PRI: To the Best of Our Knowledge

PRI: To the Best of Our Knowledge

United States

To the Best of Our Knowledge cracks open the world and the ideas that fuel it through interviews with the world's luminaries, from experts to cultural icons. Each show revolves around a theme where we explore these ideas and the people who consider them.

Episodes

Artificial Creativity  

Computer scientists are closing in on the next frontier in artificial intelligence — machines that can create. But don’t throw away your paintbrush yet. Machine Music Theory 101; Cracking the “Bestseller Code”; My Robot Could Paint That; Creative Differences with Android Lloyd Webber; Nothing Left To Do But Write Songs.

Putting Music to the City of Broad Shoulders  

Charles Monroe-Kane talks to David Nagler about setting Carl Sandburg's poems to music.

Man Up  

Be strong, be tough, don’t cry – boys are bombarded with messages about being a man and the “male code” beginning around five or six years old. By high school, it’s second nature. But it can also be toxic. Angry on the Outside, Sad on the Inside; Behind the Mask of the “American Male”; 10 Responses to the Phrase “Man Up”; The Men’s Rights Movement, Then and Now.

Remembering Huston Smith  

Last week we lost one of the great scholars of religion. Huston Smith died at the age of 97. Smith's book “The World’s Religions” sold more than three million copies and is perhaps the most important book ever written on comparative religion. Here's an excerpt of Steve Paulson's 2002 interview with Huston Smith.

Best of 2016  

the best of 2016 Best of 2016: Building a Mosque in America; Best of 2016: Elif Şafak on the Pain of Living in a Polarized Culture; Best of 2016: Terry Tempest Williams on the Importance of National Parks; Best of 2016: Country Singer Brandy Clark on a Big Day in a Small Town; Best of 2016: Chuck Klosterman Thinks About the Present As If It Were the Past.

Shirley Jackson  

On the centennial of Shirley Jackson's birth, we explore her life and her stories and novels, which continue to resonate in our culture. A Rather Haunted Life; The Daemon Lover; My Mother, Shirley Jackson; Making My Grandmother's Story Graphic; Under the Influence of Jackson.

Freeman Dyson, Sage of Science  

You get the sense that Freeman Dyson has seen everything. He's a legendary physicist who's been friends and colleagues with the giants of 20th century physics, from Wolfgang Pauli to Richard Feynman. Now in his mid-90s, he's had a front row seat on scientific breakthroughs for the past century. He's also not shy about making sweeping pronouncements - whether on the archaic rules for getting a PhD or the pitfalls of Big Science. In this extended interview, Dyson tells Steve Paulson about his own remarkable life in science.

Making A Home  

Anyone who’s moved knows how difficult it can be to settle into a new place. Whether it’s another country or an apartment just down the block, it takes time and work to get comfortable. We’re living through a period of mass human migration, with people on the move all over the planet. This hour, we’re talking about home – how to take an unfamiliar place and make it yours.   A Violinist Flees Syria and Discovers a New Home in the US; How 'Home' Made Us Human; For Some Veterans, the Return Home is the Hardest Part of Their Tour; Bookmark: Jonathan Chait recommends “What Hath God Wrought” by Daniel Walker Howe; The Revolutionary War’s Impact on America.

Larry Brilliant, Hippie Doctor  

Today, Larry Brilliant is a doctor and global health expert. But back in the Sixties, he was a hippie doctor who joined Wavy Gravy's traveling bus caravan and then landed in an Indian ashram in the Himalayas, where his guru told him his destiny was to help cure smallpox. Miraculously, his U.N. team of doctors eradicated the world's remaining cases of this terrible disease. In this extended interview, he tells Steve Paulson about a remarkable moment in history when anything seemed possible.

Getting Jazzed  

There's a new kind of music packing nightclubs with young fans. It's jazz - but not the sound of your grandparents' supper club. Infused with hip hop and other popular musical forms, jazz is being remade. We talk with some of today's biggest and most innovative jazz stars, including Esperanza Spalding and Vijay Iyer, and explore the magic of improvisation. Ecstatic Rhythm; Leroi Jones' "Blues People"; Esperanza Spalding's "Good Lava"; Tord Gustavsen Recommends a Norwegian Jazz Classic; What Is Music?.

Hip Hop Future  

the hip hop future For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood; Hip Hop as Diplomacy. Hip Hop as Journalism.; We Gon' Be Alright; Winner of the 2016 National Book Award.

Your Attention Please  

In this hour, we explore our attention economy. How does it feel to be subjected to an endless onslaught of information, clickbait and ads competing for our attention? And how does it feel to know that the commodity everyone wants is inside your skull? Addicted to Adderall; The Attention Merchants are Getting Inside Your Head; We're Short-Circuiting Our Attentiveness; Why Wasting Time on the Internet is Time Well Spent; The Secret History of the World's Most Popular Video Game.

Reconciliation  

 After one of the ugliest and most divisive presidential races in history -- can America heal? Weeks of vitriolic campaign rhetoric have taken a toll on friends and families. A majority of voters are disgusted with politics and don’t believe the next president will be able to unite the country. So where do we go from here? This hour, a look at reconciliation -- how to recover personal and political harmony. Unfriended Over Politics; How the Founding Feuds Shaped the Nation; Liberal and Conservative Till Death Do Us Part; Esperanza Spalding on Jazz and Reconciliation; Artists and Frenemies; Thomas Kunkel on 'Here Is New York'; Jacqueline Woodson's 'Another Brooklyn'.

Election 2.0  

Americans head to the polls amid mounting political rhetoric, from both sides, about vote rigging and voter supression. Maybe it's time to rethink the way we do elections. In this episode, we surface some ingenious, off-the-wall, and counter-intuitive ideas about how to make voting fairer, better and more fun. You've Been Micro-Targeted; Are Americans Smart Enough To Vote? (The Answer is No); US Elections Rank Worst Among Western Democracies ; Pay To Vote? How Markets Could Fix Democracy; Should We Let Babies Vote?; How To Make Elections Fun Again.

H.P. Lovecraft  

H.P. Lovecraft's weird tales of cosmic horror loom large 125 years after his birth. His literary tentatcles have oozed their way into movies, books, games and graphic novels. We explore Lovecraft's life, work and legacy.  Was he a literary master or a monster? The Magickal Realism and Continuing Influence of H.P. Lovecraft; The Ecology of Noise in Lovecraft's Fiction; Eugene Thacker Goes "From Beyond"; H.P. Lovecraft's Racism; The Call of Cthulhu (for Beginning Readers); Going Beyond Lovecraft: Thomas Ligotti.

Telling a Life  

How do you tell the story of your life? Do you focus on meaning, accomplishment and hope - or on failure and loss? Psychologists say telling a good life story can make you happier. But do we also create an inauthentic version of ourselves if we turn everything into a narrative? We explore the idea of life stories, and hear why poet Patti Smith chose to "write about nothing" when writing about her own life. How to Edit Your Life Story; The Terminal Bar; "I Am Not a Story"; Elena Ferrante and Elizabeth Hardwick; Patti Smith's Mind Train.

Eric Liu Teaches Power to the People  

Eric Liu is on a campaign to make voting fun again and to restore the power of the people

Who Owns Water?  

Who Owns Water? Water is for Fighting Over; A Basketball Star Heads to Standing Rock; What Is Water?; Terry Tempest Williams on the novel Tracks by Louise Erdrich; The Massacre at Wounded Knee - 10 Years Later; An Anishinaabe Poem and Creation Story.

Who Owns Water?  

Who Owns Water? Water is for Fighting Over; A Basketball Star Heads to Standing Rock; What Is Water?; Terry Tempest Williams on the novel Tracks by Louise Erdrich; The Massacre at Wounded Knee - 10 Years Later; An Anishinaabe Poem and Creation Story.

The Problem With Men's Locker Rooms and Women's Restrooms  

Why Donald Trump's locker rooms and sex-segregated bathrooms are a bad idea

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