The Science Show - Separate stories podcast

The Science Show - Separate stories podcast

Australia

The Science Show separate stories podcast makes it easy to find your favourite stories each week. Your essential source of what's making news in the complex world of scientific research, scandal and discovery, The Science Show with Robyn Williams is one of the longest running programs on Australian radio.

Episodes

The appeal of maths  

Top 5 Under 40 scientist Sophie Calabretto describes why she finds mathematics so utterly appealing.

Iranian mathematician Maryam Mirzakhani dies from breast cancer  

Maryam became the first woman to be awarded the prestigious Fields Medal for mathematics. Maryam died on 14th July 2017 at the age of 40.

Ancestor’s Trail traces the evolution of life on Earth  

It’s a walk, it’s poetry, it’s rap. The story of life on Earth plays out on this mini pilgrimage.

Leaf-cutter ants – the ultimate egalitarian workforce  

How does a colony of 9 million ants organise itself? How are decisions made as to where trials will go? And which ants do what tasks? What is the basis of their group intelligence and colony-led behaviour?

Promising results from new Taiwanese energy technologies  

As the US withdraws from the Paris Climate Agreement, and reduces funds for research, other countries are poised to take the lead.

Lawrence Krauss pitches big science to the president  

Funds are needed for the next big science project. It’s on the scale of the Large Hadron Collider. With no science advisor in the US, the pitch goes to the president.

New evidence of first Australians 65,000 years ago  

A rock shelter near Kakadu National Park is the site which has provided evidence that the first humans lived in Australia 18,000 years earlier than previously thought.

Understanding birdsong  

Birds use song to attract mates and defend territory. But is it music?

Music in human evolution and modern-day society  

Music is found in all indigenous communities. It provides strong social cohesion. Alan Harvey explores the importance of music throughout human evolution, and its continued relevance to modern-day human society.

The story of the universe and our place in it  

Lawrence Krauss tells the tale of the birth of the universe. How it happened, what happened next, and how we fit in.

Juno sweeps low over Jupiter’s mega storm  

The Great Red Spot is a mega storm cell on Jupiter. So what drives the storm? How has it endured for hundreds of years? These are questions hoped to be answered by the Juno spacecraft which has just swept low over Jupiter and across the top of the planet’s mega storm.

Fly me to Mars!  

Carmel Johnston and Josh Richards are candidates and full on keen to go to Mars. They describe the challenge of travelling to and living on Mars.

The scientist as sentinel  

Unlike times past, today, many scientists are reluctant to be sentinels. They worry that if they speak beyond the confines of scientific publications and meetings, they will be viewed as advocates or activists, politicising the science with the scientists losing their credibility.

John Church — we're approaching the climate threshold and need to act now  

To avoid global warming becoming an unstoppable runaway process, Australia needs to be carbon neutral from mid-century. There’s just over thirty years for our electricity generation to be reconfigured away from fossil fuels and towards clean renewable sources.

John Church – we’re approaching the climate threshold and need to act now  

To avoid global warming becoming an unstoppable runaway process, Australia needs to be carbon neutral from mid-century. There’s just over thirty years for our electricity generation to be reconfigured away from fossil fuels and towards clean renewable sources.

Has ‘denying’ won?  

The science is 150 years old and growing each day, yet it is still being rejected by politicians and some academics. We shall talk to some of those who remain unconvinced by climate research and its conclusions. Have they ever changed their minds? Do they perceive any risk at all? How can critics remain unmoved as the evidence mounts?

Celebrating Anne Deveson  

She was one of the great broadcasters and social reformers. To celebrate what would have been her 87th birthday this week we shall rebroadcast excerpts from two of her unique Science Shows which show Anne Deveson’s magnificent flair and humanity.

Wollongong academic wins Alan Alda science coms prize  

Johanna Howes was selected for her visual submission addressing the question, ‘What is Energy?’

Shrinking the synchrotron  

Synchrotrons are very large machines, often 1km long and cost a bomb. Bill Graves and Petra Fromme are developing equipment producing the same results but small enough to be housed in any hospital or lab, and with a similarly reduced price tag.

Biometrics the key for improved online authentication  

PhD candidate Komal is developing new systems of authentication using biometrics. These are fingerprints, iris images and other body images and measurements. They can’t be copied and offer a high level of security.

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