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The Damon Runyon Theater - It Comes Up Mud (07-31-49)  


It Comes Up Mud (Aired July 31, 1949 )
The Damon Runyon Theater radio series dramatized 52 of Runyon's short stories in weekly broadcasts running from October 1948 to September 1949 (with reruns until 1951). The series was produced by Alan Ladd's Mayfair Transcription Company for syndication to local radio stations. John Brown played the character "Broadway," who doubled as host and narrator. The cast also comprised Alan Reed, Luis Van Rooten, Joseph Du Val, Gerald Mohr, Frank Lovejoy, Herb Vigran, Sheldon Leonard, William Conrad, Jeff Chandler, Lionel Stander, Sidney Miller, Olive Deering and Joe De Santis. Pat O'Brien was initially engaged for the role of "Broadway". The original stories were adapted for the radio by Russell Hughes. THIS EPISODE: July 31, 1949 - Program #31. Mayfair syndication. "It Comes Up Mud". Commercials added locally. A story of "The Sport Of Kings," parts of which were used in "Guys and Dolls." Damon Runyon (author), John Brown, Richard Sanville (director), Russell Hughes (writer), Vern Carstensen (production supervisor). 29:01. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


Mohr Stories 383:  David Smalley  

David Smalley explains teh Dogma Debate and what it means to be an agnostic atheist. Put your Name On it!

Mohr Stories 383: David Smalley  

David Smalley explains the Dogma Debate and what it means to be an agnostic atheist. Put your Name On it!

Mohr Stories 382:  Logan Lynn  

Logan Lynn is a musician, a friend, a brother and most importantly a survivor. Put Your Name On It!

Mohr Stories 382: Logan Lynn  

Logan Lynn is a musician, a friend, a brother and most importantly a survivor. Put Your Name On It!

Mohr Stories 381:  Bob Odenkirk  

A true renaissance man Bob Odenkirk and I break down sketch shows and talk about Girlfriends Day, his new movie on Netflix. Put Your Name On It!

Mohr Stories 380:  Deanna & Steve Adler  

Deanna Adler opens my heart with pure love. Listen to her story about her sons fight with addiction the read her book "Sweet Child of Mine: How I Lost My Son to Guns N' Roses". Put Your Name On It!

Mohr Stories 379:  Shaka Senghor  

This episode profoundly moved me and my heart .. Shaka Senghor spent 19 years in prison for taking a life. Beautifully, impossibly, he rehabilitated his own. His New York Times best selling book, "Writing My Wrongs" is available at jaymohr.com. Put Your Name On It!

The Damon Runyon Theater - The Melancholy Dane (06-11-49)  


The Melancholy Dane (Aired June 12, 1949)
The Damon Runyon Theater radio series dramatized 52 of Runyon's short stories in weekly broadcasts running from October 1948 to September 1949 (with reruns until 1951). The series was produced by Alan Ladd's Mayfair Transcription Company for syndication to local radio stations. John Brown played the character "Broadway," who doubled as host and narrator. The cast also comprised Alan Reed, Luis Van Rooten, Joseph Du Val, Gerald Mohr, Frank Lovejoy, Herb Vigran, Sheldon Leonard, William Conrad, Jeff Chandler, Lionel Stander, Sidney Miller, Olive Deering and Joe De Santis. Pat O'Brien was initially engaged for the role of "Broadway". The original stories were adapted for the radio by Russell Hughes. THIS EPISODE: June 12, 1949. Program #37. Mayfair syndication. "The Melancholy Dane". Commercials added locally. An actor crossed by vengeful critic enacts his revenge under most unusual circumstances. John Brown, Damon Runyon (author), Russell Hughes (adaptor), Vern Carstensen (production supervisor), Richard Sanville (director), Frank Gallop (announcer). 28:10. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


Mohr Stories 378:  Tom Rhodes  

Tom Rhodes. A fellow seeker and world traveler tells me his tales from stand up to Hindi Gods. Put Your Name On It!

Night Beat - The Girl From Kansas (06-05-50)  


The Girl From Kansas (Aired June 5, 1950)
Broadcast on NBC, Nightbeat ran from 1949 to 1952 and starred Frank Lovejoy as Randy Stone, a tough and streetwise reporter who worked the nightbeat for the Chicago Star looking for human interest stories. He met an assortment of people, most of them with a problem, many of them scared, and sometimes he was able to help them, sometimes he wasn’t. It is generally regarded as a ‘quality’ show and it stands up extremely well. Frank Lovejoy (1914-1962) isn’t remembered today, but he was a powerful and believable actor with a strong delivery, and his portrayal of Randy Stone as tough guy with humanity was perfect. The scripts were excellent, given that they had to pack in a lot in a short time, and there was a good supporting cast, orchestra, and sound effects. ‘The Slasher’, broadcast on 10 November 1950, the last show of season one, has a very loosely Ripper-derived plot in which Stone searches for an artist. THIS EPISODE: June 5, 1950. "The Girl From Kansas" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Wheaties. A story of young love and old death. A girl from Kansas named Linda Johnson has been arrested for grand theft. She's bailed out by someone she doesn't even know. Frank Lovejoy, Frank Martin (announcer), Warren Lewis (writer, producer, director), Larry Marcus (editor), Frank Worth (music), Barbara Fuller, Gerald Mohr, Jeanette Nolan, Lou Krugman, Francis Chaney. 29:29. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


Mohr Stories 377:  Jeff  Cesario  

Jeff Cesario. Director, comedian, writer. A chameleon in our business. Not to mention incredible friend. Put Your Name On It!

Mohr Stories 376:  Penn Jillette  

My new old friend Penn Jillette and I have a conversation 20 years in the making. We have only scratched the surface. Put Your Name On It!

The Whistler - Treasure Hunt (01-21-46)  


Treasure Hunt (Aired January 21, 1946)
The Whistler was one of radio's most popular mystery dramas, with a 13-year run from May 16, 1942 until September 22, 1955. If it now seems to have been influenced explicitly by The Shadow, The Whistler was no less popular or credible with its listeners, the writing was first class for its genre, and it added a slightly macabre element of humor that sometimes went missing in The Shadow's longer-lived crime stories. Writer-producer J. Donald Wilson established the tone of the show during its first two years, and he was followed in 1944 by producer-director George Allen. Other directors included Sterling Tracy and Sherman Marks with final scripts by Joel Malone and Harold Swanton. A total of 692 episodes were produced, yet despite the series' fame, over 200 episodes are lost today. In 1946, a local Chicago version of The Whistler with local actors aired Sundays on WBBM, sponsored by Meister Brau beer. THIS EPISODE: January 21, 1946. CBS Pacific network. "Treasure Hunt". Sponsored by: Signal Oil. Grandpa Randolph hid $200,000 before he died, leaving behind a clue as to its location. Announcer Marvin Miller assures listeners that Signal Oil "re-arranges atoms" to make better gasoline. Signal does not split them for atomic bombs! Russell Hughes (writer), Mandel Kramer, Marvin Miller (announcer), Gerald Mohr, George W. Allen (director). 28:59. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


Mohr Stories 375:  Brooks Wheelan  

My friend, comedian, photographer and fellow music lover, Brooks Wheelan comes over to chat. Put Your Name On It!

The Whistler - The Weakling (01-03-43)  


The Weakling (Aired January 3, 1943)
The Whistler is one of American radio's most popular mystery dramas, with a 13-year run from May 16, 1942 until September 22, 1955.The Whistler was the most popular West Coast-originated program with its listeners for many years. It was sponsored by the Signal Oil Company: "That whistle is your signal for the Signal Oil program, The Whistler." Each episode of The Whistler began with the sound of footsteps and a person whistling. (The Saint radio series with Vincent Price used a similar opening.) The haunting signature theme tune was composed by Wilbur Hatch and featured Dorothy Roberts performing the whistling with the orchestra. The stories followed an effective formula in which a person's criminal acts were typically undone either by an overlooked but important detail or by their own stupidity. On rare occasions a curious twist of fate caused the story to end happily for the episode's protagonist. Ironic twist endings were a key feature of each episode. The Whistler himself narrated, often commenting directly upon the action in the manner of a Greek chorus, taunting the criminal from an omniscient perspective. Show Notes From The Old Time Radio Researcher's Group. THIS EPISODE: January 3, 1943. CBS network. "The Weakling". Sustaining. Will the honest District Attorney prosecute his own son for murder? Gerald Mohr, Hans Conried, Wilbur Hatch (composer, conductor). 29:54. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.


Mohr Stories 374:  Slim Jim Phantom  

Slim Jim Phantom returns to talk about his book 'a Stray Cat Struts: My life as a Rockabilly Rebel' and Jerry Lee Lewis. put Your Name On It!

Mohr Stories 373:  Jay Mohr  

Bring it on 2016. Put Your Name On It!

Mohr Stories 372:  Tom Arnold  

Comedian & actor Tom Arnold on this weeks podcast. Nicest guy in the world. Put Your Name On It!

Ep177 - Jay Mohr  

Jay is a comic, an actor, a radio host, a podcaster, and a dad. He has a podcast called Mohr Stories that you should check out. We discuss intuition, wants, needs, our kids, and our childhoods. This one gets heavy but then Big Momma Gotitall shows up and has everyone laughing. Enjoy our chat! jaymohr.com kiracomedy.com allthingscomedy.com

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