The Economist Radio (All audio)

The Economist Radio (All audio)

United Kingdom

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Episodes

The week ahead: Trivi-a-lago  

Anne McElvoy tests the recall of the Economist's US team with a special quiz on Trump's first 100 days. Also: cartoonist KAL sketches how government is taking a toll on the President, and Anne delves into the power struggle between family and ideology at the White House

The Economist asks: How can we improve the way we die?  

As medicine transforms the way terminal patients are cared for, do we risk sacrificing what really matters in the name of survival? The Economist's global public policy editor, John McDermott, speaks to surgeon and author Atul Gawande about making the inevitable palatable

Babbage: When cars fly  

Uber announces flying cars to replace taxi systems in the future. How realistic is this? Plastic-munching moths could save the world from the scourge of shopping bags. And an artificial womb could one day help premature babies to survive

Money talks: How will France's election affect business?  

As the presidential race narrows to two strongly contrasting candidates, we explore what a victory for each would mean for businesses. The digital revolution is making measuring GDP a bit trickier. Also, how a website that crowdsources algorithms for quantitative finance could disrupt the industry.

Indivisible Week 14: Join The Conversation  

Listeners are the guests on this episode of Indivisible. The whole hour will be open for callers to tell the hosts, Kai Wright, Anne McElvoy, and John Prideaux, how they’re feeling almost 100 days into Trump’s presidency. Whatever you may have thought on Inauguration Day -- have you changed your mind about President Trump in these past 14 weeks? Military families, do you feel you’re in good hands with this commander in chief? Democrats, Republicans and anyone else, let us know what issues you wish would be prioritized that so far have not been.

Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the April 22nd 2017 edition  

This week: China pushes pedal power on its city streets, fast-food restaurants in Japan look for a little more sizzle and is Argentina’s flag the wrong shade of blue?

The week ahead: Mrs May's June surprise  

The British prime minister announces she will hold a snap general election after repeatedly saying she would not. Our Britain editor Tom Wainwright discusses the implications for Brexit and the beleaguered Labour party. Meanwhile, France holds the first round of its presidential elections. And North Korea cooperates with the international community - over birds. Josie Delap hosts.

The Economist asks: Anne-Marie Slaughter  

What works better in foreign policy: cooperation or coercion? North Korea and Russia pose a challenge to Western leaders in ways that hearken back to the power politics of the Cold War. But there are plenty of problems that don’t fit into that pattern, like cybersecurity, pandemics and terrorism. Kenneth Cukier speaks to the former director for policy planning at the US State Department, Anne-Marie Slaughter, and our deputy foreign editor, Anton La Guardia, about how network theory could be applied to global problems.

Babbage: The new world of voice cloning  

The debate over internet regulation is heating up again in America. Also on the show: genetically-engineered bacteria could be used to light up hidden landmines. And voice-cloning technology can now reproduce speech. What does this mean in an era of fake news?

Money talks:  A sweet story  

The EU is to abolish its quotas on sugar-beet production. Who are the winners and losers? Also: as video games get better and job prospects worse, more young men in America are spending their time in an alternate reality. Plus: are papers written by female economists clearer than ones written by men? And with a British election in the offing, our Buttonwood columnist discusses how the markets might react. Hosted by Simon Long.

Indivisible Week 13: Feminism In The Age Of Trump  

On this episode of Indivisible, we’re talking about feminism in the age of Trump. Are we all seeing politics and life through the lens of gender more than before the election? Collier Meyerson from The Nation and Soraya Chemaly from the Women’s Media Center join hosts Kai Wright and Anne McElvoy to talk about the status of women according to the new administration and what that reflects about our culture. We’ll also discuss global feminism and what signals Trump’s election sends to women around the world.

The week ahead: Turkey's fragile future  

Turkey is holding a referendum on giving sweeping new powers to Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Our deputy editor Edward Carr explains what's at stake for the country. Also on the show: Chinese writers use science fiction to criticise their society. And while most of the world is migrating to cities, a growing numbers of urban dwellers in Italy are taking up farming. Josie Delap hosts.

The Economist asks: Paul Collier  

Is there a better way to deal with refugees? Best-selling author and development expert Professor Paul Collier speaks to The Economist's Robert Guest and Emma Hogan about why the UNHCR's model on refugees is broken and how to fix it. He argues that the model needs to change from free food and shelter to work and autonomy.

Babbage: What can science do for my garden?  

The Royal Botanic Gardens Kew has unlocked the DNA sequence of thousands of plants. Is the ability to manipulate colour and smell good news for the worldwide floral industry? Also: Pests and pathogens thriving in a warmer climate could wipe out our woodlands. And is Kew’s Millennium Seed Bank the ultimate horticultural insurance policy for the planet? Kenneth Cukier hosts.

Money Talks: The remarkable calmness of gold  

Despite rising tensions and fears of inflation, gold prices have stayed relatively still. Our Buttonwood columnist explains why. Traditional carmakers look likely to band together in the face of technological disruption. Also, what Britain's economists really think about the impacts of Brexit

Indivisible Week 12: The Fallout From Trump's Strike On Syria  

Last week President Trump exercised his military muscle for the first time, ordering a missile strike of an airfield in Syria. The Trump administration says that Assad’s regime was responsible for a chemical attack, and that the missile strike was a proportional response to a violation of the laws of war that prohibit chemical weapons. But why is this so significant? This is the first time the U.S. has attacked Syria and the Assad regime since the civil war started over 6 years ago. If you voted for Trump because he ran on prioritizing America first, what do you make of an escalation of military involvement in Syria? Also, military families or active duty personnel, do you have confidence in our Commander-In-Chief in this situation? On this episode of Indivisible, Kai Wright and John Prideaux talk to NPR’s middle east correspondent Deborah Amos and Phyllis Bennis from the Institute for Policy Studies about the implications of this military action.

Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the April 8th 2017 edition  

This week: India’s booze ban hits businesses, China announces a new megacity and a profitable way to stop computers from being racist

The week ahead: Donald decisive  

Donald Trump launches an airstrike in Syria in response to the regime's use of chemical weapons. Our defence editor Matthew Symonds discusses Mr Trump's capacity for surprise. Also on the show: Where we park our vehicles shapes our cities - usually for the worse. And Ethiopia enters Africa's space race. Josie Delap hosts.

The Economist asks: What does John McCain think of Donald Trump’s leadership?  

Since last year’s election Senator John McCain has criticised Donald Trump’s freewheeling approach to foreign policy. In this episode, he speaks to Anne McElvoy about his role in the "nuclear option" stand-off over Neil Gorsuch's Supreme Court confirmation, Rex Tillerson's mishandling of Syria - and why the US should stand up the "gangster" in the Kremlin. And he shares his advice to the President on curing Trump's Twitter habit.

Babbage: Defending data  

Security crises soar as computers meld further into our lives, but who is liable when hacking happens? We explore a potential charter to exploit the commercial value of data while also protecting privacy. And how humans can teach computers to avoid racist behaviour.

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