RunnersConnect Run to the Top Podcast

RunnersConnect Run to the Top Podcast

Norway

Running podcast to motivate & help runners of every level run their best. Tina Muir interviews running influencers, scientists, psychologists, nutritionists, & everyday runners with inspiring stories.

Episodes

Decoding Sleep: How to Clean up Your Sleep Hygiene- Luke Gupta  

Sleep Illiteracy? Sleep Education? Sleep Management? Is it really a big deal? We’ve all been sleeping our entire lives, but do we even think about sleep correctly? 

Luke Gupta graduated from the University of Bath with a B.Sc in Sport and Exercise Science and completed an M.Sc in Exercise Physiology at Loughborough University. Currently, Luke is conducting a part-time PhD Studentship into Sleep and Athletic Performance in collaboration with the English Institute of Sport. 

He worked with some of the Rio Olympians across many different sports on their sleep habits. In this episode, Luke shares with us what his research and experience has shown him about how the function and significance of sleep in an athlete's life. 

The way Luke talks about ‘sleep’, it sounds like an actual entity with it’s own set of rules. 

For those of us who have spent many nights waiting anxiously for sleep to overtake our racing minds, he may not be far off. How can people who have difficulty falling asleep learn these rules and thus manipulate them to our advantage? 

Listen as Luke decodes the inner workings of sleep, confronts myths that have permeated our ‘understanding’ of sleep and gives us all practical methods for getting all the sleep we’ll ever need. 

Here are some of the topics we’ll discuss today: The roles our genetic and early adolescent personality traits play in determining the sports we excel in. Is 8 hours a night really the magic number for sleep for everyone? Does going to bed early equate to more rest? How Circadian Rhythms affect our sleep habits. Why your bed should not be a multitasker. Internal vs. External sleep aids Performance vs. well-being Is it possible to front-load sleep before a race? Questions Luke is asked:

3:30 How did you get into your current field and position?

6:05 Has your experience reaffirmed that this is the area you want to focus on?

6:51 What does your job look like? What are some of your favorite parts of working with athletes regarding sleep and performance?

9:05 How did you help the Rio Olympians optimize their sleep for their competitions?

11:12 What differences did you see between the different types of sports / athletes?

15:01 Does all this apply to recreational athletes as well as Elite Athletes?

17:05 What are some common myths about sleep and can you debunk them?

18:40 How does anyone know what their optimal amount of sleep is?

22:45 What if someone gets up unusually early, say for a 4:00 a.m. flight; what should they do to catch back up on their sleep?

24:45 Other myths you’d like to bust?

26:46 What has your researched uncovered about how sleep affects changes to performance, motivation and physiology?

31:12 What are some of the things that you’ve found help people fall asleep?

34:17 If someone’s mind won’t shut down when they’re trying to fall asleep, what should they do?

38:13 What are the pros and cons of using sleep aids?

43:18 Other suggested sleep aids or behavioral sleep aids?

45:04 How can we avoid psyching ourselves out while waiting to fall asleep?

47:17 Based on your research, how close is the correlation to sleep and performance?

50:53 What should someone do to manage anxiety the night before a race? 

54:03 Do you have any planned research we can keep up to date with?

58:40 The Final Kick Round

Quotes by Luke:

“My research recently found that there’s big differences between sports and how the athletes sleep and perceive sleep.”

“Listen to your body.”

“Sleep is quite an automated process in that if you’ve had a bad night’s sleep one night, the next night’s sleep will, more likely than not, be that much better given the opportunity. That’s just how sleep works.”

“You can’t just say if you’ve had a bad night’s sleep you’re going to perform poorly.”

“The way sleep works is: the longer you stay awake, the sleepier you feel.”

“When you try to do anything with sleep, that’s when it tends to go wrong.”

Mentioned in this podcast: 

Dr. James Maas on Run To The Top podcast

Dr. James Maas Pillow - Bed Bath & Beyond

English Institute of Sport

Consumer Reports - Blue Blocking Glasses

Luke's research published in Sports

Jay Dicharry- If You are Serious About Your Running, Time to Get in the Weight Room  

Jay Dicharry may or may not have taken Gretchen Rubin’s Four Tendencies quiz, but it’s safe to say that he’s probably a Questioner. Jay is not afraid to question beliefs that many of us have blindly accepted for years and study if, in fact, there is actually any truth in them or if there are better ways to train to avoid injuries. He has a passion for this ‘Pre-Habbing’ which goes back to his injury-prone youth.

 Jay is a renowned expert in biomechanics and physical therapy and is also the author of Anatomy for Runners. In this episode, he challenges us to reevaluate parts of our accepted, conventional training and running wisdom.

 He does a great job of deconstructing clinically complex concepts into easily understandable ideas and examples. He breaks down things like Strength Training versus Power Training and the differences between joint limitation or blockage, shortened tissues, stiffness / sticky tissues, and dynamic mobility.

 Our conversation covered a lot of ground and included many additional resources as noted by the links below. This may very well be an episode that you will want to listen to multiple times to explore these and evaluate what changes you may want to integrate into your own personal program.

Here are some of the topics we’ll discuss today:  How biomechanic training can help Pre-Hab or prevent injuries. Biomechanics fact vs. fiction and the ongoing critical evaluation of prior assumptions. How to leverage strength training to improve your running while reducing your volume. How to evaluate a potential strength coach or options if you don’t have access to one. Risk / Reward balance of using different types of shoes for training / racing. Jay’s Mobility / soft-tissue work philosophy. The difference between ‘stretching’ and ‘dynamic mobility’ and which you should do before a run. Questions Jay is asked:

3:50 When did you determine that biomechanics was your passion?

6:37 Is there still a lot of misinformation portrayed within the PT / sporting world?

8:07 Do you still get frustrated when people repeat ‘facts’ they haven’t verified or is it getting better with more readily available information?

10:30 What is it that drives you to keep exploring?

12:33 Is there anything surprising that you’ve learned about Pre-Hab along the way?

14:42 Who else can people reference for up-to-date information

16:17 Is the UVA Running Medicine Conference open to the public?

17:14 (Listener Question) If you could go back and rewrite Anatomy For Runners, is there anything you would change?

18:58 Is there another book in the works?

19:25 What is your philosophy on strength training and plyometrics?

20:52 Exactly what type of training are you referring to by ‘Strength Training’?

27:07 When selecting a Strength Coach, how important is it that they have a running background?

29:45 What can you tell us about the Saucony Stride Lab for those who may not have access to a running lab?

34:20 Why did you choose to work with Saucony?

35:18 Were you part of the design team for the Saucony Freedoms?

35:41 (Listener Question) If you’re running in a heavier / bulkier shoe, is there an injury risk to doing the workouts or races in a lighter shoe if you train in the heavier shoe?

39:34 Can we trust our GPS / wearable tech with our biomechanics or are they inaccurate?

40:29 When it comes to imbalances or weaknesses, is it an issue if one part, or side, of your body is stronger than the other?

43:25 If you do all the form trainings we discussed, you’re prolonging the amount of time your body is able to hold good form when running?

44:21 Should people who sit all day at work and run after work stretch between working and running?

49:25 How often do you recommend that runners should perform foam rolling / mobility / soft-tissue work? Every Day?

55:00 The Final Kick Round

Quotes by Jay:

“There’s still the folks out there saying ‘Running is going to kill you and you need to stop’.”

“I don’t like being the person paving the way; I like being the person helping people.”

“ ‘What’s the ONE thing to do?” and the reality is that life isn’t that simple, right? If it was, then nobody would have problems.”

“There is very good research out there to show that running does NOT make you strong. Running efficiency DOES impr

You’re Stronger Than You Think- Hannah Smith  

For someone in their late 20’s to feel lucky that they were diagnosed with a rare form of cancer, they would have to be a very special individual. 

Hannah Smith is just that: very special, indeed. 

Her story isn’t just one of survival; it’s an inspirational journey of using what many of us might consider a nightmarish situation to then fully live life and recognize the beauty and wonder that exists all around us.

In this episode, Hannah shares her incredible journey and outlook with us. 

From her life before her diagnosis, through the treatment and recovery, having to adjust to a new ‘normal’, and ultimately achieving goal after goal, not just in regards to competing in races and triathlons, but in all areas of her life.

Her experience, attitude and advice are not helpful only to those with significant health challenges, but also to any of us who may get so caught up in our busy lives that we lose sight of what is truly important. 

She shows us all that living isn’t just about surviving, but it is really about Sur-Thriving.

Here are some of the topics we’ll discuss today: What is it like to not know when you’re hungry so that you remember to eat? How absolutely important attitude is in order to live a full life. Who was Hannah’s inspiration? How she managed the emotional cycles of difficult chemo rounds. Her experience with managing self-expectations. How she fends off external negativity. Questions Hannah is asked:

4:52 How did fitness initially fit into your life?

6:57 What happened? 

10:36 How did that make you feel to be diagnosed at such a young age?

14:15 At what point after the diagnosis did you refocus on health and fitness?

15:23 What are some examples of cancer fighting foods you now focus on eating?

16:07 How and when did you approach building fitness back into your life?

19:07 Post-surgery, what are some of the funny things that happened and what do you miss?

24:20 How has your sense of humor helped your state of mind?

27:20 Did people try to coddle you as you worked towards your fitness goals, and if so, how did you handle that?

30:17 How would you advise families of patients regarding getting medical clearance to train?

34:35 To what do you credit your improved running times when you started competing again?

39:53 Have you embraced challenges your whole life or only since your diagnosis?

43:05 Do you live a more fulfilling life because you focus more on things you want to do vs. things you feel purely obligated to do?

46:00 Is there a reason for you that running and triathlons mean so much to you?

49:02 What would you like to say to someone who may be going through a similar situation?

54:01 The Final Kick Round

Quotes by Hannah:

“You can either be bitter and twisted and angry at the situation or you can make the best of whatever time you’ve got left, because at the end of the day, you’re gonna die anyway.”

“I did come, eventually, to the understanding with my family that (my training) wasn’t anything that I wasn’t allowed to do and that my surgeon (had cleared it).”

“I carry a donor card, but I do feel like when I am gone and they cut me open, there’s just going to be an IOU.”

“Ultimately the biggest goal for me is to be as fit and healthy and the best person I can be.”

“Dream big. And if you hit somewhere in the middle, that’ll be alright.”

“Strangely enough, my experience with cancer was probably one of the best experiences of my life. My life is infinitely better after my diagnosis than before, simply because I now look at things and think, ‘Do I really want to do this?’ ”

“Your brain is the only intelligent part of your body. If you give up mentally, what chance does any other part of your body have?”

“You’re stronger than you know.”

“Find what you LOVE to do and build your life around that.”

Mentioned in this podcast: 

Do Today Well - Blog

Chrissie Wellington: A Life Without Limits

The Brownlee Brothers - Swim, Bike, Run: Our Triathlon Story

80/20 Running by Matt Fitzgerald

3 Simple Ways to Determine if You are Running Easy Enough: Matt Fitzgerald

Garmin Fenix

STOP Looking at Your GPS Watch to Run Faster (& enjoy it more too!)

Follow Hannah:

Follow Hannah on Instagram

GutlessIrongirl Website

We really hop

Gretchen Rubin-There is No Finish Line to your Goals: You Deserve More  

Haven’t we all, at one time or another, struggled with getting new activities to become more permanent?

Gretchen Rubin, author of The Happiness Project and fellow Podcaster, shares her research with us on how to create lasting habits.

And because no single strategy works for everyone, she dove deeper into different personality types and how they can use their inherent predispositions to their advantage.

She also discussed the challenges different personalities traits have so we can be aware of avoiding potential roadblocks.

In her studies, she identified 4 general personality types: Upholders, Questioners, Obligers and Rebels.

A link to her quiz is included below so you can learn how you may be able to make long-term positive changes in your own life.

She also touches on simple strategies we can all add into our daily routines to be happier people, how to avoid getting off track once the rush of completing a major goal wears off, and shares examples she has come across with other runners that are extremely helpful.

Many of us are still in a New Year, New You mindset and this episode provides powerful ideas to make sure that we stay on track with the goals we have set for ourselves, not just in the near-term, but for as long as we really want.

Here are some of the topics we’ll discuss today: How our different personality traits determine how they form habits. Why we should use ‘milestones’ vs. ‘finish lines’ to maintain habits indefinitely. Why it’s important to protect key activities in our schedules and how to do it. Why and how we should use self-reflection of our prior experiences to realize what worked well, or didn’t, in our past. How we can proactively stave off ‘Runner’s Blues’ after accomplishing a big goal or avoid Seasonal Affective Disorder. Questions Gretchen is asked:

4:19 Why should people focus on personal improvement?

5:36 What are some examples of easy, significant changes someone can make?

8:34 What are the 4 Tendencies you refer to in your books?

11:33 Besides Upholders, how can runners who fall into the other Tendencies work with their strengths to achieve their running goals?

18:08 Are there any dangers with being an Upholder that they should look out for?

20:30 How does social media play into these different Tendencies?

24:31 What is the Danger Of A Finish Line?

27:25 What would you suggest to help people avoid Finish Line Dangers?

30:00 Could you swap related activities for specific activities during a recovery period?

31:26 How do you stay mentally engaged when your fastest running days are behind you?

33:47 Do people need to take a temporary clean break without a goal or does it vary by Tendency?

36:24 What if people still feel something is missing after achieving a goal, even if they have replaced the key activities related to that goal?

37:55 What advice do you have to help people avoid Seasonal Affective Disorder?

41:38 The Final Kick Round

Quotes by Gretchen:

If there’s something that you could do pretty easily that’s going to give you a big happiness boost, wouldn’t you want to do that?

(Regarding Questioners): They tend to love data and reporting, so things like monitoring how far they’re going or what their time is, keeping records. Really figure it out, whatever it would take to make that decision because while you’re  not sure it’s going to block your way because you’re going to be sort of stuck... but once you decide then you can do it.

(Regarding Obligers): If you’re an obliger you need ‘Outer Accountability’, you could work out with a trainer, you could join a running group where people are going to be annoyed if you don’t show up.

(Regarding Rebels): They can do anything the WANT to do. The idea of a structured schedule, something that is very appealing to an Upholder, it’s a big turn-off for a Rebel.

(Regarding Upholders): Upholders sometimes suffer from ‘tightening’ and this is when the ‘rules’ get tighter and tighter… Sometimes it can feel choking. If you feel like it’s sort of over-mastering you, you want to be aware that this is a phenomenon that Upholders can experience and you want to stay in control of it.

Hitting a goal is a great way to hit a goal; it’s not a great way to keep a habit, because habits are usually things that we want to do indefinitely. It’s more helpful to think of a milestone. It’s a 30-day Yoga Challenge, but what are you doing on Day 34?

To be happy you have to think about feeling good, feeling bad, feeling right in an atmosphere of growth.

 

 

 
You Need to Build Your Ability to Train Before You Can Train- Rob Wilby  

What if triathlons (or 70.3’s) weren’t as intimidating as they may appear?

What if, as a successful long distance runner, you already possessed a unique advantage over athletes in the other disciplines?

And what if, you could become a successful triathlete, or even just improve your running, without a significant increase in training hours by training more efficiently?

Rob Wilby is a professional triathlon coach based in England, where he is head coach at both Team Oxygenaddict and Knutsford Triathlon Club.

He specialises in helping age group triathletes rapidly improve, by focussing on maximising the effectiveness of training time and addressing their biggest performance limiters.

Over the last 20 years, he has helped hundreds of athletes exceed their expectations, from completing their first triathlon through to qualifying for the World Championships.

Rob provides great insight on the world of triathlons and 70.3’s and breaks down some perceived resistances that may prevent runners from entering these events.

He’s a fellow podcaster and has wonderful tips on training, coaching and having a successful mindset to enjoy what may be a new experience for runners.

If you’ve ever wanted to pursue a triathlon, but felt intimidated, Rob has great advice to help you get started. If you have never even considered triathlons, Rob’s training perspective can help you increase your running performance by leveraging cross-discipline training.

 

Here are some of the topics we’ll discuss today: Why runners have a unique advantage over swimmers and cyclists in triathlons. How inclusive triathlons are for newcomers. Maintaining Training / Life balance. Equipment recommendations. Benefits of training in multiple disciplines. Swim form analysis and tips. Questions Rob is asked:

3:55 What is team Oxygenaddict?

5:55 How did you end up giving yourself a year to get ready for your first triathlon as opposed to waiting until the last minute?

8:19 Where did the name “Oxygenaddict” come from?

9:30 What are the brand advertising limitations for triathlon kits?

11:30 What’s your backstory?

17:59 What’s the percentage of people transitioning to triathlons are runners and what would you say to someone considering a transition to let them know they have support from the rest of the triathlon community?

22:48 What would you say about the difference between just running vs. running right after cycling?

25:20 Do you see triathletes of all levels (especially novices) competing?

28:11 What would you say to people who are 4-5 hour marathoners; is there an opportunity for them in the world of triathlon?

29:53 Do you have to like all 3 disciplines?

33:23 Do triathletes typically have 3 separate coaches for each discipline?

35:31 How does one train for a triathlon without it completely taking over their life?

40:57 As a coach, do you worry about recreational / mid-pack athletes burning out from overtraining?

43:36 What is your swim analysis?

48:21 Is there a general best swim form or are there a variety of good forms?

49:57 Do you breathe one side or both?

51:42 Any additional swim-form tips?

53:15 Is it more likely that a fit runner who thinks they’re not a good swimmer has bad form than that they’re not fit enough?

54:48 What about open-water swimming vs. indoor pool?

57:05 Good brands of entry-level bikes and wetsuits?

58:46 What is your podcast about?

1:02:52 Final Kick Round

Quotes by Rob:

“I’ve never come across anybody who’s elitist or snobbish at all at any of the events that I’ve been to.”

“Without a doubt, the people who make the strongest athletes in triathlon come from a running background.”

“You’ll see a massive variety of people at these events.”

“(By training for a triathlon) ...you’ve consistently run for 12 weeks without getting injured, you’ve done all this hard work on the bike without getting injured, your body’s had a different stimulus without getting injured, and all of a sudden the result of that is, it turns out, you’ve got out of your own way and you’ve developed a different way of training  that’s going to allow you to get even faster on the run.”

“You can let the sport take up as much of your life or as little of your life as you like.”

“I’m probably doing about half the training I was before, and I’m still getting 99% of the benefit of it. So, almost I wondered how little training I could do and still be fit for racing.”

“You need to build your ability to train before you can train.”

“(Runners are) already aerobically very fit, and the reason they can’t swim quickly is because of a skill-based problem not because of a fitness based problem.”

“The key to swimming better is to improve your technique. Practice good technique and get fit as a

Lanni Marchant-Your Body is Your Equipment: You Need to Fuel Your Engine  

What makes elite runners so good at running? Are they superhuman, and just have the talent to be able to leave us all in their dust?

Actually, no!

Even though most elite runners struggle with revealing their weaknesses in fear of losing sponsors or upsetting the selection committees, today we are talking to a runner who does not mind sharing her struggles and does not mind speaking the truth, even if it makes some waves in the process.

Lanni Marchant is the Canadian record holder in the half marathon and marathon with her 1:10:47 and 2:28:00 PRs. She competed in both the 10,000m and marathon in the Rio Olympics, which you will hear about the drama involved in that scenario during this interview.

However, despite Lanni's success as a runner, she wants her legacy to be more than just her running. Lanni is doing all she can to help women rights, including speaking in front of Parliament on the topic, and showing the world once and for all, that there is no one best body type and weight for a runner. 

Lanni spent most of her college career on crutches because she felt she needed to be skinny to run fast, but now she has a message for runners everywhere to get your head on straight, or you are throwing away your running!

Lanni is refreshingly honest, and I am sure you are going to enjoy this episode for her relatability and what she is doing for our sport.

Questions Lanni is Asked

4:00 You decided to go to University in the US, what was it that pulled you away from Canada?

5:10 What lessons were you taught about going to school in the US when you were still in high school in Canada

7:35 You struggled your way through your freshman year, why do you think so many runners struggle in that first year?

10:00 There were some remarks made to other people about being healthy, was it that about being leaner or heavier?

10:45 How did those remarks affect you?

12:30 What do you think, now that you have a good relationship with food, can be done to change the perspective?

20:00 How do you stop yourself from comparing when you are standing on the start line?

23:45 You mentioned your weight fluctuates throughout the year, what would you like to say to anyone who looks at pictures of you from Rio, and thinks WOW! I am never going to look like that.

27:20 A lot of words (such as muscular), women see as negative, do you have any thoughts on how we can change the thinking?

32:30 What made you decide to go in front of parliament to take a stand for women rights?

35:30 What would be your suggestion to men and women listening of how we can be good role models and stop the sexist comments?

39:00 Do you see women doing it to ourselves by putting each other down instead of working together?

44:00 Tell us about the double double debacle, and how is it different to qualifying for the Olympics in Canada and Great Britain

48:30 Did that affect you mentally, knowing that you did not know what you were doing. How did that affect your Olympic experience?

53:00 Where do you go from here? Running wise and career wise?

55:10 When you said you like to indulge after a big race, what do the first few days after New York look like for you?

1:00:00 Final Kick Round

Quotes from Lanni

I spent my entire college career doing what most NCAA females do, trying not to eat, eat very little, trying to cross training and overtrain, and offset what I did eat. You name the eating disorder trick, I did it.

I eat chocolate everyday…

In my off season, I might have a beer most nights, during season, I might limit it to weekends.

We need to embrace the builds and the bodies that we have, understand that you can train it and tweak it to fit within your sport and within the goals you want.

If we change that conversation for women in sport, then there’s not going to be the same insecurities for girls and there’ll be less pressure for girls to look a certain way and do stupid things to look that way.

I am not restrictive, but I have to recognize that I need to be making sure every calorie, piece of food and beverage I put into my body is servicing my body, so when I get to Rio, I am able to compete and be my best Lanni.

...A part of me regrets not getting my head on straight sooner, because who knows what I could have been doing in my 20’s had I not been just wasting away and wasting my time and wasting my talents trying to fit into other people’s definitions of what a runner should look like or what a runner should be. And those are years I’ll never get back.

If you look at any picture of an elite athlete in any sport, its not sustainable for us to look like that. You try to dial it in for maybe 4-6 weeks, where it is really important.

...both (genders) could benefit from the conversation being about our ‘machines’ and what we’re doing with them.<

There is No Finish Line: Commit to Continuous Growth- Josh Trent  

The journey of losing weight is not easy.

Anyone who has tried to lose weight in the past knows that all too well, but our guest today not only shares his struggles with using food as comfort to process his emotions, but how he finally broke free of using food as a form of self medication.

Josh Trent, of Wellness Force Radio has fantastic advice for us all on how to grow to love our bodies from a place of abundance and trust, rather than a place of anger (like so many of us do).

Every human being goes through stages, and although therapy has been shunned in the past, Josh has some great insights on why it is so important, and can help us upgrade our old software to deal with our issues once and for all/.

Josh talks about having a why, the reason you are willing to put in all the hours for your training, and that why should be bigger than you. Having a why that makes you cry will give you energy to pull from when life stacks roadblocks in front of you. We only have control over our experiences, and we need to make sure that our behaviors are in alignment with our goals.

Josh challenges us all to set a new fear PR, something that is terrifying, but will help us to feel more alive than ever before.

If you are ready to make 2017 your best year ever, this is an episode to inspire you to do just that.

Here are some of the topics we’ll discuss today: Why Josh felt like he wasn't running towards pleasure, but instead, away from pain The difference between YouStress and Distress Why the first 5 minutes of your day are the most important, are you eating mental junk food? Why voicing the thoughts that are going through your head will take the power out of them How to use habit formation to reach your goals Why having a community will help you to replace the negative thoughts in your mind Questions Josh is asked:

4:15 Where did your journey start?

8:15 What was it about the moment with the red cup that made something switch in your mind?

9:25 We often think of drugs as pills, but tell us how food or exercise can be that addiction or way of coping with our feelings

12:30 You lost 75lbs, but we are in a world of perfection, so we struggle to find peace with ourselves, how did you learn to do this while you were going through this journey?

15:00 What can people recognize within themselves, where they can realize they are in a place of anger, and how can they move to a place of love?

16:00 Tell us about some of strategies to get out of a negative mindset

20:00 How long did it take you to spin your mental perspective to where you were confident in who you were?

22:20 How did you get to a place to where you did not see vulnerability as a weakness or something to be embarrassed about?

25:15 Why do you encourage people to face their frustrations and be vulnerable?

26:25 How can we make sure we make a behavior change rather than a New Years Resolution?

32:20 Let's use an example of a runner, and how they can make good choices to be ready for their big race coming up

36:20 What about people with families who believe it is not realistic to put themselves first, what would you like to say to them?

39:30 Describe just how much our negative thoughts affect us during races, and how can we take the steps to overcome those negative thoughts in a race?

41:30 How do you practice going against the negative thoughts in the moment?

48:00 You always ask your guests for what their definition of wellness is, what is yours?

49:30 Is it possible to fill up all three cups to have balance in our lives?

51:30 What themes come up over and over on your podcast interviews, that you would like to tell people today?

53:00 What are examples of some "why's" that will help people achieve their goals?

56:35 The Final Kick Round!

Jared Ward- We Are All Just Trying to Be the Best We Can Be  

My guest today is statistics professor and humble Olympian Jared Ward.

He’s one of the best pacers in the world, and on today’s podcast we’re going to find out how we can start training to pace our races as perfectly as he does.

Jared wrote his Master’s thesis on pacing, and he’s sharing some of his insider information, tips, and tricks for how we can start managing our perfect pace.

One of his biggest pieces of advice is how he uses each running season to improve and learn new techniques.

As runners, we know that with every race we are testing our limits and learning something new about ourselves, and Jared’s got this learning down to a science.

So get excited!

Here are some of the topics we’ll discuss today: The rewards of marathon training Jared’s trick for getting into the zone Jared’s thesis on how to have successful pacing What it’s like to qualify for an Olympic team How to run well in hotter temperatures Questions Jared is asked:

3:15 What excites you about marathons?

4:10 Tell us about your success and your background as a runner

5:14 What’s your experience with running marathons?

8:23 What made you to decide to keep teaching instead of running full-time?

9:46 Can you handle the idea of just being a runner?

11:52 How has life changed for you as a running celebrity?

15:20 What inspired you to write your Master’s thesis on pacing?

18:08 What did you find out about successful pacing?

23:40 Do you have any pacing tips for runners?

27:35 Do you use a watch when running?

29:22 Do you ever have moments of doubt while running?

33:20 What do you tell yourself when you’re hurting while running?

36:35 How epic it did feel to cross the finish line at the Olympic qualifiers?

37:31 What was the Rio Marathon like?

40:09 Does your Olympic experience influence how you feel about your race abilities?

41:00 How did you train for your Olympic qualifier?

43:10 How can you run so well in the heat?

46:06 What’s your advice for high temperature runners?

48:30 What shoes do you train and race in?

51:00 Are you more or less sore after your races?

52:05 How do you manage to keep your family a priority?

55:05 What it’s like having a massage therapist for a wife?

55:42 What do you have planned for the future?

58:27 The Final Kick Round!

Quotes by Jared:

“I’ve mostly been blessed to never have a season in running that hasn’t been better than the season before.”

“I fell in love with the marathon before I raced it. I loved the training.”

“Trying to harness the trick of getting into the zone and racing so something magical can happen.”

“A marathon is more a race of me vs. me more than me vs. the people around me.”

“It’s more about maintaining a consistent metabolic rate than it is about maintaining a consistent pace.”

“Your body is always going to be your best gauge.”

“It’s just so critical to get in as much hydration as possible.”

“Never cash out long-term success for short-term success.”

Take a Listen on Your Next Run

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

Links:

Jared Ward Running Co

Runners Connect Temperature and Pace Calculator

Saucony Type A (Jared's racing shoe) women's version (Use coupon code TINA for 10% off at Saucony.com)

Saucony Kinvara (Jared's training shoe) women's version

Saucony Zealot (Jared's training shoe) women's version

Saucony Triumph (Jared's shoe for tired/sore days) women's version

Saucony Life on the Run Men's clothing and Women's clothing

Jared on Twitter

Running with the Buffaloes by Chris Lear

We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

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Run to the Top Christmas Special- Interview with Tina Muir  

Happy Holidays!

Today’s episode is a special treat – consider it an early Christmas present because I’m my very own guest today!

I’ve brought on my good friend and fellow marathoner Sarah Crouch to play hostess with the mostess and ask me the hard questions on today’s special podcast.

I just finished the Californian International Marathon with a brand new personal record, and Sarah asks me all about how it feels to be both proud and disappointed in my finishing time.

I’ve been lucky enough to have run each of my marathons faster than the one before, but my perfectionist lifestyle always expects more.

I know a lot of you can relate to the fact that we runners hold ourselves to such high standards.

I’m guilty of not giving myself enough credit where it’s due, but that doesn’t mean I’m always beating myself up either.

I’m going to share how I stay motivated, how I train, and what I do to keep myself positive and healthy when my perfectionist attitude tries to come out.

Here are some of the topics we’ll discuss today: Tina’s record-making experience at CIM How celebrity can change your running career What motivates Tina to stay positive Which boy band is (and always has been) Tina’s favorite Tina’s favorite episode of Run to the Top Tina answers fan questions! Questions Tina is asked:

1:35 Can you recap your California International Marathon?

4:05 Will you be able to settle for small successes?

4:50 Was this marathon your personal best so far?

6:00 Who is your motivation?

6:50 What was the hardest thing at CIM?

9:07 How did your pace feel at CIM?

10:30 How do you keep your confidence up?

12:00 How do you feel a week and/or a day before a big race?

14:37 How do you shape your identity outside of your race times?

16:06 What thing sticks out for you most about race time?

19:55 Who are you outside of running?

22:50 What’s Tina’s Backstreet Boys story?

24:28 How has celebrity affected your running and your life?

26:20 How do you maintain your positivity?

29:20 Would your running performance be different if you didn’t have this podcast?

30:50 What has been your favorite interview on the podcast?

31:41 Have you made it yet in your running career?

35:20 What were your teenage running exploits?

36:26 What moment changed your mind about running?

36:50 Why are British youths pushed so hard to run so young?

37:50 What was your partying lifestyle like?

40:00 What’s it like to train with Sarah?

44:26 When is your next marathon?

46:11 How do you approach personal goal setting?

48:15 How do you keep your confidence up during a race?

49:18 How did you feel when you saw your new personal record time?

53:10 What do you eat the day before a marathon?

54:54 What is your first craving after a marathon?

57:20 Rapid-fire round!

59:57 The Final Kick Round!

Quotes by Tina:

“I’m learning…that a PR is still a PR.”

“Why can’t I be a normal person who just sits and watches Netflix?”

“I like to think I’m a good person who puts others first.”

“I try and share my true feelings even it makes me look a bit stupid.”

“I’ll stop drinking, but instead I’m gonna drink Red Bull.”

“That is my next big goal - to run for England in the Commonwealth Games.”

“I was angry at myself for not giving my very best.”

Take a Listen on Your Next Run

Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel

Links:

Tina's Blog

Sarah Crouch

Cranberry Bliss Bars 

Tina's Freakshake

Phoebe Wright

Phoebe Wright Podcast Episode

Tina's favorite running shoe: Saucony Ride (use coupon code TINA for 10% off)

Matt Fitzgerald

Sarah Crouch Instagram

Tina Instagram

We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjo

Dr. Jordan Santos-Concejero- The Research is Clear: Strength Training is the Best Way to Improve Running Economy  

If you love the science behind running, this is the episode for you!

I’ve brought Jordan Santos-Concejero on the podcast today to discuss a little bit of his research on the physiology and the biomechanics behind the art of running.

Dr. Santos started out as a professional runner, but trying to keep up with competitive running and work on his PhD at the same time became a bit much.

Besides, he was much more interested in the research behind what makes a good runner truly great. He’s spent a majority of his research career studying Kenyan runners and their successes.

He breaks down genetics and human evolution and then combines them with modern training in order to uncover what makes professional runners so successful.

If you’ve ever had any questions about your stride, your strike, or even your genetic disposition for physical fitness, tune in now!

Here are some of the topics we’ll discuss today:

Finding the balance between diet, rest, and training hard
Why strength training is so important for runners
Dr. Santos’ research on ground contact time, cadence, and striking
All of the different factors that influence running economy
The touchy subject of genetic doping
Questions Jordan is asked:

3:45 What was your international running career like?

5:05 How did your dad inspire you to run?

5:26 Do you have any advice for new runners?

6:20 What was the highlight of your running career?

7:06 How long did it take you to balance training hard with resting right?

7:52 Why did you decide to retire from running?

8:48 Do you still run for fun?

9:55 Did you always know you wanted to study running academically?

12:20 When did running economy come into your research?

13:18 Are you an economical runner?

14:07 Why should runners focus on strength training?

15:15 What kind of strength training should runners do?

16:06 How often should we go to the gym?

18:03 Why did you focus your research on Kenyan runners?

19:40 Can you share some of your findings with us?

21:30 What is the ground contact time you study?

23:16 What are your theories on efficient ground contact times?

25:07 Do you see people moving to Kenya for training?

26:43 How can European runners imitate Kenyan training?

27:31 Do you see people messing with genetics in the future to be better runners?

29:55 How is your research working against genetic doping?

32:11 What is your research on running cadence and stride?

35:40 Did you find any differences in running cadence with different types of runners?

36:50 Should we just stick with the stride that is comfortable for us?

37:53 What is your research on striking?

39:45 Can we change heel striking to forefoot striking?

40:40 The pros and cons of barefoot running

42:30 How does it feel to be a researcher?

43:50 Where do you see your research going in the future?

47:12 The Final Kick Round!

Quotes by Jordan:

“Training hard is important, but actually it’s more important to get enough rest.”

“I can’t run for fun, I can only run for performance.”

“Strength training is a key training to improve your performance…and reduce risk of injury.”

“Short ground contact time will improve running performance. You can improve your ground contact time by improving your stiffness with strength training.”

“If you don’t do physical activity when you are a kid, some of the physical adaption that [Kenyans] have, you will never get.”

“If you try to change your running cadence consciously, your running economy will be worse.”

“The most economical runners strike on their forefoot.”

Alicia Shay- Emotional Stress is Powerfully Destructive in Your Body  

Katy Sherratt is the CEO of Back On My Feet, a non-profit organization that helps homeless and those down on their luck get – you guessed it! – back on their feet. 

But they do it with running! 

Members of Back On My Feet meet three times a week for morning runs on top of interview training, health and wellness education, and other services that help them find jobs and get their lives running again. 

As CEO, Katy brings her philanthropic eye and economics experience to an already thriving business. 

We discuss the ways she’s increased donations, increased programmatic impact, and improved the ways the company measures the success of its members. 

There are waiting lists of people waiting to participate in Back On My feet, and Katy shares the way we can all help out. 

Here are some of the topics we’ll discuss today: Everything Katy’s accomplished with Back On My Feet How health and success work together to create social wellness The ways running builds self-esteem and empowers individuals How individuals and the corporate world work together for social wellness What we can all do to be more socially aware How we can donate our time and money to Back On My Feet  Questions Katy is asked:

3:34 When did Katy move over to the United States?

4:30 Why is running so special?

5:33 Do you run in the mornings?

7:02 What has Katy accomplished with Back On My Feet?

9:00 What is Back On My Feet and how does it work?

11:28 Everyone with Back On My Feet gets a free pair of running shoes

12:08 What’s it like being a Back On My Feet alumni?

13:13 How did you convince your sponsors to get involved?

15:05 How many members join marathons?

16:10 Which cities participate in Back On My Feet?

17:06 How can we get in touch with Back On My Feet?

18:10 How big can Back On My Feet get?

19:24 How do the sponsors help members find jobs and get back on their feet?

21:20 Does Back On My Feet offer interview training for members?

22:32 How do donations work with Back On My Feet?

24:45 What attracted Katy to Back On My Feet?

25:53 What attracts Katy to social wellness?

26:40 What social differences do you see between the UK and the USA?

28:22 Are things moving in the right direction?

29:35 How many different ways can corporations work with Back On My Feet?

31:11 Why is running so empowering?

33:43 What moment brought it home for Katy?

36:29 How Katy’s mom inspires her

38:07 How is the running community like a family?

39:20 How does recruitment work?

41:15 Why do you start running so early in the morning?

43:27 The story that impacted Katy the most

46:28 What happens at the beginning and the end of each run?

49:18 The Final Kick Round!

Quotes by Katy:

“I run a mile a minute in how I act in daily life, and for me when I go running it’s a moment of clarity.”

“Back On My Feet starts with running.”

“Companies and corporations want to work with non-profits in a unique way. They want a variety of ways.”

“The reason we use running is because anyone can do it. We are born to run.”

  Links:

Back On My Feet

To get involved: info@backonmyfeet.org

How to get your business involved: partners@backonmyfeet.org

November Project

Born to Run Chris McDougall

Cytomax

Clif Bar

We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

Alicia Shay- Emotional Stress is Powerfully Destructive in Your Body  

As runners, we know we’re passionate about our sport and our community. 

We offer great support for one another, but sometimes it can be hard to accept that support ourselves. 

How many of us ignore pain because we don’t want to be seen as weak? 

I know I’m guilty of constantly trying to be “the strong one”, and that’s why I brought on Alicia Shay as my guest today. 

She’s a professional long-distance runner and coach, and she has first-hand experience with the effects pain and grief can have on our entire body. 

When her husband Ryan Shay suddenly and unexpectedly died in the middle of his marathon run, Alicia turned to running as a way to avoid and ignore her physical and emotional pain. 

These tough times took a toll on her body and her emotional well-being, and it took 4 years for her to be able to run professionally again. We all like to think of ourselves as the exception, as stronger than the next, but none of us [...]

Back on My Feet- The Power of Running to Overcome Homelessness  

Katy Sherratt is the CEO of Back On My Feet, a non-profit organization that helps homeless and those down on their luck get – you guessed it! – back on their feet. 

But they do it with running! 

Members of Back On My Feet meet three times a week for morning runs on top of interview training, health and wellness education, and other services that help them find jobs and get their lives running again. 

As CEO, Katy brings her philanthropic eye and economics experience to an already thriving business. 

We discuss the ways she’s increased donations, increased programmatic impact, and improved the ways the company measures the success of its members. 

There are waiting lists of people waiting to participate in Back On My feet, and Katy shares the way we can all help out. 

Here are some of the topics we’ll discuss today: Everything Katy’s accomplished with Back On My Feet How health and success work together to create social wellness The ways running builds self-esteem and empowers individuals How individuals and the corporate world work together for social wellness What we can all do to be more socially aware How we can donate our time and money to Back On My Feet  Questions Katy is asked:

3:34 When did Katy move over to the United States?

4:30 Why is running so special?

5:33 Do you run in the mornings?

7:02 What has Katy accomplished with Back On My Feet?

9:00 What is Back On My Feet and how does it work?

11:28 Everyone with Back On My Feet gets a free pair of running shoes

12:08 What’s it like being a Back On My Feet alumni?

13:13 How did you convince your sponsors to get involved?

15:05 How many members join marathons?

16:10 Which cities participate in Back On My Feet?

17:06 How can we get in touch with Back On My Feet?

18:10 How big can Back On My Feet get?

19:24 How do the sponsors help members find jobs and get back on their feet?

21:20 Does Back On My Feet offer interview training for members?

22:32 How do donations work with Back On My Feet?

24:45 What attracted Katy to Back On My Feet?

25:53 What attracts Katy to social wellness?

26:40 What social differences do you see between the UK and the USA?

28:22 Are things moving in the right direction?

29:35 How many different ways can corporations work with Back On My Feet?

31:11 Why is running so empowering?

33:43 What moment brought it home for Katy?

36:29 How Katy’s mom inspires her

38:07 How is the running community like a family?

39:20 How does recruitment work?

41:15 Why do you start running so early in the morning?

43:27 The story that impacted Katy the most

46:28 What happens at the beginning and the end of each run?

49:18 The Final Kick Round!

Quotes by Katy:

“I run a mile a minute in how I act in daily life, and for me when I go running it’s a moment of clarity.”

“Back On My Feet starts with running.”

“Companies and corporations want to work with non-profits in a unique way. They want a variety of ways.”

“The reason we use running is because anyone can do it. We are born to run.”

  Links:

Back On My Feet

To get involved: info@backonmyfeet.org

How to get your business involved: partners@backonmyfeet.org

November Project

Born to Run Chris McDougall

Cytomax

Clif Bar

We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top.

The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use.

If more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, it means I can reach out to and get through to the top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the show even more enjoyable for you!

Back on My Feet- The Power of Running to Overcome Homelessness  

Katy Sherratt is the CEO of Back On My Feet, a non-profit organization that helps homeless and those down on their luck get – you guessed it! – back on their feet. 

But they do it with running! 

Members of Back On My Feet meet three times a week for morning runs on top of interview training, health and wellness education, and other services that help them find jobs and get their lives running again. 

As CEO, Katy brings her philanthropic eye and economics experience to an already thriving business. 

We discuss the ways she’s increased donations, increased programmatic impact, and improved the ways the company measures the success of its members. 

There are waiting lists of people waiting to participate in Back On My feet, and Katy shares the way we can all help out. 

Here are some of the topics we’ll discuss today: Everything Katy’s accomplished with Back On My Feet How health and success work togethe [...]
Dr. David Minkoff- You Can Overcome and Outlast Your Setbacks  

My guest today participated in over 40 Iron Man competitions, which is admirable on its own. 

But when you hear about what he’s been doing for the health and wellness for the runners he has met, you are really going to be impressed. 

David Minkoff got his start as a doctor in emergency medicine, but after mercury poisoning threatened his wife, he rearranged his priorities. 

We all know how running can start to rearrange our lives, and David takes it to the next level. 

With over 20 years experience learning about health, wellness, and the human body – as well as running and training on his own – David has developed an almost fool-proof wellness company called Body Health. 

That’s right! 

It’s the same Body Health that creates my favorite supplement, Perfect Amino! We talk today about Perfect Amino and the ways you can rearrange your priorities in order to better benefit your health and wellness. 

Here are some of [...]
The Gait Guys- Runners Need Risk Management not Crisis Management  

Today’s episode is going to completely change the way you look at running form.

I’m sure we’re all guilty of saying we have “bad form” while running. I know my own peroneal arthritis effects my form and the way I think about it, and that’s why I brought the Gait Guys on the podcast.

It’s time to get a new perspective! Durability is what Dr. Shawn Allen and Dr. Ivo Waerlop are all about.

Your running form isn’t really what matters. It’s how durable and economical that form is and what it’s doing to and for your body.

Injuries, surgery, and simple ignorance are all responsible for our running forms, regardless of whether they’re good or bad, but it’s easier than you think to re-train your body to overcome discomfort and pain. You may not even need to change your running form at all.

Rather, we are going to discuss permanent moving patterns and how to make up for what your patterns might be lacking in order for you to have the [...]

Find What You Love and Work for it- Chiara Gandolfi  

Will you help me give a wedding present today?

My guest didn’t start out as a runner, in fact, she did not start running until one year ago.

Chiara was a springboard diver who was inspired to run by the most powerful force of all: love!

As new runners, we all know how magical that first run can be, but today’s episode is truly for the romantic runner.

Chiara shares one of the most romantic relationship stories I have ever heard about how her fiancé Francesco inspired her to become a better runner and a better woman.

She’s discovered a whole new world of health and fitness that would not have been possible if she and Francesco had never met, and she shares with us how a new perspective on running can inspire change in your whole life.

Here are some of the topics we’ll discuss today:

How running compares to other niche sports
How feelings for a significant other can inspire your perspectives on health and exercise
Tr [...]

How Running Shapes us into the People we Want to Be- Chris Heuisler  

If you’ve ever run a marathon, you know how hectic race day can be. 

You’re out of your element, you’re in a new area, and everything about your routine is falling apart. This is where Chris Heuisler comes in! 

I brought Chris on the podcast today to talk about what he does as the RunWestin Concierge. 

As concie [...]

Molly Huddle-Why New York Was the Marathon for Molly  

Today my guest is one of the best distance runners in the country. 

Molly Huddle finished 6th in the 10k at the 2016 Rio Olympics and is about to try her legs out on her first marathon in New York. 

Molly is already a superstar – and has been since college – but that doesn’t stop her from learning new things. 

Nick Symmonds- Our Filthy, Dirty Sport: It’s Time to Make a Change  

I’ve been wanting to talk to our guest today for a long time! 

He’s got a lot of experience, a lot of opinions, and he’s not afraid to share them. 

Nick Symmonds is an elite runner who’s won Olympic medals and competed in his fair share of world track and field championships. 

He’s seen a lot of things in his time running professionally, and he’s on [...]

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