … Continue reading "Science of Survival Ep 07: Cliffhanger, Part 1"

Dispatches Ep 02: National Parks Don’t Need Your Stinkin’ Reverence  

John Muir rhapsodizing about Yosemite is one thing, but Outside contributing editor Ian Frazier has had it with people calling their favorite outdoor spots “cathedrals,” “shrines,” and “sacred spaces.” When he made his case in an issue of Outside, it struck a major nerve with readers. Here, Frazier explains his argument, reacts to reader letters, … Continue reading "Dispatches Ep 02: National Parks Don’t Need Your Stinkin’ Reverence"

Dispatches Ep01: The Sound of Science  

Scientists are compiling huge amounts of data on the impact of global warming, but the story of that data often gets lost. Enter Nik Sawe, a researcher at Stanford who is transforming big data into music.  Two parts science, one art, data sonification turns the numbers we tend to ignore into a very human story, and could potentially help scientists identify new trends and correlations that are easier to hear than to see.

The Outside Interview Ep 05: The Hard Lessons of Climbing Superstar Conrad Anker  

For two decades, Conrad Anker has been at the forefront of climbing, evolving into America’s best all-around alpinist. With skills on rock, ice, and big peaks, he's now something of an elder statesmen and mentor to a new generation of elite athletes. Though perhaps best known for finding the body of legendary British mountaineer George Mallory on Mount Everest in 1999, he is celebrated among climbers for scaling a variety of difficult and dangerous routes on technical peaks around the world. Outside editor Chris Keyes talks to Anker about his long journey from dirt bag to rock star, the critical importance of choosing the right climbing partners, and why some consider bottled oxygen a performance enhancing drug.

The Outside Interview Ep04: The Secret History of Doping  

Author Mark Johnson argues that performance enhancing drugs are hardly a recent phenomenon. In his new book, "Spitting in the Soup," he traces doping all the way back to the 1904 Olympic marathon in St. Louis and shows how doping and sport have been fundamentally intertwined for more than a century. The only thing new, says Johnson, is our increasingly moralistic view of the practice and the demonization of athletes who get caught. Chris Keyes talks to Johnson about the surprising history of doping, America's double standards when it comes to performance enhancement, the trouble with media sensationalism, and the coming era of gene doping that will change sports forever.

The Outside Interview Ep03: Tim Ferriss Overshares  

Tim Ferriss is many things. A bestselling author. A kickboxing champion. A horseback archer. The first American in history to hold a Guinness World Record in tango. He has built an enormous following by doing just about everything—and, more importantly, figuring out how to do it all better than most experts and then sharing what he’s learned with the rest of us. He calls himself a human guinea pig. Outside editor Chris Keyes talks to Ferriss about the origins and evolution of his uniquely aggressive approach to experimentation and his self-improvement.

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