Search

Obama Orders Review of Attempts to Hack US Election  

The Obama White House hasn't always had the easiest of relationships with the Kremlin during his eight-year tenure, and it doesn't look like it's about to get any cosier. And that's because President Obama has ordered US intelligence agencies to investigate all cyber attacks and alleged foreign interventions in US presidential elections - and he wants the results on his desk before he leaves the White House on January twentieth. It was of course alleged during the campaign that Russia was amongst those states looking to interfere in the election. Hannah Kuchler who covers cyber security for the Financial Times in San Francisco explains more. It's a country the size of a continent, but the potential sale of private land of more than 1 per cent of the Australian landmass has caused controversy. We'll hear why the purchase of the Kidman estate is causing such concern from Danny Samson live in Melbourne. Plus, the Malaysian delegation shopping in London for data-savvy professionals to boost its growing tech sector. And you've heard of L'oreal, Maybeline and Max Factor - but what about Suzie Beauty? We'll hear from Nairobi about the Kenyan make-up artists looking to join the big name brands on a shelf near you soon. How can we eat healthily, sustainably and yet still tastily? It's the conundrum governments, scientists and the industry amongst others are pondering at a fringe event at the Nobel Prize awards in Oslo. We'll hear from two of the delegates. The BBC's Fergus Nicoll will be joined throughout the programme by Danny Samson, Professor of Management at the University of Melbourne, in Australia. (Picture: President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks at MacDill Air Force Base Credit: AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

#94: Trump gets a bounce  

Did you hear our interview with Trump pollster Tony Fabrizio & Clinton pollster Joel Benenson? You’re going to want to take a listen. It’s one of our favorite episodes so far. Poll of the Week: We’ve hit peak pollsters The Pollsters talk about the polling on polling. Huffington Post on Trump voters Ipsos poll on pollsters’ distrust Everybody (well, half of everybody) Loves A Winner Even Trump gets a post-win bounce. Huffington Post on Trump’s favorability Morning Consult on Trump’s favorability Gallup poll on president-elect’s favorability Post-Fact Universe The true polling about post-facts Pew Research on pollsters and press evaluation Buzzfeed News on fake news Morning Consult on credible media outlets Electoral College Gallup poll on the rise of support for the Electoral College Carrier and the Free Market Politico on Trump’s Carrier deal YouGov poll on Trump’s Carrier deal Donald Trump’s Businesses Conflicts are complicated. Bloomberg on Trump’s businesses Tweeter In Chief Is there a secret high-level Twitter Anonymous meeting out there that Kristen can go to? Politico on Trump’s use of Twitter We Love International Elections! International Business Times on France 2017 election International Business Times on Italy referendum Reuters on Italy referendum Quartz on Italy referendum Bloomberg on Italy referendum results Financial Times on Austria presidential election CNN on Austria election Pew Research on Europe’s future Polling on Santa Margie explains to Kristen the joys of the creepy Santa photo Ipsos polling on Santa Key findings: Here’s a real news story: With multiple polls about pollsters, we’ve hit peak pollsters. Although no one seems to be getting an A for effort. People are still working out the kinks about how to test Trump’s conflicts of interest . And if it’s hard to explain in a question, then, ah, well, i’m sure it’ll be fine. Meanwhile The pollsters transition team is in full force. We’ve put all our podcast revenue so far into a blind trust handled by my 1.5 year old. The downside is he sits in on all my meetings & is an obnoxious tweeter. Meanwhile, while people continue feel our country is off on the wrong track. AND more say belief in santa is decreasing? Correlation? Causation? You tell us! Don't forget to follow us on Twitter and Facebook!

Russia Sells Large Stake in Oil Giant Rosneft  

Almost 20% of the Russian state-controlled oil company Rosneft is about to pass into the hands of the mining and commodities-trading giant Glencore and Qatar's sovereign wealth fund. We speak to Energy Markets Editor David Sheppard from the Financial Times about the significance of the deal. Plus, it's said to be the biggest discovery of oil for the past three decades. The Kashagan field is in the northern Caspian Sea, in waters owned by Kazakhstan. But with a series of delays in getting the field open, the big question now is how long it will take investors in the project to get their money back, or even make a profit. The BBC's Abdujalil Abdurasulov reports from the official ceremony. The Indian government's recent decision to withdraw higher-value banknotes was designed to curb corruption. In the short term though it's led to chaos and confusion. But some companies and shrewd operators are managing to profit from the disruption. We hear from Shilpa Kannan in Delhi. Also on the programme, Can the Governor of Iowa help rebuild Donald Trump's fractured relations with Beijing? And what do you do when a party invite goes viral? The father of a 15 year old girl has opened the doors to more than a million people at his daughter's party in Mexico. The BBC's Roger Hearing is joined throughout the programme from Singapore by Simon Littlewood, President of management consultancy AC Growth Delivered, and from Washington DC by Peter Morici, Economist at the University of Maryland. (Picture: Rosneft oil rig seen at the Rosneft's Vankor oil field in eastern Siberia Credit: AP Photo Sergey Ponomarev)

Donald Trump's Conflicts of Interest  

Donald Trump's business empire goes under the microscope today. Many Americans may have voted for him for his business skills, but are those interests now a liability, with potential conflicts at every turn? And despite his promise to separate himself from his business empire, is it even possible to resolve them? With several Trump loans from foreign banks, and hotels and golf courses around the world, there are myriad opportunities for politicians and business people to offer sweeteners to the Trump brand in the hope of gaining favour. How does the President extricate himself from that moral hazard? We hear from the New York Times Washington correspondent, Eric Lipton, and from a former White House ethics lawyer, Professor Richard Painter of the Univ of Minnesota. Is there any easy way out for the President-elect and his family? Also in the programme, ahead of this weekend's Nobel Prize awards, our regular commentator, James Srodes, assesses the financial interests of the elusive Nobel-laureate, the poet and musician, Bob Dylan. (Picture: US President-elect Donald Trump in the elevator at Trump Tower in New York; Credit: Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images)

Italy Faces Political Upheaval Following Referendum  

Italy is facing political upheaval after a heavy defeat in a referendum forced the Prime Minister to quit. Matteo Renzi asked Italians to vote in favour of changes to the constitution - strengthening the role of central government over the regions and weakening the power of the Senate, the upper house of the Italian parliament. But his plans were defeated by a whopping 60 to 40 margin. So what now for Italy and its partners in the European Union? James Politi, Rome bureau chief for the Financial Times, gives us his view. China appears to be playing down an attack on some of its policies by the US President-elect, Donald Trump. In a series of strongly-worded tweets, Mr Trump accused China of currency manipulation and a military build-up in the South China Sea. It is though the second time in a week that Mr Trump has appeared to irk Beijing. On Friday the President elect had a phone conversation with the Taiwanese President, which led China, to lodge a formal complaint. We hear the thoughts of our our two guest who join us throughtout the show: Kara Alaimo, Assistant Professor at Hofstra University and author of 'Pitch, Tweet, or Engage on the Street'. And David Moser, Academic Director, CET Chinese Studies programme at Beijing Capital Normal University. Ride-sharing service Uber is considered the ultimate Silicon Valley disrupter - it operates in more than 500 cities around the world, much to the anger of the taxi trade. But its real goal is to replace the car in your garage, and today it has announced a deal it hopes will help with that aim. But at what cost to jobs? The BBC's Dave Lee reports from San Francisco. And can the chief executive of one of the biggest global consumer brands really mean it when he sends all of his employees his love? We find out what Lucy Kellaway thinks. Photo: Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi give a speech after the results of the referendum on constitutional reforms at Palazzo Chigi on December 5, 2016 in Rome, Italy. Credit: Getty Images.

Italy's PM Resigns After Referendum Defeat  

We ask whether the prime minister's resignation will threaten Italy's financial health. The BBC's Gavin Lee gauges the referendum result reaction in Italy, and we have analysis from economist Nicola Nobile from Oxford Economics in Milan. Also in the programme, US president-elect Donald Trump has irked China by talking to Taiwan's president. The BBC's Cindy Sui in Taipei tells us about the response in Taiwan. Ghanaians go to the polls on Wednesday, and the current administration's management of the country's economy has been a talking point on the campaign trail, as the BBC's Akwasi Sarpong explains from Accra. Plus Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times tells us why she has no faith in company bosses who say they 'love' their employees. (Picture: Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi. Picture credit: AFP.)

Italy Votes No  

We speak to Lorenzo Codogno, a former chief economist of the Italian treasury and now of the London School of Economics and LC Macro Advisors, about what Italy's rejection of constitutional change means for the country's troubled banking sector. Also Dutch engineer Auke Piet of Amazon Resources tells us how he plans to ship millions of litres of water from Suriname to Barbados to relieve the Caribbean island's worst drought in half a century. And our regular commentator Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times tells us why she has no faith in company bosses who say they "love" their employees. (Photo: Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi give a speech after the results of the referendum on constitutional reforms, Credit: Getty Images)

The Lib Dems seize Richmond Park and the rise of Paul Nuttall  

With George Parker, Jim Pickard and Miranda Green from the Financial Times, plus Marcus Roberts from YouGov. Presented by Sebastian Payne.

Gist: The Chaos Doctrine  

Tidiness is tyranny, and Tim Harford is here to set you free. The author of Messy: The Power of Disorder to Transform Our Lives makes the case for routine-busting labor strikes, cluttered desks, and leaving your emails unsorted. He also explains why we’re smart to want scatterbrained musicians and orderly accountants. Harford writes the Undercover Economist column for the Financial Times.

For the Spiel, exciting times! Let’s dig into the Indiana tax code. 

Today’s sponsors:

Rocket Mortgage from Quicken Loans. Rocket Mortgage brings the mortgage process into the 21st century with an easy online process. Check out Rocket Mortgage today at QuickenLoans.com/gist.

InterContinental Hotels & Resorts. Take a multisensory journey into the InterContinental life and discover the Empathy stories where you learn about other cultures and expand your own life simultaneously. Download the Empathy audio stories on iTunes.

Join Slate Plus! Members get bonus segments, exclusive member-only podcasts, and more. Sign up for a free trial today at slate.com/gistplus.

The Chaos Doctrine  

Tidiness is tyranny, and Tim Harford is here to set you free. The author of Messy: The Power of Disorder to Transform Our Lives makes the case for routine-busting labor strikes, cluttered desks, and leaving your emails unsorted. He also explains why we’re smart to want scatterbrained musicians and orderly accountants. Harford writes the Undercover Economist column for the Financial Times.

For the Spiel, exciting times! Let’s dig into the Indiana tax code. 

Today’s sponsors:

Rocket Mortgage from Quicken Loans. Rocket Mortgage brings the mortgage process into the 21st century with an easy online process. Check out Rocket Mortgage today at QuickenLoans.com/gist.

InterContinental Hotels & Resorts. Take a multisensory journey into the InterContinental life and discover the Empathy stories where you learn about other cultures and expand your own life simultaneously. Download the Empathy audio stories on iTunes.

Join Slate Plus! Members get bonus segments, exclusive member-only podcasts, and more. Sign up for a free trial today at slate.com/gistplus.

Italy's referendum threatens to crush Renzi  

On Sunday, millions of Italians head to polling stations to decide whether their constitution should be reformed. The vote is seen as the biggest threat to European stability since the UK's referendum on EU membership in June, because of the political and financial chaos a “No” vote could cause. Lorenzo Codogno, a former chief economist with the Italian government explains the likelihood of this. The mayors of four of the world's major cities say they will ban the use of all diesel-powered cars and trucks within a decade. Buses are a big part of the city pollution problem. We speak to Hakan Agnevall, president of the Volvo Bus Corporation who says their electric buses can play a big part in the solution. Barbados is celebrating 50 years of independence. The island nation has a lot to be proud of, but there has been a long recession since 2008 and there are question marks about basing an economy so heavily on tourism. Guy Hewitt, the High Commissioner for Barbados in the UK, explains why they still retain free education and healthcare systems in such an economic environment. Plus Elaine Moore of the Financial Times and Shelly Banjo of Bloomberg talk us through the big stories of the week.

MSF and the FT’s 2016 Seasonal Appeal: ‘The hospital is sacred’  

Médecins Sans Frontières, which the Financial Times has chosen as its partner for this year's Seasonal Appeal, is one of the few aid groups to continue working in war zones despite deadly attacks on its facilities. Erika Solomon discovers how the group’s commitment to impartiality helps staff stay on the front lines and in refugee camps in Yemen, Iraq and Syria

Rethinking Capitalism [Audio]  

Speaker(s): Michael Jacobs, Professor Mariana Mazzucato | Western capitalism is in trouble. For decades investment has been falling, living standards have stagnated or declined, and inequality has risen dramatically. Economic policy has neither reformed the financial system nor restored stable growth. Climate change meanwhile poses increasing risks to future prosperity. In this joint lecture, Mariana Mazzucato and Michael Jacobs will propose new ways of thinking about capitalism. Drawing on their new book, Rethinking Capitalism: Economics and Policy for Sustainable and Inclusive Growth they will show how today’s deep economic problems reflect the inadequacies of orthodox economic theory and the failure of economic policies informed by it. They will show how alternative economic approaches can better explain how capitalism works, why it often doesn’t, and how it can be made more innovative, inclusive and sustainable. Michael Jacobs (@michaelujacobs) is Visiting Professor in the School of Public Policy and Department of Political Science at University College London and Visiting Fellow at the Institute for Public Policy Research. An environmental economist and political theorist, his work has focused on the political economy of environmental change. He was formerly General Secretary of the Fabian Society, Co-Editor of the The Political Quarterly, and Senior Adviser to the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate, which he helped to found. Mariana Mazzucato (@MazzucatoM) holds the RM Phillips chair in the Economics of Innovation at SPRU in the University of Sussex. Her book The Entrepreneurial State: debunking public vs. private sector myths was on the 2013 Books of the Year list of the Financial Times. Professor Mazzucato is winner of the 2014 New Statesman SPERI Prize in Political Economy, the 2015 Hans-Matthöfer-Preis and in 2013 the New Republic called her one of the '3 most important thinkers about innovation'. Professor Mazzucato advises policy makers around the world on innovation-led growth. Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme at LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.

How Will Castro's Death Affect Cuba-US Relations?  

Following the death of Fidel Castro we explore the future of US-Cuban relations. We hear from Jose Azel, a Cuban exile in Florida who's now a scholar with the Institute for Cuban American Studies at the University of Miami. We also get the views of James Williams, president of a political action committee in Washington DC called the Engage Cuba Coalition and Dr Emily Morris, a Cuba specialist at University College London. Throughout the programme we're joined by Parag Khanna, author of Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilisation - he's in Singapore. Alison van Diggelen, host of freshdialogues.com also joins us from Silicon Valley. Who owns Norfolk Island? The question involves the governments of Britain, Australia and the people who actually live there. Political tensions have been rising and now the United Nations might get involved as an arbitrator. We get analysis from Mark Willacy of ABC News. A new study of the Great Barrier Reef has found that two thirds of the coral along one long section has died after a rise in water temperatures earlier this year. The bleaching was worst on the north of the reef - and it's left some sites almost completely barren. We hear from the BBC's Hywel Griffith who followed scientists from James Cook University. Jonathan Evans, a Blackhawk pilot has flown rescue missions all over the world. He's now CEO of Skyward, a drone-management startup on the banks of the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon. He tells us why the area's tech sector is thriving. We cast the net a little wider to draw in some of the business headlines from elsewhere in the world and we cross to Kolkata to hear from the BBC's Rahul Tandon. One of the top-selling business and self-help books of the late 1980s was called Feel the Fear and Do it Anyway. It sold by the million and was translated into multiple languages. Fear in our professional lives is something many people battle - at least according to our regular commentator, Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times. Picture description: Cuban President Fidel Castro waves a Cuban flag during a demonstration outside the U.S. Interest Section June 21, 2004 in Havana, Cuba. Picture credit: Jorge Rey/Getty Images

Italian Bank Shares Slide Ahead of Referendum  

Shares in Italian banks have fallen amid speculation Italy's prime minister could lose a crucial vote. We assess the health of Italy's banking sector with Isabella Buffacchi, a financial journalist from Rome's Il Sore, and have a report from the BBC's Tony Bonsignore. Also in the programme, following the death of Cuba's former president Fidel Castro, we hear the hopes of Cuban exile and senior scholar at the University of Miami's Institute for Cuban American Studies, Jose Azel, on the future of US-Cuba relations. The cost of decontamination efforts and compensation resulting from the Fukushima nuclear disaster has more than doubled to around $180bn. The BBC's Rupert Wingfield-Hayes in Tokyo brings us the details. Plus our commentator Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times gives tips on how to overcome any fear of public speaking. (Picture: An Italian bank branch.

Italian Bank Shares Slide Ahead of Referendum  

Shares in Italian banks have fallen amid speculation Italy's prime minister could lose a crucial vote. We assess the health of Italy's banking sector with Isabella Buffacchi, a financial journalist from Rome's Il Sore, and have a report from the BBC's Tony Bonsignore. Also in the programme, following the death of Cuba's former president Fidel Castro, we hear the hopes of Cuban exile and senior scholar at the University of Miami's Institute for Cuban American Studies, Jose Azel, on the future of US-Cuba relations. The cost of decontamination efforts and compensation resulting from the Fukushima nuclear disaster has more than doubled to around $180bn. The BBC's Rupert Wingfield-Hayes in Tokyo brings us the details. Plus our commentator Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times gives tips on how to overcome any fear of public speaking. (Picture: An Italian bank branch. Picture credit: AFP.)

Italian Bank Shares Slide Ahead of Referendum  

Shares in Italian banks have fallen amid speculation Italy's prime minister could lose a crucial vote. We assess the health of Italy's banking sector with Isabella Buffacchi, a financial journalist from Rome's Il Sore, and have a report from the BBC's Tony Bonsignore. Also in the programme, following the death of Cuba's former president Fidel Castro, we hear the hopes of Cuban exile and senior scholar at the University of Miami's Institute for Cuban American Studies, Jose Azel, on the future of US-Cuba relations. The cost of decontamination efforts and compensation resulting from the Fukushima nuclear disaster has more than doubled to around $180bn. The BBC's Rupert Wingfield-Hayes in Tokyo brings us the details. Plus our commentator Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times gives tips on how to overcome any fear of public speaking. (Picture: An Italian bank branch. Picture credit: AFP.)

Investing in Uncertain Times  

We speak to Mohamed El-Erian, one of the world's most respected financial markets thinker who's chief economic advisor at Allianz and chair of President Obama's Global Development Council, about investing amid unusual levels of political and economic uncertainty. Also, Phil Mercer reports from Sydney about Chinese investment in, and migration to, Australia. And our regular Financial Times commentator, Lucy Kellaway, gives tips on how to overcome your fear public speaking. (Photo: Mural in London depicting Donald Trump kissing UK foreign secretary Boris Johnson. Credit: Getty Images)

Ep 32. InDent – Become a Key Person of Influence  

Welcome to the third episode of the InDent series - a collection of shorter podcast episodes where I have a detailed look at sections of my business partner Daniel Priestley’s book, Key Person of Influence, dissecting the core principles and philosophies that our business and many others are built on. If you’re not already caught up, go ahead and check out episodes one and two before diving into this one.
    
In this installment, I’m getting into the real concept of what makes a Key Person of Influence. These are people whose names come up in conversation,who attract opportunity and earn more money. Most people think it takes decades of hard work, academic qualifications and good luck to become one of them. We’ve proven them wrong over the last six years with our Key Person of Influence Accelerator - a programme that’s been featured on the BBC, The Financial Times, Inc.com, The Huffington Post and Forbes, just to name a few.

So, go ahead and check out this episode if you’re looking for a way to take your skills, talents, expertise and existing business, and accelerate that into the inner circle of your industry, creating cut-through, differentiation and a scalable business.

In this show I talk about:

Becoming a Key Person of Influence and stepping into the inner circle of your industry
How to have more income mobility by becoming the type of person that gets closer to the top
Steps someone takes to making an exponential increase in their earning
How making small shifts has helped certain people to find themselves in the top 1% of their industry in under 12 months
Insights into representing yourself as a key person of influence at events
The five questions to uncovering a Key Person of Influence
Outlining the explicit five-step method that builds clarity, credibility, scale, transparency and commercial viability
The Key Person of Influence methodology across all industries
The five things that you need to have in place to demonstrate that you’re a key person of influence
How to turn your service business into something that can be scaled quite rapidly
Why having visibility online is crucial to becoming a Key Person of Influence
Using both social media and traditional media to create a powerful online presence
The results that come from having all five steps of the Key Person of Influence process in place
The Key Person of Influence scorecard

Resources

The Key Person of Influence Scorecard

 

The post Ep 32. InDent – Become a Key Person of Influence appeared first on Key Person of Influence.

The Curse of Cash [Audio]  

Speaker(s): Professor Kenneth S Rogoff | The world is drowning in cash—and it’s making us poorer and less safe. Kenneth Rogoff, one of the world’s leading economists, makes a persuasive and fascinating case for an idea that until recently would have seemed outlandish: getting rid of most paper money. As well as offering a plan for phasing out paper money he addresses the issues the transition will pose, ranging from fears about privacy and price stability to the need to provide subsidized debit cards for the poor. Kenneth S. Rogoff, (@krogoff) the Thomas D. Cabot Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University and former chief economist of the International Monetary Fund, is the coauthor of the New York Times bestseller This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly (Princeton). He appears frequently in the national media and writes a monthly newspaper column that is syndicated in more than fifty countries. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts. His new book is The Curse of Cash. Wouter Den Haan is Professor of Economics at LSE and Co-Director of the Centre for Macroeconomics. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.

0:00/0:00
Video player is in betaClose