Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

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Social Media Examiner’s Michael Stelzner helps your business navigate the social jungle with success stories and expert interviews from leading social media marketing pros. Discover how successful businesses employ social media, learn new strategies and tactics, and gain actionable tips to improve your social media marketing. Find show notes at http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/podcast/

Episodes

Medium: Why Bloggers Should Consider Publishing on Medium  

Want to position yourself as an authority on a specific subject? Have you considered publishing your blog posts on Medium? To explore how Medium can benefit bloggers and marketers, I interview Dakota Shane. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Dakota Shane, a social media columnist for Inc.com. He co-founded Arctiphi, a social media agency for breweries and restaurants. He's also a top writer in the social media category on Medium. Dakota shares how to maximize your content's reach using Medium. You'll discover tools and tactics for building your email list with Medium articles. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Medium Dakota's Story Right after Dakota graduated from college in 2015, he and his brother launched their agency. Dakota was learning all he could about marketing, social media marketing, and content marketing from podcasts, books, and client experience. Dakota comes from a family of creative people and grew up writing stories. In his career, this writing bug stayed with him and he wanted to write about what he was learning as a marketer. At the time, his two choices for housing content were the blogosphere and LinkedIn. Although the blogosphere was the gold standard, Dakota felt that the landscape was saturated and it would take too much time and effort to gain a following while also working a full-time job and running a business. The articles Dakota wrote on LinkedIn flopped, and the platform also seemed a little too formal for his voice. When Dakota found out about Medium, he was excited because it looked like a place where he could talk and write the way he wanted. Based on everything he'd learned since college, Dakota wrote an article titled 200+ Podcasts, 100+ Articles, and 20+ Books in 11 Bullet Points. Then he dug up the personal Twitter handle of the editor of his favorite Medium publication (The Mission) and sent him the link. The editor replied, saying the article looked great and would be published in the morning. The next day, Dakota woke up to a slew of notifications: hundreds of people shared and thousands of people had already read the article. He saw the power of Medium as a platform and realized his life and business were about to change for the better. Dakota has been seriously writing on Medium for the last year and a half, and his consistency on the platform has led to opportunities with niche social media blogs. To get those opportunities, he gathered links to his highest-performing works on Medium, wrote a pitch on why he would be a good fit for their publication, saved it as a draft, and kept sending it out. After landing spots on bigger social media blogs, Dakota used those credits as leverage to get his first speaking gigs and podcast interviews. On his third try pitching to Inc.com, he landed a column and has been writing for them for the past few months. Listen to the show to discover who shared Dakota's first Medium post. Why Write on Medium? There are four reasons to write on Medium. First, Medium provides a ready-made audience that most writers, creators, or marketers don't have and that would take years to build. Second, and most importantly, Medium presents an opportunity right now because it's at that sweet spot between an emerging platform (which could be a risk) and an established platform (which could be saturated). Since it's in this position, Medium can open doors for a creator, writer, or marketer to brand themselves as an authority on a specific subject. Although Medium has kept recent metrics to themselves, as of late 2016 there were 60 million monthly use...

How to Generate Revenue With Your Content  

Want to make money from your content? Wondering how a loyal audience can create business opportunities? To explore business models that help publishers generate revenue, I interview Joe Pulizzi. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Joe Pulizzi, founder of the Content Marketing Institute and Content Marketing World. He's written five books including Epic Content Marketing and Content Inc. His newest book is called Killing Marketing: How Innovative Businesses Are Turning Marketing Cost Into Profit. Joe explains how high-quality content can transform marketing from a cost center into a profit center. You'll discover the different ways you can monetize your content. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Generate Revenue With Your Content Why Joe Wrote Killing Marketing Joe and co-author Robert Rose work mostly with large businesses. They've been seeing a trend where businesses are viewing marketing as a profit center rather than a cost center. Only a few companies are currently doing things this way. However, Joe believes that over the next 5 or 10 years, marketing as a profit center will be the rule, not the exception. The premise of the book (and the philosophy) is to create trusted relationships with your audience and monetize that relationship by doing more than selling products. You can monetize your business in 10 different ways. Joe says the biggest mistake people make with their marketing is they set up their marketing department wrong. They seek opportunities for the sales team and don't see all of the potential in what their companies can be and sell. Any business that has lasted 10 or 15 years has evolved over time. Yes, selling products is important but you can't lead product-first anymore. The only competitive advantage people have today is communication. Everything else can be duplicated. Marketers need to be refocusing on making markets and creating opportunities for organizations; however, many have lost sight of those objectives. When the focus is on people, not necessarily products, companies can sell all kinds of things they never thought about before. Listen to the show to discover how marketers typically view marketing. Companies Embracing This Premise BabyCenter.com, owned by Johnson & Johnson, is one of the largest sites dedicated to mothers. Eight out of 10 mothers use the site, which is a stellar resource for research and development. Johnson & Johnson monetizes the site directly and launches new products from it. Red Bull Media House is judged as a profit center and media company. Although they're the marketing arm of Red Bull (and want to sell more product), their revenue comes from advertising and content syndication. They package and sell their videos to companies like The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. They also sell subscriptions (The Red Bulletin Magazine has two million subscribers). One of Joe's favorite examples is Arrow Electronics, which is the 118th company on the Fortune 500 list. They're like the Amazon.com for electronics equipment and they target electrical engineers. Two years ago, they went to Hearst and UBM (Content Marketing Institute's parent company) and bought 51 media properties, including EE Product News. Now, Arrow Electronics is the largest media company in the electronics industry. Although the media division is a marketing arm for the company, the media division is also extremely profitable. Plus, it helps the company sell more products and services. In most cases, marketers simply target customers or prospects with the goal of getting t...

Selling With Video: YouTube and Facebook Video Marketing  

Want to create a sales video that converts? Looking for expert tips about building rapport with your prospects? To explore how to sell with video on YouTube and Facebook, I interview Jeremy Vest. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Jeremy Vest, founder of Vidpow, the YouTube-certified agency for big brands and channels including Hewlett-Packard, Funimation, and ServiceMaster. He also created Adobe TV, a video training site for Adobe, and he's the host of the TubeTalk podcast. Jeremy explains how to hook your viewing audience and introduce them to your product. You'll discover why remarketing is essential to improving conversions from your videos. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Selling With Video Jeremy's Story Jeremy has been designing websites and marketing products online since 1998. He also loved teaching college-level web design, graphic design, and marketing classes. When Internet bandwidth increased enough to do online videos and courses, Jeremy realized he could teach many more people via video so he created xTrain, a video-based training company. Then, when YouTube came out in 2005, Jeremy started getting into it immediately. About four years ago, Jeremy launched Vidpow, which helps brands with strategy for creating videos. In his work for Vidpow, Jeremy combines his love for design with his interest in marketing, especially analyzing what improves conversion rates. Vidpow helps brands understand the universe of video and how to navigate it. Over four years, Vidpow has helped clients get more than a billion organic views. Listen to the show to find out how many websites Jeremy has created since 1998. Misconceptions About Selling With Video After Jeremy helps a client create an awesome ad or video strategy, the first thing the client often asks is, "Why aren't we getting massive sales?" Jeremy has to explain that there's no magic pill to sell stuff. It just takes time. Before people take their relationship with your brand to the next level, they need to see your brand 7 to 20 times, whether it's an email, your website, or social media ads. Even the most viral videos and the best sales videos don't produce that result. Instead, someone who has watched your video lands on your web page and gets put into your company's remarketing process. Jeremy believes that video is better than images for selling online. If a picture is worth a thousand words, what's a video worth? Text and pictures are great, but video has the highest capacity to show emotion. Showing your product or service with a video helps it sell better than any type marketing, other than connecting in person. Another misconception is that lots of views mean that your video is a success. However, if you're reaching the wrong people, they won't watch your video for very long. Because the YouTube algorithm prioritizes how long people watch your content, lots of short view times can harm your marketing. Listen to the show to hear me discuss a problem with an Instagram apps article that received lots of views. Traits of Successful Sales Videos Whether your video is on Facebook, YouTube, or Instagram, the first five seconds of your video have to be weird. Seth Godin calls this concept the purple cow. Even if you have a good or great video, odds are most people won't even watch it. The average view duration of Facebook video is six seconds so you have only a few seconds to engage someone and tell their brain to keep watching. One of Jeremy's favorites is the video created by Derral Eves and the Harmon Brothers for Squatty Potty.

How to Optimize Your Facebook Ads: A Proven Approach  

Want to improve the performance of your Facebook campaigns? Wondering how to successfully test and fine-tune your Facebook ads? To explore his process for optimizing Facebook ads, I interview Azriel Ratz. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Azriel Ratz, author of the Facebook Pixel eBook and the Facebook Ads Mastery online course. He manages Facebook ads for clients across the globe. Azriel explains how he researches audiences and creates ad sets. You'll discover which metrics to consider when testing Facebook ad performance. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Optimize Your Facebook Ads Azriel's Story About five years ago, Azriel started working for a friend whose business had an email list of 1,000 subscribers at the time. Azriel's job was to post on Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, and Twitter and figure out what posts worked or didn't work. When Azriel looked at the analytics and noticed that certain Facebook posts worked really well, his friend suggested scheduling posts at certain times and targeting the posts based on what was already working. For instance, they created yes-or-no poll questions on Facebook, which attracted a lot of reach and activity. The polls asked how people felt about the day's news. They also posted these questions on the website: A basic form asked a poll question and a reader had to give their email address to respond. With this approach, the email list grew to the tens of thousands, all without spending money on ads. Azriel's friend wanted to know what would happen if they started putting money behind these posts, so they started running serious tests on Facebook. Over the next three years, the list grew to about 150,000 email addresses and led to ecommerce sales and client work. Two years ago, Azriel started his own business, focusing solely on optimizing Facebook ads for clients. He discovers what audience and content work best and then uses Facebook ads to target each client's best potential audience with the best potential ads. As a result, clients get the best return on their ad spend. Listen to the show to discover what Azriel studied in college. The Value of Optimizing Ads Most people think that creating Facebook ads is a very basic process. They know who they want to talk to and what they want to say. Based on that knowledge, they create an ad, choose an audience (thinking Facebook will figure it out), and let the ad run. They believe the cost is what it is, and they can't do anything about it. However, Azriel explains, if a business talks to the same person a different way by creating slightly different ads, this change could possibly save the business money on the cost to reach that person. Over time, a savings of even one cent per click could potentially save a company hundreds of thousands of dollars, depending on the ad spend. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts on conversion rate optimization. Azriel's Process Azriel's process reflects the structure for creating ads in Ads Manager. However, before you begin creating ads in Ads Manager, you can use the specifics of Azriel's process to begin thinking about how to build your ads. Identify what business goal you want to achieve by running these ads: Do you want to get leads? Do you want people to attend your webinar? Do you want people to visit your store? Your business goal helps you choose which type of campaign will most likely get you the right results. If you choose a page likes campaign, don't expect to get webinar subscribers. A video view campaign isn't ideal for getting purchases on your website.

Growing Social Media Examiner: The Bumpy Road of Pursuit  

Ever wonder how Social Media Examiner started? Are you curious about the obstacles we faced in building a sizable media entity? Sit back and learn the story that led millions of people to us. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, my friend Mark Mason, host of the Late Night Internet Marketing Podcast, interviews me to celebrate the fifth anniversary of the Social Media Marketing podcast. We'll explore the core skills that helped me move into social media marketing. You'll also learn how I make strategic decisions about the future of the company. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Pursuit My Entrepreneurial Journey Before Social Media Examiner, I was known as a writer. I wrote a book called Writing White Papers and helped a lot of out-of-work journalists figure out how to go from writing for magazines and newspapers to writing for businesses. The job of a white paper is to persuade and educate. Businesses with expensive or complex products or services use white papers to communicate about them. For instance, a big corporation would hire someone to talk to the engineering and sales departments and translate that foreign language into something a customer could understand. Mark asks how important the helping aspect is to me as an entrepreneur. Whatever I do, I want to help the largest number of people in a way that doesn't place a huge strain on me personally. There's only so much of me to go around, and by creating products that are highly scalable, I can make helping others a big part of what I do. For example, this podcast has more than 10 million downloads and Social Media Examiner has 60 million readers. I wasn't an overnight success, however. When I started Social Media Examiner in 2009, I felt like I was really late to the social media game. A lot of people say they feel they're late today. What I lacked in timing I made up for in my ability to ask questions, understand complex things, and communicate how these things work in a way everyone can understand. This skill has helped me throughout my career. In the 1990s, my focus was creative agency work and designing websites, which was novel at the time. I also helped people design annual reports, trade show booth displays, and corporate logos. When I transitioned into a writer and later into social media, my communication skills continued to serve me well. When I started Social Media Examiner, my secret skill wasn't that I knew anything about social (I knew nothing). It was my ability to discern which people knew things, extract information from them, and convey that knowledge to my audience. No matter what you do, figure out which of your skills allow you to travel into a new space. Then you can be really successful. My entrepreneurial journey has never been easy. By the same token, I think if it had been easy, I would have been bored and moved along to the next thing. I like a challenge and solving puzzles. I'm not one of those people who wants to build a system and then sit back and retire on a beach. I want to keep pushing the envelope and figuring out ways to be better. When I was in college, I dreamed that I was in a room with a couple of hundred people who were congratulating me on my success. I had the dream when I was around 20 years old, and I'm 49 now. That dream didn't come true for around 25 years. Although I've always had certain levels of success, I've never had something amazing happen overnight. I've always been the tortoise, not the hare. I realized my dream had come true in 2014, the second year of Social Media Marketing World,

Live Video Tools: The Best Apps for Going Live  

Are you planning to start a live video show? Want to know which tools you'll need to broadcast live? To explore the best live video apps and software to produce your own live show, I interview Ian Anderson Gray. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Ian Anderson Gray, the founder of Seriously Social, a blog focused on social media tools. Ian is also a live video tools expert. His courses include Seriously Social OBS Studio and Seriously Social Wirecast. Ian explores the best live video software for beginning and advanced broadcasters. You'll discover which software and add-ons offer the features you need. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Live Video Tools Ian's Live Video Story When Facebook Live started rolling out, Ian felt like everyone had access before he did, because he was an Android user (at the time) living in the United Kingdom. In his search for a workaround, Ian discovered OBS Studio, a free tool for Macs and PCs. With OBS Studio, Ian found a way to broadcast from his computer to his Facebook page, profile, and groups. That was his entry into Facebook Live and live video. Ian wrote a blog post on how to broadcast from your computer with OBS Studio and went out of his way to make the process as easy as possible for people to understand. He even included a tool that allows people to get the magic stream key necessary to broadcast with OBS Studio. Since Ian posted the article last year, the article has had just under three million views. Listen to the show to discover what platform Ian tried using before Facebook Live. What Stops Marketers From Going Live? Two things stop marketers from going live: "the fear and the gear." But Ian believes fear is what really gets in people's way. People are afraid they'll say something silly or wrong. They might be worried their cat will jump on the keyboard, the webcam will fall over, and it will be a complete disaster. Or maybe they're afraid others will think they're a fraud. Marketers also have issues with technology. People think they can't go live because they don't have this webcam, that phone, or a decent lighting setup. Those are excuses for people who are simply scared of getting on camera and communicating their message. Everyone gets nervous, explains Ian, who's trained as a professional singer. He feels it too. The key is to channel your nervous energy into your performance. If you feel nervous or scared, Ian says, it's a good thing. It shows you care. The best performance Ian ever gave was when he was absolutely petrified before he went on stage. The worst performance was when he was entirely complacent. He thought the performance would be absolutely fine, and it turned out to be a disaster. To help you overcome that fear, Ian recommends warming up your voice before each broadcast. Exercise the lower part of your voice up to the high part of your voice. These exercises will likely make you feel a bit more at ease. Also, when you warm up, using the high and low parts makes your voice more engaging. By using your vocal range, you're not trying to become a different person. You're heightening your personality by putting more energy behind it. Listen to the show to hear Ian's example of a vocal warm-up and what your voice might sound like if you don't warm up. Basic Apps The easiest apps for live broadcasting are web-based. Fire up your browser (Safari, Chrome, Internet Explorer, etc.), and go to the tool's web page. BeLive, probably the best-known app, has an advantage because has a free trial. You can broadcast up to two 20-minute broadcasts...

Our New Podcast: Social Media Marketing Talk Show  

Have you noticed that social networks seem to change every week? How can anyone possibly keep up, right? We have a great new (and free) solution for you--the busy marketer. I'm excited to announce the new Social Media Marketing Talk Show audio podcast. Each week your friends at Social Media Examiner bring you: #1 News: Our news team breaks down the critical social updates of the week. #2 Commentary: We bring on industry experts to talk about what the news means. #3 Tips: You'll discover actionable insight that could give you an advantage. Social Media Marketing Talk Show In each episode, we cover the top 10 to 20 major announcements from Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, Pinterest, YouTube, and Snapchat for the last week. On this week's Social Media Marketing Talk Show with Michael Stelzner, we explore Facebook's latest growth with Mari Smith; Amazon's social network, Spark, with Jeff Sieh; LinkedIn's new Web Demographics tool with Viveka von Rosen; and other breaking social media marketing news of the week! Your Action Plan Step 1: Click here now to SUBSCRIBE in iTunes/Apple Podcasts app (scroll down for other options). Step 2: Click the Subscribe button. Step 3: Download the episodes. Step 4: Sit back and enjoy the content, knowing you'll never miss important social media marketing news. Step 5: If you like Social Media Examiner, we'd love a review. Confused? Watch this video to discover how to subscribe on your iPhone. Here are some quick links to the new show on all major platforms: iTunes/Apple Podcast | Android | Google Play | Stitcher | RSS Hear More About the New Show To learn more about this new show, listen to this special episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast below...

Search to Social Ads: How to Use Google With Facebook to Build Niche Audiences  

Does your business serve a specialized customer base? Wondering how to reach specific niche audiences with Facebook ads? To explore a strategy for retargeting specialized audiences using Google ads in combination with Facebook ads, I interview Shane Sams. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Shane Sams, the co-host of the Flipped Lifestyle podcast, a show focused on helping families make money online. He describes himself as a normal guy from Kentucky who loves helping others. He's also the founder of the Flip Your Life Community. Shane explains how to use website traffic generated by Google ads to retarget Facebook users. You'll discover how highly focused keywords help manage your marketing costs. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Search to Social Ads Shane's Story Shane and his wife Jocelyn met at the University of Kentucky. After graduation, Jocelyn initially worked a corporate job and Shane coached football. They then decided to become schoolteachers, which they did for about 10 years. Shane taught social studies and continued to coach, while Jocelyn was an elementary school librarian. After some bad experiences at work, Shane realized he had traded control of his life for job security. He started looking for other things to do because he knew there had to be a better way. This was in 2012. One day, as Shane and his wife were driving around town, Shane said, "I wonder if I can get 100 people to send me $50." She asked what he was talking about and Shane said that out of the 7 billion people on the planet, surely 100 would give him $50. If they all did that in a month, it would be $5,000, and for 12 months in a row, it would be $60,000. If they could do that every month, they could quit teaching. Shane didn't know how he was going to make this money but he was determined to figure it out. He began seeking information about business. One day while mowing the grass, Shane decided to look up business podcasts. An image of a guy looking at the podcast art with his eyeballs caught Shane's attention. It was Smart Passive Income with Pat Flynn. In the podcast, Pat talked about how he sold a study guide and would email it to people. Shane decided he and Jocelyn could sell PDFs of information. After trying different things online, they were finally able to figure it out. They sold lesson plans to teachers and football playbooks to coaches. A year later, Shane and Jocelyn replaced their income. As soon as they quit their jobs (which they did on September 27, 2013), people started asking questions. For example, Lindsay, a friend of Jocelyn's, quit her job to be a stay-at-home mom and wanted advice on making money online. They helped Lindsay create digital products and she made $1,000 on the Internet in a month. This money enabled Lindsay to be at home with her daughter every day. After Shane and Jocelyn realized their experience and knowledge could change the lives of others, they started Flipped Lifestyle. It has helped a lot of people. People ask why it's called Flipped Lifestyle. Shane explains that everybody flipped out after Jocelyn and he left their jobs, where they had tenure and insurance. Shane recalls how his mom cornered him and said, "Shane Sams, you have babies. You have lost your mind. You have flipped out. And I do not approve of this decision." Hence, Flipped Lifestyle. Listen to the show to hear Shane recall how much sharing online business skills meant to his friends. Why Combine Google Ads With Facebook? Early on, Shane and Jocelyn discovered a lot of the marketing advice available online didn't work for ...

Messenger Chatbots: How to Get Started  

Wondering if Messenger chatbots are right for your business? Want to know how to build your own chatbot? To explore why and how to create Facebook Messenger chatbots, I interview Ben Beck. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Ben Beck, a bot expert who writes a weekly column for ClearVoice.com. He has an online course focused on generating leads with chatbots. Ben explores what you need to know to get started with chatbots. You'll discover the best tools for creating chatbots. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Messenger Chatbots Ben's Story Ben's relationship with bots started when he was a teenager in the mid-1990s. He chatted with ALICE, the first bot to use natural language processing. ALICE had a rudimentary interface that worked via the Internet. You typed into a little box and a response showed up. Although Ben looked at the code for ALICE, it was too complex for him to figure out how to tinker with it. However, ALICE sparked Ben's interest in chatbots and he's been watching them ever since. Fast-forward to 2004. Ben got into online marketing, starting with SEO and online advertising. Over the last six or seven years, his interest shifted to marketing automation and email marketing. In the last five years, Ben has been using systems like HubSpot and Marketo to do email drip campaigns and as robust solutions for lead generation. Last year, Facebook released the option to use chatbots inside of Facebook Messenger. People naturally converse with these bots to get information about a business, submit information, get help with booking vacation plans, and more. Ben thinks bots will be the new lead generation method. Although bots may not unseat email, they'll be just as big. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts on the impact of Facebook. What's a Chatbot? A chatbot is a software application built to simulate a human-like conversation. Ben believes it was Matt Schlicht, the creator of Octane AI (a chatbot-building platform), who compared chatbots to a game of tennis. For the longest time, chatbots have followed a chat-reply, chat-reply sequence (or hit it over the net, receive, hit it back). Chatbots are now starting to take on human-like capabilities. The range of a chatbot's abilities can be huge. For instance, if you were planning a family trip to Disneyland, you could visit their site and type questions into their pop-up box like, "What time does the park open on September 12?" and a chatbot could give you the answer. In this hypothetical example, the bot watches for certain patterns in a string to determine the response. An advanced chatbot could use the best in artificial intelligence (AI) technology to learn. For example, Disney could take their conversations with customers over the last five or six years and feed them into their AI platform. The chatbot could become more human-like by studying questions and responses between an actual person and a park guest. However, the way a bot learns through AI capabilities has the potential backfire. About a year ago, Microsoft released Tay, a chatbot that learned by interacting with people on Twitter. For the first day or two, tons of people interacted with Tay, but as a result of people's communications, the bot became racist and picked up other bad conversational habits, so Microsoft had to pull it down. Listen to the show to learn more about Microsoft's chatbot fail. Facebook Messenger Chatbots Currently, Facebook Messenger has more than 1.2 billion users and Facebook is putting a lot of money into getting people on the platform.

Video Authenticity: How to Perform On-Camera  

Do you want to connect with your audience via video? Looking for tips to convey confidence and authority? To explore how to improve your on-camera performance, I interview David H. Lawrence XVII. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview David H. Lawrence XVII, an actor and professional voice artist. You may recognize him as the Puppet Master from the TV show Heroes. He specializes in audio and video communication and his course is called Camera Ready U, where he helps actors and marketers with their on-camera performances. David explores ways to be yourself in front of the camera. You'll discover how to prepare for a video performance. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Video Authenticity David's Story David started as a voiceover talent and moved into on-camera work. In both cases, after David found success, people asked him how he achieved that success. At events such as Social Media Marketing World, David talked about simple things people can do on-camera to be authoritative or authentic. For instance, he talks about how to hold your hands, what to do with your eyes, or how to hold your posture. After speaking, David would be mobbed by people asking about his course, so he decided to create one. As David developed his course, he discovered he knew so much more than he realized about his area of expertise. David created an inventory of all of the things he knew and that became the Camera Ready U curriculum. The same thing happened with voiceovers. David started by teaching commercials and ultimately created 36 different classes for VO2GoGo, covering not just the art of voiceover, but also the business and technology aspects. Listen to the show to discover how long David has been in the entertainment industry. Least Important Factors for Video Videos don't have to be perfect. Comb your hair, brush your teeth, put on makeup, wear your cool outfit, and whatever else you need to establish your base. After you do that, the key is not to be a better version of yourself, but your most authentic self with all of your flaws. That's what makes you human. Don't kick yourself if you flub a word or don't remember to turn your shoulder. People will connect with you when you're simply being yourself. And you can't be yourself when you're constantly trying to be that better version of yourself. The notion of perfection gets in the way of being real. Also, your equipment doesn't matter. If you want to get very artsy, you might need a more expensive camera. But you don't even need to buy a camera. You can start vlogging immediately with your smartphone. You may need to add a light, but you can simply set up a table lamp. Plus, you might want to get a $20 lavaliere microphone from Amazon. And that's it. You can do whatever you want with that minimal setup. Listen to the show to hear David and me discuss how people can hold themselves back with an "I can't until I..." mentality. Authenticity On-Camera Have you ever watched a video and thought, "This guy's a bag of wind" or "She's fake"? It's because they've spent too much time trying to present and too little time being themselves. The people viewers connect with most often are those who seem down to earth and genuinely interested in the subject. When you stop worrying about how you look and sound, you can start thinking about the content. And when you can focus on your content, viewers feel you're speaking to them. You make a connection. When you're completely interested, immersed, and can't wait to help people with their needs, your authenticity meter goes through the roof.

Facebook Ads: Creative Ways to Attract Prospects and Customers  

Do you advertise on Facebook? Are your ads converting? To explore how to better use Facebook ads to reach leads and customers, I interview Zach Spuckler. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Zach Spuckler, a Facebook ads expert and host of the Heart, Soul & Hustle podcast, a show about generating more leads, sales, and conversions. His course is called Rock Your FB Ads. Zach shares his framework for building leads with Facebook ads. You'll discover mistakes many marketers make with Facebook ads. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Ads Zach's Story Over the last 10 years, Zach has dabbled in most forms of online marketing, including affiliate marketing, direct sales, website flipping, consulting, and Facebook ads. About two and a half years ago, Zach was running a successful vegan food blog called The No Fuss Vegan as a hobby while working a job and studying for a master's degree. As the blog grew, the hours of work that Zach put into developing recipes, and styling and shooting photos for his blog left him feeling burnt out. He liked what he was doing but he didn't love it. Zach took three months off to explore what work made him happy and realized it was marketing. He loved testing his ads, and messaging and building his list. That's when he launched Heart, Soul & Hustle. When Zach started this business, he was committed to a foundational principle: Instead of teaching people theories that worked, his teaching would be grounded in what he had learned through experience. His first digital course came out a few months later. He had been doing one-on-one Facebook ad management using Periscope for promotion. Zach did a Periscope at Starbucks, saying, "I can't really teach you how to make a million dollars. I'm not a six-figure coach. But I have gotten my income up to about $1,000 a week on Periscope. Is that something you want to learn about?" He set up a PayPal button in real time and did about $1,200 in sales. That's when everything started to come together. Zach realized he could own his expertise without faking it. He could be fully transparent and show people what he was doing at his current level, and that approach would resonate with people. Zach's passion has always been ads, and his intention when he started the company was to create a Facebook ads course. However, everybody wanted to learn about live streaming, so he tabled the ads program in response to his market. However, he still launched the program a year later and has had a blast testing everything with Facebook ads such as Messenger, retargeting, and Facebook Live. About a year ago, Zach realized he had become a total workaholic and could use Facebook advertising to help him do the heavy lifting. He scaled up his ad spend and hired an ads manager. Although Zach emphasizes that ads don't do all of the work, his ads nevertheless work for him whether or not he can show up on a particular day. Today, hundreds of people take Zach's courses. His company does launches with thousands of people, they have incredible affiliates, and they've been affiliates. Investing in advertising has opened so many doors that he can't help but get excited about it. Listen to the show to hear about Zach's earliest experience working online. Facebook Ad Mistakes The market has been evolving but marketers aren't all keeping pace. A few years ago, you could run a Facebook ad to a sales page and make money. You could even run ads directly to a checkout page. But back then, most Facebook users didn't realize that a sponsored post in the news feed was an advertisement. Today,

Creating Advanced Facebook Custom Audiences Using Google Tag Manager  

Are you looking for advanced ways to build Facebook audiences for retargeting? Do you know you can combine Google Tag Manager with Facebook Pixel Events? To explore the value of using these tools together, I interview Chris Mercer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Chris Mercer, an analytics expert who specializes in helping marketers measure and optimize their marketing. His course is called Master the Fundamentals of Google Tag Manager. You can find him at MeasurementMarketing.io. Chris explores how to use Google Tag Manager to take your Facebook retargeting to the next level. You'll discover how to create and use Facebook Pixel Events in your Facebook marketing. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Pixel Events and Google Tag Manager Chris's Story Chris, who has a background in sales and marketing, left corporate America to investigate online business. Five or six years ago, he started a site called WP Training Videos. The site was designed to help people understand and learn WordPress, but after customers requested help with building websites, the company's business model changed. To learn about analytics, Chris installed Google Analytics and set up tracking on opt-in and lead generation forms. When he showed his analytics to a client, the client stopped asking about changing the website design and wanted to learn more about tracking results. Chris soon had more clients who were interested in analytics, and about four or five years ago, the business pivoted again. Chris's business became Measurement Marketing, which is dedicated to making Google Analytics more accessible to the masses. His clients were often people who installed Google Analytics but didn't know how to use it. Today, Chris works with marketers, marketing teams, and agencies. He shows them what's important to measure, helps them build measurement machines, and shares what to do with the data they collect. Listen to the show to discover one of the biggest struggles for marketers. What Is Google Tag Manager? Google Tag Manager is a tool that was designed to solve an enterprise-level problem. The problem arose about 10 years ago when this new upstart, Facebook, started putting out pixels (snippets of code to copy and paste on a site) that enabled marketers to track things online. It was revolutionary at the time. After the Facebook pixel arrived, large businesses had to figure out how to bridge the gap between marketing and IT. To add the code to web pages, marketing had to submit IT help desk tickets, because IT developers were the only people allowed to mess with the website. As a result, IT departments developed bottlenecks and couldn't focus on the right projects, and marketing teams couldn't get the pixels on the pages fast enough. By the time IT added a pixel to a page, the campaign that marketing wanted to measure had been over for eight weeks. Tag Manager was created to solve that problem. Marketing teams can use it to put out individual snippets of tracking code (for instance, a Facebook remarketing or conversion pixel) that they can use at any point without having to involve developers. Tag Manager gives marketers granular control over their measurement and tracking. I ask about the difference between Google Tag Manager and Google Analytics, and Chris explains Google Analytics does three main things. It collects its data, stores the data, and builds reports based on the data. Google Tag Manager replaces Google Analytics' ability to collect its own data. Tag Manager collects the data and sends it to Google Analytics so it can stor...

Live Video Strategy: How to Create a Show That Engages  

Interested in broadcasting live video? Have you considered starting a live video show? To explore how to create a successful live video show, I interview Luria Petrucci. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Luria Petrucci, a live video expert. She's the host of Live Streaming Pros, a live show dedicated to helping businesses produce professional live streams. She's helped big brands such as AT&T and Panasonic, and influencers such as Michael Hyatt, Amy Porterfield, and Pat Flynn. Luria explores four levels of broadcasting equipment. You'll discover how to create an engaging flow for your live show. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Live Video Strategy Luria's Story Luria got started with video in 2005. She was one of the first video podcasters to create content for the video iPod. (This was before the iPhone and long before YouTube "became a thing.") Shortly thereafter, Luria started doing live video, too. By 2007, she was live-streaming from a professional studio and from mobile devices and began learning how live video creates a connection with her audience. Ever since, she's been doing a weekly or daily show. Before Periscope and Facebook Live, Luria's live-streaming tech included a NewTek TriCaster and Ustream. She also did some YouTube. Justin.tv (which is now Twitch) and Livestream were the other early platforms, although they focused more on business. Although Ustream focuses more on businesses now, it concentrated on creators back then. Luria enjoys seeing other people getting excited about going live, because she's believed in live video for so long. She says live video creates a strong relationship with her audience and is the reason her audience has stuck with her for 11 years through massive business changes, partnership changes, and all of the hard stuff that goes on in business. People tell her they've been watching her since day one. (Note: Back then, Luria was known as Cali Lewis.) Listen to the show to discover what tech Luria used in the early days, as well as what live video was like at the beginning. Why Consider Live Video Live video is the best marketing conversion tool Luria has ever seen because of its impact. When people are watching you on live video, they know you're not faking it. When you're selling something or trying to lead people into a funnel, live video is easy because of what Luria calls the "conversational call to action." Like most people, Luria has a hard time selling. People don't like to sell because they don't like to be sold to. The conversational call to action is really about helping people. You're letting them know you're there for them and will take care of them. When you offer something in a live video, it's easier to sell it because you're not really selling. When somebody asks a question, your answer proves the value of your products or services. Also, although the excitement for and accessibility of live video is new, its formulas and structure are proven. Listen to the show to hear what I love about live video. The Four Levels of Live Video Gear Luria explains what gear you need for live video in four levels. She calls level 1 the "selfie stream." You hold your mobile phone in your hand and the live video is raw, up-close, and personal. For level 2, add some gear to your mobile phone such as a microphone, video stabilizer, and a light. This gear adds a little polish to your video and removes the shakiness. Level 3 is going live from a computer with software like Wirecast. Finally, level 4 is for TV-quality video.

Social Customer Care: Apps and Processes for Success  

How does your business respond to customer concerns and inquiries? Do you have a social customer care plan in place? To explore how to improve customer care for your business, I interview Dan Gingiss. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Dan Gingiss, author of Winning at Social Customer Care, head of global social media at McDonald's, and host of the Focus on Customer Service podcast. Dan explores the most important qualities of social care representatives. You'll discover tools to make providing social customer care easier. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Social Customer Care Why Social Customer Care Is Important Offline experiences don't stay offline for long, Dan explains, particularly when they're bad. They get discussed online and things can get out of control. (Just watch the news!) Marketers need to care because they're the ones at the helm of social media handles. Plus, whenever you do social media marketing (organic or paid, but especially paid), people ask customer service questions. When people see your brand in their feeds, they remember their questions or problems. Your marketing is their reminder. More marketing leads to more people talking back. And that can be a good thing. Listen to the show to discover what marketers should never say. Who Should Do Social Customer Care The ideal people for social customer service are those who are naturally empathetic, want to talk to customers and solve their problems, and can remain calm when an angry customer is yelling at them. You don't need to involve everyone, and the people who are involved should like talking to people. These days, social customer care agents are doing work that blurs the line with community management. Which role deals with someone commenting on your really cool sponsorship with the NFL versus someone asking a question about your product or service versus a customer who is really angry because you screwed up? That line may not always be clear. When the marketing department owned all of social media, they were okay with the first two. They loved talking about football and could answer questions. However, when they started getting complaints or complicated questions, they had to call customer service for backup. Customer service's job was to know about the products and services, how to fix things when they went wrong, and most importantly, how to talk to other people. A social customer care agent could be a phone rep, an email rep, or a chat rep. Depending on the size of your organization, the social person may need to have phone skills as well as writing skills. In a large company, people in customer service may work only on the phone, chat, or social. But in a smaller business, one person might handle phone calls and Twitter. However your organization divides up the work of customer service, Dan emphasizes that everyone involved should have the same customer service training. Customers should have a consistent experience, no matter which customer service channel they choose. You've probably seen examples of people calling a company, talking to an agent, and not liking the answer. So they go to Twitter to get a different answer. The biggest mistake the company can make is to give a different answer on Twitter because then you teach everybody to just go to Twitter. Listen to the show to hear Dan discuss what skills customer care agents might need in the near future. Customer Support Bots Although bots have a role in customer support, they still have a ways to go. For instance, Dan tried using a bot to buy flowers and when he needed...

Facebook Video Retargeting for Live Video and Beyond  

Do you post videos on Facebook? Have you tried retargeting your live and uploaded videos? To explore techniques for retargeting your videos, I interview Amanda Bond. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Amanda Bond, who's known as the "Ad Strategist" specializing in Facebook ads. Amanda also advises top social pros and has taught the ADdicted Facebook Ads course. Online, she's known simply as Bond. Amanda explores Facebook video ads and retargeting. You'll discover how to use Amanda's technique to warm up your Facebook followers. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Video Retargeting for Live Video and Beyond Amanda's Story Before Amanda started working in social media marketing, she worked with big brands such as Pepsi and Labatt. As a salesperson for Pepsi, she went door to door to compete with Coke. After she sent two truckloads of Pepsi to a store for a large sale, Coke sent three. Looking over 110 pallets of pop, Amanda realized that the impact she was having in her sales role wasn't aligned with where she wanted to show up in the world. To move forward, Amanda decided to give back through her local Rotary service club. As the club's youngest member, she was encouraged to become their social media manager. When Amanda started working with her Rotary club in 2013, social media marketing felt like magic. Talking to people on the Internet seemed to create relationships out of thin air. However, Amanda quickly learned the impact of social when she used social media marketing for a live local Rotary event. To promote the event, the Rotary club used traditional marketing such as ads in the newspaper, and Amanda used everything she'd been learning about social media marketing. Throughout the weekend, the club expected 4,000 people to attend, but 23,000 people actually came, largely due to social media. That was Amanda's impetus to change direction in her career and she became a social media manager. As she became more versed in Facebook ads, she found that being an ad strategist was a great niche for her as a math and data nerd. Amanda now teaches and helps other businesses behind the scenes. She loves doing the deep dives into the data, helping people see the story the numbers are telling. Listen to the show to hear about Social Media Examiner's role in Amanda's early social media marketing efforts. What Retargeting Means The words retargeting and remarketing are interchangeable. Most people know about retargeting through the Facebook pixel, which is a tiny code snippet you add to your website. When someone lands on a page with this code, the Facebook pixel sends a message back to Facebook, saying something important is happening. Facebook has opened up new ways to retarget people (or show them content or ads based on prior actions), including video retargeting. Because Facebook has been emphasizing live video and video in the news feed, Amanda is especially excited about these video retargeting features. Anytime somebody sees at least three seconds of a video (recorded or live), Facebook takes note of who they are and puts them into a retargeting custom audience that you can use to retarget them again and again. I ask why you would want to retarget someone who watched a Facebook video. Amanda says it's part of getting people to know, like, and trust your brand. You want to start nurturing conversations that may lead to a sales transaction. As the Ad Strategist, she calls this framework "Connect, Convert, Close." In that connection phase, your audience may be cold (they may not know or have heard of you),

Influencer Marketing: How to Scale Your Social Media Exposure  

Wondering how to increase your business's reach on social media? Have you considered partnering with an influencer? To explore how to develop business relationships with influencers, I interview Neal Schaffer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Neal Schaffer, author of three social media books including Maximize Your Social. He teaches social media strategy at Rutgers University and is the founder of PDCA Social, an agency that specializes in helping Japanese businesses leverage American social media platforms. Neal explores the difference between paid and earned influencers. You'll discover how to use influencer marketing to scale your social media results. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Influencer Marketing Why Influencer Marketing? Social media is a noisy place and the days of 100% organic success are over. Brands, companies, and practitioners need to use paid social to get noticed. In this environment, Neal believes other people can accelerate your social media marketing efforts. Put simply, you need to consider other users on social media who might be able to help spread the word about your brand and amplify your message. Neal identifies three different types of "others": your employees or partners (employee advocacy), your fans (brand advocacy), and influencers (also known as influencer marketing). Each type is powerful in its own way, and in 2017, influencer marketing is the most mainstream. It can help you cut through the noise in a different way than paid social. Plus, influencer marketing is ideally more authentic and leads to more engagement. I ask Neal to explain what influencer marketing is, for people who are new to the concept. Neal says influencer marketing involves partnering with people who have influence over others. In the old days, newspaper writers and television broadcasters had tremendous influence. Now, in certain online or social media communities, people on YouTube or Instagram are famous and influential in a way that's similar to big-name media celebrities. Some social media influencers focus on one network, such as Instagram or YouTube, whereas others have appeal across several platforms. With influencer marketing, you work with an influencer who talks about your brand, and those mentions of your product or service have a positive effect on your business. People become influencers on social media because they're creating their own valuable content. They have a regular audience that cares about the influencer's tips, recommendations, or other content. However, unlike a true celebrity, a person doesn't need a million followers or subscribers to be an influencer. They need to have relevance only in their community. For example, a YouTuber may have never heard of a podcasting influencer. That's okay. The podcaster needs to have influence only within their specific podcasting community. Listen to the show to hear more about how social influencers compare to big-name celebrities. How to Discover and Evaluate Potential Influencers To begin, use listening tools and do keyword searches to learn who in your industry is talking about topics or products relevant to your business. For instance, a consumer brand selling to moms needs to know which mommy bloggers are talking about products similar to theirs, or which Instagrammers are taking photos and using hashtags related to their products. A B2B company needs to seek out tech bloggers who carry a lot of weight. Remember, influence isn't only about the number of followers. Find people who are producing content that seems to have an effect.

Local Social Media Marketing With Facebook and Instagram  

How do you promote your business locally? Are you using Facebook and Instagram? To explore how to reach a local customer base on social media, I interview Bruce Irving. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Bruce Irving, the host of the Smart Pizza Marketing podcast, where he helps local pizza restaurants master marketing. He's a former pizzeria owner and you can find him at SmartPizzaMarketing.com. Bruce explores why social media marketing is worthwhile for local businesses. You'll discover tips to get your local business started with social media video. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Marketing for Local Business Bruce's Story Bruce has been in the pizza industry since he was 16 years old. He worked his way up and then partnered with someone to run his own pizza business. The restaurant did a pretty high volume of sales for their style of restaurant, which had 10 seats plus takeout and delivery. Starting in the late 1990s, Bruce and his partner used old marketing methods such as direct mail, which worked well until the mid-2000s. Around 2008, the effectiveness of that kind of marketing started to dwindle, so they tried marketing their restaurant on social media. Even as the economy struggled after the 2008 economic crash, their pizza business was successful and growing. When relatives and friends in the pizza business started asking how Bruce and his business partner used different types of marketing to grow, they began sharing their methods. Bruce decided he wanted to talk to other pizzeria operators so they could learn from each other. In 2015, Bruce started his podcast and the knowledge-gathering he did for it evolved into creating an agency that helps local pizza-specific restaurants run social media and digital advertising. For the last 16 months, Bruce has been running the agency full time, helping local pizzerias grow their business and get better results with online marketing. Listen to the show to discover why podcasting was a great way for Bruce to learn from other business owners while running his own pizza restaurant. Video in Social Media A pizzeria is a very visual style of restaurant. The cooks often work the pizza dough and put together pizzas in front of a big window because it's entertaining. Even more traditional restaurants are moving to the open-kitchen concept because the chef creating the food is part of the show. To bring this entertaining element to the web, Bruce encourages clients to do video. A lot of them shy away from video in the beginning, but it's important to become comfortable in front of the camera. Different styles of videos work in any business, not just restaurants. For instance, you can do tutorials. You can also give people a look behind the scenes. If you have the best pizza in town, show your fans why. Do you make your own dough? Do you use a special kind of sauce? Do you cut up all of your own vegetables? Showing what makes your restaurant special helps you compete with every other place in your neighborhood and the big chains. Your personality also differentiates you from your competitors. If you're a personable owner and can be charismatic in front of the camera, your personality (along with your products and services) separates you from other brands.   It's all in the sauce - the special Stanislaus Pizza Sauce married with PizzaMan Dan's secret blend of spices - which makes your PizzaMan Dan's pizza mouth watering delectable! TODAY ONLY - yes, MONDAY - we're celebrating our long time relationship with the family-owned Stanislaus Farms in Stanislaus Count...

Facebook Ads Strategy: How Marketers Can Win With Facebook  

Do you use Facebook ads? Want to make them more effective? To explore how to create a successful Facebook ads strategy, I interview Nicholas Kusmich. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Nicholas Kusmich, author of Give: The Ultimate Guide to Using Facebook Advertising to Generate More Leads, More Clients, and Massive ROI. He also heads up the H2H Media Group, where he consults and manages accounts for high-profile speakers and authors. Nicholas shares how the four M's can help you plan your Facebook ad strategy. You'll discover the three key elements every Facebook ad needs. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Ads Strategy Nicholas' Story Nicholas got into Facebook ads almost by accident. He had been marketing his products on the Internet without any success, even though he followed what everyone said to do: Create a course or ebook, and get paid traffic to sell it. His next step was to try Google ads, but then Google had another algorithm adjustment. Fortunately, around that time, two websites' ad platforms were being released in beta: Plenty of Fish (the dating site) and Facebook. Nicholas jumped in to advertise his products on both and soon realized Facebook was going in a very aggressive direction. He was in the right place at the right time. Nicholas learned about Facebook advertising very quickly and got the advantage of being an early adopter. This was about five years ago. These days, Nicholas runs his marketing business with two key services. His boutique agency serves clients in a fully managed scenario. His business also offers marketing training and consulting for business owners and entrepreneurs who want to implement their marketing for themselves. Listen to the show to hear what Facebook ads were like in the early days. The Role of Facebook Ads in Marketing Nicholas loves the paradox of Facebook's size. On one hand, Facebook is an enormous platform: around two billion users log in for at least a few minutes each day. Therefore, regardless of your type of business or message, your prospects are probably using Facebook. Moreover, you don't need a 30-second spot on the Super Bowl to reach hundreds of millions of people. With Facebook, you can do that with a few clicks of a button. On the other hand, Facebook allows advertisers to zero in on a small, specific audience because Facebook aggregates data. Facebook notes where people check in, what they like, whom they follow, and what they mention. And it makes that kind of information available to advertisers. So, for instance, if Nicholas wanted to target a Beverly Hills housewife who lives on a particular street based on her zip code, and who shops at Whole Foods, has an Amex card, and spent money on it in the last seven days or so, he could. This capability makes Facebook an interesting platform for an advertiser (a business owner or entrepreneur) who has a message, product, or service and who knows the audience they're trying to reach. Facebook allows people to advertise at far lower cost than traditional advertising. So in the grand scheme of marketing, Nicholas believes Facebook advertising is the best direct-response platform and distribution channel to get a message to your ideal prospects. Listen to the show to discover the joke at Nicholas' office. How to Put Together a Facebook Ads Strategy A lot of people focus on the tactics, such as how much to bid for the ad or what objective to use. Those are legitimate concerns, but Nicholas doesn't think they're the big needle-movers.

Facebook Video for Marketers: Strategy for Future Success  

Do you create videos for your business? Wondering how to best leverage your videos on Facebook? To explore Facebook video strategy, I interview Jay Baer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Jay Baer, a digital marketing and social media strategist. He authored Hug Your Haters, a book about social care, and also hosts the Social Pros Podcast and the Jay Today show. Jay discusses the differences between video on Facebook and YouTube. You'll discover the tech and tools Jay uses to produce his own videos. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Video for Marketers Facebook Versus YouTube Jay says a lot of people do very well with YouTube videos, and just as many do well with Facebook videos. However, not too many people do equally well with both because each platform has a specific use case. People watch YouTube as a replacement for television entertainment or they're searching for how-to videos. On Facebook, videos appear in the news feed and can interrupt people while they're on the platform. At Convince & Convert, Jay says they advise clients to think about what the video is and under what circumstances people will want to watch it. Based on that assessment, choose one of the platforms as the primary home for the video. I mention how views of The Last Jedi trailer on Facebook far surpassed views on YouTube within the first 30 minutes of its release. Jay responds by noting a few factors that might have contributed to that difference at that particular point in time. One is that Facebook allows users to share content with others easily. Also, Facebook defines a "view" differently than YouTube. Although we both suspect most viewers of The Last Jedi are watching the whole trailer, marketers should remember that Facebook counts 3 seconds as a view, whereas YouTube requires 30 seconds. Also, a video on Facebook may receive substantially more views immediately after it's posted but the YouTube video may receive more views in the long run, especially on a strong YouTube channel. To clarify how The Last Jedi example pertains to the everyday marketer, Jay stresses that Facebook drives exposure based on engagement. So if you put a video on Facebook and a disproportionate number of people like, comment, and share, then a disproportionate number of people will see the video in their feed. This visibility gives even more Facebook users an opportunity to share the video with somebody else, and the cycle continues. Jay sees this ripple effect every time he posts a video on Facebook. If he gets immediate engagement, then more people see it. If he doesn't, users' engagement with the video will plateau. Next we talk about streaming live video to Facebook versus YouTube. For vlogging, Jay says that you could use both Facebook and YouTube. Jay does something like this with his Jay Today show. He streams the live video first on his personal Facebook profile and posts the video file elsewhere afterward. Jay explains that Facebook's API prevents you from live-streaming anywhere else while you're streaming to Facebook Live. To stream to Facebook Live, Periscope, and YouTube Live simultaneously, you would need multiple phones or computers. That limitation is one reason Jay goes to Facebook Live first; he can't be anywhere else. He also notes that on YouTube (for now at least), you need to have 1,000 or more subscribers to stream live video from a mobile device. So YouTube's live video feature isn't as widely accessible as Facebook's. Listen to the show to hear Jay discuss his approach t...

Google Analytics and Social Media: What Marketers Need to Know  

Do you track the return on your social media activity in Google Analytics? Want to discover some valuable shortcuts? To explore cool hacks for Google Analytics, I interview Annie Cushing. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Annie Cushing, Google Analytics expert and chief data officer at Outspoken Media digital marketing agency. She's a total analytics geek who loves teaching other marketers how to make the most of their analytics data. Annie explores Google Analytics, social reporting, dashboards, and more. You'll discover how to customize Google Analytics reports for yourself. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Google Analytics and Social Media What's New in Google Analytics Starting May 15, 2017, Google Analytics will allow people to do remarketing across multiple devices. Annie explains that if someone visits your site on their mobile device and then comes back to it on their laptop, as long as they're logged into Google in both places, you'll be able to target them across their devices. This new capability is a huge step forward for remarketing audiences because few people shop only on their computer, tablet, or phone. Annie explains that Google previously relied on user IDs to offer remarketing features, but most businesses couldn't implement the technology very easily. Only advanced analysts could set it up for sites where users were highly incentivized to log in. Because most businesses don't have sites like that, this new ability is groundbreaking. Annie says one issue she regularly sees with clients is they seldom use Google Analytics for retargeting. Instead, they use AdWords and DoubleClick. However, Google Analytics enables marketers to get much more granular with targeting. For instance, you can serve an ad to someone who visited a certain page but didn't convert or to someone who put something in a cart but didn't check out. Hopefully, multiple-device retargeting will incentivize more people to take advantage of Google Analytics. Listen to the show to discover how a retargeting ad saved Annie last Christmas. Google Optimize Google recently announced they were releasing Google Optimize, a free tool for A/B testing. For example, say you want to experiment with product page design, such as the placement of the price or Buy button or different font colors or text. In an A/B test, you run two versions of your page and compare how each version performs. Up until this point, Optimizely has been the industry standard. At Social Media Examiner, we use Visual Website Optimizer. Annie believes Google Optimize is perfect for small- to mid-sized or even large businesses. (Google Optimize 360 is the enterprise-level version.) Annie recommends that businesses get what they can from the free version first. Then as your organization develops more sophisticated testing needs (for instance, reducing the bounce rate or increasing the conversion rate), consider paying for more advanced features. Annie also notes that Google Optimize is user-friendly. To move things around, you simply drag and drop. You don't have to ask a developer to customize the page for you. Listen to the show to hear my description of how optimizing tools work. Ad Blockers and Do-not-track Technology Annie explains how ad blockers and do-not-track tools impact your analytics data differently. If you run display ads on AdWords, then ad blockers will impact your overall effectiveness. As people choose to block ads, impressions and conversions will decrease. A lot of publishers,

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