The History of England

The History of England

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A weekly podcast on a gentle History of England. We follow England through the monarchy, starting with Cerdic at the start of the 6th Century.

Episodes

209 Exploration  

Through the 15th century, Portugal explored the African coast in search of the Indies and the fabulous wealth of the trading networks with the East - such as those of Mansa Musa from Timbuktu. Until the great expeditions of Columbus and Da Gama led to the opening of contact with the Americas and Asia.

208 I Heart Henry  

What happened when Henry was gone. And the report card - was Henry an incompetent tyrant, a fun loving saviour of England's future - or something in between? Should we listen to Francis Bacon or to Henry himself?

207 The Underworld  

While the young prince Henry built a group of aristocratic companions and longed desperately for the joust, his father drove his hatchet men Dudley and Empson ever further into the dark world of extortion and oppression. But in 1509, Henry fell ill again.

206 Descent to the Underworld  

Henry had found two hatchet men to replace Reginald Bray - Richard Empson and Edmund Dudley. They spread their tentacles and contacts through London and England, and used the Council Learned to drive their master's policy to extort every possible fee 'to the king's advantage'. And did pretty well for themselves too.

205 Do Not Let Me Perish  

In the early 1500's Henry VII saw many of his closest confidentes and supporters die. Catherine of Aragon was to be one of those who suffered as a result. He also built the rather magnificent palace at Sheen, renaming it Richmond; not knowing that in a few years, it would be the place of his death.

204 Governing the Early Tudor State  

Henry made changes to the English court, administration and legal system. He increased the health of royal finances, and tried to make the justice system work better, based around the JP. But many of his actions would be seen as setting a path to tyranny and avarice later in the reign

203 The Spanish Princess  

After negotiations that would win prizes, it was finally time for Henry VII and Queen Elizabeth's pride and joy Prince Arthur to marry the Spanish Princess, Catherine of Aragon.

202 Scotland, Cornwell and Warbeck  

The travels of Perkin Warbeck take him to Scotland, marriage and war; which leads to taxes, which leads to rebellion. T'was ever thus.

201 Poyning's Law  

Ireland in 1495 was almost 3 societies living side by side. We take a trip to Ireland, hear about the Great Earl, and the law that became known as Poyning's law. Plus, Perkin arrives - will Ireland welcome him as it did Lambert?

200 Printin and Perkin  

The appearance of a new pretender - Perkin Warbeck in Ireland was to distort Henry VII's domestic and foreign policy for the rest of the 1490's.

199 The New Men  

Henry VII's ambitions were to rule in the French style - to better control and increase his income. He gathered around him bureaucrats - new men he could trust and who depended on him rather than the nobility of the court. We also start the story of printing.

Members Shedcasts are here!  

The new History of England Members only feed - Shedcasts - is finally here. It's at a bright shiny new website - www.thehistoryofengland.CO.UK. Find out more!

198 Mothers and Wives  

In 1485 and 1486 Henry established the foundations of his reign through parliament, and established his household. The relationship between his wife and his mother would always be a matter of some debate.

197 The Story of Henry VII  

The personality of Henry VII, the story he created of himself, and how history has treated his reputation.

196 England at the Dawn of the Tudor Age  

England in 1485 was at once a deeply traditional medieval society - and yet poised at the edge of change - economic, social, religious and political

Members Podcast  

News about a Members service and podcast I am proposing to launch in a few weeks; and a request for come help from you

195 The History of Europe Part VIII  

15th Century European kingdoms were wracked by internal division as well as international war. By the end of the century, Rome was no more, Christendom was increasingly disunited and new monarchies were on the way.

194 The Wars of the Roses  

1485 was not the end of the Wars of the Roses; the fear of dynastic strife lasts well into Henry VIII's reign. But we draw a close at the battle of Stoke, and ask what the Wars changed - if anything.

193 The Blood of Innocents  

In 1483, the gates of the Tower of London closed on two innocent and defenceless boys; one, Edward, captured and the other Richard, given up by his mother. As far as we know, neither of were seen outside the walls again.

192 Bosworth  

At last in 1485 Richard got to meet his challenger in person at the Battle of Bosworth - a meeting he needed every bit as much as Henry Tudor.

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