Speaking of Psychology

Speaking of Psychology

United States

"Speaking of Psychology" is an audio podcast series highlighting some of the latest, most important and relevant psychological research being conducted today. Produced by the American Psychological Association, these podcasts will help listeners apply the science of psychology to their everyday lives.


Discrimination and stress  

Experiencing discrimination in any form can be profoundly stressful for many people, according to the latest Stress in America™ survey, published by the American Psychological Association. In this episode, psychologist Lynn Bufka, PhD, talks about how stress and discrimination are linked and what that can mean for people’s health and well-being over time.

Planning for a successful career  

Succeeding in any profession takes careful planning and skills that may not be obvious to people at the start of their careers. In this episode, psychologist Garth Fowler, PhD, talks about the benefits of having an individual development plan and introduces a set of videos that can help psychologists and other professionals take the next step in their careers.

Nonverbal communication speaks volumes  

If you think reading people is not a science, think again. Understanding expressions that only appear on someone’s face for tenths of a second can mean a lot to those who know what to look for. In this episode, psychologist and nonverbal communication expert David Matsumoto, PhD, talks about why nonverbal communication is so important in everything from police investigations to intercultural exchanges.

Putting an end to bullying and school violence  

School violence and bullying are a concern for parents and educators alike. As a result, thousands of school districts have implemented anti-bullying programs. In this episode, psychologist and education expert Dorothy Espelage, PhD, talks about the effectiveness of these programs and what parents and schools can continue to do to curb everything from cyberbullying to dating violence.

Psychology’s influence on our digital world  

Psychologists are key in understanding how and why we use technology the way we do. Our smartphones and activity trackers can gauge our moods, and there are apps that can act as mobile therapists. In this episode, Pamela Rutledge, PhD, applies psychological science to interactive and mobile media technology, an evolving area of research.

Understanding your racial biases  

Racial bias is everywhere but we may not always see it. However, understanding the way people feel about and behave toward those outside their own group can help communities heal after a tragedy, as well as prevent future ones, according to Yale University psychologist John Dovidio, PhD.

Helping transgender people thrive  

Transgender and gender nonconforming people are becoming more accepted in mainstream society, but they still remain misunderstood and understudied. In this episode, psychologist Anneliese Singh discusses how she and other researchers are trying to understand resilience within this population. She also talks about new practice guidelines for the mental health professionals who work with them.

Integrated care for kids  

Combining mental and behavioral health services with pediatric medical care is a natural fit. But there have been relatively few studies on whether or not it actually works. In this episode, we speak with Joan Asarnow, PhD, who led one of the top studies comparing more traditional care with integrated health care models. She talks about why these studies can help expand integrated care to even more patients.

Keeping your brain fit  

Much like in our arms or legs, our brain’s “muscles” can rebuild and grow if they’re given the right exercise. In this episode, neuroscientist Tracey Shors talks about how her research has led her to explore links between physical and mental exercise.

Dispelling the myth of violence and mental illness  

Recent mass shootings have inevitably led to news reports of the suspected shooters’ mental health, but psychological research shows there is no clear link between mental illness and violence. In this episode, clinical and forensic psychologist Joel Dvoskin, PhD, talks about the misconceptions surrounding mental illness and violent behavior and how basic prevention efforts could help stop future violent events.

Unlocking the psychology of millennials  

Psychologists are studying millennials and trying to discover more about the motivations and desires of a generation often thought of as being narcissistic and self-absorbed. In this episode, psychologist and researcher Jean Twenge, author of the best-selling book “Generation Me : Why Today's Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled—and More Miserable Than Ever Before ,” discusses the latest research into millennials and how they’re changing what it means to be an individual in today’s society.

Making psychotherapy work for you  

Research has shown that psychotherapy is an effective tool for people who are dealing with a wide range of mental and behavioral health issues, yet people are still hesitant to visit a therapist for treatment. In this episode, we talk with psychologist and researcher Bruce Wampold, PhD, about why psychotherapy works and can often be a better alternative to medications.

Stamping out mental health stigma  

Millions of people suffer from mental illness but stigma prevents many of them from seeking out effective treatments. In this episode, psychologist Arthur C. Evans Jr., PhD, talks about how the city of Philadelphia is using several novel approaches to help improve the mental health of its residents, fight stigma and get people on a path to recovery.

Surviving the AIDS epidemic  

Despite recent medical advances and drug treatments, HIV remains a burdensome condition for millions of people around the world. In this episode, psychologist Perry Halkitis, PhD, MS, MPH, talks about how the lessons from the survivors of the AIDS generation can inform the lives of those who are newly infected with HIV and those living with other challenging diseases.

The stress of money  

APA’s latest Stress in America survey found that 72 percent of Americans reported feeling stressed about money at least some time in the prior month. In this episode, psychologist and researcher Linda Gallo, PhD, talks about how stress from finances and other sources can affect your health.

Using your mind to find love  

There are few things in life so strongly tied to our overall happiness as a stable and happy marriage. In this episode, psychologist Ty Tashiro, PhD, gives advice and tips on how to use psychological science to find lasting love, showing us that using our heads, and not just our hearts, can lead to our happily ever after.

Treating the whole person  

A growing body of research has shown a connection between our minds and bodies – a relationship that can affect our overall health. In this episode, psychologist Parinda Khatri, PhD, discusses the impact of an integrated and patient-centered health care model, which brings psychologists, physicians and patients together to treat the whole person.

Improving lives through virtual reality therapy  

Advancements in virtual reality technology have not only led to improved experiences for people who enjoy video games but they are also treating very serious psychological and physical disabilities. In this episode, psychologist Albert “Skip” Rizzo, PhD, discusses research into the effectiveness of virtual reality therapy and how this technology can improve the therapist-client relationship.

The mental price of affluence  

American teens from upper-middle class families are more likely to have higher rates of depression, anxiety and substance abuse than any other socioeconomic group of young people, says psychologist Suniya Luthar, PhD. In this episode, she talks about the pressures facing economically advantaged teens and what parents can do to keep them from spiraling out of control.

Protecting your aging brain  

Research into effective ways to prevent or slow down the onset of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease has come a long way, according to researcher and neuropsychologist Glenn E. Smith, PhD. In this episode, he discusses the causes of dementia as well as the effectiveness of activities such as physical exercise and brain training games in preventing it.

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