We the People

We the People

United States

The National Constitution Center is an interactive museum, national town hall, and civic education headquarters. Steps from Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell in Historic Philadelphia, the Center is a nonprofit, nonpartisan institution devoted to the U.S. Constitution and its legacy of freedom. Join the conversation.

Episodes

Presidential pardons and the rule of law  

Brian Kalt and Margaret Love join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen in a broad-ranging discussion about the President’s constitutional powers to issue pardons. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Charlottesville and free assembly  

Protests in Charlottesville, Baltimore, and Ferguson have prompted many questions about the right to protest in our country. What restrictions can governments place on assemblies? What responsibilities do governments have to protect protestors? How should we think about the right to protest in a free society?

John Inazu and Burt Neuborne join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to discuss Charlottesville and the right to free assembly. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

War powers and national security  

Article I of the Constitution gives Congress the power to declare war, raise armies, and regulate forces. Yet Article II names the President the Commander-in-Chief and vests him with the executive power. Who should be in charge of the nation’s security? What does the Constitution say about the relationship between Congress and the President in wartime?

With rising tensions with North Korea, Afghanistan, and the global war on terror, these questions are as important as ever.
Joining National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to discuss these important questions are two leading scholars of national security law.

Sai Prakash is the James Monroe Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia. He is the author of Imperial from the Beginning: The Constitution of the Original Executive.  He has written extensively on the domestic war powers of Congress, the powers of the presidency, and the Constitution.

Deborah Pearlstein is an associate professor at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. Her work on national security and the separation of powers has appeared widely in law journals and the popular press. Today, she serves on the editorial board of the peer-reviewed Journal of National Security Law and Policy.

CREDITS

Today’s show was engineered by Kevin Kilbourne and produced by Ugonna Eze and Lana Ulrich. Research was provided by Lana and Tom Donnelly.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

And finally, despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.







Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Trump, Twitter and the First Amendment  

Can President Trump block citizens from following his own Twitter feed?

The Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University has filed suit on behalf of several Twitter users who were denied the ability to follow the President’s Twitter feed after they made comments critical of him. The Institute claims that the ban is a violation of a First Amendment right to free speech and free assembly, and that a public official’s social media page is a designated public forum.

The Justice Department, defending President Trump, says the courts are powerless to tell President Trump how he can manage his private Twitter handle and the Institute’s requests would “send the First Amendment deep into uncharted waters.”

Joining our We The People podcast to discuss these arguments are Alex Abdo, a senior staff attorney at the Knight First Amendment Institute and Eugene Volokh, the Gary T. Schwartz Professor of Law at UCLA School of Law.


CREDITS

Today’s show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Ugonna Eze and Lana Ulrich. Research was provided by Lana and Tom Donnelly.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

And finally, despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.


Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Civil Rights And Constitutional Change  

National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen moderates a special discussion about the 1963 Birmingham Church bombing and how it impacted the meaning of equality in America.

In this event, held on June 16 in Philadelphia, bombing survivor Sarah Collins Rudolph, Washington Post editor and author of Kennedy and King Steven Levingston, and Philadelphia Orchestra composer-in-residence Hannibal Lokumbe spoke with Rosen about the bombing’s legacy could also bring about constitutional change.




Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

George Washington’s warning to future generations  

John Avlon, editor-in-chief of The Daily Beast, discusses the first president’s momentous and prescient farewell address to the nation and how the address could help reunite America through the lessons rooted in Washington’s experience as described in his new book, Washington’s Farewell: The Founding Father’s Warning to Future Generations.

Michael Gerhardt, scholar-in-residence at the National Constitution Center, moderates. the discussion.







Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jeffrey Rosen at the Chautauqua Institution  

In a special We The People podcast event, National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen talks about the importance of the Supreme Court’s future at the famed Chautauqua Institution. Rosen spoke to an enthusiastic crowd on July 26, 2017 at the Institution in the southwestern part of New York State, which was founded in 1874.

Among the upcoming cases Rosen discussed were free speech and privacy issues in front of the Supreme Court during its next term, which starts in October. In particular, the case of Carpenter v. United States is expected to be one of the biggest decisions of the upcoming term, Rosen said.

The Carpenter case involves the ability of police to seize a cellphone using a statute, and not probable cause under the Fourth Amendment, to see information about its user’s locations over a several-month period.

Also, Rosen previewed an important religious freedom case before the Court in its next term, Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, about compelled free speech.

Today’s show was edited by David Stotz. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast. Email us at [email protected].

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.



Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The debate over President Trump's election commission  

Deborah Archer of New York Law School and Derek Muller of Pepperdine University discuss the agenda and challenges of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity.

Read about the 24th Amendment on the National Constitution Center's Interactive Constitution.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast. Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

Today’s show was edited by David Stotz and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Jackie McDermott. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Special thanks to Tom Donnelly for serving as host. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Should the 17th Amendment be repealed?  

David Schleicher of Yale University and Todd Zywicki of George Mason University discuss the text, history, and future of this contested amendment.

New essays are now available on the Constitution Center's Interactive Constitution. Read about the 17th Amendment, the 20th Amendment, the 24th Amendment, and the 25th Amendment.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast. Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

Today’s show was edited by Kevin Kilbourne and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The future of digital free speech  

At a live event in Los Angeles, CA, Cindy Cohn of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Judge Alex Kozinski of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and Eugene Volokh of UCLA discuss current debates about speech online.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

Today’s show was edited by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

What just happened at the Supreme Court?  

Brianne Gorod of the Constitutional Accountability Center and Ilya Shapiro of the Cato Institute break down the busy final days of the Court's 2016-2017 term.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

Today’s show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

EXTRA: A celebration of Lyle Denniston  

Legendary Supreme Court reporter Lyle Denniston reflects on the Court, the Constitution, and his long career.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitterusing @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at [email protected].

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

Today’s show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Government leaks and the Espionage Act at 100  

Cybersecurity expert Paul Rosenzweig and Stephen Vladeck of the University of Texas explore the constitutional debate over leaks and their publication.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

Today’s show was edited by Kevin Kilbourne and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Loving v. Virginia at 50  

Steve Calabresi of Northwestern University and Sheryll Cashin of Georgetown University discuss the landmark case and its constitutional legacy.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Please subscribe to We the Peopleand our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

Today’s show was edited by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The soul of the First Amendment  

Celebrated First Amendment attorney Floyd Abrams examines the degree to which American law protects free speech more often, more intensely, and more controversially than anywhere else in the world.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at [email protected].

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by David Stotz and edited by Jason Gregory. It was produced by Nicandro Iannacci. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

EXTRA: Trump, Comey and obstruction of justice  

Alan Dershowitz and Laura Donohue join our Jeffrey Rosen to discuss the legal and constitutional issues surrounding President Donald Trump’s handling of the Russia probe.

This show was engineered by Jason Gregory and produced by Nicandro Iannacciand Scott Bomboy. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Continue today’s conversation onFacebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at [email protected].

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Please subscribe to We the Peopleand our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.








Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Your constitutional questions, answered  

Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, answers listener questions about the Preamble, judicial power, and more.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by Kevin Kilbourne and produced by Nicandro Iannacci and Scott Bomboy. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Special thanks to Tom for serving as guest inquisitor. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The life and legacy of John Marshall  

Michael Gerhardt of the University of North Carolina and Kevin Walsh of the University of Richmond explore the influential career of the nation's longest-serving chief justice.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

Please subscribe to We the Peopleand our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by David Stotz and produced by Nicandro Iannacci and Scott Bomboy. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Special thanks to Tom Donnelly for serving as guest host. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Will the President's travel ban hold up in court?  

Leah Litman of the University of California, Irvine, and Earl Maltz of Rutgers University discuss the latest legal developments and how the ban may ultimately fare at the Supreme Court.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by David Stotz and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Exploring the debate over 'sanctuary cities'  

Elizabeth Price Foley of Florida International University and Cristina Rodriguez of Yale University discuss President Trump's executive order on immigration and how Congress could respond to sanctuary cities going forward.

Continue today’s conversation on Facebookand Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr.

We want to know what you think of the podcast! Email us at editor@constitutioncenter.org.

Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

Please subscribe to We the People and our companion podcast, Live at America’s Town Hall, on iTunes, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out the full roster of podcasts at Panoply.fm.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit; we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

This show was engineered by Kevin Kilbourne and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Lana Ulrich and Tom Donnelly. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

0:00/0:00
Video player is in betaClose