The Eddie Mair Interview

The Eddie Mair Interview

United Kingdom

Eddie Mair speaks at length to people with interesting things to say, for Radio 4's PM.

Episodes

Steve Hewlett: 'I discovered there are not many jokes about cancer'  

Earlier this year Steve Hewlett, presenter of Radio 4's The Media Show, was diagnosed as having cancer of the oesophagus, and has been telling us over the last few weeks about his approach to treatment. In this podcast he talks about his consultant restricting him to one type of drug "to see how his body reacts". Also about the invitation to his local rugby club Christmas lunch, where he was unexpectedly asked to do a speech and discovered "there are not that many jokes about cancer".

Steve Hewlett: 'The intensity of the applause made my spine tingle'  

Earlier this year Steve Hewlett, presenter of Radio 4's The Media Show, was diagnosed as having cancer of the oesophagus, and has been telling us over the last few weeks about his approach to treatment. In this podcast he talks about the fantastic feeling he had when he hosted an evening reflecting on his career, and how amazed he's been at hearing from over 4,000 listeners following his appearance on PM.

Steve Hewlett: 'I see my condition as a bit of a story'  

Earlier this year Steve Hewlett, presenter of Radio 4's The Media Show, was diagnosed as having cancer of the oesophagus, and has been telling us over the last few weeks about his approach to treatment. In this podcast he discusses the benefits of talking openly to the media about his condition.

Steve Hewlett:'I've been dehydrating myself for weeks'  

Earlier this year Steve Hewlett, presenter of Radio 4's The Media Show, was diagnosed as having cancer of the oesophagus, and has been telling us over the last few weeks about his approach to treatment. In this podcast he talks about the importance of drinking fluids and how, with hindsight, he realises "that ever since the radio therapy started, I haven't been eating and drinking enough". He says it's now a critical time and he hopes that on his next visit to the hospital, his condition will have "sufficiently improved, so that I can have the chemo".

The lives changed by bullying  

After suffering years of bullying at school and online, Lucy Alexander's son Felix killed himself earlier this year. Ben Smith ran 401 marathons in as many days, raising awareness for LGBT and anti-bullying charities after he suffered bullying at school for his sexuality. They discuss their experiences of bullying with Eddie Mair.

Steve Hewlett: Dealing with the effects of cancer treatment  

Earlier this year Steve Hewlett, presenter of Radio 4's The Media Show, was diagnosed as having cancer of the oesophagus, and has been telling us over the last few weeks about his approach to treatment. In this podcast Steve talks about visiting the "business class" area of the hospital, otherwise known as the private patients unit, to take a new cancer drug. He also shares his experience of wearing a "Paxman", a new machine for the cold cap, which gave him "a worse headache than (Jeremy) Paxman ever managed". (Photo: Steve Hewlett Credit: BBC)

Steve Hewlett: Should I pay for the new drug?  

Earlier this year Steve Hewlett, presenter of Radio 4's The Media Show, was diagnosed as having cancer of the oesophagus, and has been telling us over the last few weeks about his approach to treatment. In this podcast, he talks about the option of using "his son's inheritance" and paying around £12,000 for a new drug to treat the cancer.

What is it like to be Donald Trump's ghostwriter?  

Almost 30 years ago, a book was published entitled The Art of the Deal. On the cover a large photo of Donald Trump. His surname was in large letters and underneath, as you'd expect, details of the authors: Donald J Trump with Tony Schwartz. The Art of the Deal was on the New York Times bestseller list for 48 weeks and many commentators say it was instrumental in helping propel Donald Trump from being famous in New York, to being famous across America. Those commentators include Tony Schwartz - that other name on the front page of the book. As he tells PM in an exclusive radio interview he regrets ever writing the book and insists that Donald Trump never wrote a word.

Steve Hewlett: My radiotherapy  

Earlier this year Steve Hewlett, presenter of Radio 4's The Media Show, was diagnosed as having cancer of the oesophagus, and has been telling us over the last few weeks about his approach to treatment. In this podcast, he talks about having radiotherapy.

Taking on 'Islamic State'  

The attempt by Iraqi Government and Kurdish forces to oust so-called Islamic State from Mosul goes on. Meanwhile IS has unleashed a counter-attack in the north of Iraq in and around the city of Kirkuk. Watching with interest from the UK is Macer Gifford who knows the conflict first hand: he has been to Syria to try to take on IS in a number of ways. He's 30-years-old and was moved to do something when he saw what IS was doing.

How are the Hewlett family dealing with Steve's illness?  

For the past few weeks Steve Hewlett, the presenter of Radio 4's The Media Show has been talking about his health. Earlier this year Steve was diagnosed as having cancer of the oesophagus, and has been telling us about his research into the illness, his approach to treatment and going through chemotherapy. In order to hear how the family have been dealing with Steve's illness, he and his three sons Bertie, Billy and Fred joined Eddie in the studio.

Doctors: Is there a good way of breaking bad news?  

Does it make a difference to patients how they are told bad news by doctors? A recent interview with Radio 4 's Steve Hewlett about being diagnosed with cancer prompted a doctor in Liverpool to share his experience of giving bad news to patients. Gareth Jones, a respiratory consultant at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital, says "the day you get told you have cancer is one of the most important days of your life, and if that is handled badly, it can really influence how the course of the next few months goes."

Next steps on a cancer journey  

Steve Hewlett, a well known voice on Radio 4, was diagnosed with cancer of the oesophagus earlier this year. He talks about a set back in his treatment, and the next phase of his cancer journey. For details of organisations offering information and support for people with cancer see related links

Life as an Undercover Cop  

Neil Woods has strong views on how drugs like heroin, cocaine and ecstasy are treated by the law. He speaks as someone who for 14 years worked as an undercover police officer, bringing drugs lords to justice. He put himself in danger repeatedly, and ended up with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Now he's left the force and campaigns for a radical change in drugs laws. He's written a book: Good Cop Bad War.

Ben Smith runs 401 marathons in 401 days in anti-bullying fundraiser  

Ben Smith was bullied at school for years for being gay, and at the age of 18 he tried to take his own life. Now at the age of 34 he's doing something to raise awareness of the damage done by bullying. He's gone out for a run to help his charities, Kidscape and Stonewall. He's run 401 marathons in 401 days and just completed his final marathon in his home city of Bristol.

How to get the right cancer care  

Steve Hewlett, a well known voice on Radio 4, was diagnosed with cancer of the oesophagus earlier this year. He talks about his experience with getting the right treatment. Details of organisations offering information and support with cancer are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information on 08000 560 190. For further information on Macmillan visit: https://www.macmillan.org.uk/ (Photo: Steve Hewlett in his cold cap)

Dealing with cancer  

Steve Hewlett, a well known voice on Radio 4, was diagnosed with cancer of the oesophagus earlier this year. He talks about his experience, from diagnosis to treatment. Details of organisations offering information and support with cancer are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information on 08000 560 190. For further information on Macmillan visit: https://www.macmillan.org.uk/ Information on oesophageal cancer: http://www.macmillan.org.uk/information-and-support/oesophageal-gullet-cancer Good patient experience: http://www.macmillan.org.uk/about-us/what-we-do/evidence/cancer-story-is-changing/cancer-patient-experience.html (Photo: Steve Hewlett in his cold cap)

A mother's experience of Downs syndrome  

Carolyn Quinn speaks to Angie Emrys-Jones whose 9-year-old son, Ted, has Downs syndrome. She tells Carolyn that not all people with Downs syndrome are endlessly happy and loving like the stereotype would suggest. Angie and a group of other parents in Cornwall have produced a childrens' book to help break down the myths around those with down syndrome, and to promote inclusion in schools. Their book is being given to all 30,000 children starting school in Cornwall in the next four years.

The woman who killed her violent husband  

Archers' fans have been gripped by the trial of Helen Titchener for the attempted murder of her husband. It's a fictional case - but what happens in real life? How should the law treat women who strike out against abusive husbands? Kiranjit Ahluwalia was jailed in 1989 for killing her violent husband. After a retrial her life sentence was quashed. She was given a conviction of manslaughter due to diminished responsibility. This was based on new psychiatric evidence which showed that the abuse had contributed to her long standing depression. Kiranjit spoke to Carolyn Quinn about her husband, her trial, and life before marriage. Some of the details are rather disturbing.

A refugee and the cadet who helped rescue her  

As the migrant crisis continues we look back at the parallels with the late 1970s and one of the great migrations by the sea when around 800,000 Vietnamese refugees fled the communist takeover of their country. Diep Quan was nine in 1978 when her family joined more than 300 others on a perilous sea journey on a defective boat. If a scottish cargo ship had not spotted their last desperate flare and embarked on a remarkable rescue, all on board would have drowned. Graeme Anderson was the 17-year-old cadet on board the MV Wellpark who saw the flare.

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