The Economist: Money talks

The Economist: Money talks

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In these podcasts, our correspondents discuss the most important business, finance and economics news of the week

Episodes

Money talks: Tricky trading  

As NAFTA trade talks begin, we examine whether a deal can be made and discuss the investigation President Trump has ordered into China's trading practices. Artificial intelligence often gets a bad rap but could it create as many jobs as it takes? Plus, how fidget spinners have transformed the toy industry.

Money talks: Silicon sexism  

Google fires a software engineer after his anti-diversity memo was leaked. However, this points to wider culture wars in Silicon Valley. Janet Yellen’s term watching over America’s central bank will end in February. We look at possible candidates. And how Say's law, a 200 year-old economic theory, still has relevance today. Simon Long hosts.

Money talks: Billion dollar TV deal, Becker and Beckham  

Discovery Communications and Scripps Network team up to fight the competition. Also on the show: Why are economists so interested in human capital? And David Beckham’s Miami soccer dream might finally be realised.

Money talks: International monetary fun  

Host Philip Coggan and guests discuss the economic futures of the UK and USA,both of which have had their prospects downgraded in the International Monetary Fund’s updated World Economic Outlook. Also: the recent compromise ending a so-called Bitcoin "civil war".

The week ahead: Schwarzenegger campaigns to terminate gerrymandering  

Why is Arnold Schwarzenegger fighting for more competitive politics? He tells David Rennie, the Economist’s Lexington columnist, that politicians in gerrymandered seats are like overweight people who should go to the “fucking gym”. Also, Anne McElvoy, our Senior Editor, and Tom Wainwright, Britain Editor, tussle over the many versions of Brexit. And South Koreans rally against the elitist education system. Josie Delap hosts.

Money talks: Goodbye Benito  

Brazil’s rigid labour market regulations were transplanted wholesale from Benito Mussolini’s Italy back in 1943. Now President Michel Temer has approved  an overhaul. Will it encourage job creation? Also, an exorcist in Paris fighting “bad spirits”. And why President Trump is playing hardball in renegotiating NAFTA. Hosted by Andrew Palmer.

Money talks: A stormy time for America’s GDP  

A new report has established a link between America’s annual GDP and climate change. But can weather shifts really affect an entire country’s economy? Also, why China is likely to lead in artificial intelligence. And the Big Mac index and its purchasing-power parity. Hosted by Philip Coggan.

Money talks: Vorsprung durch Angst  

Germany is admired for a stable economy and holding on to blue-collar jobs but derided for its persistent trade surpluses. Our economics editor John O’Sullivan examines what Chancellor Merkel’s government might do next. Also, how “total immersion” could drive the masses to virtual reality. And why banks are de-risking to avoid penalties. Hosted by Simon Long.

Money talks: The Italian bailout job  

Italy has been forced to bail out two banks at a cost of as much €17bn euros ($19bn). Is that the end of the bleeding in Italy's financial sector? Also, as the iPhone turns ten, we look at how Apple is evolving. And Catherine Mann, Chief Economist at the OECD, tells us how to government can help workers made jobless by globalisation. Hosted by Simon Long.

Money Talks: The scandal that won’t go away  

Barclays and four of its former executives have been charged with fraud, a throwback to the 2008 financial crisis when the bank raised billions from Qatari investors. But what happened nine years ago? And why have the company's actions been investigated? Also, how buyers are striking a hard deal at the Paris Air Show. And why meddling by Saudi Arabia’s Muhammad bin Salman in Aramco might scupper the world’s biggest IPO. Hosted by Simon Long.

Money talks: A poison chalice for GE’s new boss  

Patrick Foulis asks if a break-up is on the cards as General Electric appoints a new CEO. Also, Uber is on a collision course as it grapples with management problems. Why confidence among European companies is sky high. And tension in global trade in aluminium. Hosted by Philip Coggan.

Money talks:  Super Mario to the rescue  

As the European Central Bank meets in Estonia this week, is it time for Mario Draghi to withdraw support from the Eurozone economy? Emerging Markets Editor Simon Cox on why the BRICs label is still relevant. And, how investors are taking care of the planet. Simon Long presents

Money talks: British Airways hits turbulence  

After a disastrous weekend of technical glitches for British Airways, our correspondent Charles Read estimates the long-term damage to the airline's reputation. Also: America's army of small banks are demanding lighter regulation. And Anne McElvoy travels to Portugal to find out about Economy Minister Manuel Cabral's plans for the country. Simon Long hosts.

Money talks: Ford's falling fortunes  

Simon Long and Philip Coggan reflect on the suicide bombing in Manchester and its impact on the markets. In the rest of the programme: as heads roll at Ford, our industry expert Simon Wright explains the problems besetting the car manufacturer. Why some African countries are reluctant to sign up to trade deals. And, how Cuba has transformed a troublesome weed into a key export.

Money talks: Bankrolling the hackers  

Simon Long hears about a potential bubble in the market for Bitcoin and other crypto-currencies. Also: a report on how American ex-convicts are breaking into the job market. And, could Bollywood be eclipsed by regional rivals?

Money talks: Trumponomics  

Simon Long delves into what Donald Trump means for taxes, growth and trade. Also: the markets react to Emmanuel Macron's election victory in France and China develops its first large passenger jet

Money talks: Another pay rise?  

Callum Williams joins presenter Simon Long to examine the merits of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn’s proposal for a £10 minimum wage. The Chinese investors who idolise American billionaire Warren Buffet. Why a gender gap among Economics students could cause problems down the road

Money talks: How will France's election affect business?  

As the presidential race narrows to two strongly contrasting candidates, we explore what a victory for each would mean for businesses. The digital revolution is making measuring GDP a bit trickier. Also, how a website that crowdsources algorithms for quantitative finance could disrupt the industry.

Money talks:  A sweet story  

The EU is to abolish its quotas on sugar-beet production. Who are the winners and losers? Also: as video games get better and job prospects worse, more young men in America are spending their time in an alternate reality. Plus: are papers written by female economists clearer than ones written by men? And with a British election in the offing, our Buttonwood columnist discusses how the markets might react. Hosted by Simon Long.

Money Talks: The remarkable calmness of gold  

Despite rising tensions and fears of inflation, gold prices have stayed relatively still. Our Buttonwood columnist explains why. Traditional carmakers look likely to band together in the face of technological disruption. Also, what Britain's economists really think about the impacts of Brexit

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