The Radio 3 Documentary

The Radio 3 Documentary

United Kingdom

Exploring different aspects of history, science, philosophy and the arts.

Episodes

Apocalypse How  

Eleanor Rosamund Barraclough on how different cultures have viewed the end of the world

Sunday Feature:Kandinsky - A Story of Revolution  

Christian Weikop, examines Kandinsky's Russian roots.

Breaking Free: Freud versus Music  

Listen in pop-out player Did Freud really dislike music as much as he professed? Stephen Johnson explores Sigmund Freud's enigmatic relationship with music. He talks to the American cultural analyst Michelle Duncan, pscyho-analysts and writers Darian Leader and Julie Jaffee Nagel, the music critic David Nice, whose first job it was to take tours around the Freud Museum in Hampstead, and the Barcelona-based neurologist Josep Marco Pallares who is studying amusia and music-specific anhedonia, which he proposes might have been the root cause of Freud's problem with music. Plus extracts from Freud's writings read by the actor Nicholas Murchie. Producer, Elizabeth Arno Part of Radio 3's "Breaking Free - the minds that changed music", exploring the music of the Second Viennese School.

Breaking Free: Freud versus Music  

Did Freud really dislike music as much as he professed? Stephen Johnson explores Sigmund Freud's enigmatic relationship with music. He talks to the American cultural analyst Michelle Duncan, pscyho-analysts and writers Darian Leader and Julie Jaffee Nagel, the music critic David Nice, whose first job it was to take tours around the Freud Museum in Hampstead, and the Barcelona-based neurologist Josep Marco Pallares who is studying amusia and music-specific anhedonia, which he proposes might have been the root cause of Freud's problem with music. Plus extracts from Freud's writings read by the actor Nicholas Murchie. Producer, Elizabeth Arno Part of Radio 3's "Breaking Free - the minds that changed music", exploring the music of the Second Viennese School.

David Attenborough - World Music Collector  

David Attenborough recalls collecting music from around the world, and listens once again

Sunday Feature: Whatever Happened to the Avant-Garde?  

Is the avant-garde dead? Paul Morley conducts an autopsy, but detects signs of life ...

Langston Hughes at the Third  

How an unlikely friendship led to the epic 1964 radio series The Negro in America

SUNDAY FEATURE: NEW GENERATION THINKERS  

Sandeep Parmar retraces the steps of "Paris", a lost Modernist masterpiece by poet Hope Mirlees, and Daniel Lee explores the fate of North Africa's Jewish communities during WW2.

New Generation Thinkers  

1. Euphemism and Eroticism in Scottish Gaelic Songs. 2.Reappraising Nollekens.

The secrets of the Music Reading Panel  

What was the BBC's panel for new scores for broadcast?Charlotte Higgins finds out.

Sunday Feature: Philip French and the Critical Ear  

Laurence Scott on the radio producer and esteemed film critic Philip French

The Envy of the World: Rudely Truncated  

Part two of Humphrey Carpenter's history of the Third Programme. First broadcast 1996

The Envy of the World: No Fixed Points  

Humphrey Carpenter's history of the Third Programme. First broadcast in 1996.

Sunday Feature: Not Suitable for Children  

Dr Sophie Coulombeau explores the history of children's literature and censorship.

Dawn on the Somme  

Kate Kennedy explores the Somme through the lives of musicians who took part

Sherlock, Sigmund and Signor Morelli  

Giovanni Morelli, exposer of fakes and European man of mystery, who may have inspired Conan Doyle's detective, and Freud's theory of the unconscious. Naomi Alderman investigates.

An Explosion of Geraniums - The International Surrealist Exhibition of 1936  

Ian McMillan on the International Surrealist Exhibition of 1936,that changed everything

Antonio Carlos Gomes, the Brazilian who conquered La Scala  

Travelling to both Brazil and Milan, Fabio Zanon tells how Carlos Gomes, the Brazilian mixed-race composer, conquered La Scala in the 19th century, becoming a hero at home too.

Literary Pursuits: Dubliners  

Sarah Dillon on James Joyce's epic struggle to publish his first book, Dubliners.

Literary Pursuits: Jane Austen's Persuasion  

Sarah Dillon discovers how Jane Austen's last completed novel, 'Persuasion' was written. The novel has sometimes been viewed as Austen's valedictory novel - written while she was suffering with her final illness. But Sarah Dillon uncovers a more complex story: dates of revisions on the manuscripts in the British Library confirm her sister's story that Persuasion was completed almost a year before Austen's death, but it was only published posthumously. By talking to Dr Kathryn Sutherland from St Anne's College, Oxford, Paula Byrne, author of 'The Real Jane Austen, A Life In Small Things' and writer Margaret Drabble, we go behind the scant details of Austen's life and uncover reasons for the delay: her last illness; the possibly personal inspirations for the plot of the novel; the state of her finances; her fascinating creative process; and the radical reaches and determination of her literary ambitions.

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