Speaking of Psychology

Speaking of Psychology

United States

"Speaking of Psychology" is an audio podcast series highlighting some of the latest, most important and relevant psychological research being conducted today. Produced by the American Psychological Association, these podcasts will help listeners apply the science of psychology to their everyday lives.

Episodes

Children, loss and stress  

Protecting children from sadness, anxiety and stress is a natural instinct for many adults. But, finding ways to help them address these inevitable obstacles to happiness is a challenge parents, teachers and other caregivers have to face head on. In this episode, Bonnie Zucker, PsyD, talks about how to explain death to young children as well as the research into the effectiveness of relaxation and mindfulness techniques for kids.

Living the better single life  

Married people are often considered to be happier and healthier, while single people are often stereotyped as being isolated, self-centered and unhappy. But what if these are myths? In this episode, psychologist Bella DePaulo, PhD, talks about the benefits of remaining unattached and calls on psychology to pay more attention to why certain single people do, in fact, thrive.

Treating anxiety in children  

Fear and anxiety are part of most normal children’s lives. But how do we know when anxiety is a problem in need of professional help? In this episode, Golda Ginsburg, PhD, talks about how to recognize the signs of an anxiety disorder in your child and what are the most effective, evidence-based treatments.

Understanding mass violence  

Are terrorists flooding into our country? Are we facing an epidemic of mass shootings and violence? Whatever your thoughts are on gun control or terrorism, psychologists who study human behavior, specifically thrill-seeking and risk taking behaviors, have a lot to contribute to the discussion. In this episode, Frank Farley, PhD, talks about why mental health experts need to be on the front lines of violence prevention efforts.

How politics became so uncivilized  

Political elections ought to bring out the good in people – aren’t they a chance to talk about plans and hopes for the future? But lately they have come to resemble brawls on a playground. When did it become OK to wave insulting signs at rallies or call candidates ugly names? Why are so many candidates focusing on the personal instead of policy? In this episode, Jonathan Haidt, PhD, talks about incivility in politics and how psychological research can help us understand each other a little better and return civility to politics.

How to talk to teen boys about dating and sex  

Chances are parents know they need to tell their boys something about sex but aren’t sure where to start. As a result, television, friends and the internet often fill in the gaps, leading to confusion and misconceptions about what it means to be romantic and masculine. In this episode, Andrew Smiler, PhD, talks about his new book, a guide aimed at teen boys, in which he challenges the “myth of manhood,” and gives advice and tips on how to encourage boys to become sexually responsible and mature in their relationships.

Born bashful? Learning how to manage shyness  

Have you ever felt awkward, worried or tense during social encounters, especially with people you don’t know? We’ve probably all felt shy at one time or another, but for some people the shyness is so intense it can keep them from interacting with others even when they want or need to – leading to problems in relationships and even at work. In this episode, Bernardo Carducci, PhD, gives advice and tips to shy people who want to understand and manage their reticence.

Kids and psychologists team up to learn from one another  

In order to understand how children think and behave, psychologists need to study them. Most of the time, these experiments take place in university labs or sometime in schools, but one program is taking psychological science into museums around the country. In this episode, Peter Blake, EdD, talks about the Living Laboratory and how it’s breaking down barriers between scientists and the public.

Improving health care with psychology  

Where we live, work or socialize have an impact on our health. Poverty greatly increases the risk of heart disease, depression and stress, as do racism and ethnic discrimination, according to numerous psychological studies. In this episode, Elizabeth Brondolo, PhD, talks about how psychologists are taking the findings from those studies and using them in medical settings in an effort to improve patients’ quality of care.

How masculinity can hurt mental health  

The availability and quality of health care is often substandard when it comes to serving low-income boys and men in ethnic/minority communities. As a result, they have some of the worst health outcomes in the country. In this episode, psychologist Wizdom Powell, PhD, MPH, talks about how racism, discrimination and gender stereotyping can contribute to a decline in men’s health over time.

Recognizing a narcissist  

Narcissism is not just something attributed to people who post selfies and list all their favorite meals on Facebook. It’s a diagnosable personality disorder that causes people to have a delusional sense of self-worth and lack of empathy. In this episode, psychologist Ramani Durvasula, PhD, talks about how people can recognize a narcissist and what to do if you’re in a relationship with one.

Discrimination and stress  

Experiencing discrimination in any form can be profoundly stressful for many people, according to the latest Stress in America™ survey, published by the American Psychological Association. In this episode, psychologist Lynn Bufka, PhD, talks about how stress and discrimination are linked and what that can mean for people’s health and well-being over time.

Planning for a successful career  

Succeeding in any profession takes careful planning and skills that may not be obvious to people at the start of their careers. In this episode, psychologist Garth Fowler, PhD, talks about the benefits of having an individual development plan and introduces a set of videos that can help psychologists and other professionals take the next step in their careers.

Nonverbal communication speaks volumes  

If you think reading people is not a science, think again. Understanding expressions that only appear on someone’s face for tenths of a second can mean a lot to those who know what to look for. In this episode, psychologist and nonverbal communication expert David Matsumoto, PhD, talks about why nonverbal communication is so important in everything from police investigations to intercultural exchanges.

Putting an end to bullying and school violence  

School violence and bullying are a concern for parents and educators alike. As a result, thousands of school districts have implemented anti-bullying programs. In this episode, psychologist and education expert Dorothy Espelage, PhD, talks about the effectiveness of these programs and what parents and schools can continue to do to curb everything from cyberbullying to dating violence.

Psychology’s influence on our digital world  

Psychologists are key in understanding how and why we use technology the way we do. Our smartphones and activity trackers can gauge our moods, and there are apps that can act as mobile therapists. In this episode, Pamela Rutledge, PhD, applies psychological science to interactive and mobile media technology, an evolving area of research.

Understanding your racial biases  

Racial bias is everywhere but we may not always see it. However, understanding the way people feel about and behave toward those outside their own group can help communities heal after a tragedy, as well as prevent future ones, according to Yale University psychologist John Dovidio, PhD.

Helping transgender people thrive  

Transgender and gender nonconforming people are becoming more accepted in mainstream society, but they still remain misunderstood and understudied. In this episode, psychologist Anneliese Singh discusses how she and other researchers are trying to understand resilience within this population. She also talks about new practice guidelines for the mental health professionals who work with them.

Integrated care for kids  

Combining mental and behavioral health services with pediatric medical care is a natural fit. But there have been relatively few studies on whether or not it actually works. In this episode, we speak with Joan Asarnow, PhD, who led one of the top studies comparing more traditional care with integrated health care models. She talks about why these studies can help expand integrated care to even more patients.

Keeping your brain fit  

Much like in our arms or legs, our brain’s “muscles” can rebuild and grow if they’re given the right exercise. In this episode, neuroscientist Tracey Shors talks about how her research has led her to explore links between physical and mental exercise.

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