Slate's Working

Slate's Working

Sweden

Slate interviews Americans about their jobs. On this season of Working, we're going to the White House. Part of the Panoply Network.

Episodes

In Detroit: How Does a Barbecue Chef Work?  

On this season of Working, we left the East Coast behind and flew to Detroit. We’re speaking with eight people who are drawing on the city’s complex history as they work to create its future.

For this episode, we visited Slows Bar B-Q to talk with its chef, Mike Metevia. Prior to coming to Slows a decade ago, Metevia had worked in other sectors of the restaurant industry and with other cuisines, but he’d always been a barbecue guy in his private life. “I just like starting fires,” he tells us.

Then in a Slate Plus extra, Metevia offers some tips on how to barbecue better at home. If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan
Production: Mickey Capper, @FMcapper

In Detroit: How Does the Mayor's Chief of Staff Work?  

On this season of Working, we left the East Coast behind and flew to Detroit. We’re speaking with eight people who are drawing on the city’s complex history as they work to create its future. For this episode, we spoke with Alexis Wiley, Mayor Mike Duggan's Chief of Staff.

Wiley showed us around her office, told us about how she transitioned into the world of politics from a role as a local tv reporter, and explained what goes into the mayoral team's response to a crisis.

Then in a Slate Plus extra, Wiley talks about introducing and advocating for Detroit’s Project Green Light, an effort to install police video cameras at gas stations. If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan
Production: Mickey Capper, @FMcapper

In Detroit: How Does a Community Internet Organizer Work?  

On this season of Working, we left the East Coast behind and flew to Detroit. We’re speaking with eight people who are drawing on the city’s complex history as they work to create its future. For this episode, we spoke with Diana Nucera, director of the Detroit Community Technology Project.

Diana Nucera runs an organization that promotes digital literacy and internet access in Detroit. Diana tells us about how she works to fill in technological gaps in Detroit—a city where nearly 40% of households still don't have internet access. She talks us through her organization's digital literacy programs and describes their efforts to build networks to build networks. Nucera also tells us a bit about her organization's DIY roots, and how they fit into the city's evolving political infrastructure.

In a Slate Plus Extra, Nucera describes how net neutrality might change and how that might affect DCTP's work. If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan
Production: Mickey Capper, @FMcapper

In Detroit: How Does an Automotive Battery Engineer Work?  

On this season of Working, we left the East Coast behind to visit Detroit. We're speaking with people who are drawing on the city's complex history as they work to create its future.

The automotive industry, which has arguably defined Detroit for generations, employs a dizzying array of professionals responsible for every aspect of car design and manufacture. We visited the General Motors battery lab, where we spoke with Mark Hughes, a recent chemical engineering graduate from the University of California, Berkeley.
Hughes describes himself as a “cell technical specialist.” In essence, he conducts forensics tests on failed batteries, mostly for fully electric cars such as the Chevrolet EV Bolt, though he sometimes works on hybrid vehicles as well. And while Hughes is primarily dealing with inorganic chemistry, some of the stories he tells us really do sound a lot like medical mysteries.

Then, in a Slate Plus extra, Hughes talks about his own relationship to cars—and tells us what he drives. If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan
Production: Mickey Capper, @FMcapper

In Detroit: How Does an Urban Farmer Work?  

On this season of Working, we left the East Coast behind to visit Detroit. We're speaking with people who are drawing on the city's complex history as they work to create its future.

Greg Willerer grows a variety of organic crops on a few plots of carefully cultivated land in Detroit. We spoke with him about how he transitioned to farming from teaching, how he sees farming's role in a revitalized Detroit, and why he keeps on his farm.

In a Slate Plus Extra, Willerer discusses some of the equipment that makes working on an urban farm feasible. If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan
Production: Mickey Capper, @FMcapper

In Detroit: How Does a Hair Care Entrepreneur Work?  

On this season of Working, we left the East Coast behind to visit Detroit. We're speaking with people who are drawing on the city's complex history as they work to create its future.

For our first episode, we sat down with Gwen Jimmere, CEO of Naturalicious, a company that makes hair care products for curly-haired women. Before she started Naturalicious, she had worked in Detroit's signature industry—the automotive industry—but we visited her at a place called Ponyride, a startup incubator for socially conscious entrepreneurs. She tells us about how she got started, and how her business has grown. She also leads us through the process of making and selling her specialized line of products, and she tells us about her relationship with her ideal imagined customer, the great Shonda Rhimes. She tells us about how her business fits into the changing Detroit landscape that she's a part of.

In a Slate Plus Extra, Jimmere tells us the importance of what she does when she's not working. If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan
Production: Mickey Capper, @FMcapper

In Baltimore: How Does a Schooner Captain Work?  

On this season of Working, we visit the city of Baltimore, to talk to people about their jobs there. We're hoping to learn about how the city informs their work, and how they are shaping Baltimore itself, by working.

Jordan Smith is a captain of the Pride of Baltimore II, a recreation of a 19th century Baltimore Clipper. He tells us about the ship's history, his duties as captain, and how the crew supports each other to keep the ship in top shape. He also took us on a tour of the Pride and showed us how he uses both modern and traditional equipment to sail, race, and educate.

In a Slate Plus Extra, Smith tells us about racing the Pride, and the combination of strategy and proficiency that goes into winning a sailing race. If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan
Production: Mickey Capper, @FMcapper

In Baltimore: How Does a Real Estate Property Manager Work?  

On this season of Working, we visit the city of Baltimore, to talk to people about their jobs there. We're hoping to learn about how the city informs their work, and how they are shaping Baltimore itself, by working.

Damon Walker helps real estate investors manage Section 8 housing. He explains how he makes sure that the properties are comfortable and up to code, and how he finds tenants for each availability.

In a Slate Plus Extra, Walker tells us about how he takes care of his own home. If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Thanks to the Stoop Storytelling Series for putting us in touch with Walker. Hear his story on the Stoop Storytelling Series podcast here: http://www.stoopstorytelling.com/event/podcast-the-moment-that-changed-everything/

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan
Production: Mickey Capper, @FMcapper

In Baltimore: How Does the Aquarium Veterinarian work?  

On this season of Working, we visit the city of Baltimore, to talk to people about their jobs there. We're hoping to learn about how the city informs their work, and how they are shaping Baltimore itself, by working.

Leigh Clayton takes care of the health of 1,500 animals in Baltimore's National Aquarium. She explains how you can tell when a fish is sick, and everything that goes into keeping them healthy. She also tells us about how the National Aquarium connects to and educates about local species, and shares some tips for home aquarium care.

In a Slate Plus Extra, she talks about caring for Jacob Brogan's favorite animals: octopuses. If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan
Production: Mickey Capper, @FMcapper

In Baltimore: How Does Dan Deacon Work?  

On this season of Working, we visit the city of Baltimore, to talk to people about their jobs there. We're hoping to learn about how the city informs their work, and how they are shaping Baltimore itself, by working.

Dan Deacon makes inventive, playful electronic music, and leads crowds through silly group exercises. He tells us about how he finds time to make new music, how he first began his famous crowd participation games at his shows, and his relationship with the city of Baltimore.

In a Slate Plus Extra, Deacon takes us on a tour of his home recording studio, and gives us a peek at the board game he had set up when we visited him. . If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan

In Baltimore: How Does a Public Defender Work?  

On this season of Working, we visit the city of Baltimore, to talk to people about their jobs there. We're hoping to learn about how the city informs their work, and how they are shaping Baltimore itself, by working.

Jenny Egan defends children in juvenile court, trying to keep them from getting locked up. She tells us about earning the trust of her clients, researching their cases, and the satisfaction of winning trials.

In a Slate Plus Extra, Egan tells us about how she first fell in love with Baltimore and decided to move to the city she now calls home. If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan

In Baltimore: How Does a Neurosurgeon Work?  

On this season of Working, we visit the city of Baltimore, to talk to people about their jobs there. We're hoping to learn about how the city informs their work, and how they are shaping Baltimore itself, by working.

When Harry Mushlin operates on a brain, he feels his patient's selfhood in his hands. Mushlin is a neurosurgery resident with the University of Maryland currently practicing pediatric neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins Medical Center and operating on victims of violence at UMD's Shock Trauma Center. He spoke with us about working on the human brain, the trying hours of neurosurgery, and seeing Baltimore through the lens of the operating room.

Then in a Slate Plus Extra, Mushlin tells us about working in the shadow of Baltimore's most famous neurosurgeon, Dr. Ben Carson. If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan

In Baltimore: How does a Yarn Dyer Work?  

On this season of Working, we visit the city of Baltimore, to talk to people about their jobs there. We're hoping to learn about how the city informs their work, and how they are shaping Baltimore itself, by working.

Karida Collins names her yarn colors after Baltimore neighborhoods at her Neighborhood Fiber Company. Karida tells us about how she got started dying yarn, walks us through the full dying process at their studio, and tells us about how she tries to weave connections with Baltimore's wider community.

In a Slate Plus Extra, Lippman tells us about her own knitting projects and the special qualities that make a friend or family member "knit-worthy." If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan

In Baltimore: How Does Crime Novelist Laura Lippman Work?  

On this season of Working, we visit the city of Baltimore, to talk to people about their jobs there. We're hoping to learn about how the city informs their work, and how they are shaping Baltimore itself, by working.

On this first episode, crime novelist Laura Lippman tells us about how she first got started writing fiction, how she approaches writing and revising her books, and why she's tired of arguing about the validity of genre novels. She loves Baltimore despite its problems, and the city infuses her books, including the Tess Monaghan detective series.

In a Slate Plus Extra, Lippman tells us about her connection to the progenitor of detective novels Edgar Allan Poe, another Baltimore citizen. If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan

The "How Does a Labor Organizer Work?" Edition  

This season on Working, we’re speaking to individuals employed in fields potentially imperiled by the Trump presidency. These are the stories of people doing difficult but important jobs—jobs that may get much more difficult and much more important in the years ahead.

Between the rise of so-called "Right To Work" states and increasing deregulations, labor unions are facing increasing challenges. David Mott organizes health care workers with the Service Employees International Union (SEIU). Mott spoke with Jacob Brogan about how he charts out workplaces, identifies and develops leaders, and evades management to help build and strengthen unions.

Then, in a Slate Plus Extra, Mott brings out his guitar and tells us how he uses music as an organizing tool. If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan

The "How Does a Satirist Work?" Edition  

This season on Working, we’re speaking to individuals employed in fields potentially imperiled by the Trump presidency. These are the stories of people doing difficult but important jobs—jobs that may get much more difficult and much more important in the years ahead.

Alexandra Petri writes humorous spins on the news for the Washington Post She spoke to Jacob Brogan about what it's like to make satire in an increasingly absurd news climate.

Then, in a Slate Plus extra, Petri tells us about Emo Kylo Ren, a parody account she made imagining the villain of Star Wars: The Force Awakens as a petulant teenager. If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Petri's blog "ComPost": https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/compost/
Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan

The "How Does a Psychotherapist Work?" Edition  

This season on Working, we’re speaking to individuals employed in fields potentially imperiled by the Trump presidency. These are the stories of people doing difficult but important jobs—jobs that may get much more difficult and much more important in the years ahead.

Shane'a Thomas helps LGBTQ youth work through depression, anxiety, and other mental illness. She spoke to Jacob Brogan about a typical day of sessions, how she helps patients get what they want out of their therapy, and how the recent political climate is affecting her work.

Then, in a Slate Plus extra, Thomas tells us how she feels about armchair attempts to "diagnose" Donald Trump from afar. If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan

The "How Does a Pollster Work?" Edition  

Recently, Donald Trump tweeted that "any negative polls are fake news," so we wanted to understand some of the work that goes into polling.  In this episode of Working, Pollster Jim Gerstein of GBA Strategies tells Jacob Brogan about how he uses surveys and focus groups to help his clients understand and influence America. In a Slate Plus Extra, Gerstein tells us how he got some of his earliest experience in polling in Israel.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan

The "How Does a Librarian Work?" Edition  

This season on Working, we’re speaking to individuals employed in fields potentially imperiled by the Trump presidency. These are the stories of people doing difficult but important jobs—jobs that may get much more difficult and much more important in the years ahead.

University of Pennsylvania Librarian Laurie Allen is working with a collective of scientists, students, professors, programmers, and librarians on the Data Refuge project, archiving environmental data before it has the opportunity to disappear in government transition. She spoke with Jacob Brogan about her work with the Data Refuge Project, and about her career as a librarian. Allen detailed how her work has evolved as digital technology has progressed and about how she tries to keep her work connected to scholarship and helping students, even as the times change.

Then, in a Slate Plus extra, Allen tells us about a special project she worked on with the Penn Environmental Humanities Lab featuring stories and information from Philadelphia's Schuykill River. If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan
Learn more about Data Refuge: http://www.ppehlab.org/





The "How Does a CIA Analyst Work?" Edition  

This season on Working, we’re speaking to individuals employed in fields potentially imperiled by the Trump presidency. These are the stories of people doing difficult but important jobs—jobs that may get much more difficult and much more important in the years ahead.

Since his election, Trump has been dismissive of the intelligence community, reportedly neglecting briefings and sometimes even insulting the efforts of its members. We wanted to understand what it means to actually work in that secretive world. And while we couldn’t, for obvious reasons, get an active intelligence officer to talk to us, we did score the next best thing. Our guest this week is Aki Peritz, who worked as an intelligence analyst for the C.I.A., focusing for much of his time there on counterterrorism. He talks to Jacob Brogan about what that job actually involved, and about the importance of getting things right. He also tells us about everything from office culture at the CIA to the burden of secrecy. And, of course, he shares some thoughts about Trump.

Then, in a Slate Plus extra, Peritz tells us about Hunted, the reality TV show that he’s working on now. If you’re a member, enjoy bonus segments and interview transcripts from Working, plus other great podcast exclusives. Start your two-week free trial at slate.com/workingplus.

Email: working@slate.com
Twitter: @Jacob_Brogan

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