Special Relationship, from The Economist and Mic

Special Relationship, from The Economist and Mic

United Kingdom

Special Relationship is a podcast collaboration that examines the US presidential election from the characteristic perspectives of two leading news organizations. Hosted by The Economist’s John Prideaux and Mic’s Celeste Katz, Special Relationship grapples with the major themes and issues in a campaign that has been anything but predictable. Each episode is a conversation, fusing deep dives into specific themes with broader perspectives provided by global and historical comparisons from both sides of the pond. It’s a unique transatlantic partnership between two distinctive voices. It’s a special relationship.

Episodes

Special Relationship #7: Unconventional Conventions  

In a special edition of the podcast, Celeste and John share their personal observations after covering both the Republican National Convention in Cleveland and the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Celeste contrasts 2016 with covering five previous conventions; John reports on his takeaways after entering the U.S. convention bubble for the very first time. Special Guest: Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani.

Special Relationship #6: Brexit Strategy  

To help unravel what the U.K.'s decision might mean for the nation's "Special Relationship" with the United States and the 2016 presidential elections, and the world, Celeste and John are joined by two guests. Robert Tuttle served as ambassador to the United Kingdom from the United States from 2005 to 2009. Speaking from California, Tuttle shares his thoughts on how the international landscape will change — and his own surprising plans for casting his own vote in November. Economist columnist Jeremy Cliffe, an expert on politics of Europe, joins the conversation and speaks about how young people will be affected by the Brexit vote — and the parallels between their political participation, or lack thereof, in the U.K. and U.S.

Special Relationship #5: The Politics of Gun Control  

Today, Celeste and John speak with U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy, the Connecticut Democrat who led a 15-hour filibuster to force lawmakers to take action on stronger gun control regulations after 49 people were gunned down at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida. Murphy's measure also came as Jo Cox, a U.K. Labour Party member of Parliament, was murdered in a savage shooting and stabbing attack in her home district amid the tensions of the Brexit vote. Murphy expresses his anger and frustration — but also his hope for change — as he and like-minded legislators battle the gun lobby for measures including a ban on gun sales to people on the terror no-fly watch list.

Special Relationship #4: Bernie Sanders and Beyond  

Today, Celeste and John delve into the Bernie Sanders phenomenon and what it means for the future of Democratic and third-party politics. Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean, a supporter of Sanders rival Hillary Clinton, looks at the election through the lens of his own experiences as a 2004 presidential contender. He gives his take on not only Clinton and Sanders, but on presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump as well. Providing an international perspective: Writer Sam Knight, who uses the knowledge he gained from producing a deeply reported New Yorker magazine profile of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn to compare the state of left-flank politics in the U.S. and the U.K.

Special Relationship #3: Ad Wars  

In our third episode, Celeste and John focus on the stunning tidal wave of 2016 campaign television advertising — and whether or not it's even effective. Veteran strategist and admaker Jimmy Siegel opens the discussion with his take on makes a winning TV commercial. Darrell West, vice president and director of governance studies at the Brookings Institution, speaks about the changing landscape of how candidates connect with voters and forecasts the general election ad wars. And Matt Steinglass, The Economist's Europe editor, contrasts America's political broadcast bonanza with the very different — but changing — tone of TV commercials across the pond.

Special Relationship #2: The Woman Card  

In our second episode, we examine the complexities of why American voters may select or reject their first female leader. Celeste and John talk about how Clinton's second attempt to win the Oval Office may be helped — or hurt — by her gender. Guest Joanne Bamberger, author of "Love Her, Love Her Not: The Hillary Paradox," speaks about the complexities of how female voters view Clinton and the personal and political choices she's made. And later, Economist Senior Editor Anne McElvoy contrasts Clinton's quest with how women such as Margaret Thatcher and Angela Merkel rose to power in Europe.

Special Relationship #1: Terrorism and National Security  

In ancient times — pre-2012, say — American presidential elections were often reasoned, somber affairs. The 2016 campaign will not be remembered that way. Combative candidates have channeled voters' anger and fear into a new strain of hypernationalism. In this, our first episode of Special Relationship, we examine how fear of terrorism is shaping the campaign — and whether what is happening in the U.S. is really so different from the politics of other countries.

Special Relationship: Coming Soon  

Special Relationship is a podcast collaboration that examines the US presidential election from the characteristic perspectives of two leading news organizations. Hosted by The Economist’s John Prideaux and Mic’s Celeste Katz, Special Relationship grapples with the major themes and issues in a campaign that has been anything but predictable. Each episode is a conversation, fusing deep dives into specific themes with broader perspectives provided by global and historical comparisons from both sides of the pond. It’s a unique transatlantic partnership between two distinctive voices. It’s a special relationship.

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