World Business Report

World Business Report

Finland

The latest business and finance news from around the world from the BBC

Episodes

Wall Street Update  

Robert Brusca of Fact and Opinion Economics in NYC takes a look at the day's trading.

N Korea Economy Surges Despite Sanctions  

North Korea's economy accelerated at its fastest pace in 17 years last year. Jean Lee of the Woodrow Wilson Center assesses the figures. And amid reports that US citizens are to be banned from travelling to North Korea, we find out more from Matt Kulesza of Young Pioneer Tours, which arranges visits to the country. Also in the programme, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports from Sicily, where EU agricultural subsidies may be helping to keep the mafia alive. Chinese internet entrepreneur Jack Ma of Alibaba has received a rock star's welcome in East Africa. Laban-Cliff Onserio is a business news presenter on NTV Kenya and tells us why Mr Ma is such a hero there. Plus we look back at all the week's big business stories with Carl Riccadonna of Bloomberg Intelligence in New York, and Riva Gold at Dow Jones in London.

Wall Street Update  

Peter Jankovskis from Oakbrook Investments in Chicago looks at the day's trading

Huge Dark Web Drug Sites Shut Down  

Two of the largest dark web marketplaces have been shut down following an investigation. The BBC's Rory Cellan-Jones explains how the authorities targeted the AlphaBay and Hansa sites. Also in the programme, the latest round of Brexit talks have concluded in Brussels. James Randerson at Politico in Brussels tells us where progress has been made, and what sticking points remain. As part of a day of programmes looking at the cost of childcare around the world, the BBC's Yogita Limaye reports from Mumbai, India on workplaces that offer employees childcare on site, and the BBC's Samira Hussein in New York tells us about businesses offering summer day camp programmes for kids. Plus BBC arts editor Will Gompertz brings us the surreal story of how artist Salvador Dali's body is being dug up, to settle a dispute over his estate. (Picture: AlphaBay went offline earlier this month. Picture credit US Dept of Justice.)

Wall Street Update  

Doug McIntyre of 24/7 Wall Street looks at the day's trading

French Military Head Quits Over Cuts  

The head of the French armed forces has quit after a clash with President Macron.

Wall Street Update  

Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading analyses the day's trading

US Hits Iran With New Economic Sanctions  

The US has announced fresh sanctions against Iran over its ballistic missile programme and what it says is Iran's support for terror organisations. Amir Paivar is business correspondent with the BBC Persian service, he explains the implications. Also in the programme, the UK's advertising watchdog is to clamp down on adverts that feature stereotypical gender roles. Ali Hanan is an advertising creative who tells us the background. It's exactly 200 years since the death of author Jane Austen. The BBC's Jo Palmer explains how the writer came to prominence. We have a report from Joe Miller in Bremen, Germany, examining the implications of Brexit for the country. Plus Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times explains the power of saying 'no' at work.

Wall Street Update  

Robert Brusca of Fact & Opinion Economics looks at the day's trading

Looking Ahead to Kenya's Presidential Election  

We take the temperature of Kenya's economy ahead of next month's election. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis in Nairobi finds out how voters feel about their standard of living. We ask opposition leader Raila Odinga what he would do if elected president. And we hear from Raphael Tuju, secretary general of the ruling Jubilee Party. Political commentator Danstan Omari looks at the promises being made by the candidates. The BBC's Will Bain reports on the influential Kenyan political satire programme XYZ. Plus as the latest wave of summer visitors breaks over some of Europe's oldest and most beautiful cities, David Randle, director of sustainable tourism at the University of Southern Florida, tells us why some cities are introducing restrictions on visitor numbers.

Wall Street Update  

Chris Low of FTN Financial looks at the day's trading

Australian PM Seeks Access to Encrypted Messages  

Australia's government wants to force tech firms to provide access to encrypted messages. Nicola Whiting from cyber security firm Titania tells us if the bid is likely to succeed. Also in the programme, Somalia endures almost three weeks of data deprivation after a ship cut through its internet cable. Bidan Tahir from the BBC's Somali service has been monitoring the situation. Su Burtner from Tennessee tells us how she managed to get a cricket emoji added to our mobile phones. Plus we look back at all the week's big business stories with Matthew Campbell from Bloomberg, and Robin Wigglesworth of the Wall Street Journal.

Wall Street Update  

Cary Leahey of Decision Economics analyses the day's trading

Macron and Merkel Hold Summit  

The German chancellor and French president hold a joint cabinet session in Paris. Carsten Brzeski is chief economist of ING in Germany, and tells us whether there is a new impetus in the relationship at the heart of Europe. Also in the programme, Ugandan Afrobeat musician turned member of parliament Bobi Wine tells us how he hopes to help his country's people. The European Commission hopes to prevent Poland from logging one of the last remaining areas of primeval forest in Europe, as the BBC's Adam Easton explains. We hear how Kazakhstan hopes to make its mark in the renewable energy field. Plus as Europe prepares to clamp down on companies who search social media for information on those applying to work for them, we ask employment lawyer Gillian Howard if we should all be more careful about what we post.

Wall Street Update  

Doug McIntyre of 24/7 Wall Street looks at the day's trading

Uganda's Gold Rush  

Thousands of Ugandans have left their homes to chase their fortunes underground. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on an unregulated gold rush. And she hears why Uganda has been commended by the UN and IMF for its treatment of refugees. Also in the programme, the BBC's Will Bain finds out about Uganda's tourism sector. Plus we ask economist Irwin Stelzer of the Hudson Institute why President Trump is still struggling to win congressional approval for his economic plans.

Wall Street Update  

Joe Saluzzi from Themis Trading in New Jersey looks at the day's trading

'All Work in UK Economy Should be Fair'  

The author of a government review into work says the modern economy should be fair. We assess the review's proposals with our regular economic commentator, Roger Bootle of Capital Economics. Also in the programme, India's top court has suspended a proposed law banning the trade of cattle for slaughter. The BBC's Sameer Hashmi in Delhi brings us the details. As the International Olympic Committee prepares to unveil the hosts of the 2024 and 2028 Olympic Games, Andrew Zimbalist, professor of economics at Smith College in Massachusetts, tells us the economic arguments for and against hosting the event. Plus the BBC's Matthew Kenyon at Wimbledon talks to the daughter of the founder of legendary sports agency IMG.

Wall Street Update  

Peter Jankovskis from Oakbrook Investments in Chicago looks at the day's trading.

Philip Morris: Tobacco Giant Ordered to Compensate Australia  

The company is to pay back millions of dollars of legal fees after losing a court battle. The ruling is related to Australia's move to introduce plain cigarette packaging with graphic health warnings, as Tom Iggulden, a reporter for ABC News in Canberra, Australia, explains. Also in the programme, Chinese shipping firm Cosco has made a $6.3bn bid for Hong Kong rival, Orient Overseas International. Neil Dekker is director of container research at Drewry Shipping in London and tells us the significance of the deal. The World Petroleum Congress is under way in Istanbul, Turkey, from where Mehul Srivastava of the Financial Times brings us a briefing. We hear from the Ivory Coast about gangs of men who make a living out of helping people park their cars. Plus our regular commentator Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times discusses the limitations of robots in the workplace. (Picture: Australian cigarette packaging. Picture credit: Getty Images.) Show less

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