Revolution Health Radio

Revolution Health Radio

Australia

Revolution Health Radio debunks mainstream myths on nutrition and health and delivers cutting-edge, yet practical information on how to prevent and reverse disease naturally. This show is brought to you by Chris Kresser, health detective and creator of chriskresser.com.

Episodes

RHR: Prevention and Treatment of Alzheimer’s from a Functional Perspective—With Dr. Dale Bredesen  

In this episode we cover: 5:56 How much does environment influence Alzheimer's? 11:27 Should we get genetic testing to assess Alzheimer's risk? 17:32 The three types of Alzheimer's 20:25 What testing do you do? 25:50 How diet and lifestyle changes impact Alzheimer's 39:30 The challenges of functional medicine and clinical trials [smart_track_player url="http://traffic.libsyn.com/thehealthyskeptic/Prevention_and_Treatment_of_Alzheimers_from_a_Functional_PerspectiveWith_Dr._Dale_Bredesen.mp3" title="Prevention and Treatment of Alzheimer’s from a Functional Perspective—With Dr. Dale Bredesen" artist="Chris Kresser" social="true" social_twitter="true" social_facebook="true" social_gplus="true" ] Chris Kresser:  Hey, everyone, it’s Chris Kresser. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. This week I’m happy to welcome Dr. Dale Bredesen. Dr. Bredesen is an internationally recognized expert in the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. He graduated from Caltech, then earned his MD from Duke University Medical Center. He served as Chief Resident in Neurology at the University of California, San Francisco before joining Nobel laureate Stanley Prusiner’s laboratory at UCSF as an NIH Postdoc. He held faculty positions at UCSF, UCLA, and the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Bredesen directed the Program on Aging at the Burnham Institute before coming to the Buck Institute in 1998 as its founding President and CEO. I met Dr. Bredesen at a Functional Forum event where I gave the keynote back in April, and we had a fascinating chat before my talk on a functional and ancestral or evolutionary approach to diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease. I was really excited by our conversation, and I asked Dr. Bredesen if he’d be willing to join me on my podcast to talk about it, which he was, so without further ado, let’s jump in. Chris Kresser: Dr. Bredesen, thank you so much for joining me. I’ve really been looking forward to this. Dale Bredesen, MD: And I as well. Thanks, Chris. Chris Kresser: We met at the Functional Forum event, and I was happy to have a chance to chat with you beforehand about your work with Alzheimer’s disease and was really excited to learn that you are beginning to approach it—or have been for sometime now—from a functional and evolutionary perspective, so I want to spend our time together today talking about that, but before we do that, can you maybe just give us a 30-second idea of your background, where you’re coming from, and how you got to this place where you’re now looking at Alzheimer’s from this pers...
RHR: Unschooling as a Cure for “Industrialized Education”—with Jeremy Stuart  

In this episode we cover: 06:30 The history of the modern education system 13:12 The "symptoms" of industrialized education 18:05 What the research says about education best practices 21:50 So what's the alternative? 34:14 Some common misconceptions about homeschooling 47:00 What are some of the challenges of unschooling? 56:43 What surprised you when making your film? Links we discuss ClassDismissedMovie.com John Taylor Gotto op-ed article Sir Ken Robinson TED Talk about how schools kill creativity Sugata Mitra "Hole in the Wall" project HomeSchool Association of California [smart_track_player url="http://traffic.libsyn.com/thehealthyskeptic/Unschooling_as_a_Cure_for_Industrialized_Education22_-_with_Jeremy_Stuart_.mp3" title="Unschooling as a Cure for “Industrialized Education”—with Jeremy Stuart" artist="Chris Kresser" social="true" social_twitter="true" social_facebook="true" social_gplus="true" ] Chris Kresser: Hey, everybody, it’s Chris Kresser. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. This week we’re going to do something a little bit different on the show. It may seem like today’s topic is a bit far afield for a show that’s dedicated to health and wellness, but I think by the end of the show you’ll agree that that’s not the case. We’re going to talk about industrialized education and the conventional schooling system and how that is just as much of a mismatch with the way that humans are naturally designed to learn as an industrialized diet and lifestyle is with the way that humans are naturally designed to eat and move and live. To talk about these issues, I’m really excited to welcome Jeremy Stuart. Jeremy is the director and creator of the film Class Dismissed, which looks at unschooling and homeschooling and alternative—well, they’re alternative now, at least; they were the dominant paradigm for most of human history, but we’ll be talking more about that—models of education. Jeremy’s involvement in the television and film industry has spanned over 25 years. As an editor, he has worked on hundreds of music videos, commercials, and corporate projects as well as award-winning documentaries and short films for clients such as Lucasfilm, Dolby Laboratories, National Geographic, Smithsonian, Yamaha, Virgin America, Sony, Dave Matthews Band, Acura, and GoPro. Class Dismissed, his directorial debut,
RHR: Why You Need to Eat More Vegetables—and How To Do It, with Dr. Tom Cowan  

In this episode, we cover: 04:33 Why focus on vegetables? 08:18 How did our ancestors incorporate plants into their diets? 12:58 The biggest difference between traditional and modern diets 20:44 The challenges of adding wild plants to your diet 24:42 How the idea for vegetable powders was born 28:00 Ideas for using vegetable powders 37:38 Where can we learn more? [smart_track_player url="http://traffic.libsyn.com/thehealthyskeptic/RHR_-_Why_You_Need_to_Eat_More_Vegetables_-_and_How_To_Do_It_with_Dr._Tom_Cowan.mp3" title="Why You Need to Eat More Vegetables—and How To Do It, with Dr. Tom Cowan" artist="Chris Kresser" social="true" social_twitter="true" social_facebook="true" social_gplus="true" ]   Link we discuss: Dr. Cowan's Garden Chris Kresser: Hey, everyone, it’s Chris Kresser. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. This week I’m excited to welcome Dr. Tom Cowan as a guest on the show. Dr. Cowan discovered the work of two men who would have the most influence on his career while teaching gardening as a Peace Corps volunteer in Swaziland, South Africa. He read [easyazon_link identifier="0916764206" locale="US" tag="chrikres-20"]Nutrition and Physical Degeneration[/easyazon_link] by Weston Price, as well as [easyazon_link identifier="0880105402" locale="US" tag="chrikres-20"]Rudolf Steiner’s work on biodynamic agriculture[/easyazon_link], and these events inspired him to pursue a medical degree. He graduated from Michigan State University College of Human Medicine in 1984. After his residency in Family Practice at Johnson City Hospital in Johnson City, New York, he set up an anthroposophical medical practice in Peterborough, New Hampshire. Dr. Cowan then relocated to San Francisco in 2003. He served as the vice president of the Physicians Association for Anthroposophical Medicine and is a founding board member of the Weston A. Price Foundation. During his career, he has studied and written about many subjects in medicine, including nutrition, homeopathy, anthroposophical medicine, and herbal medicine. He’s the principal author of the book [easyazon_link identifier="0967089794" locale="US" tag="chrikres-20"]The Fourfold Path to Healing[/easyazon_link], which was published in 2004 by New Trends Publishing, and is the co-author of the [easyazon_link identifier="0982338317" locale="US" tag="chrikres-20"]Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care[/easyazon_link] published in 2013. He writes the "Ask the Doctor" column in Wise Traditions in Food, Farming, and the Healing Arts, the Foundation’s quarterly magazine, and has lectured throughout the United States and Canada. He has three grown children and three grandchildren an...
RHR: Is a Disrupted Gut Microbiome at the Root of Modern Disease?—with Dr. Justin Sonnenburg  

In this episode, we cover: 03:25 Just how many microbial cells are there? 11:38 What are the primary functions of the microbiota? 15:59 The connection between microbiota and chronic disease 27:14 How do you define a healthy microbiota? 30:36 The connection between low microbial diversity and disease 35:24 Can we manipulate our microbiota? 39:40 What inspired you to write your book? Links we discuss [easyazon_link identifier="0143108085" locale="US" nw="y" tag="chrikres-20"]The Good Gut: Taking Control of Your Weight, Your Mood, and Your Long-term Health by Justin and Erica Sonnenburg[/easyazon_link] [smart_track_player url="http://traffic.libsyn.com/thehealthyskeptic/RHR_-_Is_a_Disrupted_Gut_Microbiome_at_the_Root_of_Modern_Disease_-_with_Dr._Justin_Sonnenburg_.mp3" title="Is a Disrupted Gut Microbiome at the Root of Modern Disease?—with Dr. Justin Sonnenburg" artist="Chris Kresser" social="true" social_twitter="true" social_facebook="true" social_gplus="true" ] Chris Kresser: I’m Chris Kresser and this is Revolution Health Radio. Hey, everybody, it’s Chris Kresser. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. Today I’m really excited to welcome Justin Sonnenburg as my guest. He is currently an associate professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the Stanford School of Medicine. He conducted his PhD in biomedical sciences at the University of California, San Diego, in the laboratory of Ajit Varki. His postdoctoral work was conducted at Washington University in Saint Louis, Missouri, in the laboratory of Jeffrey Gordon. After moving to Stanford University in 2008, Justin received an NIH Director’s New Innovator Award. In 2011 he received the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Investigators in Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease Award. He and his wife and collaborator, Erica Sonnenburg, PhD, are the authors of the book The Good Gut: Taking Control of Your Weight, Your Mood, and Your Long-Term Health. The goals of the Sonnenburg Lab are to elucidate the basic mechanisms that underlie dynamics within the gut microbiota and to devise and implement strategies to prevent and treat disease in humans via the gut microbiota. The long-term objective of the research program is to continue to the emerging vision of how our microbiota may be incorporated into precision medicine. I met Justin at the UCSF Paleo event a couple of months ago and was really impressed with the presentation and talk he gave. I’ve read his book, which I enjoyed, and I’ve been familiar with his work for some time, so I wanted to invite him onto the show to discuss the latest research on the microbiota and its connection to health and disease and harvest some clinical pearls for what we can do to improve our microbiota...
RHR: Genomic Testing for Chronic Illness—with Dr. Ritchie Shoemaker  

In this episode, we discuss: 6:30 What is genomic testing? 13:52 The problem with current testing methods 17:05 Why looking at one gene isn't enough 23:00 Should people be cautious of genomic testing? 29:39 The importance of microRNA 32:19 Will the Progene DX test be worth the cost? [smart_track_player url="http://traffic.libsyn.com/thehealthyskeptic/RHR_Genomic_Testing_for_Chronic_Illness_with_Dr._Ritchie_Shoemaker.mp3" title="RHR: Genomic Testing for Chronic Illness with Dr. Ritchie Shoemaker" artist="Chris Kresser" social="true" social_twitter="true" social_facebook="true" social_gplus="true" ] Chris Kresser: I’m Chris Kresser and this is Revolution Health Radio. Hey, everybody, it’s Chris Kresser. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. I’m really excited to welcome Dr. Ritchie Shoemaker back on the show for the second time as my guest. Dr. Ritchie Shoemaker is a pioneer in understanding how low-dose biotoxin exposure, including toxic mold and algae, impacts our health and contributes to disease. He’s the author of eight books and multiple published academic papers. His latest book, Surviving Mold: Life in the Era of Dangerous Buildings, is a guide through diagnosis, treatment, remediation, and return to health. Dr. Shoemaker is currently retired, but continues to lecture throughout the US on chronic inflammatory illnesses that are caused by exposure to moldy buildings and other biotoxins. If you’ve been listening to my podcast for a while or following my email list, you’ll know that this is a topic of great interest to me both professionally as a clinician because we’re starting to treat a lot of patients with CIRS, or chronic inflammatory response syndrome, and also personally because I recently discovered a mold issue in our home, and my entire family, my wife and our daughter, were all affected by that. We’ve since, fortunately, gotten out of that house, and we’re in a new house now, and we’re well along the path of recovery from that. This is something that I’m really fascinated by, and it’s something we’re seeing a lot in our practice, so I wanted to ask Dr. Shoemaker to come back to particularly talk about some new genomic testing that is becoming available that quite dramatically improves our ability to diagnose this condition and get a lot more specific about how to treat it. So far, there have been some tantalizing developments in the world of genetic testing, promise that sequencing our genome would lead to personalized medicine and treatments, and I would say that so far that has mostly been a failure. I mean, there have been some ways that that has been helpful, but overall, it hasn’t really panned out the way that we thought it was going to pan out,
RHR: How to Stay Fit—And Healthy—with Mark Sisson  

In this episode we cover: 3:40 Mark's early years as an endurance athlete 9:24 Mark's progression to a primal diet 13:20 How burning fat is the key to endurance 19:00 Why you should shift your exercise patterns 26:20 How weight training contributes to endurance 30:30 Maximizing high-intensity interval training 32: 41 Mark's new Paleo food offerings   Links we discuss [easyazon_link identifier="1939563089" locale="US" tag="chrikres-20"]Primal Endurance by Mark Sisson[/easyazon_link] [smart_track_player url="http://traffic.libsyn.com/thehealthyskeptic/RHR_-_How_to_stay_fit_-_and_healthy_-_with_Mark_Sisson.mp3" title="RHR: How to Stay Fit - and Healthy - With Mark Sisson" artist="Chris Kresser" social="true" social_twitter="true" social_facebook="true" social_gplus="true" ] Chris Kresser: I’m Chris Kresser and this is Revolution Health Radio. Hey, everybody, it’s Chris Kresser. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. Today I’m excited to welcome Mark Sisson as a guest on the show. Mark is the author of the Amazon.com best-seller, [easyazon_link identifier="0982207786" locale="US" tag="chrikres-20"]The Primal Blueprint[/easyazon_link], and publisher of one of the world’s most trafficked health blogs, MarksDailyApple.com. As a former top endurance athlete riddled with ailments that defied treatment from conventional wisdom, he made it his mission to heal his body and help others do the same. Today he successfully runs a leading education and supplement company, publishing house, and food line, which offers invaluable nutrition, fitness, and lifestyle resources to the huge market of individuals who benefit from his ancestral health model of "living awesome". I’ve known Mark for several years now, and he’s obviously a huge voice in the primal/Paleo/ancestral health and nutrition movement. I think he’s one of the wisest and most balanced voices in the movement, and so I’m really looking forward to talking to him about his background and history, the challenges that he overcame, how he came to ancestral health in the first place, and specifically his thoughts on primal and Paleo nutrition for endurance athletes, since he has a background in endurance training. I think that will be of interest to a lot of people who listen to the show. And then a little bit about what he’s up to in terms of making healthy foods available on a wider scale, because I think that’s really exciting. So let’s dive in. This episode of Revolution Health Radio is brought to you by 14Four.me. 14Four is a diet and lifestyle reset program I created to help you dial in t...
RHR: Fecal Microbiota Transplants — An Update with Glenn Taylor  

While in the U.K. in late October, I took the opportunity to visit the Taymount Clinic. I was really impressed with what they’re doing and the results that they’re getting. In the U.S., FMT is only FDA-approved for antibiotic-resistant Clostridium difficile. So if someone wants to get an FMT for a different condition, they’re not able to do it in the US, but that is not a limitation in the U.K. I’ve sent some of my own patients there and had a chance to see some really positive clinical responses. I wanted to have Glenn come back onto the show and get an update from him on what he has learned since the last time we talked. In this episode we cover: 6:18 Is FMT a panacea? 8:40 How well IBD responds to FMT 14:00 How C. difficile, colitis and multiple sclerosis respond to FMT 19:00 How Crohn’s disease responds to FMT 26:10 FMT and weight loss 30:40 FMT’s effect on eczema and allergies 39:38 How to increase species diversity in the gut 48:30 The new Taymount Clinic in the Bahamas [smart_track_player url="http://traffic.libsyn.com/thehealthyskeptic/RHR_-_Fecal_Microbiota_Transplants_-_An_Update_with_Glenn_Taylor.mp3" title="RHR: Fecal Microbiota Transpants -- An Update with Glenn Taylor" artist="Chris Kresser" social="true" social_twitter="true" social_facebook="true" social_gplus="true" ] Chris Kresser: Hey, everyone. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. This week I’m really excited to welcome back Glenn Taylor, Founder and Co-Director of the Taymount Clinic in the U.K. Taymount was founded in 2003, and it’s one of the only dedicated FMT (fecal microbiota transplant) clinics in the world, that I’m aware of. Glenn developed Taymount’s donor selection and quarantine safety process, the Taymount Laboratory Stool Processing System, and the treatment delivery program that Taymount uses for FMT. As Taymount’s Director of Science, he oversees the lab team and the entire processing system and supervises the training of the nursing staff to deliver the treatment program. Glenn’s personal specialty is the human microbiome and microbiology, building on his early training in human biology, biology, and organic chemistry. Glenn was a guest on the show maybe a year or a year and a half ago. We talked about fecal transplant and the way that they’re applying it over there at Taymount Clinic. I was actually in the U.K. for a couple of weeks, doing some public speaking in late October and early November of last year, and I took the opportunity to head up to Hitchin, which is a little bit outside of London, and meet Glenn and the staff there. I was really impressed with what they’re doing and their professionalism and the results that they’re getting and the way that they’re handling the whole procedure from beginning to end. I’ve referred several patients there because FMT is not avail...
RHR: The Healing Power of the Placebo Effect—with Jo Marchant  

I asked Jo to come on the show because I recently read her book called Cure: A Journey Into the Science of Mind Over Body, and I mentioned it in an email recently because Jo has written extensively about the placebo effect, which is something that I’ve been interested in for many years and something that I don’t think gets enough attention because it has some very profound implications for how we approach our own healing, how we work with our kids when they get sick, and if you’re a clinician, how you work with your patients.

In this episode, we cover:

3:15  How Jo became interested in “mind over body" 4:50  Historical definition/conception of placebo effect 9:48  Measurable biological/physiological effect of placebo 19:38  Can placebo heal underlying conditions? 36:45  How to harness placebo effect

Links we discuss Cure: A Journey Into the Science of Mind Over Body

[smart_track_player url="http://traffic.libsyn.com/thehealthyskeptic/The_Healing_Power_of_the_Placebo_Effectwith_Jo_Marchant.mp3" title="RHR: The Healing Power of the Placebo Effect—with Jo Marchant" artist="Chris Kresser" social="true" social_twitter="true" social_facebook="true" social_gplus="true" ]

Chris Kresser: I’m Chris Kresser and this is Revolution Health Radio. Hey, everybody. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. I want to apologize in advance for any audio quality issues today. I’m still in the process of moving my old home office to my new home office, and I don’t have all of my equipment set up yet. There’s also quite a bit of construction going on around the house and in the neighborhood, so we’ll do the best we can. I’m really excited today to welcome Jo Marchant as a guest on my show. Jo Marchant is an award-winning science journalist and author of three books. She trained as a scientist and has a PhD in genetics and medical microbiology from St. Bartholomew’s Hospital Medical College in London and a master’s in science communication from Imperial College London. Jo has worked as an editor at New Scientist and at Nature and has written on topics from the future of genetic engineering to underwater archaeology. Her articles have appeared in publications including The Ne...
RHR: The Keys to Longevity with Peter Attia  

Longevity is something Peter has some unique insight into, given his range of experience all the way back in medical school, his position at NIH and his work with patients over the years, and his own personal exploration and biohacking. Peter has an approach to longevity that he has thought a lot about and presents to any patient that is considering working with you, so maybe we can just kind of go through that and then take some interesting detours along the way.In this episode, we cover:

2:45  Peter’s approach to longevity 22:55  Commonalities of degenerative diseases 45:00  Social support and sense of purpose

[smart_track_player url="http://traffic.libsyn.com/thehealthyskeptic/RHR_-_The_Keys_to_Longevitywith_Peter_Attia.mp3" title="RHR: The Keys to Longevity with Peter Attia" artist="Chris Kresser" social="true" social_twitter="true" social_facebook="true" social_gplus="true" ] Chris Kresser: Hey, everybody, it’s Chris Kresser. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. Today I’m really excited to welcome Dr. Pete Attia to the podcast. Peter is the founder of Attia Medical, PC, a medical practice with offices in San Diego and New York City, focusing on the applied science of longevity and optimal performance. The practice applies nutrition science, lipidology, four-system endocrinology, sleep physiology, stress management, and exercise physiology to minimize the risk of chronic disease onset while simultaneously improving healthspan—something I want to talk to Pete about today. Peter trained for five years at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in General Surgery, where he was the recipient of several prestigious awards, including resident of the year, and the author of a comprehensive review of general surgery. He also spent two years at NIH as a surgical oncology fellow at the National Cancer Institute, where his research focused on immune-based therapies for melanoma. He has since been mentored by some of the most experienced and innovative lipidologists, endocrinologists, gynecologists, sleep physiologists, and longevity scientists in the US and Canada. Peter was the founder and president of a medical research organization that funded human clinical trials in nutrition and metabolic disease. During his four years as president, they raised and deployed over $40 million. Peter earned his MD from Stanford and holds a bachelor’s in science in mechanical engineering and applied mathematics, and he’s licensed in California and New York. I met Pete several years ago. I’m actually having trouble remembering exactly where we met. We travel in the same circles, of course, and our paths crossed a number of different times, but we hit it off and became fast friends. Pete is one of the smartest people I know, without a doubt. Every time we talk,
RHR: Dr. Mark Hyman on the Future of Medicine  

I want to do something maybe a little different than the typical interview where we talk about nutrition and lifestyle and all that great stuff, which is really important, but I want to start by just learning a little bit more about your background and how you got to be where you are now. You’re really well known in the functional medicine community, nine-time New York Times bestselling author, heading up the Cleveland Clinic’s functional medicine initiative, but I’m curious to know a little bit more about how you even got interested in all this stuff. You were trained originally in conventional medicine. How did you get from there, in medical school, to where you are today?

In this episode, we cover:

4:44  How Mark got to where he is today 7:50  Where has conventional medicine failed? 15:04  Research that supports functional medicine 24:36  Future developments in the delivery of care 28:28  Mark’s new book, Eat Fat, Get Thin

[smart_track_player url="http://traffic.libsyn.com/thehealthyskeptic/RHR_-_Dr._Mark_Hyman_on_the_Future_of_Medicine.mp3" title="RHR: Dr. Mark Hyman on the Future of Medicine" artist="Chris Kresser" social="true" social_twitter="true" social_facebook="true" social_gplus="true" ] Chris Kresser: Hey, everyone, it’s Chris Kresser. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. Today I’m really excited to welcome Dr. Mark Hyman as a guest. Dr. Hyman is a practicing family physician, a nine-time #1 New York Times bestselling author, and an internationally recognized leader, speaker, educator, and advocate in the field of functional medicine. He’s the Director the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine. He is also the founder and medical director of The UltraWellness Center, chairman of the board of the Institute for Functional Medicine, a medical editor of The Huffington Post, and was a regular medical contributor on many television shows including CBS This Morning, Today Show, CNN, The View, Katie, and The Dr. Oz Show. I met Mark, I think it was maybe a year and a half ago, at an event that we were both at in Arizona, and we immediately hit it off and became fast friends. He’s an extremely intelligent person and one of the sweetest guys you’ll ever meet. I have tremendous respect for his contribution in this field. He’s a real inspiration for me and many other functional medicine practitioners. He has done probably more than anyone that I can think of to move th...
RHR: How To Test Your Home for Mold, with Mike Schrantz  

Mike is the mold inspector that I had inspect my home and my office for mold and helped identify some issues that we were having there that I’ve mentioned in a couple of emails and elsewhere, so I thought it would be really helpful to have Mike come on the show and talk about some of the myths and truths when it comes to testing for mold and also share a little bit of my experience, what I went through, as an illustration of how complicated and murky things can get when you dive into this world and then finish up with some tips for how to find a qualified and dependable indoor environmental professional, which is what they call this profession, in your area.

In this episode, we cover:

4:16  What industrial hygienists do 8:35  Common myths about testing for mold 20:02  Chris' personal experience with mold 46:02  Where to start if your house needs inspecting

[smart_track_player url="http://traffic.libsyn.com/thehealthyskeptic/RHR_-_How_to_Test_Your_Home_for_Mold_with_Mike_Schrantz.mp3" title="RHR: How To Test Your Home for Mold, with Mike Schrantz" artist="Chris Kresser" social="true" social_twitter="true" social_facebook="true" social_gplus="true" ] Chris Kresser: Hey, everybody. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. Sorry I’ve been absent for the past few weeks. There’s a ton going on for me. We recently moved, which I’m going to talk a little bit about in this episode actually. Launch of my clinician training program, ADAPT Framework Level One, from the Kresser Institute happened earlier in January. Suffice to say, it’s been a busy time, but we’re going to get back on a fairly normal schedule pretty soon, and we’re going to kick things off with an interview with Mike Schrantz from Environmental Analytics. Mike is the mold inspector that I had inspect my home and my office for mold and helped identify some issues that we were having there that I’ve mentioned in a couple of emails and elsewhere, so I thought it would be really helpful to have Mike come on the show and talk about some of the myths and truths when it comes to testing for mold and also share a little bit of my experience, what I went through, as an illustration of how complicated and murky things can get when you dive into this world and then finish up with some tips for how to find a qualified and dependable indoor environmental professional, which is what they call this profession, in your area. A little bit more about Mike, to begin with: Mike currently owns and operates Environmental Analytics, LLC, an environmental consulting firm. They’ve been in business since September 2007 and have worked with a number of large clients in the Southwest. Mike is based in Tucson. Previously Mike worked with a large residential heating and air condition...
RHR: What Mainstream Medicine Gets Wrong About Hormones with Dr. Sara Gottfried  

Typically a woman will go in to see her doctor, and if she complains of any symptoms related to hormone balance, it seems to me that one of two things will happen. This is an oversimplification, but one is nothing. Nothing happens. There’s actually no investigation into hormone levels as a possible cause of her issues or anything that could affect hormone levels directly. Maybe two is that an antidepressant gets prescribed. Or three, if the practitioner is maybe a little bit more progressive than most, they might recommend hormone replacement, estrogen perhaps if the woman is in menopause or maybe estrogen and/or progesterone if she’s still menstruating. What’s wrong with that as a model?

In this episode, we cover:

3:30  Biggest mistakes in mainstream treatment model 9:23  Post birth control syndrome 22:43  What hormone treatment should look like 49:35  Three things most women with hormone problems would benefit from 55:35  Sara’s next book

[smart_track_player url="http://traffic.libsyn.com/thehealthyskeptic/RHR_-_What_Mainstream_Medicine_Gets_Wrong_About_Hormones_with_Dr._Sara_Gottfried.mp3" title="RHR: What Mainstream Medicine Gets Wrong About Hormones with Dr. Sara Gottfried" artist="Chris Kresser" social="true" social_twitter="true" social_facebook="true" social_gplus="true" ] Chris Kresser: I’m Chris Kresser and this is Revolution Health Radio. Hey, everyone, it’s Chris Kresser. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. I’m really excited to welcome Dr. Sara Gottfried as our guest today. She is the New York Times bestselling author of The Hormone Cure and The Hormone Reset Diet. After graduating from Harvard Medical School and MIT, Dr. Gottfried completed her residency at the University of California at San Francisco. She is a board-certified gynecologist who teaches natural hormone balancing in her novel online programs so that women can lose weight, detoxify, and slow down aging. Dr. Gottfried lives in Berkeley, California, with her husband and two daughters. I met Sara a few years ago. I was on my book tour, actually, in Chicago, and I got a text from her. I think she was there also on one of her book tours,
RHR: What Influences Methylation? An Interview with Dr. Ben Lynch  

What I really want to do today is dive in a little bit deeper on the topic of methylation and specifically discuss the role that genetics and epigenetics and diet and lifestyle play, talk about some of the primary environmental influences that may affect methylation, go beyond MTHFR to talk about some of the other methylation-related genes, and then perhaps more than anything else, talk about what Dr. Lynch has learned in the last few years of really taking a deep dive into this material, and working with thousands of people, and hosting his conference, and what he is excited about and working on, and looking forward to.

In this episode, we cover:

The relative roles that genetics, epigenetics, and diet/lifestyle play in influencing methylation The primary environmental influences on methylation beyond diet Beyond MTHFR: the role of other methylation-related genes What Dr. Lynch is interested in now

[smart_track_player url="http://traffic.libsyn.com/thehealthyskeptic/RHR_-_What_Influences_Methylation_An_Interview_with_Dr._Ben_Lynch.mp3" title="RHR: What Influences Methylation? An Interview with Dr. Ben Lynch" artist="Chris Kresser" social="true" social_twitter="true" social_facebook="true" social_gplus="true" ] Chris Kresser: Hey, everyone, it’s Chris Kresser. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. Today I’m really happy and excited to welcome Dr. Ben Lynch as my guest. I became aware of Ben’s work in methylation several years ago and have been really impressed with his contribution there. I’m sure many of you are familiar with his work and maybe have done some of his trainings or attended his conference. He’s a naturopathic physician, and he received his cell and molecular biology bachelor’s degree from the University of Washington and his ND from Bastyr University. His passion for identifying the cause of disease directed him toward nutrigenomics and methylation dysfunction. Currently he researches, writes, and presents worldwide on the topic of MTHFR and methylation defects, and you can learn more about Dr. Lynch and his work at www.MTHFR.net. Dr. Lynch is also the president and CEO of Seeking Health, which is a company oriented towards disease prevention and health promotion. He makes some really great supplements that we use in our clinic and I have used personally as well. He lives in Bothell, Washington—sorry, I’m not familiar with that town; I’m probably slaughtering the pronunciation—with his wife Nadia and three boys, Tasman, Mathew, and Theodor. So without further ado, I’m really happy to welcome Ben Lynch, and let’s get started with the show. Ben, thank you so much for joining me. I feel like I know you already because we’ve been kind of collaborating in this space for so long, but this is actually the first time we’ve had a chance...
RHR: Yes, You Still Need 7-8 Hours of Sleep—with Dan Pardi  

I’m sure by now many of you have heard about the recent study that came out of UCLA that looked at sleep patterns in three different hunter-gatherer groups, and the way that the media is reporting on this study suggests that despite a lot of recent evidence and claims that humans need 7 to 8 hours of sleep to function properly, which I’ve been an advocate of in my book and elsewhere, that in reality our ancestors may have only slept 5-1/2 to 6 hours a night and get even sleep than most of us in the industrialized world get today. So I wanted to invite Dan Pardi, a sleep expert that we’ve had on the show before, back to discuss this study and its implications for those of us that are living in the industrialized world.

In this episode, we cover:

What the UCLA sleep study says Important sleep factors What the study did not tell us Sleep recommendations while traveling

Links we discuss How Much Sleep Do You Need?

Natural Sleep and Its Seasonal Variations in Three Pre-industrial Societies

[smart_track_player url="http://traffic.libsyn.com/thehealthyskeptic/RHR_-_Yes_You_Still_Need_7-8_Hours_of_Sleepwith_Dan_Pardi.mp3" title="RHR: Yes, You Still Need 7-8 Hours of Sleep—with Dan Pardi" artist="Chris Kresser" social="true" social_twitter="true" social_facebook="true" social_gplus="true" ] Chris Kresser: Hey, everybody, it’s Chris Kresser. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. I’m sure by now many of you have heard about the recent study that came out of UCLA that looked at sleep patterns in three different hunter-gatherer groups, and the way that the media is reporting on this study suggests that despite a lot of recent evidence and claims that humans need 7 to 8 hours of sleep to function properly, which I’ve been an advocate of in my book and elsewhere, that in reality our ancestors may have only slept 5-1/2 to 6 hours a night and get even sleep than most of us in the industrialized world get today. So I wanted to invite Dan Pardi, a sleep expert that we’ve had on the show before, back to discuss this study and its implications for those of us that are living in the industrialized world. Dan is an entrepreneur and researcher whose life’s work is centered on how to facilitate healthy behaviors in others. He’s the CEO of humanOS.me and DansPlan.com, health technology companies that utilize the Loop Model to Sustain Health Behaviors, which he developed to help people live a healthy lifestyle in the modern world. He does research with the Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Department at Stanford and th...
RHR: Dr. Chris Shade on Mercury Toxicity  

At CCFM, we use Dr. Shade's test methodology and protocols for metal toxicity, and a pretty high percentage of our patients are dealing with it on some level, and we’ve found the protocols to be really effective. Several patients stand out in my mind in terms of people who’ve had quite high levels of mercury or other metals, and then within several months of the protocol and retesting them, watching those drop below the normal levels and watching their symptoms improve. It’s exciting as a clinician to have access to new tools that I feel like I can rely on and are evidence based and aren’t going to cause any harm!

In this episode, we cover:

4:29  Dr. Shade’s Background 10:06  What mercury does to your body 15:55  How we get exposed to mercury 32:20  What determines an individual’s sensitivity to mercury 38:04  Testing for mercury

[smart_track_player url="http://media.blubrry.com/thehealthyskeptic/p/traffic.libsyn.com/thehealthyskeptic/RHR_-_Dr._Chris_Shade_on_Mercury_Toxicity.mp3" title="Dr. Chris Shade on Mercury Toxicity" artist="Chris Kresser" social="true" social_twitter="true" social_facebook="true" social_gplus="true" ] Chris Kresser: Hey, everybody, it’s Chris Kresser. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. Today I’m very excited to have Dr. Christopher Shade as a guest on the show. Dr. Shade obtained a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from Lehigh University in environmental and aqueous chemistry and a PhD from the University of Illinois, where he studied metal-ligand interactions in the environment and specialized in the environmental and analytical chemistries of mercury. During his PhD work, Dr. Shade patented analytical technology for mercury speciation analysis and later founded Quicksilver Scientific to commercialize this technology, and it’s the lab that we use for heavy metal and mercury testing, as you’ll learn in the show. Shortly after starting Quicksilver Scientific, Dr. Shade turned his focus to the human aspects of mercury toxicity and the functioning of the human detoxification system, and that’s what we’re going to be talking about today. So without further ado, let’s begin the interview. Chris, it’s such a pleasure to have you on the show. I’ve been wanting to do this for a long time, and I’m glad we could finally get our schedules to synch up. Dr. Christopher Shade: Absolutely, Chris. I’m glad.
RHR: Should Everyone Supplement with Fish Oil?  

Maybe two or three years ago most patients that came to me were taking some kind of fish oil supplement because the idea was we weren’t getting enough omega-3 in our diets, and there were studies that suggested that fish oil goes a long way toward preventing heart disease. But there have been some chinks in the armor this hypothesis over the past few years and especially so over the past year.

In this episode, we cover:

0:24  My two upcoming London seminars 6:43  The latest research on fish oil supplementation 10:47 Testing for omega-6 and omega-3

Links we discuss Let's Take Back Your Health (October 31) The ADAPT Method: Functional & Ancestral Medicine in Clinical Practice (November 1) Should You Really Be Taking Fish Oil? [powerpress] Chris Kresser: Hey, everybody, it’s Chris Kresser from Revolution Health Radio. My two upcoming London seminars Today I’m going to answer a listener question, but before I do that, I want to remind you that my two events in London, October 31 and November 1, are coming up, probably only a few days away by the time you hear this. The Saturday event is geared toward the general public and will cover a broad range of topics in the ancestral nutrition and health and functional medicine world. I like to do those events in a way that’s driven by the interests of people in the room. That one is nearly sold out, I believe, but I think there are still a few spaces. It’s going to be at King’s College, and a paleo lunch will be provided. It’s from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. And then the Sunday event is geared more toward clinicians and healthcare practitioners, though all are welcome to attend. I’m going to focus here more on trends that will define the future of medicine, functional medicine, and the crucial role of the exposome in health and disease. I’m going to present a systems model of functional medicine that I’ve developed to guide my own practice and also for my clinician training program. I’m going to talk about how to structure and layer a treatment for maximum efficacy, how to customize nutrition plans for individual needs, and of course,
RHR: Subclinical Hypothyroidism—What You Need to Know  

Whenever we talk about thyroid function, we’re generally looking at lab values or certain markers, and in particular, we’re talking about TSH, or thyroid-stimulating hormone, and in the case of subclinical hypothyroidism, TSH is high, but the thyroid hormones, specifically, free T3 and free T4, can still be in the normal range.

In this episode, we cover:

4:22  The prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism 8:56  The laboratory reference range for TSH 15:30  Clinical consequences of subclinical hypothyroidism

[powerpress] I’m Chris Kresser and this is Revolution Health Radio. This episode of Revolution Health Radio is brought to you by 14Four.me. 14Four is a diet and lifestyle reset program I created to help you dial in the four pillars of health—nutrition, physical activity, sleep, and stress management. Whether you want to lose weight, boost your energy, treat a chronic health problem, or just maintain your current good health and extend your lifespan, these are the four areas you need to focus on before anything else. In the 14Four program, I walk you through every step of the process, from cleaning out your pantry and shopping for the right foods to recipe and meal plans to video demos of workouts that you can do at home without any special equipment to guided meditation and stress management programs to daily sleep tips to personalized recommendations for what to do after you finish the reset. 14Four is a great option whether you’re just getting started with this stuff or you’ve been on the path for a while. In fact, I do a 14Four myself three or four times a year to hit the reset button and give myself a boost. To learn more about how 14Four can help you achieve your health goals, head over to 14Four.me. OK, now back to the show. Chris Kresser: Hey, everyone, it’s Chris Kresser. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. Today we have Dr. Amy Nett, our staff physician from the California Center for Functional Medicine, whom you’ve met before if you’ve been listening to the show. We had Dr. Nett on previously, and this episode we’re going to talk about subclinical hypothyroidism, which is an issue we see a lot in our patients at the clinic, and so I thought it would be a good idea to have Amy on to talk about this a little bit further. So, Amy, welcome again to Revolution Health Radio. Dr.
RHR: Transform Your Practice, Change the World  

I want to share the two strategies that I think have made the biggest impact for me. Number one is having a foundation and a framework into which you can plug your own knowledge and curiosity and grow a completely unique practice that fits you. And number two is a system to plug your expertise into to reach new patients and readers and grow beyond your practice. What you can do right now, essentially, to build a better and more rewarding future.

In this episode, we cover:

4:54  Keith's healthcare background 9:15  How Chris found success 21:00  Why the ADAPT framework will work for you 32:53  What is the Evergreen course? 45:28  How to sign up for the ADAPT Framework Level One Course

[powerpress] Chris Kresser: Hey, everybody. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. Most of the time, this podcast, as you know, is aimed at the general public and particularly toward people that are interested in improving their health, but today I want to talk to the healthcare practitioners out there, those of you that are working on the frontlines to help patients and clients to achieve that goal. Specifically, I want to talk about a central challenge that I know many of us as practitioners face, which is that you want to make an impact on a big scale but maybe you’re not sure how or you’re struggling to carve out a career for yourself in a world of healthcare that’s rapidly changing or you’re looking for ways to build and grow your practice more effectively and more quickly. Here’s why I want to do this today: I know that many of you who listen to this show are currently healthcare practitioners or aspiring healthcare practitioners, and as I’ve done this work for the past several years, what’s become really clear to me is that the world needs you and your voice matters. You want to have a meaningful career, you want to make a difference, you want to help people, and we absolutely need you on board more than ever before, but the truth is it can be hard to build a practice, it can be hard to stand out, it can be hard to learn the best functional medicine principles in a way that’s practical and useful, so I wanted to have a discussion about that today. In particular, I wanted to share the two strategies that I think have made the biggest impact for me in overcoming this challenge. Number one is having a foundation and a framework into which you can plug your own knowledge and curiosity and grow a completely unique practice that fits you, and number two is a system to plug your expertise into to reach new patients and readers and grow beyond your practice, what you can do right now, essentially, to build a better and more rewarding future.
RHR: SIBO Update—An Interview with Dr. Mark Pimentel  

Dr. Pimentel has been very active in research and served as a principal investigator or co-investigator for numerous basic sciences, translational and clinical studies in areas like IBS and the relationship between gut flora composition and human disease.  He is widely known and sought out for major scientific developments that he’s pioneered, including the discovery that IBS is a condition of altered intestinal microbial balance.

In this episode, we cover:

7:36  What is small intestinal bacterial overgrowth? 11:20  Testing for SIBO 18:42  The future of SIBO treatment

[powerpress] Chris Kresser:  I’m Chris Kresser and this is Revolution Health Radio. Hey, everyone.  Chris Kresser here.  Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio.  I’m really excited about our guest today.  We have Dr. Mark Pimentel, a global expert on small intestine bacterial overgrowth, and I’m going to talk to him all about some unresolved questions and problems or issues with SIBO, the SIBO hypothesis, diagnosis and treatment of SIBO, and I’m really looking forward to this, and I hope it’s going to be useful for you as well. Mark Pimentel is an associate professor of medicine at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California.  His medical training includes a fellowship in gastroenterology at the UCLA Affiliated Training Program.  He’s been very active in research and has served as a principal investigator or co-investigator for numerous basic sciences, translational and clinical studies in areas like IBS and the relationship between gut flora composition and human disease.  Dr. Pimentel is widely known and sought out for major scientific developments that he’s pioneered, including the discovery that IBS is a condition of altered intestinal microbial balance, which we’ve talked about before; the recognition that antibiotics improve IBS, irritable bowel syndrome, and this officially legitimized IBS because before these discoveries, IBS was often considered to be a psychosomatic condition; the discovery that methane produced in the gut by specific microbes produces constipation, which we might talk about today; and then his work linking SIBO to IBS and other conditions. So again, I’m really, really excited about this episode, and without further ado, let’s get to it. This episode of Revolution Health Radio is brought to you by 14Four.me.  14Four is a diet and lifestyle reset program I created to help you dial in the four pillars of health —...
RHR: Are Food Intolerance Tests Accurate?  

In order for a test to produce actionable and reliable information, the methodology must be plausible, it should be independently verified, and the results should be consistent and reproducible.  These are really all fundamental aspects of the scientific method in general, and specifically, it’s how clinical diagnostic tests are validated.  If a test doesn’t meet these criteria, then we really can’t rely on the information that it gives us.

In this episode, we cover:

00:32  Upcoming events in Pennsylvania and the UK 04:45  Clinician training program update 13:06  Is food testing methodology plausible? 20:10  What determines testing accuracy?

[powerpress]

Chris Kresser:  Hey, everyone, it’s Chris Kresser, co-director of the California Center for Functional Medicine and creator of ChrisKresser.com.  Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. Upcoming events in Pennsylvania and the UK Before we dive into today’s episode, I want to make a couple of announcements.  The first is that I have two great events coming up.  The first is a seminar in Pennsylvania, about an hour outside of Philadelphia, on Saturday, September 19, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and this is geared more towards healthcare practitioners and clinicians, though everybody is welcome.  I’m going to discuss new trends that will define the future of medicine, the crucial role of the exposome — which I’ve talked about on the blog before; that’s the sum total of all environmental exposures that we encounter from the moment of our conception to the moment of our death — so the role of the exposome in human health and disease, a comprehensive systems model of functional medicine, how to structure and layer treatment for maximum efficacy, how to customize nutrition plans for individual needs, and of course, a Q&A where you can ask me really anything you want on any topic!  We’re going to have a delicious paleo lunch of sliced roast Berkshire pork loin with huckleberries, fresh lavender oil, roasted seasonal vegetables from Harvest Lane Farm, and seasonal fresh fruit also from Harvest Lane Farm.  The cost is $125 for the day, including lunch, and we’ve already had quite a strong response, so make sure to get tickets in advance.  You can do that by going to ChrisKresser.com/PA, PA for Pennsylvania. The next two events are in London in October.
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