Social Media Marketing

Social Media Marketing

United States

Social Media Examiner's Michael Stelzner helps your business navigate the social jungle with success stories and expert interviews from leading social media marketing pros. Discover how successful businesses employ social media, learn new strategies and tactics, and gain actionable tips to improve your social media marketing. Find show notes at http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/podcast/

Episodes

Facebook Messenger Marketing: What Marketers Need to Know  

Do you want to communicate with your customers via Facebook Messenger? Wondering how Facebook Messenger bots and Messenger ads can help? To explore this topic, I interview Molly Pittman. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Molly Pittman, the vice president of marketing at DigitalMarketer. She specializes in customer acquisition and teaches regularly for DigitalMarketer Engage, which is the company's membership community. You'll discover how businesses can benefit from integrating Facebook Messenger features into their marketing. Molly shares use cases for Facebook Messenger marketing. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Messenger Marketing Why Consider Messenger Ads? As soon as Facebook Messenger ads became available in November 2016, Molly started experimenting with them. Molly says she's excited about Facebook Messenger ads because they're not just a new interface element or feature. Facebook Messenger ads are a whole new channel. Molly believes the value of Facebook Messenger ads lies in the app's popularity and convenience. More than one billion people communicate via Facebook Messenger. Because that's where people are having conversations with friends, family, colleagues, or whomever, Molly believes businesses should be connecting with their customers via Facebook Messenger, too. The app's popularity makes Facebook Messenger a good place to buy ads, connect with prospects, and talk to customers. Molly says that DigitalMarketer's initial tests have shown good results. The open rate and consumption are really high. Molly has seen the benefit from the consumer's standpoint, too. A few months ago, as Molly was driving in Austin, she saw a new apartment complex being built. Molly was interested, so she went to the company's Facebook page and contacted them through their Message Us button. They responded almost instantaneously. Every step of her communication with the company was done through Facebook Messenger. I ask Molly if she believes Facebook Messenger will replace email. Molly responds that email will likely always be a powerful tool for marketers, certainly for the next five years. However, she says Facebook Messenger isn't necessarily a replacement but is the mode of communication most similar to email. In some aspects, Messenger is better than email, she continues, because people tend to respond instantaneously on Messenger, whereas people don't feel compelled to respond to emails right away. Listen to the show to hear Molly and I discuss our predictions for the future of Facebook Messenger. The Types of Messenger Ads Molly explains the two types of Facebook Messenger ads. The first one is called a destination ad because when you set it up, you choose Facebook Messenger as the destination (as opposed to your website). Like a regular ad, a destination ad appears in the news feed and can display a video, carousel, or image. When someone clicks the ad, a message to your Facebook page opens in Facebook Messenger and you can begin a conversation. For example, the first test Molly ran was a simple destination ad that said, "Do you have questions about how DigitalMarketer can help grow your business? We'd love to chat." When someone clicked the ad, a Facebook Messenger window opened where the person could type his or her message to DigitalMarketer. Molly says you can target anyone with destination ads, such as your custom audiences and interests. The opportunities are endless. The other type is a sponsored message, which is more like an email.

Animated Visuals: How to Bring Still Images to Life  

Do you use visuals on your blog and social media? Have you considered animating them? To explore how to use animated visuals in your content, I interview Donna Moritz. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview visual marketing expert Donna Moritz. Her blog Socially Sorted was recognized as one of Social Media Examiner's Top 10 Social Media Blogs in 2015, 2016, and 2017. Donna explores three popular types of animated images. You'll discover tools to easily animate your own images. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Animated Visuals Why Animate As people scan their social media feeds, they're making lightning-fast decisions about what content they'll pay attention to. In this context, animated visuals add a little bit of movement that can attract the eye and add value in a short, snappy way. Donna explains that short animations can be less intimidating to create than video. Animation is simply combining drawings, photographs, text, or computer graphics to make them move. You don't need to talk in front of a camera. Short animations can also be a way to develop your audience. Donna says if you can make a strong first impression with a short animation, that animation can encourage viewers to watch longer videos and further engage with your content. Listen to the show to hear Donna discuss the findings of a small MIT study that investigated how quickly people interpret images. Popular Formats Donna says that quick animations aren't divided into formal types, but you do tend to see a few common approaches. In a one- to three-second animated image, the background is typically fixed and only text is animated. For example, she points out, Social Media Examiner does these on Instagram. She says you might also see a mini slideshow. "Video is your window of opportunity to get seen the Facebook news feed." - @mari_smith #SMMW17 #marketing #socialmedia #business #entrepreneuer #socialmediamarketing #smm #socialmediatips #smallbusiness #new #socialmediaexaminer #professionaldevelopment #smb #socialmediastrategy #businesstraining #quote #quoteoftheday A post shared by Social Media Examiner (@smexaminer) on Feb 8, 2017 at 4:58pm PST A GIF is a silent animated loop often used to convey a feeling. GIFs have become hugely popular on social media. GIFs started appearing in blog posts and emails but have spread to messaging apps like Slack and Facebook Messenger. For example, in a blog post about social media strategies that drive her crazy, Donna says the only way she could express her frustration was with a Muppet GIF from Giphy. Another type is a 3- to 10-second video, which you could create with something like the Ripl app. (More on that below.) Finally, Instagram and Snapchat stories enable you to blend and share quick successions of images or videos. All of these types of content are easy to create because so many tools are available. Listen to the show to hear about audio in short video. The Pros and Cons of GIFs In blog posts and in email, GIFs are a great way to highlight particular emotions, add humor, or simply break up the content. Donna says she once sent out the wrong email to her subscribers, so she used a GIF to apologize. However, you need to be careful about how you use GIFs. Donna recommends using GIFs sparingly. In a blog post, use no more than two GIFs, and in email one is enough. Donna says too many GIFs are like strobe lights going off at a nightclub. When you insert a GIF in an email, Donna suggests checking the file size and compressing the GIF bef...

How to Use Facebook to Market Your Products  

Do you have products to sell? Have you tried using Facebook ads to promote your products? To find out how to market products via Facebook, I interview Steve Chou. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Steve Chou. Steve and his wife run an ecommerce site that sells handkerchiefs and linens at BumblebeeLinens.com. He's also host of the My Wife Quit Her Job podcast and the website MyWifeQuitHerJob.com, where he teaches people how to sell physical products online. Steve explains which Facebook ad types he uses to sell his physical products. You'll discover how Steve uses email and Facebook ads in tandem. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Use Facebook to Market Physical Products Steve's Story As Steve and his wife were preparing for their wedding, his wife wanted a nice handkerchief because she expected to cry during the service. After shopping around, they imported a bunch of handkerchiefs from Asia. After using only a few, Steve and his wife listed the rest on eBay, where they sold like hotcakes. Later, when Steve's wife became pregnant with their first child, she wanted to quit her six-figure income job. They reconnected with the handkerchief vendor and opened their online store, Bumblebee Linens. At first, Steve worked as a microprocessor designer by day, and after the baby went to bed, Steve and his wife ran the business. It became such a success that they maintained their income even after his wife quit her job. Steve explains that soon afterward, their friends began wanting to have kids and quit their jobs, and they kept asking Steve how to launch an ecommerce store. Instead of answering the same questions over and over again, Steve began blogging about his experiences running the store. That's how MyWifeQuitHerJob.com got started in 2009. To generate sales in the early days, Steve used Google AdWords. His brother-in-law worked at Google in the AdWords division and showed Steve how to use it. Back in 2007, Steve generated a lot of sales via clicks that cost him about 10 to 15 cents. Steve says online content also helped generate sales. They wrote articles to help brides and provide craft ideas for their products. After three to six months, the articles started ranking in search engines and sent traffic to their store, too. Today, Bumblebee Linens sells handkerchiefs, linen napkins, linen towels, lace parasols, aprons, and more. Steve says the store has several target audiences. The handkerchief audience includes people planning weddings and an over-55 crowd. Event and wedding planners are the target audience for napkins and moms are the audience for Mommy & Me aprons. The company has in-house embroidery machines for personalizing their products. Listen to the show to learn more about the audience and the content on MyWifeQuitHerJob.com. Win-back Campaigns Steve explains that a win-back campaign targets people who have already purchased from your shop because those people are more likely to buy again. To run this type of campaign, you need to figure out who those people are, and if they haven't purchased within a certain timeframe, give them an incentive to come back. You can automate a win-back campaign with an online merchant system. For example, if someone hasn't purchased from Bumblebee Linens in 60 days, they automatically receive an email and a Facebook ad with a 10%-off coupon. To automate the Facebook component of the campaign, Steve says the ecommerce system Klaviyo allows Bumblebee Linens to export a specific segment (in this case people who haven...

Thought Leadership: How to Become Known to People Who Matter  

Do you want to be recognized as an expert in your field? Wondering how to make a name for yourself? To explore how to become known, I interview Mark Schaefer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Mark Schaefer, a prolific blogger, author, and speaker. He's written Social Media Explained, The Content Code, and The Tao of Twitter. He's also been a frequent guest on this podcast. His newest book is KNOWN: The Handbook for Building and Unleashing Your Personal Brand in the Digital Age. Mark shares how to position yourself as a thought leader. You'll discover the four things it takes to become known. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Thought Leadership How Mark Became Known Before Mark launched his business, he was a global director of ebusiness at a Fortune 100 company. He had won a bunch of awards and had seven patents, a big global team, stock options, and a company car. After he left that job to start his business, Mark realized everything that he was known for at his previous company no longer mattered. He thought he was known, but he wasn't. As Mark grappled with being the go-to guy for nothing, he learned the only thing that matters in terms of your online presence is to be known. Being known isn't about being famous, but having an appropriate digital presence to help you achieve your goals. Mark says that building expertise and becoming known is a process. Nine years ago, as Mark started to teach and write for his own business, he struggled. Like everyone else, he started at the bottom. For instance, when Mark started blogging, he didn't know anything about it. Later on, Mark wrote a book about blogging. When he started consulting, he knew very little about it, but now he consults for big companies. Mark emphasizes that to start, you don't have to be an expert. You only need to be open and willing to learn continuously. I ask Mark what helped him become known again in the second phase of his career as he was building his own business. Mark says his goals, one of which was speaking at Social Media Marketing World, helped, but enjoying the journey was also important because becoming known takes time. Mark says some people set milestones that unknowingly let other people validate their work. However, as he was interviewing known people for his recent book, they often mentioned the positive impact they have on others. Mark believes this sense of mission is important because it defines who they are from within and motivates them as they put in the time necessary to become known. Listen to the show to discover how many years it takes to become known. What Prompted the Book Mark explains the two seeds that led to him write KNOWN. As research for his last book, The Content Code, Mark interviewed Jay Baer. They debated whether just anybody can become known or if you need a certain "it" factor. For three and a half years, this question stayed with Mark and he began wondering whether becoming known involved a process that he could define. The other seed, Mark explains, came from his conversations with consulting clients. People from all over the world ask Mark questions like, "How do I get in a position where I can write a book someday?" "How do I get in a position where I can be a speaker someday?" "How do I get appointed to a board?" "How do I attract more clients in my industry?" "How do I become regarded as a voice of authority?" Mark found himself giving the same answer over and over again: "To do that, you have to be known.

Video Blogging: How to Create Consistent YouTube Content  

Do you create videos to promote your business? Have you considered starting a regular video blog? To explore vlogging, I interview Amy Schmittauer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Amy Schmittauer, an online video expert. She founded Vlog Boss Studios and regularly produces awesome content for her YouTube channel, Savvy Sexy Social. She's also the author of the brand-new book, Vlog Like a Boss: How to Kill It Online with Video Blogging. Amy explores how video blogging can help your business. You'll discover what you need to start your own video blog. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, or SoundCloud. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Vlog Like a Boss What Is Vlogging? The term vlog builds off the word blog, and a vlog is simply a blog in video form. In a vlog, you can share anything you might do in a blog post, such as a tutorial or a story from your life. Consistency is best for vlogging. If you post a vlog here and there, you won't gain much traction. Amy says most vlogs that do well have a regular schedule. I ask Amy about how using YouTube for vlogging is different from the other ways people use YouTube. Amy says the purpose of a vlog is to help people discover you. Videos that may be suitable for YouTube but that don't help people discover you, such as a product commercial or an introduction to your company, don't make great vlog posts. To be discovered, think of the users who are searching for a concern, a specialty, or the answer to a question. Think about what a potential customer or audience member might want to know, create a video about the topic, and upload it to YouTube. Listen to the show to discover Amy's thoughts about vlogging on mobile apps like Snapchat and Instagram, which have video and social. Amy's Vlog When Amy launched Savvy Sexy Social, she was just getting started as a social media marketer. She thought teaching people the best way to do things on social media would to attract an audience and potential clients. She wanted her vlog to be informative and fun. She didn't want social media to feel like a chore. To juggle her content marketing with her client work, Amy says she scheduled her vlog posts to appear three days a week but she created the week's videos all in one day. She would pick three topics (which could be an app, a product, or a general social media tip), record the videos sitting in front of her bookshelf, and then edit and schedule them for the rest of the week. Amy emphasizes that people didn't have to know who she was to find her videos via search. They just needed to have a question about a topic in her videos. For instance, Amy created a video about a hack to make tweets a little longer. She thought the topic was something new that people didn't know much about, and the video became one of her popular vlog posts. The video's headline focused on the Twitter tip but the video also introduced viewers to Amy. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJRp22IXqXY Amy shares the simple vlog format she used for a long time. She introduced her topic, delivered information about the topic that her viewers would value, and gave an actionable item that would give them results right away. Then she wrapped up with, "By the way, I'm Amy. Hope you can subscribe and stay tuned." In the last year, Amy says she's been having fun with her format so her community could get to know her a little more personally. For instance, throughout January, she documented the journey of launching a book. This approach was more of a lifecasting vlog, but her audience was learning through Amy's experien...

How to Use Facebook Ads to Boost Your Best Content  

Do you use Facebook ads? Have you considered creating Facebook ads from your top-performing organic posts? To explore how to identify and boost your best Facebook content, I interview Larry Kim. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Larry Kim, the founder and chief technology officer for WordStream. He's a frequent blogger, pay-per-click expert, and social advertising ninja. Larry explains how to improve the performance of your best content with Facebook advertising. You'll discover how to budget for Facebook ads. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, or SoundCloud. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Use Facebook Ads to Boost Your Best Content Larry's Backstory Larry's company, WordStream, does search engine and social media advertising, and Larry believes that it's important for businesses to do both types. For instance, B2B software companies build new features, functions, and solutions that nobody is searching for yet. However, with social ads, these businesses can target people who are likely to buy their software based on demographics, interests, or behaviors. Unlike an individual advertiser who has data about only one business, Larry is able to spot trends and patterns in online advertising because WordStream manages approximately $1 billion of ad spending across Facebook, Bing, and Google and runs thousands of campaigns for different clients. WordStream analyzes all of these campaigns to figure out data such as the typical cost per click and typical engagement rates. Listen to the show to discover the percentage of WordStream's clients using Facebook advertising. How Algorithms Work To understand the algorithms, Larry says it's important to think about the context in which your ad appears. (Our conversation focuses on Facebook, but Larry says the same is true for ads on Twitter and other social media platforms.) When you sponsor or promote a post, you're one of thousands or even millions of companies going after the same audience. Larry explains that the Facebook algorithm is designed to handle that volume in a way that keeps Facebook engaging for users so they come back. To determine which posts to show users and how much to charge the advertiser, Larry believes that the algorithm looks at many different factors, but the main one is engagement (clicks, likes, comments, or shares). A post with low engagement has an engagement rate of 1% to 2%. (Only 1 or 2 people out of 100 engage with the post.) A high-engagement post has a rate of 10% to 15%, and the average is around 2.5% to 3%. Larry emphasizes that Facebook doesn't want users' news feeds filled with ridiculous updates that no one cares about. A company trying to promote garbage content with low engagement rates will be dinged with very few ad impressions. The ad might not even be shown. If the ad does show, the click-through rate will be expensive (a few dollars per click versus a few cents). The reverse is also true. Facebook rewards companies that promote interesting content by showing their ads and charging only pennies per click. Listen to the show to hear Larry's thoughts about how engaging ad content needs to be compared to organic content. Unicorns Because algorithms reward engaging content, Larry believes that the winning advertising strategy is simple: promote your unicorns. These outlier posts do spectacularly well. They get three to five times more traffic than the average post and are among the top 1% to 3% of your most engaging content. For instance, a unicorn post might have a 20% engagement rate,

Instagram Stories: How to Create Engaging Stories  

Do you use Instagram? Wondering how Instagram stories work? To explore how to craft Instagram stories for business, I interview Sue B. Zimmerman. Instagram Stories The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Sue B. Zimmerman, an Instagram marketing expert who helps businesses and marketers take their Instagram marketing to the next level. She's the author of the Instagram Strategy Guide ebook and a regular speaker at Social Media Marketing World. Sue shares how a number of businesses are creating engaging Instagram stories. You'll discover several techniques to improve your own Instagram stories. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, or SoundCloud. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Instagram Stories Why Marketers Should Consider Instagram Stories Sue started using Instagram Stories as soon as the feature rolled out in 2016. She still uses Snapchat, but she says now she mostly relies on Instagram Stories. She says pulling together content to tell a story is creative work, similar to scrapbooking. Sue recommends that you develop a thread that keeps people engaged in your story from start to finish. Also, create Instagram stories with content that's original to Instagram, rather than duplicating content from other platforms. Sue says Instagram stories have three main benefits: First, Instagram stories direct followers to your actual Instagram feed, where your posts are always available. (Instagram stories disappear after 24 hours.) Stories that are entertaining and engaging give your followers a quick and easy way to consume your content. Engagement is important to the new algorithm that determines what people see in their Instagram feed. Because Instagram stories boost engagement with your Instagram posts, they improve your chances of showing up at the top of people's news feeds. Listen to the show to discover when Sue still uses Snapchat instead of Instagram Stories. Instagram Stories and Posts We talk about the highly produced content that marketers often feature on their Instagram feeds, and Sue says high production value is not necessary for Instagram stories. Sue shares a few examples of businesses that use Instagram stories in creative ways. These businesses create stories that are different from the content in their regular Instagram feeds. For example, Jenny Schatzle, who owns a gym in Santa Barbara, uses Instagram stories to let people know when she's starting new sessions. Her stories are more like ads, which is a completely different approach than her regular posts on Instagram. Sue has also seen companies with products (such as shoe company M.Gemi) use stories to feature sales and direct people to their Instagram feeds. Sue notes that marketers use text differently on Instagram posts and stories. The more successful accounts on Instagram typically include the text in the description, not on the photo itself, so people connect with the experience of the product or service that the photo depicts. However, in an Instagram story, text can add value. People who don't have the volume turned up in the story can read the text on the video or the photo. I ask how Instagram Stories has changed the way people interact with content on Instagram. Sue shares a few changes she's noticed since the release of Instagram Stories and the algorithm change. Although she's been posting less frequently on Instagram, Sue gets more engagement with her posts over a longer period of time. She attributes that engagement to having active Instagram stories. People discover Sue through her stories, which provide value.

Mobile Local Marketing: Reaching the Mobile Customer  

Do you have a local business? Want an effective way to market to people who are near you? To explore how to reach your customers with mobile marketing, I interview Rich Brooks. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Rich Brooks, author of The Lead Machine: The Small Business Guide to Digital Marketing. He's also host of The Agents of Change podcast and The Agents of Change Digital Marketing Conference. Rich explores how local businesses can use mobile marketing to deliver relevant messaging to their customers. You'll discover how to combine mobile marketing with social media. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, or SoundCloud. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Mobile Local Marketing The Importance of Mobile In 2017, every business should focus on mobile, Rich says, especially businesses with physical locations and a local audience. Mobile is important because people always have their devices by their side. For example, when Rich takes his daughter to volleyball practices in different towns, he uses Waze on his phone to get directions. Then after dropping her off, he goes to Yelp to find a coffeehouse or asks Google or Siri to find the nearest supermarket so he can go shopping. While he waits in line, Rich explores Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram; plays a game; or reads a news article. Because people are always on their phones, local businesses can attract customers who are looking for information on the go and making immediate decisions. If those people are in your area, you can capture their business with a strong mobile presence. Listen to the show for more about how potential customers use mobile. Mobile Offers and SMS Messages To engage people on mobile, Rich says you can create mobile offers, which are being redeemed at 10 times the rate of old print coupons. Mobile offers take many forms. You can run a Facebook campaign on mobile, promote an offer that's available on a mobile device, or tell people they can download a deal onto their phones and show it at the counter. Another option is SMS text messaging. Rich explains that SMS offers work a lot like email marketing. For example, a pizzeria can send people discounts. A massage therapist near Rich gives customers who opt into SMS text messages first dibs on appointment times that open up due to last-minute cancellations. To send SMS marketing messages, you start by finding an SMS marketing vendor in your area. These vendors work similarly to email marketing vendors, such as MailChimp, Constant Contact, AWeber, and smaller local players. Your vendor assigns you a short code and customers opt into your SMS messages by texting that code and confirming they want to receive your messages. Rich says a pizza restaurant might tell customers, "Text Pizza to 004400." After you're set up to send messages, you can start building your SMS marketing list. Rich emphasizes that people will sign up to receive messages only if you offer an incentive for signing up. For a pizza business, that incentive might be a dollar off, a free topping, or free delivery. Rich suggests promoting your SMS list on your social media profiles, website, flyers, and product packaging (such as pizza boxes). Rich says you can expect a smaller but more engaged audience for your SMS messages. Fewer people will opt in, but right now those who do are much more likely to look at their text messages immediately. Rich predicts that engagement with SMS messages may drop off if people become overwhelmed with text messages, but says that currently SMS is still fairly new and can be a boon to a local ...

Content Marketing Success: Why Answering Questions Sells  

Do you want more sales? Is content marketing a part of your strategy? To explore how to create content that sells, I interview Marcus Sheridan. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Marcus Sheridan, a blogger, podcaster, and keynote speaker who specializes in content and inbound marketing. He's known as "The Sales Lion," and is the author of the brand-new book, They Ask You Answer: A Revolutionary Approach to Inbound Sales, Content Marketing, and Today's Digital Consumer. Marcus explores how to market and sell with content. You'll discover how the right content can overcome buyers' fears. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, or SoundCloud. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Content Marketing Success Marcus' Story Marcus began learning about content marketing during the 2008 market crash. Within 48 hours, his swimming pool business, River Pools, lost a quarter of a million dollars after five clients pulled their deposits. By January 2009, three consultants had suggested filing for bankruptcy. However, if Marcus filed, he and his partners would lose their homes and their 16 employees would lose their jobs. Marcus knew he had to generate more trust, traffic, leads, and sales than ever, and he had no money to do it. So he looked at the Internet. Marcus read all about inbound marketing, content, and blogging. He learned that addressing his prospects' questions, issues, fears, worries, and concerns on the business website could help the business be successful. In March 2009, Marcus told his two business partners that the company needed to live by a new philosophy: "They Ask. You Answer." Marcus brainstormed all of the questions he'd ever been asked and found that the major questions were often ones businesses don't like to answer online. Committed to the new philosophy, however, Marcus began writing blog posts about customers' questions, including the good, the bad, and the ugly. The company became committed to answering questions more consistently and transparently than anybody in their space. Listen to the show to discover how this new approach transformed the website's traffic, leads, and sales. Online Content Overload Now that many websites have taken the same approach to content that Marcus did, I ask Marcus what advice he would give to any business owner concerned that approaches to website content have changed. Marcus says he's really bothered when businesses assume they shouldn't share their philosophies or content because they think everything has already been said. Those businesses are letting other people in their industry create the content. Business leaders also think they shouldn't share content because their content isn't amazing. Marcus disagrees and notes that initially his writing and video content were bad. However, he kept going and now his content is good. Listen to the show to hear what false idea Marcus says everyone believes. The Five Subjects That Make a Difference In any industry, Marcus says buyers want to discuss five subjects as they research a company, product, or service online, and addressing these subjects on your website will help you reach your marketing goals. Cost questions Problems questions (what the drawbacks and issues are) Comparisons (your product versus another) Best of (for example, the best marketing automation software) Reviews However, Marcus finds that businesses don't like to talk about these topics on their websites. As a result, they lose customers. Most people research cost online before they buy and get frustrated when they can't find ...

Facebook Community Development: How to Cultivate Loyal Fans  

Are you creating a fan base on Facebook? Want to discover how to engage your audience via pages and groups? To explore how to nurture a community on Facebook, I interview Holly Homer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Holly Homer, a professional blogger whose Kids Activities Blog helps parents discover fun things to do with their kids. Her Facebook page (Quirky Momma) has more than 3 million fans. Holly shares how she's cultivated a thriving community using Facebook. You'll discover how Holly uses Facebook Insights to develop her content. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, or SoundCloud. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Community Development The Importance of Community Community is the key to performing well in the algorithm-driven world of Facebook. To serve the community of Kids Activities Blog and the Quirky Momma Facebook page, all of the content focuses on the people who make up that community. Those people are mostly moms (plus the occasional dad, grandparent, or teacher) who are looking for something to do with their small children and survive the day. Whether that content is a video, picture, or saying, it needs to help the community and bring people closer together. When Holly began blogging 10 years ago, the community developed via comments on her personal blog, June Cleaver Nirvana, as well as comments she made on her friends' blogs. A popular blog post might attract 300 visitors and 150 comments. Holly recalls that commenting made this community visible and close-knit. When social networks came along, Holly says she had to relearn how to establish community, so she steered the conversation from comments onto Facebook because that's where comments and engagement were happening. She had to tell her community where she would be engaging and eventually turned off the comments on her blog. Facebook Live changed Holly's community again. She says she can now talk directly to her fans, but Facebook Live allows her to have more of a two-way conversation and be a participant rather than the center of her community. Listen to the show to hear Holly's advice for maintaining a community as social media changes. Facebook Insights Holly is a bit of an analytics geek and uses Facebook Insights learn about her community and what they like. With Facebook Insights, Holly can learn what common traits her community shares (they're typically moms with small children), where they live (mostly the United States and Australia), when they're online, and what they do online. Holly says she can also see what types of content her community likes (such as photos, links, or videos) and even what kinds of links or videos attract the most engagement. What Holly learns in Facebook Insights helps her decide what type of content brings her community together. In Facebook Insights, Holly says she mostly focuses on the magical orange bar. This bar shows each post's reach in comparison to other content for that day or other content on the page. (You find the orange bar by clicking More under the list of posts to get a whole page of posts and then looking in the fifth column.) Holly says her team knows that if the orange bar is short, don't repeat that content. If the orange bar is long, try to figure out how to repeat the performance of that successful content. For Holly, a short orange bar doesn't mean that the proverbial algorithms didn't like some content. It means her fans didn't like the content. She says every single interaction on your page is a vote for more of that content.

Building a Business on the Back of Interviews  

Do you interview people for your blog or podcast? Want to discover different ways to repurpose those interviews? To explore how he built his business through expert interviews, I interview Nathan Chan. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Nathan Chan, the founder, CEO, and publisher of Foundr Magazine, a paid digital magazine that profiles well-known entrepreneurs. He's built a huge following of almost 1 million Instagram fans and 300,000 email subscribers. He's also launched a new book, Foundr V1.0: Everything you need to know about starting and building a successful business, from the world's most influential entrepreneurs. Nathan shares his interviewing process. You'll discover how Nathan used expert interviews to build his business. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, or SoundCloud. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Building a Business on the Back of Interviews The Start of Foundr In 2013, Nathan was working in IT support at a travel company. He loved the company culture, but the work wasn't a fit. As he searched for something more fulfilling to do, he noticed that the major business magazines, of which he was a fan, were difficult for him to relate to. His life wasn't like the lives of the people on a Forbes billionaire list. Nathan started his magazine with about $3,000 and a goal of filling the gap between major business magazine content and entrepreneurs like himself. He wanted to speak to aspiring young entrepreneurs (he was 26 years old at the time) and provide in-depth content about what it takes to build a successful business. Nathan says that podcasts inspired this vision for his magazine, too. Podcasts were becoming increasingly popular, featured stories about relatable people, and could cover a topic in depth. Four months into producing the magazine, Nathan and his startup magazine faced a major roadblock. A large business magazine sued Nathan's startup magazine for trademark infringement. Luckily, Nathan says, the rebranding of the magazine resulted in the name Foundr, which is a better fit. Listen to the show to learn more about how Nathan responded to the lawsuit by improving the magazine's branding. The Business Model Foundr has three main sources of revenue: magazine subscriptions, the membership site, and courses. The magazine subscription is $2.99/month or $21.99/year and is available through the iTunes and Google Play stores. Across monthly and yearly subscriptions, Foundr has 20,000 monthly readers. On the Foundr membership site, subscribers have access to premium content, an online community, and exclusive training. In addition to the main revenue sources, Foundr includes a bit of sponsorship and advertising. Listen to the show to discover the similarities between what Nathan and I do. Nathan's Interviewing Process Nathan has interviewed successful entrepreneurs including Richard Branson, founder of Virgin; Steve Case, founder of AOL; Arianna Huffington, founder of Huffington Post; Gary Vaynerchuk; Barbara Corcoran; Tim Ferriss; Robert Herjavec; Jessica Livingston, founder of Y Combinator; and others. Much of Nathan's interview preparation involves his day-to-day reading about and listening to the topics, brands, and people Foundr covers. He regularly looks at Facebook, reads what's happening in TechCrunch and Mashable, and follows podcasts to see what they're doing and whom they're interviewing. To help find guests, he looks for people who have books coming out or otherwise need press. By consuming a lot of content, Nathan is aware of what's happening in his space and how to...

Live Video and Marketing: Where the Industry Is Heading  

Interested in using live video for business? Have you considered creating a live video show? To find out what live video can do for your business, I interview Brian Fanzo. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Brian Fanzo, a tech evangelist who specializes in live video. He's the founder of iSocialFanz and host of the FOMOFanz podcast. Brian explores live video, where it's headed, and how it can help your business. You'll discover whether to use Facebook Live or Periscope if you're just getting started. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, or SoundCloud. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Live Video and Marketing What Live Video Means for Business Whether yours is a small business, a brick-and-mortar store, or an ecommerce company, you need to shrink the distance between yourself and your customer, Brian explains. Live video is much more than a marketing play because it shrinks that distance by humanizing your brand and business. Live video is also the gateway to technologies such as augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR), which Brian believes will be huge by 2020. To embrace AR and VR, he says, companies and brands will need to have a live video strategy already in place. He says today's consumers want you to convince them that you can be trusted, that you're a resource, are invested in them, and can understand them. They don't want to be marketed or sold to; they want to engage and have a conversation with you. Businesses need to spend time building rapport, a relationship, and trust with their audience, and live video is a great vehicle for that. With regard to building trust, Brian believes the most valuable statement anyone can make on live video is, "I don't know." If a brand admits they don't know something on live video, it adds validity to what they do know. (When you're stumped, you can also ask audience members to send you a message on Twitter or Facebook, and say you'll have your product manager get back to them.) Listen to the show to hear more about the strategy behind using live video to break down barriers with your audience. Getting Started With Live Video Brian says that according to Cisco, 79% of Internet traffic in 2020 will be video. Nowhere did anyone say that's going to be great video, good video, or live video, Brian continues. However, he believes most brands are thinking about video. Many people think live video is scary because they picture themselves on the video. Brian has to remind them that the best live videos are often made when you're celebrating customers and employees. And if your live video brings people access they can't get anywhere else, the camera doesn't even need to be on you. For example, say you use live video to interview a client, a customer, or a celebrity while they're in the office. As the person behind the camera, you can watch the comments for questions and decide which are important enough to ask the guest. With these kinds of live videos, all of the scary elements of being on air are taken away. Listen to the show to discover my process for doing live videos. Innovative Examples of Live Video Brian says Cisco has done an amazing job with their We Are Cisco campaign. Employees in different offices are trusted to take over the company's social media accounts, including Snapchat and Instagram, to share their point of view. Happy #MillennialMonday! Meet Stephen Lam, a Global Audience Manager who likes to parkour! Learn more about Stephen by watching our #InstagramStories or click the link in our bio. #WeAreCisco

How to Build Raving Fans in Unconventional Ways  

Do you want enthusiastic fans? Looking for unique ways to engage your audience? To discover how he grew a large and thriving fan base, I interview Pat Flynn. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Pat Flynn, the founder of SmartPassiveIncome.com, a website dedicated to helping people start businesses. He's also host of the Smart Passive Income podcast and author of Will It Fly? Pat explores unconventional ways to build loyalty with your fans. You'll discover which forms of content are better than others for creating raving fans. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, or SoundCloud. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Build Raving Fans in Unconventional Ways The Beginning of Smart Passive Income Pat built the Smart Passive Income blog in the latter half of 2008 as a way to showcase how he was finding success with Green Exam Academy, a website with resources to help people pass the architecture exam. On the blog, Pat shared how he'd built his business, things he wished he would have done, and mistakes he made. In October 2008, he started including income reports (how many products he sold and how much money he made), not to show off but to provide inspiration. Pat believes that by keeping people in the loop of his activities and leading by example, others benefit from his knowledge. Over time, the Smart Passive Income blog became more about experimenting with new tactics, documenting, and sharing what Pat learned along the way. Pat says that's how he became known as the crash test dummy of online business. Back in 2008, if you had told Pat that he would be a leader in this space, he says he would have laughed. He didn't think that was what he wanted. Now Pat is owning the role, trying to lead by example and starting a movement of authentic entrepreneurship. Listen to the show to hear Pat explain more about crash test dummies. Nurturing Fans in the Early Days While Pat got a lot of encouragement via the comments on his blog for the first couple of years, he never thought of those commenters as fans. Then in July 2010, he started his podcast. Later that year, strangers came up to him at a conference and chatted like they were old friends. Nobody at the conference mentioned his blog. Pat thinks his fans connected more through the podcast rather than his blog because they viewed the podcast as more real. He explains that the written word gives you a feel for who a person is, but a podcast puts you in the ears of your listeners. For listeners, the feeling is similar to being part of a conversation. Pat says he's very much himself on air, and shares personal tidbits in each episode to help his audience relate to and connect with him. For example, at the beginning of every show, Pat's voiceover guy John Melley (who does our intros in a different accent) reads a random fun fact about Pat. For example, "Here's your host. He's a Sagittarius who loves long walks on the beach: Pat Flynn." or "Here's your host. He was an 11-pound, 12-ounce baby." Pat says he once met a woman at a conference who told him she loved his show and randomly added, "When I had my baby, he was also a giant." That small fact immediately connected them, because she could relate. When you share fun little facts about yourself, Pat notes, people can find something they have in common with you and decide to follow you. This isn't true only for podcasts; the same thing can happen on your blog or your video channel. Listen to the show to discover Pat's thoughts on using video versus a podcast to connect with people. Being Yourself

Advanced Blogging: How to Make Your Blog Serve Your Business  

Do you have a blog? Want to supercharge your content and increase email subscribers? To explore advanced techniques for improving blog content, collecting more email addresses, and promoting products and events, I interview Darren Rowse. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Darren Rowse, one of the world's leading experts on blogging. He's the founder of two popular blogs: Digital Photography School and ProBlogger. He also co-authored the book ProBlogger and hosts the ProBlogger podcast. Darren shares how he learned to better serve the needs of his readers. You'll discover how Darren uses portal pages and what goes into creating them. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, or SoundCloud. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Advanced Blogging Determine What Type of Content to Create Darren started by writing what he was excited about in the moment, and he believes that's a great place for bloggers to start because their writing comes across as passionate. However, for bloggers to build expertise in a niche, he notes, they need to put more thought into it. Darren says there are two parts to achieving that outcome. First, you need to understand the people who read your blog and what their needs are. Ultimately, Darren's content ideas come from the conversations he has with readers; this determines what he writes about. Second, you should develop before and after avatars. The before avatar represents who his readers are when they come to the blog, and the after avatar represents who he wants his readers to become. Use your avatars to fill in what your readers need to move from the before avatar to the after avatar, he explains. For example, readers first come to the Digital Photography School blog because they don't know how to use their cameras to full potential. The "after" readers have full creative control of their cameras, along with the confidence, knowledge, and technical skills to get out of automatic mode and take their photography to the next level. Give them what they want and sell them what they need. For example, readers who come to Darren's blog to get photography tips realize they need more help when they return from vacation and discover their photos didn't reflect their journey. His ebook, A Guide to Captivating Travel Photography: Transcending Travel, delivers the things they didn't realize they didn't know, such as tips to help lift their photos. Darren used this exercise for the first time in 2006, and came up with 200 things his blog readers needed to know. Those notations became the first 200 posts on the site. Listen to the show to discover how Darren uses what he knows about what people need to collect email subscribers, attract Facebook fans, sell products, and more. Develop an Editorial Strategy Darren shares the nine different elements he and his team work through each year to figure out their editorial strategy. Voice: Is your content more conversational, teaching, or storytelling? Evergreen vs. Time-sensitive Content: What's the proper ratio? Darren's photography blog leans more toward evergreen, but he notes others may need to create more time-sensitive content. Intent: Is your aim to inform, inspire, educate, or interact? Darren's blogs focus on information and education, but mix in inspirational and interactive content here and there. As an example of content created to drive interaction, Darren says Digital Photography School does a challenge post each week in which they prompt readers to take photos using a specific technique and then share the photos in the comments.

How Snapchat and Periscope Can Grow a Business  

Do you want to use Snapchat for business? Wondering how to incorporate your brand into live stories? To explore how to use Periscope and Snapchat for business, I interview John Kapos. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview John Kapos, part of a long family line of chocolatiers who have run Perfection Chocolates in Australia since 1939. Online he's known as Chocolate Johnny. He's very active on Snapchat, Instagram, and Periscope. John shares how marketing on Snapchat has affected his business. You'll discover creative ideas to help your own business succeed with Periscope, Snapchat, and Instagram Stories. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, or SoundCloud. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How Snapchat and Periscope Can Grow a Business How John Got Started With Snapchat John shares that his store in Sydney, Australia gets bombarded with kids at the end of the school day, and he had begun to notice his sons and their friends using Snapchat. Even though he was told he's "too old" for Snapchat, he decided to take a chance. John, a self-described early adopter, started on Facebook and then got involved with Instagram. While he felt Instagram was cleaner, nicer, and crisper, he loved the functionality of Snapchat. For example, it let him do a video and include titles, add music, and so on. In the beginning, John posted photos of customers and chocolate, as well as videos of him making treats and introducing himself. In one of those early promos, he posted a picture and told his followers to screenshot it, and then come in for a free hot chocolate; two people did just that, and John shares that he's had as many as 60 people come to the store in response to a similar promotion. Now, John explains, his Snapchat stories all have a beginning, a middle, and an end, and all have a tie to chocolate. Each story also has a call to action such as Come to Perfection Chocolates, Come to the website, Come to meet me, or Be part of the party. For example, a Snapchat promotion of his Star Wars chocolate products began with an image of Han Solo and the text, "I'm in a dilemma. Help Me." The middle was an explanation of what John was making. The story ended with a call to action: "Please screenshot and tell me which one is better: milk chocolate or dark chocolate." A total of 63 people responded. Listen to the show to discover how using Snapchat has turned John's store into a global brand. Working Your Brand Into Snapchat Stories Everyone has a story, John believes, and he says it's all about getting out of your comfort zone and telling your story. People tell John he's got an advantage because he's promoting chocolate, and everybody loves chocolate. However, John doesn't think that should make a difference, and shares that he's helped a dentist create funny stories that make children want to come and see him, as well as a mechanic in New Zealand build a story around how to change a tire. John reiterates that anyone can create stories with any product, they just have to step out of the box. For example, he explains, spotting a large chocolate Easter egg in his store inspired a Snapchat video about two chocolate rabbits mated to produce a ten-pound chocolate egg, and out of which came a white chocolate elephant. John also creates stories about his characters, Johnny Chocolate, a chocolate 'dealer'; Johnny's bodyguard, Frankie; and Johnny's drag-queen girlfriend, Vanilla Chocolate. Listen to the show to hear what happened when John set out to prove he could go a week without using chocolate in his Snapchats.

The Social Media Examiner Story: From Blog to Conference  

Wonder how the Social Media Examiner blog got started? Interested in how we grew a live conference from an online publication? To share the evolution of Social Media Examiner and Social Media Marketing World, Ray Edwards will interview me. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, Ray Edwards of The Ray Edwards Show takes the mic to get the backstory on how Social Media Examiner went from publishing a blog to hosting a live conference. You'll discover the behind-the-scenes story of how I founded Social Media Examiner more than seven years ago and how we decided to start our own conference. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, or SoundCloud. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: The Social Media Examiner Story The Beginning of Everything Prior to launching Social Media Examiner, I was writing white papers for clients and I also authored a book called Writing White Papers. Somewhere along the way, I started a weekly newsletter, which included interviews with experts, pieces written by experts, and tips and techniques. I started covering social media and how it could be used to generate more leads for white papers. Subsequently, I reached out to Copyblogger and MarketingProfs, and wrote some articles for them. The turning point came after I sent a LinkedIn request to Ann Handley, chief content officer for MarketingProfs, and she asked if I was on Facebook. After opening a Facebook account, I was immersed in a different world. Then, I went to a small conference in San Diego and met Paul Colligan, Warren Whitlock (co-author of Twitter Revolution), and Mari Smith. As a result, I decided to do an online conference under my white paper business. (Up to that point I did teleclasses, where people would pay $39/month to hear me interview people like Bob Bly, Peter Bowerman, and others in the copywriting world.) I sold a couple of hundred tickets for the Copywriting Success Summit, more than I ever had for my teleclasses, and the conference was all done via webinars. This led to doing the Social Media Success Summit, for which we sold around 700 tickets. I felt I was onto something, so I searched domain names at GoDaddy, found SocialMediaExaminer.com, and immediately registered a trademark. I had the opportunity to speak at BlogWorld and MarketingProf's B2B Summit in October 2009. Deciding that would be the time to launch, I hustled to build Social Media Examiner and reached out to all of my friends, asking if they would write one article a month until it didn't work for them anymore. I officially launched Social Media Examiner on October 12, 2009. Listen to the show to learn which connections Ray and I share from the early days of social media. A Focus on Quality Content When we launched, blogs were opinion outlets and I wanted to be a resource. That's why we're known for how-to content and why our tagline is still "Your guide to the social media jungle." I knew if we could create content with a certain level of depth or richness to it, it would be smart in the long run; each of our articles is at least 1,000 words long. And we've invested heavily in the quality of our content. We've always had at least two or three, and sometimes up to five, editors working on all of the articles and we put at least $1,000 into development for each article. Our vision statement is, "All we serve is quality and we serve all with excellence." I've been in this business for seven years, and almost everyone who started in this space has moved on. It just goes to show you can win in the long run if you consistently deliver excellent value.

How to Grow a Business Using YouTube  

Do you want to use YouTube for business? Want to learn how to script and produce YouTube videos for your business? To find out how marketers can develop a business channel on YouTube, I interview Sunny Lenarduzzi. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Sunny Lenarduzzi, a video marketing expert. Previously she was a TV news reporter and the host of the Social Update from Hootsuite. Now she produces regular videos focused on social media, creates online courses, and helps her clients find success with YouTube. Sunny Lenarduzzi shares insights from creating her own business on YouTube. You'll discover how to use social media to drive traffic to your YouTube channel. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, or SoundCloud. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Grow a Business With YouTube Sunny's Story Sunny has a background in traditional media (broadcasting, television, and radio), but fell in love with social media in the early days of Facebook and Twitter. She started an online magazine and after building the brand organically using YouTube and other social media platforms, she ended up with a social media consulting business. When Sunny noticed she was routinely getting the same questions from her clients (such as how to build a Twitter following or how to use Instagram video), she started using YouTube FAQ to record and send the answers to clients. Her first video tutorial now has almost 80,000 views. Today, her channel (started in March 2015) has amassed over 60,000 subscribers and 3.8 million video views. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9D7qmseGz6o Listen to the show to learn more about how Sunny came to partner with Hootsuite on the Social Update. The Path Between YouTube Videos and Business It's all the about email addresses. The biggest thing to remember, Sunny says, is that YouTube is a social media platform. She reminds listeners that social media algorithms change and you can't always rely on social media reach to get your message out. That's where an email list comes in, and she notes that YouTube is vital to growing your email list. For example, Sunny created a tutorial on How to Get More Views on YouTube, in which she offers a free YouTube SEO checklist. Every week, she gains about 200 email subscribers from that one video. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LokwDpM1wnc Sunny explains the importance of helping your videos rank on page one of Google and YouTube search, and shares that the first 24 hours of a video's life are vital in determining where the video will rank. For this reason, when she has a new video, she spends that first day driving people directly to the video on YouTube. Sunny credits getting ranked on the first page of Google or YouTube search results with the growth of her business over the past year. People found her videos when they were searching for help on certain topics such as how to use Snapchat, Twitter, YouTube, etc. Answering questions related to these topics introduces her to potentially thousands of new people a day, and capturing the email addresses of those people grows her potential customer database. Sunny shares that she uses a customized Leadpages link, designed in the same branding as her website, to collect her leads. Sunny says to create your freebie based on what you eventually want to sell. Make it a guide, a checklist, or an ebook. If writing isn't your strong suit, there are other options to use for the freebie, such as audio training or short video courses. For example, Kimra Luna offers a two-day video mini-series for her Rock-It With Webin...

How to Sell on Instagram  

Is your business on Instagram? Do you want to use Instagram as a revenue stream? To find out how to use Instagram for sales, I interview Jasmine Star. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Jasmine Star, a professional photographer who specializes in Instagram marketing. Her story starts with law school, transitions over to photography, and ultimately goes to Instagram. Jasmine is sure to inspire you with ways to sell with Instagram. Jasmine shares how to sell your products and services via Instagram. You'll discover the advantages of using Instagram for selling. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, or SoundCloud. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Sell on Instagram Jasmine's Story In 2005, Jasmine was in her first year of law school at UCLA when she got the news that her mother's brain cancer was in the final stages. She left school and moved home. Jasmine knew she didn't want to go back to law school and decided to give photography a try. For Christmas, her husband gave her her first digital camera and she started her wedding photography business. When her business exploded that first year, it helped her identify as an entrepreneur. Jasmine joined Instagram six years ago but says she used it haphazardly until just a few years ago. When she learned how to use Instagram strategically as a marketing vehicle for her business, it was a game-changer. Since then, she's been named one of the top 10 wedding photographers and one of the most influential photographers, which she believes is due to her varied and intentional use of Instagram and other social media platforms. Listen to the show to discover more of Jasmine's backstory and why she believes she was called to live a passionate life. Why Instagram Works for Selling Jasmine shares one of her favorite quotes from author Simon Sinek, "People don't buy what you do, they buy why you do it." In her opinion, there's no better platform than Instagram to showcase why you do something. She believes Instagram's powerful storytelling components give you the ability to make customers loyal before a purchase has been made. If you can tell a powerful story in fewer than 87 characters (the caption limit), along with a photo that matches and elevates the storytelling component, you'll win at Instagram. Listen to the show to learn what Jasmine says makes Instagram different from other platforms. How to Get Seen on Instagram It's no secret that people are seeing the effects of the Instagram algorithm on their visibility in the news feed, and that's why Jasmine says it's more important to build an audience of the right kind of followers than to collect followers just to increase your numbers. Visibility in the news feed comes from having engaged followers who care about your business, leave comments and likes, tag their friends, and share your posts. An account with a lot of followers who aren't engaged won't be indexed high by the algorithm. This results in fewer people seeing that account's posts, which then results in fewer people liking and commenting. So, all things being equal, if one account has 200 followers and another has 2,000 followers, and each account routinely gets 20 likes and two comments, the account with fewer followers is more likely to be seen, because it's perceived as more relevant. To build an audience of the right followers, Jasmine suggests creating an ideal client profile. Figure out where your ideal client is on Instagram and why, she says. Then figure out how to serve the people who follow you.

Email Sales Funnels: How to Automate Your Sales  

Do you have an automated way to market to your email list? Are you thinking of creating a sales funnel? To explore how to automate your email marketing, I interview Yaro Starak. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Yaro Starak, a blogging expert who specializes in helping people turn their blogs into profitable businesses. He's the author of the ebook Blog Profits Blueprint. Yaro also is an expert in building automated email sales funnels. Yaro shares what you need to know to build successful email sales funnels that sell for you. You'll discover how to create a successful automated email sequence. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, or SoundCloud. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Email Sales Funnels Yaro's Backstory Yaro discovered blogging in 2004 after someone suggested he start a blog for his editing company. While many bloggers were spending a lot of time writing content, Yaro knew of people who generated $30,000 using email. To avoid becoming one of those bloggers who was trapped writing 20 posts a day and to automate the sales process for his course, Yaro built what he now calls a blog sales funnel. He set up a series of blog posts to go to his email newsletter once a week for 52 weeks. Then at intervals throughout the email delivery process, he would include a sales message for his course. Yaro notes that it took him six months to write a year's worth of messages, so he recommends starting smaller. He's spent the last few years building and perfecting his process. Listen to the show to discover when and why Yaro first went online. How an Email Sales Funnel Works Email sales funnels deliver sequenced pieces of content to anyone who opts in, Yaro explains. When automated, those emails (autoresponders) let marketers deliver trust, educate, and sell their product on autopilot. Businesses have customers at different levels of interest, he points out. Some people are ready to buy a $30 ebook but aren't ready to invest $1,000 in a course. Some want to purchase everything you offer, while others just want to explore your free information. After you set up an email sales funnel, it automatically meets the needs of all of those different people. As each person goes through the email sequence and various product offers, they self-select to enter the next sales level. Yaro now markets a range of ebooks, his membership site, and a flagship course. Because he set up a range of email sequences to market each one, he's free to spend his time blogging and doing podcasts. When someone new discovers him via a blog post or a podcast, his sales funnel automatically goes to work. Listen to the show to hear Yaro discuss the old-school way of doing email newsletters. Examples of Successful Email Funnels Yaro shares that he uses an event-based direct selling launch sequence, similar to that of the Jeff Walker school of marketing, to sell his flagship course. The launch includes a series of free videos and a free copy of his Blog Profits Blueprint report. At the end of the launch, he delivers an offer to join his course. To automate that process, he's set up an email sequence that's triggered when someone visits his site and opts to receive a copy of the Blog Profits Blueprint report. Once people opt in, they receive a series of video trainings over three weeks via an automated email sequence. On the fourth week, he invites people to enter his course. Comparing the two processes, Yaro says it's not necessarily changing the way you sell; it's applying automation to create a more hands-off business proces...

Facebook Live: Fuel All of Your Content With Live Video  

Do you broadcast on Facebook Live? Want to discover how to use your videos to create more content? To explore why Facebook Live is a path to success for creators, I interview Chalene Johnson. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Chalene Johnson, a lifestyle expert, author of Push, and host of two top podcasts: Build Your Tribe and The Chalene Show. She's also active on Facebook with 1 million fans and regularly uses Facebook Live. Chalene shares how she uses Facebook Live. You'll discover what she does to leverage the content she captures. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, or SoundCloud. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Live Chalene's Background With Video While Chalene has developed a number of businesses, most people associate her with fitness and a program called Turbo Kick that she created for fitness instructors to teach in health clubs. Instructional videos were part of the program and when a cast member fell ill, Chalene was forced to be on camera. Since that time, she's done many videos and discovered the more she relaxed, the better she could connect with her audience, whether it was for fitness or business. Chalene first broadcast live on Periscope in the summer of 2015. She remembers it well because it was also the day she was hacked. Chalene stresses there's no correlation between the two events. You can listen to Episode 158 of this podcast for the backstory. When she got early access to Facebook Live, Chalene went live and applied what she'd learned on Periscope. Her first Live reached a half-million people within 20 minutes and she knew it was a game-changer. Listen to the show to discover Chalene's philosophy on the importance of doing things that are scary. What Facebook Live Is All About Chalene believes Facebook Live is like TV, meaning you can use it to spread your message, become famous, or have a reality TV show. Mike and Chalene discuss the connection between bloggers becoming paid authors, musicians on YouTube becoming paid recording artists, and the likelihood that a future show host will be discovered through Live video. Listen to the show to hear why podcasters should consider live-streaming video. How Chalene Goes Live Chalene and her team have an organic plan in place for her Live videos. The calendar is set around the promotion of the Virtual Business Academy, the Marketing Impact Academy, and Smart Success. Eighty percent of the content for each Live broadcast relates to the upcoming promotion, so it attracts the people interested in the related product. Currently, she's promoting Smart Success. Chalene aims to go live a couple of times each week. She's noticed that the longer she broadcasts, the better the video does in terms of reach and live viewers. Often, she plans to go live for 15 minutes but ends up broadcasting for an hour. Chalene's Live prep starts when she wakes up at 5:45 AM. She spends the first hour of her day in learning mode focusing on a certain topic. She then finds a way to relate what she's studying to the product she's promoting. For example, since she's studying the neuroscience behind behavior, discipline, and habits, she'll do a Live broadcast about developing good habits, which ties into her promotion of Smart Success. To prepare, Chalene writes down a proposed title, five bulleted discussion points, and any research or stats she wants to reference. She describes how to start a broadcast and in which order to share information. In the first 10 seconds, tell people what you're talking about and why they need to stay ...

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