The Economist Radio (All audio)

The Economist Radio (All audio)

United Kingdom

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Episodes

Babbage: The automation game  

How quickly will robots disrupt global industries and what will the implications be? We explore with economist Andrew McAfee at the World Economic Forum in Davos. Also, neuroscientists often compare the human brain to a computer chip, so what happened when the idea was put into practice?

Money talks: Davos in the spotlight  

China's president has addressed the World Economic Forum, the first Chinese head of state to do so. We assess his message to Donald Trump. Plus the author of the “Second Machine Age” Erik Brynjolfsson on why governments are failing to address the downsides of automation. And Harvard’s Ken Rogoff examines the The Curse of Cash and why reducing our dependency on it might be a good thing

Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the January 14th 2016 edition  

This week: The harsh environment for startups in the Middle East, China’s bullet trains to nowhere and why an Uber for kids may struggle to reach maturity’

The week ahead: Hacks, leaks and videotape  

Matthew Symonds joins host Josie Delap to explain how the relationship between Donald Trump and the intelligence community fell apart and ask whether it can be rebuilt. Also: Modi's teflon streak and fishy economics in Japan

The Economist asks: Should education last a lifetime?  

Andrew Palmer joins host Anne McElvoy to discuss a special report saying we should upend our education model. To dig into the practicalities of transforming an education system, renowned education reformer Esteban Bullrich and digital education pioneer Gabriel Zinny discuss their plans as education ministers in Argentina's government

Babbage: Conversational computers  

When will computers truly be able to understand what we are saying? We discuss with our guest, Amazon's Alexa. Also, long-distance electrical supergrids could flood the planet with renewable energy

Money talks: Turbulence ahead  

Airlines have gone on an unprecedented shopping spree - but is their luck running out? We examine how Mexico might respond to Donald Trump's threats on trade. And can the way people buy pet insurance help the US sort out mushrooming costs in human health care?

Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the January 7th 2016 edition  

This week: Why sub-national currencies flounder, Europe’s toll crisis and China’s Shakespeare is thrust into the limelight

The week ahead: Desperately seeking Reagan  

Host Richard Cockett brings in Lexington columnist David Rennie to discuss how American conservatives plan to square their agenda with Donald Trump's. Also: how Theresa May's background will shape Brexit and the radio telescope making waves in the South African wilderness

The Economist Asks: Bernard Henri Levy  

Liberalism is embattled, says the French author and intellectual. As France faces its election year and the rise of the Front National, he argues that liberal politics have helped bring about their own crisis. But should liberals embrace the bans of the Hijab? And how should they respond to Vladimir Putin’s autocracy?

Babbage: War of the words  

We explore a clutch of new words from 2016 and how technology contributes to the evolution of language. Vishal Sikka, the CEO of a technology services company explains how artificial intelligence can enhance the labour force. Also, science correspondent Matt Kaplan on a new device to sniff out disease

The cultural review of 2016 and preview of 2017  

A look back at the highlights of 2016: including gender-bending Shakespeare and “In Praise of Weiner” - a political disaster documentary 2017 is the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution and we discuss the "confluence": Venice Biennale, Documenta in Kassel and the Munster sculpture show Anne McElvoy is joined by The Economist’s Fiammetta Rocco and Jonathan Beckman

Money talks: We wish you a merry reorganisation  

In a Money talks special, Anne McElvoy brings in Suzane Heywood and Stephen Heidari-Robinson, authors of Reorg: How to get it right. They delve into the art and science of reorganising a business

The World In 2017 Special: Ingenuity  

Part three of a three part series: Anne McElvoy and World In editor Daniel Franklin look ahead to 2017. Forecaster Parag Khanna suggests that reports of globalisation's death may have been premature. 20 year old Joshua Wong, a Hong Kong political activist who helped lead 2014's umbrella protests, explains how he plans to secure a democratic future for the peninsula. Also: Ryan Avent digs into trade after Trump and foreign editor Robert Guest picks out 3 bright spots for the year ahead

Money talks: We wish you a merry reorganisation  

In a Money talks special, Anne McElvoy brings in Suzane Heywood and Stephen Heidari-Robinson, authors of Reorg: How to get it right. They delve into the art and science of reorganising a business

Babbage: year end review and preview of 2017  

How artificial intelligence moved from the research lab into the real world, plus the challenges facing cyber security. And we explore the development of data donorship in the year ahead. Kenneth Cukier hosts

Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the Christmas double issue 2016  

This week: What the Norman conquest did for England’s economy, the difficulties with silence and how Mario became the world’s most beloved character

Babbage: year end review and preview of 2017  

How artificial intelligence moved from the research lab into the real world, plus the challenges facing cyber security. And we explore the development of data donorship in the year ahead. Kenneth Cukier hosts

The week ahead: Christmas and New Year special  

We look at the highlights from the Christmas double issue with its editor Oliver Morton. John McDermott reports on how Finland's reindeer herders fight to keep their traditions alive. And magazine mogul Hu Shuli on why China's business leaders worry more about Brexit than a Trump presidency. Josie Delap hosts.

The World In 2017 Special: Instability  

Part two of a three part series: Anne McElvoy and World In editor Daniel Franklin look ahead to 2017. The Prime Ministers of Bhutan and Sri Lanka make their predictions for the 12 months to come. Also: correspondents and editors weigh in on the world in the age of Trump, an investigation into the future of immigration and refugees and introducing our Brexit barometer

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