Search

Winter Culture Scene: Art  

Deborah Solomon, WNYC art critic and the author of American Mirror: The Life and Art of Norman Rockwell (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2013), talks about some of the art worth bundling up for this winter.

 Kerry James Marshall: Mastry - The Met Breuer (Until January 29 2017)

Kerry James Marshall. American, born Birmingham, Alabama 1955 Slow Dance (The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Jasper Johns and Edvard Munch: Love, Loss and the Cycle of Life - Richmond Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond (Until February 20, 2017)

Jasper Johns, Savarin, 1981. Lithograph, 50 x 38 in. (127 x 96.5 cm). (Private Collection. Art © Jasper Johns and ULAE/Licensed by VAGA, New Yok, NY. Published by Universal Limited Art Editions) Edvard Munch, Self-Portrait between the Clock and the Bed, 1940-43, Oil on canvas, 58 7⁄8 x 47 1⁄2 in. (149.5 x 120.5 cm) (Munch Museum)

 A Revolutionary Impulse: The Rise of the Russian Avant-Garde - Museum of Modern Art (Until March 12, 2107)

Kazimir Malevich (Russian, born Ukraine. 1878-1935). Suprematist Composition: Airplane Flying. 1915. Oil on canvas. 22 7/8 x 19″ (58.1 x 48.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. (Acquisition confirmed in 1999 by agreement with the Estate of Kazimir Malevich and made possible with funds from the Mrs. John Hay Whitney Bequest (by exchange)) Vladimir Stenberg (Russian, 1899-1982) and Georgii Stenberg (Russian, 1900-1933). Symphony of a Big City. 1928. Lithograph, 41 x 27 1/4″ (104 x 69 cm). (The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Marshall Cogan Purchase Fund.)

 Marilyn Minter: Pretty/Dirty - the Brooklyn Museum (Until April 2 2017)

Marilyn Minter (American, b. 1948). Pop Rocks, 2009. Enamel on metal, 108 x 180 in. (274.3 x 457.2 cm). Collection of Danielle and David Ganek (The Brooklyn Museum ) 

 I'm Nobody! Who are you? The Life and Poetry of Emily Dickinson - The Morgan Library (January 20 -May 21, 2017)

Emily Dickinson (1830-1882). I'm Nobody! Who are you? Poem (detail), ca. late 1861 (Houghton Library, Harvard University.)

Marsden Hartley's Maine - The Met Breuer (March 15 - June 18, 2017)

Marsden Hartley (American, 1877-1943) ; Canuck Yankee Lumberjack at Old Orchard Beach, Maine ; Oil on Masonite-type hardboard ; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution (The Metropolitan Museum of Art /Metropolitan Museum of Art)

 Robert Rauschenberg - Museum of Modern Art (May 21 - September 17 2017)

Robert Rauschenberg. Collection. 1954/1955. Oil, newspaper, and fabric on three panels of raw canvas, each overlaid with silk in wood frame with other wood elements, overall: 6 ft. 8 in. × 8 ft. × 2 (San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Gift of Harry W. and Mary Margaret Anderson. Photo: Ben Blackwell. © 2016 Robert Rauschenberg Foundation)

 

The Black Museum - The Car Tire (09-25-52)  


The Car Tire (Aired September 25, 1952)
Opening in 1875, the Crime Museum at Scotland Yard is the oldest museum in the world purely for recording crime. The name Black Museum was coined in 1877 by a reporter from The Observer, a London newspaper, although the museum is still referred to as the Crime Museum. The idea of a crime museum was conceived by Inspector Neame who had already collected together a number of items, with the intention of giving police officers practical instruction on how to detect and prevent burglary. It is this museum that inspired the Black Musuem radio series. The museum is not open to members of the public but is now used as a lecture theatre for the curator to lecture police and like bodies in subjects such as Forensic Science, Pathology, Law and Investigative Techniques. A number of famous people have visited the musuem including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Harry Houdini, Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. Orsen Welles hosted and narrated the shows. THIS EPISODE: September 25, 1952. Syndicated, WRVR-FM, New York aircheck. "The Car Tire". Sponsored by: Hemlock Farms. A policeman is murdered when he stops a stolen car. The date is approximate. Syndicated rebroadcast date: September 25, 1974. Harry Alan Towers (producer), Orson Welles (narrator), Ira Marion (writer), Sidney Torch (composer, conductor). 24:45. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


The Black Museum - The Small White Boxes (02-19-52)  


The Small White Boxes (Aired February 19, 1952)
Opening in 1875, the Crime Museum at Scotland Yard is the oldest museum in the world purely for recording crime. The name Black Museum was coined in 1877 by a reporter from The Observer, a London newspaper, although the museum is still referred to as the Crime Museum. The idea of a crime museum was conceived by Inspector Neame who had already collected together a number of items, with the intention of giving police officers practical instruction on how to detect and prevent burglary. It is this museum that inspired the Black Musuem radio series. The museum is not open to members of the public but is now used as a lecture theatre for the curator to lecture police and like bodies in subjects such as Forensic Science, Pathology, Law and Investigative Techniques. THIS EPISODE: February 19, 1952. Program #28. Towers Of London syndication. "The Small White Boxes". Commercials added locally. The date is approximate. Orson Welles (narrator), Harry Alan Towers (producer), Sidney Torch (composer, conductor), Ira Marion (writer). 25:19. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


The Black Museum - A French-English Dictionary (05-06-52)  


A French-English Dictionary (Aired May 6, 1952)
Opening in 1875, the Crime Museum at Scotland Yard is the oldest museum in the world purely for recording crime. The name Black Museum was coined in 1877 by a reporter from The Observer, a London newspaper, although the museum is still referred to as the Crime Museum. The idea of a crime museum was conceived by Inspector Neame who had already collected together a number of items, with the intention of giving police officers practical instruction on how to detect and prevent burglary. It is this museum that inspired the Black Musuem radio series. The museum is not open to members of the public but is now used as a lecture theatre for the curator to lecture police and like bodies in subjects such as Forensic Science, Pathology, Law and Investigative Techniques. THIS EPISODE: May 6, 1952. Towers Of London syndication, WDC-FM, Glen Ellyn Illinois aircheck. "A French-English Dictionary". Commercials deleted. A British pub owner has been poisoned. Could it have been his wife and her French-speaking lover? The date is approximate. Orson Welles (narrator), Harry Alan Towers (producer), Ira Marion (writer), Sidney Torch (producer, director). 25:32. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


A Home for Black History  

In what is described as the fitting coda to his administration, President Obama cut the ribbon of the Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African American History and Culture on 24 September. Journalists Jesse J Holland and Robin N Hamilton are onsite in Washington DC for BBC World Service to hear from the architects, curators, donors, and expectant visitors who have travelled hundreds of miles to celebrate its grand opening. Taking the last spot on America’s National Mall, the museum – a beautiful three-tiered structure sheathed in bronze metalwork - opens after what’s described as the hardest curatorial job in history. It has been more than ten years in the making. It’s a museum that will explain, celebrate and confront the African American experience. At a time of racial tension, its mission to heal is seen as vital too. Museum director Lonnie Bunch, congressman John Lewis and judge Robert Wilkins describe the challenges of creating a museum which aims to tell the story of America through the lens of the African American experience. A story which is bound to provoke distress and anger as well as joy and admiration - something the museum’s 250 volunteers are being specially trained to deal with. We hear from two founding donors, Samuel L Jackson and General Colin Powell about the importance of having a national museum dedicated to African American history and culture. From locations across the USA - Philadelphia, Detroit, Houston, St Louis, Nashville - we uncover stories behind the museum’s varied new acquisitions, largely told by the donors themselves: from Harriet Tubman’s Hymn book to Lauren Anderson’s ballet shoes, protest banners from Ferguson, the late music producer J Dilla’s synthesizer, and a former slave’s printing press. And we follow inspirational young divers in South Florida working in partnership with the museum to locate long-lost slave wrecks.

The Black Museum - The Bathtub (04-01-52)  


The Bathtub (Aired April 1, 1952)
Opening in 1875, the Crime Museum at Scotland Yard is the oldest museum in the world purely for recording crime. The name Black Museum was coined in 1877 by a reporter from The Observer, a London newspaper, although the museum is still referred to as the Crime Museum. The idea of a crime museum was conceived by Inspector Neame who had already collected together a number of items, with the intention of giving police officers practical instruction on how to detect and prevent burglary. It is this museum that inspired the Black Musuem radio series. The museum is not open to members of the public but is now used as a lecture theatre for the curator to lecture police and like bodies in subjects such as Forensic Science, Pathology, Law and Investigative Techniques. A number of famous people have visited the musuem including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Harry Houdini, Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. Orsen Welles hosted and narrated the shows. THIS EPISODE: April 1, 1952. Program #25. Syndicated, WRVR-FM, New York aircheck. "The Bathtub". Participating sponsors. Edward Jones is married...very married. He has wives all over the place. The date is approximate. Syndicated rebroadcast date: February 26, 1975. Harry Alan Towers (producer), Orson Welles (narrator), Sidney Torch (composer, conductor), Ira Marion (writer). 26:59. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


The Black Museum - The Bathtub (04-01-52)  


The Bathtub (Aired April 1, 1952)
Opening in 1875, the Crime Museum at Scotland Yard is the oldest museum in the world purely for recording crime. The name Black Museum was coined in 1877 by a reporter from The Observer, a London newspaper, although the museum is still referred to as the Crime Museum. The idea of a crime museum was conceived by Inspector Neame who had already collected together a number of items, with the intention of giving police officers practical instruction on how to detect and prevent burglary. It is this museum that inspired the Black Musuem radio series. The museum is not open to members of the public but is now used as a lecture theatre for the curator to lecture police and like bodies in subjects such as Forensic Science, Pathology, Law and Investigative Techniques. A number of famous people have visited the musuem including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Harry Houdini, Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. Orsen Welles hosted and narrated the shows. THIS EPISODE: April 1, 1952. Program #25. Syndicated, WRVR-FM, New York aircheck. "The Bathtub". Participating sponsors. Edward Jones is married...very married. He has wives all over the place. The date is approximate. Syndicated rebroadcast date: February 26, 1975. Harry Alan Towers (producer), Orson Welles (narrator), Sidney Torch (composer, conductor), Ira Marion (writer). 26:59. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


A Home for Black History  

In what is described as the fitting coda to his administration, President Obama will cut the ribbon of the Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African American History and Culture on 24 September. Journalists Jesse J Holland and Robin N Hamilton are onsite in Washington DC for BBC World Service to hear from the architects, curators, donors, and expectant visitors who have travelled hundreds of miles to celebrate its grand opening. Taking the last spot on America’s National Mall, the museum – a beautiful three-tiered structure sheathed in bronze metalwork - will open after what’s described as the hardest curatorial job in history. It has been more than ten years in the making. It’s a museum that will explain, celebrate and confront the African American experience. At a time of racial tension, its mission to heal is seen as vital too. Museum director Lonnie Bunch, congressman John Lewis and judge Robert Wilkins describe the challenges of creating a museum which aims to tell the story of America through the lens of the African American experience. A story which is bound to provoke distress and anger as well as joy and admiration - something the museum’s 250 volunteers are being specially trained to deal with. We hear from two founding donors, Samuel L Jackson and General Colin Powell about the importance of having a national museum dedicated to African American history and culture. From locations across the USA - Philadelphia, Detroit, Houston, St Louis, Nashville - we uncover stories behind the museum’s varied new acquisitions, largely told by the donors themselves: from Harriet Tubman’s Hymn book to Lauren Anderson’s ballet shoes, protest banners from Ferguson, the late music producer J Dilla’s synthesizer, and a former slave’s printing press. And we follow inspirational young divers in South Florida working in partnership with the museum to locate long-lost slave wrecks.

Antony Gormley: Missing Continents at the British Museum  

When it was founded in the 18th century from the collections of Sir Hans Sloane, the British Museum aspired to being not just a national museum, but a world collection, accessible to a global audience. The recent, outgoing director Neil MacGregor gave fresh life to this idea - the British Museum as a museum of the world for the world. But does this definition hold true? Artist Antony Gormley, a former British Museum trustee, is on a quest to right what he sees as a centuries-old wrong. While the history of the classical Old World cultures are given centre stage in the museum's hallowed halls, those of the numerous rich and complex cultures of Africa, Oceania and the Americas are barely visible. Although cared for by the museum's curators, much of the time they are packed away in boxes. And yet, the collections of historical objects from these continents are among the best in the world - from the monumental to the domestic, from lavish feather costumes to fragile woven skirts. They tell the stories of the unlikely settlement of the far-flung islands of Micronesia, Captain Cook's ill-fated Pacific voyages and the oppression of the colonised by the colonisers. Antony Gormley challenges the museum's new director Hartwig Fischer to restore these neglected cultures to their rightful place in human history. He talks to Lissant Bolton the Keeper who spends much of her time in the Oceanic store rooms. Can these objects and the stories they tell, help today's diverse cultures overcome their deep divisions and find a common humanity? Produced by Zoe Blackler. A Cast Iron Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

The Black Museum - The Champagne Glass (09-30-52)  


The Champagne Glass (Aired September 30, 1952)
Opening in 1875, the Crime Museum at Scotland Yard is the oldest museum in the world purely for recording crime. The name Black Museum was coined in 1877 by a reporter from The Observer, a London newspaper, although the museum is still referred to as the Crime Museum. The idea of a crime museum was conceived by Inspector Neame who had already collected together a number of items, with the intention of giving police officers practical instruction on how to detect and prevent burglary. It is this museum that inspired the Black Musuem radio series. The museum is not open to members of the public but is now used as a lecture theatre for the curator to lecture police and like bodies in subjects such as Forensic Science, Pathology, Law and Investigative Techniques. A number of famous people have visited the musuem including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Harry Houdini, Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. Orsen Welles hosted and narrated the shows. THIS EPISODE: September 30, 1952. Program #26. Towers Of London syndication. "The Champagne Glass". Commercials added locally. The date is approximate. Orson Welles (narrator), Harry Alan Towers (producer), Sidney Torch (composer, conductor), Ira Marion (writer). 23:42. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


The Black Museum - The Champagne Glass (09-30-52)  


The Champagne Glass (Aired September 30, 1952)
Opening in 1875, the Crime Museum at Scotland Yard is the oldest museum in the world purely for recording crime. The name Black Museum was coined in 1877 by a reporter from The Observer, a London newspaper, although the museum is still referred to as the Crime Museum. The idea of a crime museum was conceived by Inspector Neame who had already collected together a number of items, with the intention of giving police officers practical instruction on how to detect and prevent burglary. It is this museum that inspired the Black Musuem radio series. The museum is not open to members of the public but is now used as a lecture theatre for the curator to lecture police and like bodies in subjects such as Forensic Science, Pathology, Law and Investigative Techniques. A number of famous people have visited the musuem including Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Harry Houdini, Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. Orsen Welles hosted and narrated the shows. THIS EPISODE: September 30, 1952. Program #26. Towers Of London syndication. "The Champagne Glass". Commercials added locally. The date is approximate. Orson Welles (narrator), Harry Alan Towers (producer), Sidney Torch (composer, conductor), Ira Marion (writer). 23:42. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


Deirdre Lawrence 1/1  

Deirdre Lawrence has been the Principal Librarian at the Brooklyn Museum since late 1983. Before coming to the Brooklyn Museum, she was Associate Librarian at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. She received her M.L.S. from Pratt Institute and studied art history on the graduate level. Deirdre tells us how she became a librarian at the Brooklyn Museum and why the profession appealed to her so much in the first place. We talk about the Museum’s collection. How the collection is built and how they acquire their artist books. We also wonder if Deirdre has a personal favourite within the collection. And because she is working with and around books all day, we’re curious what her personal collection consists of. Recorded at the Klingspor Museum – Symposium on the occasion of their 60th birthday – in Offenbach Germany.

Brooklyn Museum :: Brooklyn Museum blog :: NYARC - New York Art Resources Consortium :: NY Times article :: video of ‘6 Empty Bookcases’by Sjoerd Hofstra ::

File Download (14:06 min / 20 MB)

tspp #306- TEA Summit & Theas Pt. 4: EXPERIENCE! 8/4/15  

*Subscribe @ iTunes*

The Season Pass is back at the 2015 TEA Summit and Thea Awards for another award filled podcast!  Recorded in March, 2015, at the Disneyland Hotel in Anaheim, CA, this episode focuses on Museums and Educational Experiences; storytelling, interactivity, and immersive technology goes far beyond the theme park world.  Interviews with the creative teams behind the National September 11 Museum, New York - Amy Weisser and Bryan Abelwitz (Electrosonic); Nature Lab at the Natural History Museum, Los Angeles - Dr. Karen Wise and Jennifer Morgan; Wonderkamers at Gemeente Museum, The Hague Netherlands - Vera Carasso and Ellen Schindler (Kossmann.dejong); and Story Garden at AmorePacific Beauty Campus, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea - Christian Lachel (BRC) and Carmel Lewis (BRC). Enjoy!

 

Upcoming Events:

SCARE LA SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA HALLOWEEN CONVENTION

BUY YOUR TICKETS HERE!

**Use promo code HATBOX to receive 15% off your General Admission Purchase.

 

Links:

The National 9/11 Memorial Museum

Natural History Museum, Los Angeles

Wonderkamers - Gemeente Museum

Story Garden - AmorePacific Beauty Campus

TEA: Themed Entertainment Association

Electrosonic

BRC Imagination Arts

Touring Plans

Walt Disney Birthplace 

MiceChat

Pixie Vacations

Season Pass Closing Song - Wheels by Enuff Z’nuff on iTunes

 

Check Out The Season Pass Podcast Website at:

www.seasonpasspodcast.com

 

Follow Us On Twitter! - www.twitter.com/theseasonpass

Like the TSPP Facebook page! - www.facebook.com/theseasonpass

 

Contact us:

doug@seasonpasspodcast.com

brent@super78.com

robert@robertcoker.com

 

Call the Hotline with Park Trip Reports, Podcast Comments, or Anything else you would like to announce. –1-916-248-5524

 

Thanks to each one of you for listening to the show.  Your support is extremely appreciated.

 

© 2015 Season Pass Podcast

Jewish Museum in Munich: "Our history is not just a history of loss and sufferance"  

The Jewish Museum in Munich is not your typical Jewish Museum. For a start, it doesn't make the Holocaust a central pillar of its offerings. But there are other points of difference too, as SBS reporter Daniel Salg found out when he visited the mu...

(Das jüdische Museum in München versteht sich nicht als Holocaust-Museum. Es feiert die jüdische Geschichte und Kultur, ohne die Juden in der Opferrolle zu sehen. SBS Reporter Daniel Salg liess sich das Museum von dessen Direktor Bernhard Purin zeigen.  )

German 0

Migration: an English history [Audio]  

Speaker(s): Professor Robert Tombs | Migration has been a crucial element of British and English history. England emerged as a nation amid a period of migration. Its culture is a hybrid. Its modern experience has been shaped by an unprecedented outward and inward flow of peoples. This lecture aims to identify what is special and characteristic about the migration history of England and Britain, and reflect on the way in which migration has affected and still affects the life of the nation. Robert Tombs is Professor of French History at Cambridge and author of The English and their History. He is a specialist in modern French history and on the Franco-British relationship. His most recent work has been an excursion into English history, though with something of a French perspective. Robert Winder is a trustee of the Migrationa Museum Project and author of Bloody Foreigners: The Story of Immigration to Britain, among many other books on cricket, sport and history. The Migration Museum Project (@MigrationUK) is creating a dedicated Migration Museum, telling the story of movement into and out of the UK in a fresh and engaging way. The museum will be an enquiry into who we are, where we came from and where we are going. We hope that, by revealing our shared history to be a history of migration, the museum will open up conversations and discussions about Britishness and belonging. We aim to represent the tales, the emotion and the history that have gone into shaping our national fabric; we aim to be the museum of all our stories.

CHP-152-The Flying Tigers Part 2  

Laszlo finishes off the CHP overview of the story of the AVG in World War II.  In this episode the battle commences on December 20, 1941. From that point forward until the organization was disbanded on July 4, 1942 the Flying Tigers wrote their name into the history books.  

TERMS FROM THIS EPISODE

Song Meiling 宋美龄 Soong Mei-ling, Madame Chiang Kai-shek

T.V. Song  宋子文  T.V. Soong, brother of Song Meiling

Yunnan  云南  Province in Southwestern China

Fei Hu  飞虎  The Flying Tigers

Kunming  昆明  Capital of Yunnan

Chen Xiangmei  陈香梅  Anna Chennault, 2nd wife of Claire Chennault

Nu Jiang  怒江  The Salween River separating Yunnan from Burma

Guilin  桂林  City in Guangxi

Hengyang  衡阳  City in Hunan

Yangren laihua zhuzhan, junmin yiti jiuhu  

洋人来华助战,军民一体救护 (洋人來華助戰,軍民一體救護)

This foreigner has come to China to help in the war. Soldiers and civilians, one and all, should rescue and protect him.

Hangkong Weiyuanhui 航空委员会  The Aviation Committee

Zhongguo Laobaixing  中国老百姓  The Chinese People

Jianchuan Museum 建川博物馆聚落  The Jianchuan Museum Complex

Feihu Qibingguan  飞虎奇兵馆  The Flying Tigers Museum

Fan Jianchuan  樊建川  Chengdu real estate mogul, founder of the museum complex

Daniel Ford's Book:  Flying Tigers: Claire Chennault and his American Volunteers 1941-1942

The Jianchuan Museum Complex Web Site

The Flying Tigers Official Web Site

Ray Harris's History of WWII Podcast

Universitetet på Tøyen - Museum podkast 28/8  

Da det endelig ble bestemt at Norge skulle få sitt første universitet, var det Bergverksseminaret på Kongsberg som ble valgt i 1811. Der var allerede den naturvitenskapelige undervisningen i gang, men ganske snart ble planene om utbygging skrinlagt. ”Kongsberg har en høyst melankolsk beliggenhet, uegnet for studenter” , mente man i København. Dermed kjøpte kong Frederik VI den adelige setegården Tøyen, langt ute på landet utenfor Christiania. Her var det mulig å innkvartere de syv professorene, anlegge Botanisk have og dyrke opp løkkene som en del av den professorale gasje. I MUSEUM forteller Bjørn Vidar Johansen fra Museum for universitets og vitenskapshistorie om de første årene av Universitetets 200 år lange historie. Selv om man leide midlertidige lokaler i Kvadaturen, og de kjente bygningene ved Karl Johan ble bygget i 1850-årene, forlot man aldri planene om å satse på Tøyen. – Helt fram til 1910 var planene klare for utvidelser på Tøyen, sier Johansen. I MUSEUM tar Johansen oss med til loftet på Zoologisk Museum, hvor det finnes unike glassplater med fotografier og gjenstander som ble vist fram i de aller første utstillingene i Oslo sentrum. – Tusenvis av mennesker strømmet til de eksotiske utstillingene i Zoologisk museum og Oldsaksamlingen i 1880-årene, sier Johansen. Historiker Anne Vaalund fra MUV forteller også om fotoutstillingen ”Universitetsliv”, som blant annet viser bilder fra ”klassekampen i fotball” på universitetsplassen på 1960-tallet. Konservative mot sosialister.

Travel Today with Peter Greenberg — National World War II Museum, New Orleans  

This week, the Peter Greenberg Worldwide Radio Show broadcasts from one of America’s best museums—The National World War II Museum in New Orleans, Louisiana. Stephen Watson, Executive Vice President and COO of The National WWII Museum, talks about the museum’s innovative approach to telling the thousands of World War II stories. Award-winning Chef John Besh discusses supporting local communities in post-Katrina New Orleans. Doug MacCash, Entertainment Editor at The Times-Picayune, discusses the vast art scene and staggering number of galleries in New Orleans. He also talks about post-Katrina New Orleans and the city’s future—including Bourbon Street and his favorite local jazz clubs. Plus, the show wouldn’t be complete without Burton Benrud, President of Café du Monde, who talks about the cafe’s history and Peter’s addiction to beignets. There’s all of this and more as the Peter Greenberg Worldwide Radio Show broadcasts from the National World War II Museum in New Orleans, Louisiana.  

Free Thinking: Tom McCarthy. Jacobitism; Satirical Indexes; A Museum of Modern Nature  

Essayist Tom McCarthy joins presenter Anne McElvoy, academics Dennis Duncan + Peter Mackay and the curator of A Museum of Modern Nature. As a new exhibition opens in Edinburgh, 'Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobites', poet and New Generation Thinker Peter Mackay explores the hundreds of artefacts gathered from home and abroad and gives us his reflections on the old old story of the Kings over the Water. Dennis Duncan from The Bodleian Centre for the Study of the Book brings a tale of how indexes were used to expose British Jacobite sympathisers in the decades following the Glorious Revolution of 1688. Plus a new exhibition called 'A Museum of Modern Nature' features objects offered by members of the public who were asked to reflect on what connected them to the natural world and their sense of the presence of nature in their own lives with Rosie Stanbury and Rebekah Shaman Tom McCarthy's Essay Collection is called Typewriters, Bombs, Jellyfish. Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobites: National Museum of Scotland 23 June - 12 November 2017 A Museum of Modern Nature: Wellcome Trust exhibition in London 22 June - 8 October 2017 Producer: Jacqueline Smith

Åpning i Neiden  

Østsamisk museum i Neiden så lenge ut til å bli en evigvarende skandale. I mer enn åtte år har museet stått ferdig uten at det har kunnet åpne. En lang rekke store og små problemer har stått i veien, men fredag 16.juni 2017 blir det stor, offisiell åpning. I MUSEUM forteller museumsleder Honna Havas om noen av de 300 gjenstandene som stilles ut, lånt inn eller langtidsdeponert fra de samiske samlinger i Karasjok, Grenselandmuseet i Kirkenes og Norsk Folkemuseum. - Samarbeidet med Norsk Folkemuseum har vært helt uvurderlig, sier Honna Havas. Det opprinnelige og historiske Skoltelandet strakk seg langt inn i det som er Finland og Russland i dag, sier styreleder Steinar Pedersen. – Meningen med at Sametinget vedtok at Østsamisk museum skulle være deres tusenårssted var å vise solidaritet med den samiske gruppen som har fått lide mest som følge av grensedragninger, fornorskning og manglende støtte, sier Pedersen. Kanskje Ä'vv skoltesamisk museum kan bli en arena for samarbeid med skoltesamiske organisasjoner i Finland og Russland, sier Pedersen. – Og nå burde også Russland og Norge utvide den visumfrie sonen til å gjelde alle de skoltesamiske gruppene som en gang kunne ferdes fritt over grensene, sier han. I MUSEUM møter vi også skoltesamiske Heini Wesslin fra Sevetijãrvi på finsk side av grensen. Der er det ennå et lite, skoltesamisk miljø og det eneste sted i verden det skoltesamiske språket fortsatt brukes. Programleder Øyvind Arntsen

0:00/0:00
Video player is in betaClose