The Economist: Money talks

The Economist: Money talks

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In these podcasts, our correspondents discuss the most important business, finance and economics news of the week

Episodes

Money talks: The Italian bailout job  

Italy has been forced to bail out two banks at a cost of as much €17bn euros ($19bn). Is that the end of the bleeding in Italy's financial sector? Also, as the iPhone turns ten, we look at how Apple is evolving. And Catherine Mann, Chief Economist at the OECD, tells us how to government can help workers made jobless by globalisation. Hosted by Simon Long.

Money Talks: The scandal that won’t go away  

Barclays and four of its former executives have been charged with fraud, a throwback to the 2008 financial crisis when the bank raised billions from Qatari investors. But what happened nine years ago? And why have the company's actions been investigated? Also, how buyers are striking a hard deal at the Paris Air Show. And why meddling by Saudi Arabia’s Muhammad bin Salman in Aramco might scupper the world’s biggest IPO. Hosted by Simon Long.

Money talks: A poison chalice for GE’s new boss  

Patrick Foulis asks if a break-up is on the cards as General Electric appoints a new CEO. Also, Uber is on a collision course as it grapples with management problems. Why confidence among European companies is sky high. And tension in global trade in aluminium. Hosted by Philip Coggan.

Money talks:  Super Mario to the rescue  

As the European Central Bank meets in Estonia this week, is it time for Mario Draghi to withdraw support from the Eurozone economy? Emerging Markets Editor Simon Cox on why the BRICs label is still relevant. And, how investors are taking care of the planet. Simon Long presents

Money talks: British Airways hits turbulence  

After a disastrous weekend of technical glitches for British Airways, our correspondent Charles Read estimates the long-term damage to the airline's reputation. Also: America's army of small banks are demanding lighter regulation. And Anne McElvoy travels to Portugal to find out about Economy Minister Manuel Cabral's plans for the country. Simon Long hosts.

Money talks: Ford's falling fortunes  

Simon Long and Philip Coggan reflect on the suicide bombing in Manchester and its impact on the markets. In the rest of the programme: as heads roll at Ford, our industry expert Simon Wright explains the problems besetting the car manufacturer. Why some African countries are reluctant to sign up to trade deals. And, how Cuba has transformed a troublesome weed into a key export.

Money talks: Bankrolling the hackers  

Simon Long hears about a potential bubble in the market for Bitcoin and other crypto-currencies. Also: a report on how American ex-convicts are breaking into the job market. And, could Bollywood be eclipsed by regional rivals?

Money talks: Trumponomics  

Simon Long delves into what Donald Trump means for taxes, growth and trade. Also: the markets react to Emmanuel Macron's election victory in France and China develops its first large passenger jet

Money talks: Another pay rise?  

Callum Williams joins presenter Simon Long to examine the merits of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn’s proposal for a £10 minimum wage. The Chinese investors who idolise American billionaire Warren Buffet. Why a gender gap among Economics students could cause problems down the road

Money talks: How will France's election affect business?  

As the presidential race narrows to two strongly contrasting candidates, we explore what a victory for each would mean for businesses. The digital revolution is making measuring GDP a bit trickier. Also, how a website that crowdsources algorithms for quantitative finance could disrupt the industry.

Money talks:  A sweet story  

The EU is to abolish its quotas on sugar-beet production. Who are the winners and losers? Also: as video games get better and job prospects worse, more young men in America are spending their time in an alternate reality. Plus: are papers written by female economists clearer than ones written by men? And with a British election in the offing, our Buttonwood columnist discusses how the markets might react. Hosted by Simon Long.

Money Talks: The remarkable calmness of gold  

Despite rising tensions and fears of inflation, gold prices have stayed relatively still. Our Buttonwood columnist explains why. Traditional carmakers look likely to band together in the face of technological disruption. Also, what Britain's economists really think about the impacts of Brexit

Money talks: The robot era is dawning  

As robots grow more nimble, humans look increasingly vulnerable. Are the machines poised to take over? Also: now that Article 50 has been triggered, is Ireland's economy set to be damaged by Brexit? And despite Japan's workforce growing by more than two million, wage gains aren't enough to hit an inflation target of 2%. Why is this? Philip Coggan sits in for Simon Long.

Money talks: Luxury for the masses?  

The Chinese middle class led a boom in demand for luxury goods. But a government crackdown made consumers wary about showing off their wealth. How has China’s new modesty affected the luxury business as a whole? Also: India’s power sector has until now been dependent on using dirty coal but things are changing. And sand has become a scarce resource, leading to a burgeoning trade in illegal mining. Simon Long hosts.

Money talks: A most unusual company  

The one-time bookseller Amazon accounts for more than half of every new dollar spent online in the US. But how did it get to be the fifth most valuable company in the world? Also: why it costs the American government more to borrow money on the bonds market than European ones. And the big brands used to account for two-thirds of the tyre market. Now China has massively deflated their share. Simon Long hosts.

Money talks: Microsofter  

Microsoft has reinvented itself under its new CEO Satya Nadella with a move to the cloud. Is its friendlier approach to program developers likely to pay off? Also: as the Netherlands goes to the polls, our Europe editor Matt Steinglass examines how each party’s financial manifestos were put to the test. And: many people are fed up with their banks. Now help is at a hand from Europe’s banking regulators. Simon Long hosts.

Money talks: GM says ‘au revoir’ to Europe  

General Motors has sold its Vauxhall and Opel brands to PSA in France. Adam Roberts our European business editor asks how the car industry is reacting to the consolidation. Also: can Snapchat succeed as a public company? And might President Trump’s accusation that China hasn't been playing by the rules have a point? Simon Long hosts.

Money talks: Euro-optimism  

There are a number of growing threats to Europe with Brexit and maybe another Greek disaster looming. But Eurogroup president Jeroen Dijsselbloem tells Sacha Nauta the EU is actually on the mend. Also: Why Oscar mix-ups symbolise how independent films such as Moonlight are overshadowed by the big studios. Simon Long hosts.

Money talks: Clean energy’s dirty secret  

Could the rise of renewables be putting the traditional electricity market into a crisis? Also: Economist Diane Elson takes governments to task about the gender biases in their economic policies. And how the Brazilian government is tackling one of its biggest financial problems: pensions.

Money talks: Banks on the move  

Are thousands of banking jobs set to migrate from Britain into the eurozone? Patrick Lane discusses potential destinations with host Simon Long. Also: a currency catastrophe in Zimbabwe and the decline of the executive jet

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