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156: Kevin Smith's Favorite 10 Movies of 2016  

Kevin and Marc discuss Kevin's favorite movies of 2016.

Farming Today This Week: National Parks  

The UK's National Parks serve a vital function, offering all kinds of outdoor recreation for visitors while preserving wild landscapes, but they're also working economies for farmers and rural businesses. Charlotte Smith visits the Brecon Beacons National Park, meeting farmers and staff, whilst trying some sledging in the freshly fallen snow. Chief Executive of Dartmoor National Park, Kevin Bishop, explains that England's National Parks received budget cuts of 43% over the last 5 years, but he says he's reassured that funding is assured for the next few years. We hear a report by Nancy Nicolson about calls for a new national park in Scotland's borders. And Charlotte speaks to two Brecon Beacons farmers, one young, one old, about their relationship with the national park. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.

Power Pod: Thursday, Jan. 12, 2016  

Get your political quick fix with the Power Panel. Kathleen Monk, Susan Smith, Chad Rogers and Chris Hall discuss B.C.'s Trans Mountain pipeline approval, PM's town hall tour and Kevin O'Leary's exploratory leadership report.

Turbo 3 - Canciones sanadoras para comenzar 2017 - 02/01/17  

Primer Turbo 3 de este nuevo año. Hoy te ofrecemos una sesión más calmada repleta de lo que nosotros llamamos canciones sanadoras para comenzar este 2017 con buen pie. Playlist: KEVIN MORBY - Beautiful strangers, THE WHITE STRIPES - You’ve got her in your pocket, KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD - Sense, EELS - In my dreams, REAL ESTATE - Talking backwards, BELLE & SEBASTIAN - Another sunny day, TEN FÉ - Elodie, THE WAR ON DRUGS - Burning, THE CURE - Plainsong, WOODS - Hollow home, TY SEGALL - Orange color queen, T. REX - Cosmic dancer, DAVID BOWIE - Soul love, SMITH WESTERNS - Weekend, TWIN PEAKS - Getting better.


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12-24-2016 DLT Solutions Post-Game Show Hour 1  

Hour 1 of the DLT Solutions Post-Game Show with Scott Jackson and Clinton Portis, recorded live at The Blagaurd in Adams Morgan on Christmas Eve; following the Redskins' 41-21 win over the Chicago Bears. Includes Jay Gruden's post-game press conference and post-game interviews from Larry Michael and Sonny Jurgensen with Bashaud Breeland, Preston Smith, Kirk Cousins, Josh Norman and Jay Gruden. Plus, post-game analysis with Kevin Sheehan.

K&B Podcast: Friday December 23rd with guest: [Best Of] Bob Saget and Kevin Smith  

The Recipe Psychic. Taking Phones Away at Concerts. Loquecia Reviews 'How the Grinch Stole Christmas'. Bob Saget. Armenian Comedian's 'Rock N Pot Christmas'. Mugs 'Splains Manscaping. Top 5 Live Perfomances of 2016. Snoopy Gets the Boot from Metlife. Kevin's Christmas Interviews. You Consume Excessive Amounts of a Certain Food. My Shiney Hiney.

Episode 288- White People Are Back - Jimmy Martinez  

Big Jay Oakerson, Dave Smith, and Luis J Gomez have Jimmy Martinez back on the show! We talk about Jimmy's amazing weight loss, we call Kevin Brennan to air out their beef, and we talk about the benefits of fucking a homeless chick! All this and more on the most offensive podcast on Earth... THE LEGION OF SKANKS!!!

Hour 3: 12/14/16  

Mike Greenberg and Mike Golic cover the downside of resting players and chat with Basketball Hall of Famer Kevin McHale, His & Hers' Jemele Hill and Michael Smith and more.

What Will the World Make of New US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson?  

As President-elect Donald Trump confirms the Chief Executive of Exxon Mobil, Rex Tillerson, as his choice for US secretary of state and the former Texas Gov. Rick Perry to lead the Energy Department, we look at the implications of the appointments, for both the United States and the rest of the world. Professor James Goldgeier is Dean of the School of International Service at American University in Washington DC and gave us his thoughts. Also in the programme, the BBC's Coletta Smith reports from Reykjavik, Iceland, on the country's place at the head of a global league table for gender equality. Plus we hear from Bill Gates who has just launched his latest start-up - a billion-dollar project to turn good clean energy ideas into successful money-making schemes. It's called Breakthrough Energy Ventures - and he talked about it with David Brancaccio of Marketplace on American Public Radio. As US debt approaches the $20trillion mark within weeks, possibly days, of Donald Trump's arrival in the White House, we discuss why this matters and the impact of excessive debt on the global economy. And they may be an aphrodisiac, but oysters certainly aren't seducing some of the locals on Rhode Island where public land is being turned into oyster farms. Marketplace's Andy Uhler went there to check it out. Andy joins us throughout the programme alongside Lingling Wei who China correspondent for the Wall Street Journal in Beijing. (Picture: Exxon Mobil CEO Rex Tillerson speaks as he and other top oil and gas industry executives testify during a Senate Finance Committee Credit: REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

Renewable energy in Scotland's Western Isles; sheep farmers respond to PETA's anti-wool campaign.  

Making money from the weather. Will wind energy still pay its way in rural areas despite the drop in subsidies, asks Charlotte Smith. Not, perhaps, in Scotland's Western Isles. A betrayal. That's how political leaders in the Western Isles see the decision to block subsidies for onshore wind there. A fresh consultation was announced last month at Westminster on support for renewables in the islands which could lead to a one billion pound investment. BBC Scotland's rural affairs correspondent Kevin Keane reports from Lewis. This week on Farming Today we're focussing on the ONE thing farmers can't change, but nonetheless famously endlessly moan and commiserate over - the weather! But for some the weather is less of a challenge and more of a resource. Sun and wind can offer farmers an opportunity to create energy. Initially the Government offered incentives to encourage the take-up of renewable energy, though those have changed Merlin Hyman - chief executive of Regen South West, which specialises in renewables, told me that UK weather systems still offer massive potential for untapped power generation. Farmers in the UK have said that a campaign by an animal welfare charity urging people NOT to wear wool is misguided - and could actually end up causing harm to sheep. People for the ethical treatment of Animals, PETA - says people shouldn't wear wool because the animals are treated cruelly. But those that farm them say that if they are NOT shorn, they could well die. BBC South's Environment Correspondent Yvette Austin reports. Among the unexpected things you learn whilst listening to Farming Today: did you know, for example, that in their larval stage, fresh water mussels are free swimming, and rely on sheltering in the gills of fish such as brown trout? Despite that rather clever evolutionary trick - fresh water pearl mussels are struggling in many of England's streams and rivers because of climate change and pollution. BBC South West's Environment Correspondent, Adrian Campbell, has been given exclusive access to some pioneering work in Devon which aims to change that. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.

#883 - Kevin Smith  

Kevin Smith is a filmmaker, actor, comedian, public speaker, comic book writer, author, and podcaster. His latest movie "Yoga Hosers" is now available on Netflix.

FJ Classic 248: Avatar  

Another golden oldie from the Film Junk Vault featuring guest appearances by Singe and Reed Farrington. We review Avatar and discuss some of our favourite films of the 2000s, plus we also talk In The Loop, The Lives of Others, Santa with Muscles, Superbad, Sons of Anarchy and Man v. Food.

0:00 – Intro
2:50 – Singe's Cop Story / Steven Seagal: Lawman
22:40 – Top 20 Films of the Decade: District 9, The Lord of the Rings, The Dark Knight, The Departed, Grizzly Man
39:40 – Review: Avatar
1:16:30 – Trailer Trash: Iron Man 2, Robin Hood, Hot Tub Time Machine
1:31:15 – Other Stuff We Watched: Superbad, Man v. Food, A Threevening with Kevin Smith, Sons of Anarchy, Up, Inglourious Basterds, In The Loop, The Limits of Control, The Messenger, The Lives of Others, Beautiful Losers, Santa with Muscles
2:07:40 – Junk Mail: Kill Bill Vol. 3 and James Cameron's hometown, Commentaries Ruining the Magic, Worst Movies of the Year, Donnie Darko and Zombieland, The Girlfriend Experience, Bob Clark and Halloween, Martial Arts Eras
2:47:35 – This Week on DVD
2:49:14 – Outro

Super Tuesday Recap - The Flash S3E7 Killer Frost  

Kriss & Dpalm are back to talk about The Flash season 3, episode 7, Killer Frost. Kevin Smith returns to direct this episode and he doesn't disappoint. This episode is not only a huge improvement over the last disjointed episode, it proves that you can have multiple plotlines and threads going and make a well formed episode. There's a lot going on in this episode and it all works. Check out our discussion and let us know what you think.

Leave a 5 Star Review for us on the Super Tuesday feed and we'll read it on the next show!

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Flashback Podcast: Killer Frost (S03-E07)  

How cool was this week’s episode of The Flash? There are definitely comic book ties to this week’s episode!

KILLER FROST
Caitlin uses her powers to save Barry, but as her mother predicted, the effort unleashes her inner Killer Frost. Killer Frost goes on a rampage looking for Dr. Alchemy, kidnapping Julian and battling both The Flash and Vibe. Meanwhile, Joe and H.R. have a heart-to-hear talk. Kevin Smith directs.

Want more? Become a Patreon member today! http://patreon.com/MajorSpoilers

Flashback Podcast: Killer Frost (S03-E07)  

How cool was this week’s episode of The Flash? There are definitely comic book ties to this week’s episode!

KILLER FROST
Caitlin uses her powers to save Barry, but as her mother predicted, the effort unleashes her inner Killer Frost. Killer Frost goes on a rampage looking for Dr. Alchemy, kidnapping Julian and battling both The Flash and Vibe. Meanwhile, Joe and H.R. have a heart-to-hear talk. Kevin Smith directs.

Want more? Become a Patreon member today! http://patreon.com/MajorSpoilers

Flashback Podcast: Killer Frost (S03-E07)  

How cool was this week’s episode of The Flash? There are definitely comic book ties to this week’s episode!

KILLER FROST
Caitlin uses her powers to save Barry, but as her mother predicted, the effort unleashes her inner Killer Frost. Killer Frost goes on a rampage looking for Dr. Alchemy, kidnapping Julian and battling both The Flash and Vibe. Meanwhile, Joe and H.R. have a heart-to-hear talk. Kevin Smith directs.

Want more? Become a Patreon member today! http://patreon.com/MajorSpoilers

The Movie Crypt: Ep 180: C. Robert Cargill  

  Things get “strange” when Adam, Joe, and Arwen welcome writer C. Robert Cargill to sit down with them at the ArieScope studio and discuss his career from on-line critic (you likely know him as “Massawyrm” from AIN’T IT COOL NEWS) to screenwriter (SINISTER 1 & 2) to novelist (DREAMS AND SHADOWS) to co-writing his latest Hollywood blockbuster Marvel’s DOCTOR STRANGE which is currently playing in theaters everywhere.  As The Movie Crypt has proven time and time again, every artist’s journey is different and Cargill’s path is one of the best examples of destiny finding a way despite the difficult odds and the various hurdles.  Including stories from his AIN’T IT COOL days (there’s an amazing Kevin Smith story with a happy ending that you’ll love), opportunities that arose from Cargill being prepared at the right place and at the right time, and a discussion about what it’s like crossing the line with grace and respect when moving from one of “them” (a critic) to one of “us” (a filmmaker), Cargill brings the sincerity and honesty that make this program what it is from week to week and you are sure to gain some great insight behind the Hollywood curtain before the ending theme song rolls. Do you want to see The Movie Crypt program keep going every week?  Do you want to make Arwen’s tail wag like crazy?  Then please donate to the program by using our “Feed Arwen A Treat” option in the “Buy Stuff” store on www.ariescope.com today!  Your donations may not go in to the guy’s pockets but they’re still pivotal in keeping the ArieScope studio’s rent paid and the lights on so that the guys can keep donating their own time to bring you these candid and inspirational conversations with Hollywood’s best every single Monday morning without fail. Follow everyone on Twitter: @Massawyrm, @Adam_Fn_Green, and @TheJoeLynch.  And find out who will be appearing on upcoming episodes and get your questions in for “Viewer Mail” by following @MovieCrypt.

Please Spit in This Tube: An Election Experiment  

Every day another article comes out about how voters are stressed by this election. But we wanted to know: what is the election doing to our biology?

The American Psychological Association recently found that more than half of all Americans — 52 percent — say this year’s presidential election is a “somewhat” or “very significant” source of stress in their lives. The survey was self-reported, meaning respondents answered a few questions online and the APA took their self-assessments at face value. Anecdotally, those assessments probably ring true for many of us, but it turns out there’s a way to measure the physiological effects of election stress.  

Over the last few years, a group of neuroscientists and political scientists have pioneered a new field called biopolitics, the study of biology and political behavior. Professor Kevin Smith is a political scientist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and a co-author of the book, "Predisposed: Liberals, Conservatives, and the Biology of Political Differences.” He often collaborates with Dr. Jeffrey French, who runs a lab at the University of Nebraska-Omaha and studies cortisol, a hormone we release when we’re stressed.  

One of Smith and French’s recent studies looked at stress and voting. They wanted to know if cortisol levels influence whether people vote. The easiest way to test cortisol is through saliva, so they collected spit samples from a bunch of participants and got their official voting records for the past six elections.

The researchers found that people with higher cortisol levels vote less. And that finding correlates with another one of their studies, which found that people who voted absentee experienced less stress than people who went to the polls.

So we asked French and Smith to help us design an experiment of sorts. We’d use the presidential debates as a proxy for the election. Our team would go to debate watch parties and collect saliva samples from viewers to measure their cortisol levels. We’d also ask the participants to fill out a survey about themselves: their party affiliation, age and self-reported stress level. And we’d see who had the biggest changes in their cortisol over the course of the debate.

During the first two presidential debates, we went to watch parties in Times Square, Midtown Manhattan and Northern New Jersey. Participants spat three times into tiny tubes: before the debate, to get a baseline sample, midway through the debate and after the debate.

We over-nighted the samples to Omaha, where Dr. French processed them in his lab. A few weeks later, he had the results.

We all agreed that the debate watch parties seemed stressful. At a bar in Times Square, we talked to young Republicans unhappy with their nominee and worried about their party’s future. Others were terrified at the prospect of a Clinton presidency. In Midtown, a group of Democrats had gathered to watch at the Roosevelt Institute, a left-leaning think tank. A few of them brought their own alcohol, to temper their anxiety (French and Smith took alcohol and caffeine intake into account in their analysis) and a number of them worried about Trump’s popularity.

But the results surprised us: cortisol levels stayed close to normal levels throughout the debates. Clinton supporters had a small spike at the midway point, but not by much. Overall, the stress levels for liberals and conservatives didn’t really change — with one exception.

The researchers looked at cortisol levels based on whether participants had someone close to them who planned to vote for the opposing candidate. And for Trump supporters who had a conflict with a person close to them — a parent, a sibling, a spouse — cortisol levels actually went up after the debate. They probably found the debate more stressful.

French and Smith warned us that this wasn’t a pristine study. In fact, both professors laughed when we asked if they’d submit our work to a peer-reviewed journal. But they agreed that this finding was statistically significant. And they didn’t find it for Clinton supporters, or voters who supported a third party candidate.

The other significant finding related to baseline cortisol levels — the participants’ stress level before the debate. The researchers found that Trump supporters had much higher baseline levels compared to Clinton voters.

Smith, the political scientist, couldn’t tell us why Trump voters had two times as much cortisol in their saliva compared to Clinton supporters. But he did say that our experiment served as an interesting pilot study — one that made him think differently about what he hopes to study next: tolerance.

Here, Smith made a co

Only Human Bonus Episode: What Is This Election Doing to Us?  

This election certainly feels stressful. As Amanda Aronczyk from WNYC's Only Human podcast told us in Episode 7, it's possible to measure the election's effect on us biologically. This bonus episode explains more about Only Human's experiment with the stress hormone, cortisol. 

Every day another article comes out about how voters are stressed by this election. But we wanted to know: what is the election doing to our biology?

The American Psychological Association recently found that more than half of all Americans — 52 percent — say this year’s presidential election is a “somewhat” or “very significant” source of stress in their lives. The survey was self-reported, meaning respondents answered a few questions online and the APA took their self-assessments at face value. Anecdotally, those assessments probably ring true for many of us, but it turns out there’s a way to measure the physiological effects of election stress.  

Over the last few years, a group of neuroscientists and political scientists have pioneered a new field called biopolitics, the study of biology and political behavior. Professor Kevin Smith is a political scientist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and a co-author of the book, "Predisposed: Liberals, Conservatives, and the Biology of Political Differences.” He often collaborates with Dr. Jeffrey French, who runs a lab at the University of Nebraska-Omaha and studies cortisol, a hormone we release when we’re stressed.  

One of Smith and French’s recent studies looked at stress and voting. They wanted to know if cortisol levels influence whether people vote. The easiest way to test cortisol is through saliva, so they collected spit samples from a bunch of participants and got their official voting records for the past six elections.

The researchers found that people with higher cortisol levels vote less. And that finding correlates with another one of their studies, which found that people who voted absentee experienced less stress than people who went to the polls.

So we asked French and Smith to help us design an experiment of sorts. We’d use the presidential debates as a proxy for the election. Our team would go to debate watch parties and collect saliva samples from viewers to measure their cortisol levels. We’d also ask the participants to fill out a survey about themselves: their party affiliation, age and self-reported stress level. And we’d see who had the biggest changes in their cortisol over the course of the debate.

During the first two presidential debates, we went to watch parties in Times Square, Midtown Manhattan and Northern New Jersey. Participants spat three times into tiny tubes: before the debate, to get a baseline sample, midway through the debate and after the debate.

We over-nighted the samples to Omaha, where Dr. French processed them in his lab. A few weeks later, he had the results.

We all agreed that the debate watch parties seemed stressful. At a bar in Times Square, we talked to young Republicans unhappy with their nominee and worried about their party’s future. Others were terrified at the prospect of a Clinton presidency. In Midtown, a group of Democrats had gathered to watch at the Roosevelt Institute, a left-leaning think tank. A few of them brought their own alcohol, to temper their anxiety (French and Smith took alcohol and caffeine intake into account in their analysis) and a number of them worried about Trump’s popularity.

But the results surprised us: cortisol levels stayed close to normal levels throughout the debates. Clinton supporters had a small spike at the midway point, but not by much. Overall, the stress levels for liberals and conservatives didn’t really change — with one exception.

The researchers looked at cortisol levels based on whether participants had someone close to them who planned to vote for the opposing candidate. And for Trump supporters who had a conflict with a person close to them — a parent, a sibling, a spouse — cortisol levels actually went up after the debate. They probably found the debate more stressful.

French and Smith warned us that this wasn’t a pristine study. In fact, both professors laughed when we asked if they’d submit our work to a peer-reviewed journal. But they agreed that this finding was statistically significant. And they didn’t find it for Clinton supporters, or voters who supported a third party candidate.

The other significant finding related to baseline cortisol levels — the participants’ stress level before the debate. The researchers found that Trump supporters had much higher baseline levels compared to Clinton voters.

Smith, the political scientist, couldn’t te

Episode 7: This Is Your Brain on Politics  

Stress is a part of everyday life. But in this election filled with bombast, disregard of all sorts of political norms, and multiple October Surprises, the road to November 8th often appears overwhelming.

Join WNYC Studios and The Nation as we explore the burgeoning field of biopolitics and uncover how our bodies respond to 2016’s political circus.

WNYC’s Amanda Aronczyk sits down with neuroscientist Jeffrey French and political scientist Kevin Smith, as we perform an unusual test to find out just what in this election is causing voters’ stress. Plus, learn how our bodies’ natural response systems can indicate where we locate ourselves along the political spectrum.

Afterwards, Kai Wright and Arun Venugopal sit down with political scientist Jonathan Weiler, co-author of the book "Authoritarianism & Polarization in American Politics," to talk about voter psychology, and why certain personality types are allured by authoritarian leaders.

Episode Contributors:

Kai Wright

Arun Venugopal

Amanda Aronczyk

Karen Frillmann

Joseph Capriglione

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