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#35: BIden, Bumps, BFFs & Canadian Reax  

Hello new listeners & subscribers! We love feedback, so don’t forget to write a review on iTunes or Stitcher, or follow us on Twitter or Facebook. And our Soundcloud page now has a great archive.

 

More Dem post-game

When is a bump a bump? Clinton won the debate, but not every poll shows her gaining in the vote.

Globe/WMUR poll in NH Herald/Franklin Pierce NH NBC/Survey Monkey Huff Post/YouGov CNN/ORC WP/ABC poll NBC/WSJ poll Bloomberg Politics/St Anselm/Purple NH poll

 

GOP debate pre-game

On the Republican side, many thought Trump’s bubble was bursting. Looks like the joke’s on us all.

NBC/WSJ poll CNN/ORC Bloomberg Politics poll

 

These guys know about the bump

Pope Francis & John Boenher have a lot in common. In fact, both their favorables improved after their meeting a few weeks ago.

Gallup on Pope Francis visit John Boehner rebounds

 

Victory (for the pollsters!) in Canada

Good news for the industry: Canadian pollsters called the popular vote just about exactly right. We talk to Elizabeth Sena from GQRR about her work in the ridings.

Canadian polling

 

The latest on guns

After every tragic shooting, outlets re-test a battery of questions on guns. The results from Gallup’s recent questioning are mixed.

Gallup on 3-way gun question
The Briefcase: The Psychology of It All  

In today's episode of the Briefcase, we talk about the appointment of H.R. McMaster. It seems that his appointment will lead to reorganization within the foreign policy teams and we discuss reports that Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is being sidelined

Discord in the White House is nothing apparently compared to the discord found at Congressional Town Halls across the country - specifically growing concerns about the repeal of Obamacare. We talk about Senator Tom Cotton's town hall specifically. We discuss Vox's Sarah Kliff's trip to Kentucky to investigate the Affordable Care Act and the political climate surrounding it. Beth is concerned at the lack of replacement plan. Sarah is concerned the replacement plans help the wrong people

Also, we loose our nuance for this. McConnell: 'Winners make policy, losers go home' 

We correct our coverage of the FEC.

We also talk about the Trump administration's decision to revoke the Obama administration's guidance on transgender restrooms in schools, the role of the judiciary and the legislature, and the cultural polarization around these issues. Sarah recommends This Is How It Always Is - a novel that deals with this issues in a beautiful way and analogizes the personal experience with cultural issues that shift our society's position on things, such as gay rights. She cited Ilyse Hogue's speech about abortion at the Democratic National Convention. 

We end with listener feedback on our last episode. We discuss whether or not we are rational animals and how we can design your life (and voting decisions) in the face irrationality.  We also discuss a message from Autumn about Trump's creation of an "in group" and "out group." 

Also, a final plug for our book club on goodreads and the book that they are currently reading Strangers In Their Own Land!

Resistance and Backlash  

Today, we talk about a provocative New York Times essay, "Are Liberals Helping Trump?" But first, we continue our efforts to keep up with the chaotic pace of news. 

Show Notes

In the Pearls, we talk about immigration raids taking place across the United States. Some worry that the raids are too aggressive. Others point out that the raids themselves aren't as significant as our overall immigration policy. Sarah recommends this episode of Death Sex & Money. 

We also discuss Ann Ravel's surprising decision to resign from the Federal Election Commission. She says that the partisan gridlock in the FEC is unproductive and that she can be more effective as a private citizen. Customarily, Senate Democrats would help choose a replacement, but the choice belongs to President Trump. 

We talk about the rally President Trump held over the weekend in Florida.  During that rally, Trump's comments about Sweden made waves in the United States and abroad. He later clarified that he learned about crime in Sweden from FOX News. That Fox News report has been challenged

We decide that we're not going to talk about Milo Yiannaopoulos, ever. You can read about him here if you want, but we don't recommend it. 

President Trump called the media the enemy of the American people. Journalists had some strong reactions

President Trump also fired Craige Deare, a senior NSC official--reportedly over critical comments he made during a private speech. 

Sarah's compliment today goes to Shephard Smith. Beth compliments Chris Seelbach

In The Suit, we start with the New York Times essay, "Are Liberals Helping Trump?" and then move into a wide-ranging discussion of Trump, politics, education, and backlash. We talk about Trump's public relations experiences and strategy, and about how we can overcome the current political polarization.

We end with our thoughts outside of politics--including multigenerational caregiving and an idea to revolutionize small talk.  

#38: Polling's future, man buns, & our live show at Georgetown  

You guys are podcast-hipsters! Like the people who did swing dancing before Swingers. Or the people who have been doing paddleboard yoga for years. So we need your help to get more people to listen to our show. We’d love to double, or even triple, the number of listeners by the time 2016 voting begins. Can you help by doing these free 60-second micro-assignments? The first one: write a review on Stitcher. You don’t need to be a Stitcher user. But it will make it so people can stumble upon our show. Here’s the link.

 

2016: Let’s get serious.

The Republicans had a real debate this time! But how will the polls react? What about insta-polls and insta-groups? We’re going to talk about hte Dem primary next week, but check out some cool charts the Washington Post made using general election crosstabs.

Post-debate poll in Time Luntz FG/NH Monmouth/SC IA CNN poll Cool charts from the Washington Post/Marist/McLatchy Marist

 

Polling: What is it good for? Absolutely Nothing?

Lots of people worrying about the future of polling. One thing is for sure, there is way more polling coverage. Is this good for democracy? We say yes, others are less sure.

Jill lepore’s New Yorker story NYT worries about polling quality.

 

Recent veteran polling.

We record on Veterans Day and check out some polling about recent vets’ experiences getting help. It’s actually more positive than you might think.

WP/Kaiser past polling among veterans

 

Millennials and government jobs.

Are Millennials less interested in government jobs than other generations? And what would attract them, other than pets at work, free dry cleaning, and free breakfasts? We ask our resident Millennial: Kristen.

Millennials and government jobs/Deloitte study The Selfie Vote

 

A segment from our live show @ Georgetown: What are women’s issues anyway?

The Georgetown Institute of Politics and Public Service kicked off their women in politics speaker series with us! We recorded the whole show, and have included a clip here. We had great questions!

Georgetown University IPPS

 

Now hair this.

Should Kristen get her haircut? Obviously, we consult the experts--the public. Take that polling haters!

Gallup '71 on men's hair
#34: The Democratic debate winner depends on who you ask  

The Democrats debated! The press seems unified in who they think won. But voters perhaps say something else? And what are the trends in online polling, and all things Canada?

 

Dem debate post-game

Every outlet gives the ribbon to Clinton. But Sanders wins online and in post-debate groups.

Fox News/Luntz focus group CNN focus group Sanders gained more twitter followers Sanders gains more google searches Sanders wins Google Consumer Surveys CNN/ORC Nevada & SC polls

 

Trade/TPP

Last week Chuck Todd grilled us on TPP and Democrats, but voters don’t seem particularly interested.

Trade not a big search during debate Gallup polling on TPP Pew polling on TPP  

 

Welcome to Snoozeville

 

Not too much action on the GOP side this week. We do revisit the GOP Bloomberg/Purple Groups, and see which GOP candidates are earning the most trust.

Bloomberg/Purple groups: Carson Bloomberg/Purple groups: Bush CBS national poll/GOP  

 

15 for Pres, NOBODY for Speaker

Lots of people want the top spot, and pretty much no one wants the #3 spot. And can you blame them, with poll numbers like these?

CBS national poll/GOP  

 

An interview with Nick Nanos about the Canadian election

So while you might think of US politics & polling as a little rough & tumble, Margie interviewed top Canadian pollster Nick Nanos from Nanos Research--and what he says about Canadian polling & politics might surprise you.  

Nanos Research

 

LA Times moving online

Another sign that media outlets may be moving online: The LA Times is experimenting with the methodology.

LA Times experiment

 

We poll therefore we are

A study appearing in the New York Times suggests an easy fix for the gender divide in tech. Coffee makers and cool t-shirts!

David Axelrod On The President, Hillary Clinton, & Why He's Still A Believer After 40 Years in Politics  

David Axelrod joins me on the show from Politicon in Los Angeles.  In his 40 year career in politics, he has advised over 150 Democrat campaigns.  He's the campaign wizard behind President Barack Obama's victories in 2008 and 2012 and he served in the White House as Senior Advisor to the President.  Today he's founder and director of the Institute of Politics at the University of Chicago and he now has his own podcast called The Axe Files.

 

On the podcast, he talks about his very first campaign, his early days covering notorious Chicago politics for the Tribune, his 23 year friendship with Barack Obama,
and his love of the political process. We also discuss the healthcare act and the president’s relationship with Israel.  Plus he reveals why he almost sat out the 2008 election, why he shaved his mustache and at least one reason why he says Donald Trump isn’t so bad.

 

If you enjoy this episode, be sure to subscribe to David's new political podcast The Axe Files on iTunes.  You can also purchase his fascinating and insightful autobiography BELIEVER: MY FORTY YEARS IN POLITICS on Amazon.

 

And if you're a young person looking at colleges and considering a career in politics, consider the Institute of Politics at the University of Chicago.  David Axelrod is the founder and director of the Institute.  Face it, whether you're a Republican, a Democrat, or an Independent, if you're aspiring to a career in politics, you'd be hard pressed to find a better teacher than David Axelrod!  Click here to learn more.

 

For more information, visit www.KickAssPolitics.com, and if you enjoyed the show and would like to help keep us on the air, then please help us reach our fall fundraising goal by donating at www.gofundme.com/kickasspolitics. Also, we’d appreciate it if you would take our listener survey to give us an idea of who our audience is and what you want.

The Briefcase: Comey, Flynn, & Mueller  
Embed from Getty Images

It's been another whirlwind week! 

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We catch up on the news since our Tuesday episode: 

On Tuesday morning, the President tweeted that he had properly shared information with Russian officials in order to pressure them to join the fight against ISIS. We then learned that Israel was the source of information shared with Russia. That's complicated, but we didn't have time to think about how complicated because...The New York Times reported that James Comey kept contemporaneous memos of conversations with President Trump, and that one of those memos details the President asking Comey to back off Michael Flynn. Meanwhile, the President met with the Turkish president, and protestors were attacked outside the Turkish embassy. Also, a subpoena was issued for financial records related to a loan Paul Manafort took out right after leaving the Trump campaign. Representative Jason Chaffetz demanded to see all the Comey memos. Members of Congress started openly discussing impeachment, and, of course, many Trump supporters say this is all the media crying wolf. AND, Rod Rosenstein appointed Robert Mueller to serve as special counsel on the Russia investigation.

We also share listener feedback from Brett and Kerri. 

Hi Beth and Sarah,

I’m writing to draw your attention to two items that actually managed to make me feel a bit more optimistic about politics than I have been recently. 

First, I don’t know if either of you had a chance to see the town hall CNN hosted with Bernie Sanders and John Kasich.  Most of the thing was taken up with discussion about the recent Trump/Comey/Russia stuff, but the last 20 minutes or so were pretty powerful and more philosophical about the direction of the nation, particularly with respect to division and polarization.  These are two men who are certainly not perfect, and with whom I would disagree about various things (and who themselves disagree about many things), but their interactions at that town hall gave me a bit of renewed hope that a higher, more thought provoking, and generally more respectful discourse between different perspectives is absolutely possible when you recognize that the person opposite you is a human being with good intentions. 

Second, I was struck by the reporting about Emmanuel Macron selecting a member of a rival party to be France’s Prime Minister.  I found that move to be incredibly refreshing, and a signal that his message about leading a centrist, inclusive government wasn’t just campaign talk, but an actual strategy he intended to pursue.  I hope the arrangement works, because our country could certainly do well to see examples of people from various perspectives and ideologies working together in good faith.  A truly centrist government feels like it’s a long way from a practical reality in the United States, but that sort of movement has to start somewhere. 

Being concerned about the breakdown of our national identity and discourse at the hands of partisanship, I found these two stories encouraging. 

Regards,

Brett

I appreciate your show.  I wanted to comment on the thought, briefly mentioned on your latest episode, that none of what we're learning about Trump was not evident during the election.  That may be true, BUT no one in the establishment thought he was actually going to be elected (not even Trump himself thought he was going to win).  The election itself demonstrated over and over again that the Republican establishment is out of touch with its base (for better and worse), so for them to not really get what was going to happen after he was elected is really not a surprise.

Very few people within the party backed Trump enthusiastically at any point during the campaign, really.   I think most established Republicans did fear what might happen were he elected, which is why they didn't support him.  Of course, now they see an opportunity to push their agenda forward and seem willing to publicly tolerate almost anything.  Which is apparently true of their base, regardless.

Sincerely,

Kerri 

The Briefcase: What the Comey!?!  

We struggle maintaining our nuance in the face of Sally Yate's testimony and (most impactful) President Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey

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Pantsuit Politics takes time and energy to produce and that's why we're asking for your help and support. By pleading your monthly support for Pantsuit Politics, you make it possible to produce additional content, improve our offerings, and host events. Check out our Patreon page to see how you can support our show and get loads of additional content!

SPONSORS:

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We discuss the takeaways from Sally Yates's testimony before Congress, including the fact that President Obama warned Donald Trump not to hire Michael Flynn.

As we now know, Donald Trump did hire, then fire Michael Fynn - as well as Sally Yates - and most shockingly FBI Director James Comey. Before Comey was fired there were additional subpoenas issued for Michael Flynn's associates from the US Attorney's office in Virginia and since then the Senate has subpoenaed Micheal Flynn himself.

We discuss Trump's letter, Session's letter, and Rosenstein's memo. We also express exasperation at the White House's handling of the process and aftermath of the firing, including the entirely bizarre moment with Spicer and the bushes.

In attempt to figure out what's really behind the firing, we look back at Comey's March 20th testimony as well as the role of intimidation and other's perspectives on this. 'Like the horse head in the bed': Ex-intel officer says Trump fired Comey to 'send a message' to FBI We mention a great New Yorker article we will discuss in depth at another time and the role of hubris in this crisis. 

Then, we talk about next steps and whether a special prosecutor or independent commission is the right path forward. 

Show 1379 Two Interviews of Thomas Sowell of his new book Wealth, Poverty, and Politics: An International Perspective  

Show 1379 Two Interviews of Thomas Sowell of his new book Wealth, Poverty, and Politics: An International Perspective

Segment 1 is from the Tom Woods Show episode 528

Sowell on Inequality, and Why Equality Is an Impossible Goal

 Today I discuss some fantastic material from Thomas Sowell’s new book Wealth, Poverty, and Politics: An International Perspective. Plus, responses to my discussion with Matt Zwolinski on whether libertarians should favor a basic income guarantee.

 Book Discussed

Wealth, Poverty, and Politics: An International Perspective, by Thomas Sowell

Subscribe to the Tom Woods Show:https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/t...
http://www.TomWoods.com/528
http://www.SupportingListeners.com
http://www.RonPaulHomeschool.com
http://www.TomWoodsHomeschool.com
http://www.LibertyClassroom.com

 

Segment 2- Malzberg | Thomas Sowell on his book "Wealth, Poverty, and Politics: An International Perspective”

Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, and Author of "Wealth, Poverty and Politics" joins Steve to discuss his latest book: "Wealth, Poverty, and Politics: An International Perspective” and more. See: tsowell.com

#32: There's anger in the polls  

It’s International Podcast Day! Have you sent out all your cards & gifts? Don’t forget to write us a review on Stitcher or iTunes, or follow us on Twitter or Facebook.

 

2016

Trump has a classy pollster. Meanwhile, slow and Rubio wins the race? Are you ready for some Biden? We take a question from activist Deray McKesson. And Kristen has a new poll showing Republicans agree climate change is happening.

NBC/WSJ Echelon Insights poll on climate change Huffington Post/pollster average NYT: Focus group of one

 

Boehner: Out. Anger: In.

 

Boehner has resigned, but it judging by these numbers, it’ll take a lot more to turn around these sad Gallup numbers on how people view our government.

Gallup - Majority want a third party Gallup - Trust in media at record low Gallup - To know Congress is to hate Congress Gallup - People don’t even trust their own Member of Congress anymore Bloomberg Politics/Selzer

 

So let’s shut the whole thing down?

Well, not quite. Most people oppose shutting down the government to stop funding for Planned Parenthood. Even Republicans.

Quinnipiac CBS/NYT Pew

 

More Canada!

Listeners, you’ve spoken, and you want more data on Canada. We’re here to deliver. Apparently releasing a poll publicly is “guerrilla warfare.” It’ll take more than that to raise an eyebrow in these parts.

Canada poll-tracker Huffington Post Globe & Mail story on “questionable results”

 

The most current polling on OJ Simpson.

We know you’ve been wondering: what is the polling on OJ Simpson these days? Well, the Post has been wondering too.

WP/ABC on OJ

 

Hey, what’s up listeners?

We love it when dating apps release their data. They should

Episode 004 – Technology and Politics  

Are the recent debates on net neutrality, the protests of Google buses, even SOPA a sign of things to come? Building on Ben’s article The Net Neutrality Wake-up Call Ben and James discuss the intersection of technology and politics. Why do people in technology tend to dislike politics? Is net neutrality really that important and understanding open loop unbundling The tech industry and creative destruction: is it good for society when companies go out of business? The impact of money on politics Why tech and politics are on a collision course What we can do to effect change on an … Continue reading Episode 004 – Technology and Politics

Exponent 0

Show 994 NRO  National Review Online 5 Segments. The End is Near, Conscience and Its Enemies etc  

Show 994 NRO  National Review Online 5 Segments. The End is Near, Conscience and Its Enemies etc

 

Segment 1. The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome: How Going Broke Will Leave America Richer, Happier, and More Secure by Kevin D. Williamson. 12 minutes

 

Segment 2. Conscience and Its Enemies: Confronting the Dogmas of Our Age by Robert P. George. 10 minutes.

 

Segment 3. The Savior Generals: How Five Great Commanders Saved Wars That Were Lost-From Ancient Greece to Iraq by Victor Davis Hanson. 10 minutes

 

Segment 4. Becoming Europe: Economic Decline, Culture, and How America Can Avoid a European Future by Samuel Gregg. 10 minutes

 

Segment 5. 'Til Faith Do Us Part: The Rise of Interfaith Marriage and the Future of American Religion, Family, and Society by Naomi Schaefer Riley. 9 minutes.

 Please visit National Review Online Between the Covers for many good author interviews. The audio quality is poor but the content is good.

http://www.nationalreview.com/media/betweenthecovers

 

The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome: How Going Broke Will Leave America Richer, Happier, and More Secure by Kevin D. Williamson

 Overview-  The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome is a radical re-visioning of what government is, a powerful analysis of why it doesn't work, and an exploration of the innovative solutions spontaneously emerging thanks to the fortunate failure of politics.

 Every year, consumer goods and services get better, cheaper, and more widely available while critical necessities delivered by government grow more expensive, even as their quality declines. The reason for this paradox is simple: politics. Not bad politics, not liberal politics, not conservative politics, not politics corrupted by big money or distorted by special-interest groups, but the simple practice of delivering goods and services through federal, state, and local governments and their obsolete decision-making practices.

 National Review columnist Kevin Williamson describes the crisis of the modern welfare state in the era of globalization and argues that the crucial political failures of our time—education, health care, social security, and monetary policy—are due not to ideology but the nature of politics itself. Meanwhile, those who can't or won't turn to the state for goods and services—from homeschoolers to Wall Street to organized crime—are experimenting with replacing the outmoded social software of the state with market-derived alternatives.

 Williamson compellingly analyzes the government's numerous failures and reports on the solutions that people all over the country are discovering. You will meet homeschoolers who have abandoned public schools; see inside private courtrooms that administer the law beyond government; encounter entrepreneurs developing everything from private currencies to shadow intelligence agencies rivaling the CIA; and learn about the remarkably peaceable enforcement of justice in the allegedly lawless Wild West.

 As our outmoded twentieth-century government collapses under the weight of its own incompetence and inefficiency, Williamson points to the green shoots of the brave new world that is already being born.

  

Conscience and Its Enemies: Confronting the Dogmas of Our Age by Robert P. George

 Overview-  “Many in elite circles yield to the temptation to believe that anyone who disagrees with them is a bigot or a religious fundamentalist. Reason and science, they confidently believe, are on their side. With this book, I aim to expose the emptiness of that belief.” —From the introduction

 Assaults on religious liberty and traditional morality are growing fiercer. Here, at last, is the counterattack.

 Showcasing the talents that have made him one of America’s most acclaimed and influential thinkers, Robert P. George explodes the myth that the secular elite represents the voice of reason. In fact, George shows, it is on the elite side of the cultural divide where the prevailing views frequently are nothing but articles of faith. Conscience and Its Enemies reveals the bankruptcy of these too often smugly held orthodoxies while presenting powerfully reasoned arguments for classical virtues.

  

The Savior Generals: How Five Great Commanders Saved Wars That Were Lost-From Ancient Greece to Iraq by Victor Davis Hanson

 Overview- Leading military historian Victor Davis Hanson returns to non-fiction in The Savior Generals, a set of brilliantly executed pocket biographies of five generals who single-handedly saved their nations from defeat in war. War is rarely a predictable enterprise—it is a mess of luck, chance, and incalculable variables. Today's

HR Happy Hour- 131 - 'Office Politics'  

HR Happy Hour- Episode 131 - 'Office Politics' Sponsored by Aquire Thursday January 5, 2012 - 8:00PM ET Call in 646-378-1086  Follow the backchannel on Twitter - hashtag #HRHappyHour This week on the HR Happy Hour Show we dive into the New Year, at least in the USA, thinking quite a bit about politics. The campaign for President is in full swing, debates, press conferences, and TV ads are everywhere, and ceratinly 2012 is shaping up to be a very interesting year. Do you care about the political campaigns? Do they impact your work in HR and effect your organizations? Do you stay away from talking about 'real' politics at work and keep the focus on office politics? Can we learn anything from savvy politicians to help us navigate our own careers? We will have open lines this week on the show to talk politics, office politics, and whatever else 2012 has in store for you, for HR, and in your careers.  Joining me on the show will be special guest Trish McFarlane, from HR Ringleader and HRevolution who will also be updating us on what is happening with her projects and ventures, as well as offering some insight on HR leadership challenges for 2012. It should be a fun show and I hope you can join us!

The Politician and the Preacher  

The recent quasi-controversy over the comments made by the Rev. Dr. Jeremiah Wright, retired pastor of the United Church of Christ, to which Sen. Barack Obama (D.IL), both belongs and attends, has shown us how limited, and how narrow, is this new politics peddled by the freshman Senator from Chicago. Although first popularized via the web, the Reverend's comments caused Sen. Obama to say he was "appalled" by them, and he has repudiated such remarks as "offensive." Just what were these comments? As far as I've heard, they were that Sen. Hilary Clinton (D.NY) has had a political advantage because she's white; that she was raised in a family of means (especially when contrasted with Obama's upbringing); and she was never called a nigger. Sounds objectively true to me. Rev. Wright's other remarks were that the country was built on racism, is run by rich white people, and that the events of 9/11 was a direct reaction to US foreign policy. Again -- true enough. And while we can see how such truths might cause discomfort to American nationalists, can we not also agree that they are truths? Consider, would Sen. Clinton be where she is if she were born in a Black female body? Or if she were born to a single mother in the projects? As for the nation, it may be too simplistic to say it was built on racism, but was surely built on racial slavery, from which its wealth was built. And who runs America, if not the super rich white elites? Who doesn't know that politicians are puppets of corporate and inherited wealth? And while Blacks of wealth and means certainly are able to exercise unprecedented influence, we would be insane to believe that they 'run' this country. Oprah, Bob Johnson and Bill Cosby are indeed wealthy; but they have influence, not power. The limits of Cosby's power was shown when he tried to purchase the TV network, NBC, years ago. His offer received a corporate smirk. And Oprah's wealth, while remarkable, pales in comparison to the holdings of men like Bill Gates, or Warren Buffet. Would George W. Bush be president today if he were named Jorje Guillermo Arbusto, and Mexican-American? (Not unless Jorje, Sr. was a multimillionaire!) In his ambition to become America's first Black president, Obama is in a race to prove how Black he isn't; even to denouncing a man he has considered his mentor. As one who has experienced the Black church from the inside, politics and social commentary are rarely far from the pulpit. The Rev. Dr. Martin L. King spoke of politics, war, racism, economics, and social justice all across America. His fair-weather friends betrayed him, and the press condemned his remarks as "inappropriate", "unpatriotic", and "controversial." Rev. Dr. King said the US was "the greatest purveyor of violence" on earth, and that the Vietnam War was illegitimate and unjust. Would Sen. Obama be denouncing these words, as the white press, and many civil rights figures did, in 1967? Are they "inflammatory?" Only to politics based on white, corporate comfort uber alles (above all)" only to a politics that ignores Black pain, and distorts Black history; only to a politics pitched more to the status quo, than to real change. Politics is ultimately about more than winning elections; it's about principles; it's about being true to one's self, and honoring one's ancestors; it's about speaking truth to power. It can't just be about change, because every change ain't for the better! - maj 3/15/08 (c) '08 Mumia Abu-Jamal

Comic Susie Essman & Rep. Alan Grayson  

Curb Your Enthusiasm's Susie Essman, Congressman Alan Grayson, Adorable Laura House, World Politics Review's Editor-in-Chief Judah Grunstein, and Film Critic Michael Snyder.  Susie and David discuss how David came up with a Curb storyline, being approached by annoying Curb fans, Susie Green’s  understanding of men, whether the fighting between Susie and Jeff is sensual, growing up around secure, alpha females, dealing drugs, the monotony of acting classes, relationships with their mothers, turning to comedy as an act of desperation, improv versus stand-up, taking kids to see your stand-up, bombing, Broadway audiences, meeting your idols, Paul Dooley, their parents’ sex life, can a women be with a man after he cheats?, why it took a while to get married, Beverly Hills couples making arrangements for what they both need in a relationship, the myth of Larry David being a lousy stand-up, Caroline's Comedy Hour, being a performer versus a writer, growing up in a theatrical family, the mental health that comes from reading, Joy Behar ruining David’s marriage, growing up without religion, falling off the vegetarian wagon, her dog with one eye, programming Turner Classic Movies, and refusing to play along with Jeff Garlin. Congressman Alan Grayson says the single biggest threat to American security is the Republican health care plan that will end up killing tens of millions of Americans to pay for a tax cut for billionaires. Judah Grunstein the editor chief of World Politics Review, reports from Paris on France's new President and what that means for both the French safety net and stability inEurope. Judah also explains the situation in Qatar and why it's a  flashpoint Americans must pay attention to. Judah also attempts to disabuse David of the notion that life is better in France than here in America.  Film Critic Michael Snyder reviews "The Mummy," "Megan Leavey," "My Cousin Rachel,"  "The Hero," "The Hunter's Prayer," and "Last Men In Aleppo." He says no to Cruise in The Mummy. "Megan Leavey is very well told," say Snyder.  Rep. Alan Grayson was the United States Representative for Florida's 9th congressional district and a member of the Democratic Party. He previously served as Representative for Florida's 8th congressional district from 2009 to 2011.In 2016, Grayson endorsed Bernie Sanders to be the Democratic nominee for President of the United States. Comic Susie Essman is best known for her role as Susie Greene on Curb Your Enthusiasm and the voice of Mittens in Bolt. She is also a regular on Broad City. Judah Grunstein is the Editor-in-Chief of World Politics Review. His coverage of French politics, foreign policy and national security has appeared in World Politics Review, the American Prospect online, French Politics, the Small Wars Journal and Foreign Policy online. He is a regular guest commentator on France 24, as well as a published playwright.   Listen to entire episode here on our You Tube Channel: https://goo.gl/xxgnjP Tell us what you think in the comment section below. More David @ http://www.DavidFeldmanShow.com About the show: http://bit.ly/2rqp5un Tune in every Tuesday and Friday for brand new episodes of our show featuring a diverse mixture of comedians, actors, professors, comedy writers and journalists talking about your world. Check out our new You Tube channel. More about David: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0271017/?ref_=nv_sr_1 David writes for Triumph The Insult Comic Dog's series on Hulu and Maya and Marty on NBC. David has also won three Prime Time Emmys for comedy writing, as well as four Writers Guild Awards. He has also written on ABC's Roseanne, HBO's Dennis Miller Live, HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher, Comedy Central's The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, The Academy Awards, The Emmys, and countless roasts on Comedy Central. Get Social With David: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/davidfeldmancomedy?ref=hl Twitter: https://twitter.com/David_Feldman_ Subscribe to his audio podcast: iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/david-feldman-show/id321997239 Become a subscriber to our podcast! When you join for only a $5 monthly subscription donation you’ll gain access to the David Feldman Premium Content, featuring bonus material from the funniest comedians who have been guests on the show. We accept all major credit cards. Join today and help support the show!

The Briefcase: Mo Brooks, Elizabeth Warren, and Andrew Jackson?  

Mo Brooks makes interesting connects between morality and health. Elizabeth Warren criticizes President Obama. Donald Trump becomes a Civil War historian and Hillary Clinton starts talking. We discuss it all and address listener feedback. 

MEMBERSHIP DRIVE

Pantsuit Politics takes time and energy to produce and that's why we're asking for your help and support. By pleading your monthly support for Pantsuit Politics, you make it possible to produce additional content, improve our offerings, and host events. Check out our Patreon page to see how you can support our show and get loads of additional content!

SPONSORS: 

Aaptiv What do you get when an app that Sarah is obsessed with becomes a sponsor of the show? Aaptiv - a fitness app that provides audio workouts guided by a trainer synched with the perfect playlist and fully customizable by workout type, machine, duration, and intensity. Aaptiv is are offering our listeners a free 30 day trial. Go to https://aaptiv.com, sign up for a monthly subscription, and enter promo code PANTSUIT.
 
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In a CNN interview, Representative Mo Brooks, an Alabama Republican, said, "It will free healthy people from having to pay the cost of the sick. It will allow insurance companies to require people who have higher health care costs to contribute more to the insurance pool that helps offset all these costs, thereby reducing the cost to those people who lead good lives, they’re healthy, they’ve done the things to keep their bodies healthy. And right now, those are the people who have done things the right way that are seeing their costs skyrocketing.”

We discuss the morality of healthy, as well as Blue Zones.

Elizabeth Warren critiqued President Obama during an interview with the Guardian

“I think President Obama, like many others in both parties, talks about a set of big national statistics that look shiny and great but increasingly have giant blind spots,” she said. “That GDP, unemployment, no longer reflect the lived experiences of most Americans. And the lived experiences of most Americans is that they are being left behind in this economy. Worse than being left behind, they’re getting kicked in the teeth.”

President Trump, in an interview with Salena Zito, a reporter for The Washington Examiner, on Sirius XM’s “Main Street Meets the Beltway,” Mr. Trump said the following: “Had Andrew Jackson been a little later you wouldn’t have had the Civil War. He was a very tough person, but he had a big heart, and he was really angry that he saw what was happening with regard to the Civil War. He said, ‘There’s no reason for this.’ ” We have nothing kind to say for this observation, except acknowledging the good point of one of our listeners that he did do Big Block of Cheese Day

Wilbur Ross, speaking at the Milken Institute Global Conference on Monday, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross recalled the scene at Mar-a-Lago on April 6, when the summit with Chinese President Xi Jinping was interrupted by the strike on Syria.

“Just as dessert was being served, the president explained to Mr. Xi he had something he wanted to tell him, which was the launching of 59 missiles into Syria,” Ross said. “It was in lieu of after-dinner entertainment.” As the crowd laughed, Ross added: “The thing was, it didn’t cost the president anything to have that entertainment.”

Hillary Clinton sat down with moderator Christiane Amanpour, the CNN anchor, at a Women for Women International event in New York. “If the election had been on October 27, I would be your president,” Clinton said. We talk about the ways in which Clinton is covered are unfair, as well as the perspective this article offered Democrats say they now know exactly why Clinton lost and whether or not it was James Comey

In listener feedback, we addressed Eric: I try to listen to shows that veer away from emotional responses to news as I view that as part of the problem, you don't de-escalate or resolve issues when you are operating on the emotional side of your brain. As an officer we learned to de-escalate a person by asking factual questions and to get them to disengage from their self feeding emotional loop that they are in.

After her blog post, Beth heard from Christopher again and he has some questions:

Now here are a few questions for you.

If not America first then who first?

How is stopping criminal entry to our nation racist?

How is enforcing our law racist?

How is keeping our nation safe from a group that has told us "we will infiltrate our fighters with the refugee population" xenophobic?

We also talk trolling generally, in particular Lindy West's excellent examination in her book Shrill.

If you want a little homework, we'll be discussing the future of the Republican party, including this episode of This American Life on Tuesday.  

The Briefcase: Mo Brooks, Elizabeth Warren, and Andrew Jackson?  

Mo Brooks makes interesting connects between morality and health. Elizabeth Warren criticizes President Obama. Donald Trump becomes a Civil War historian and Hillary Clinton starts talking. We discuss it all and address listener feedback. 

MEMBERSHIP DRIVE

Pantsuit Politics takes time and energy to produce and that's why we're asking for your help and support. By pleading your monthly support for Pantsuit Politics, you make it possible to produce additional content, improve our offerings, and host events. Check out our Patreon page to see how you can support our show and get loads of additional content!

SPONSORS: 

Aaptiv What do you get when an app that Sarah is obsessed with becomes a sponsor of the show? Aaptiv - a fitness app that provides audio workouts guided by a trainer synched with the perfect playlist and fully customizable by workout type, machine, duration, and intensity. Aaptiv is are offering our listeners a free 30 day trial. Go to https://aaptiv.com, sign up for a monthly subscription, and enter promo code PANTSUIT.
 
Leave us a review on iTunes by clicking here!
Subscribe to Episodes: iTunes | Android
Subscribe to our weekly email and get a free Pantsuit Primer audiobook!
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In a CNN interview, Representative Mo Brooks, an Alabama Republican, said, "It will free healthy people from having to pay the cost of the sick. It will allow insurance companies to require people who have higher health care costs to contribute more to the insurance pool that helps offset all these costs, thereby reducing the cost to those people who lead good lives, they’re healthy, they’ve done the things to keep their bodies healthy. And right now, those are the people who have done things the right way that are seeing their costs skyrocketing.”

We discuss the morality of healthy, as well as Blue Zones.

Elizabeth Warren critiqued President Obama during an interview with the Guardian

“I think President Obama, like many others in both parties, talks about a set of big national statistics that look shiny and great but increasingly have giant blind spots,” she said. “That GDP, unemployment, no longer reflect the lived experiences of most Americans. And the lived experiences of most Americans is that they are being left behind in this economy. Worse than being left behind, they’re getting kicked in the teeth.”

President Trump, in an interview with Salena Zito, a reporter for The Washington Examiner, on Sirius XM’s “Main Street Meets the Beltway,” Mr. Trump said the following: “Had Andrew Jackson been a little later you wouldn’t have had the Civil War. He was a very tough person, but he had a big heart, and he was really angry that he saw what was happening with regard to the Civil War. He said, ‘There’s no reason for this.’ ” We have nothing kind to say for this observation, except acknowledging the good point of one of our listeners that he did do Big Block of Cheese Day

Wilbur Ross, speaking at the Milken Institute Global Conference on Monday, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross recalled the scene at Mar-a-Lago on April 6, when the summit with Chinese President Xi Jinping was interrupted by the strike on Syria.

“Just as dessert was being served, the president explained to Mr. Xi he had something he wanted to tell him, which was the launching of 59 missiles into Syria,” Ross said. “It was in lieu of after-dinner entertainment.” As the crowd laughed, Ross added: “The thing was, it didn’t cost the president anything to have that entertainment.”

Hillary Clinton sat down with moderator Christiane Amanpour, the CNN anchor, at a Women for Women International event in New York. “If the election had been on October 27, I would be your president,” Clinton said. We talk about the ways in which Clinton is covered are unfair, as well as the perspective this article offered Democrats say they now know exactly why Clinton lost and whether or not it was James Comey

In listener feedback, we addressed Eric: I try to listen to shows that veer away from emotional responses to news as I view that as part of the problem, you don't de-escalate or resolve issues when you are operating on the emotional side of your brain. As an officer we learned to de-escalate a person by asking factual questions and to get them to disengage from their self feeding emotional loop that they are in.

After her blog post, Beth heard from Christopher again and he has some questions:

Now here are a few questions for you.

If not America first then who first?

How is stopping criminal entry to our nation racist?

How is enforcing our law racist?

How is keeping our nation safe from a group that has told us "we will infiltrate our fighters with the refugee population" xenophobic?

We also talk trolling generally, in particular Lindy West's excellent examination in her book Shrill.

If you want a little homework, we'll be discussing the future of the Republican party, including this episode of This American Life on Tuesday.  

 

LSE Literary Festival 2017 | The Fractured American Republic and the Possibilities for Political Renewal [Audio]  

Speaker(s): Yuval Levin, Dr Michael McQuarrie, Professor Cheryl Schonhardt-Bailey | US politics are failing twenty-first-century Americans, with both parties blind to how America has changed over the past half century and why the dysfunctions of the nation's fragmented national life will need to be answered by the strengths of its decentralized, diverse, dynamic character. What are the prospects for political renewal? Yuval Levin argues that what is needed is a modernizing political revival through the middle layers of society in order to achieve not a single solution to the problems of our age, but multiple and tailored answers fitted to the daunting range of the challenges faced today. Yuval Levin is the Hertog Fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center and Editor of National Affairs. He is also a senior editor of The New Atlantis, and a contributing editor to National Review and the Weekly Standard. He has been a member of the White House domestic policy staff (under President George W Bush), Executive Director of the President's Council on Bioethics, and a congressional staffer. His essays and articles have appeared in numerous publications including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, Commentary, and others, and he is the author of The Great Debate: Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, and the Birth of Right and Left and The Fractured Republic: Renewing America's Social Contract in the Age of Individualism. Michael McQuarrie (@mgmcquarrie) is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at LSE. He is primarily interested in urban politics and culture, nonprofit organizations, and social movements. He has recently been awarded a Hellman Fellowship at the University of California and a Poiesis Fellowship at the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University. Cheryl Schonhardt-Bailey (@Cheryl_SB) is Professor in Political Science in the Government Department at LSE, where she teaches courses in the politics of economic policy and legislative politics. Her research interests are in political economy and quantitative textual analysis. By measuring the words, arguments and deliberation of politicians and policy makers, she aims to gauge the extent to which ideas, interests and institutions shape political behavior. She is author and editor of several books including most recently Deliberating Monetary Policy. Her articles have appeared in the American Political Science Review, World Politics, the British Journal of Political Science, Presidential Studies Quarterly, Political Analysis, PS: Political Science and Politics, and Parliamentary History. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at LSE and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The United States Centre at LSE (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Its mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States.

Jennifer Lawless on why you — yes, you — should run for office  

There are 500,000 elected positions in the United States. I'll say that again: 500,000. And that's no accident. "Our political system is built on the premise that running for office is something that a broad group of citizens should want to do," writes political scientist Jennifer Lawless.

But Lawless's research reveals something scary — something that helps explain the political moment we're in. Participating in politics has begun to repulse the average America. 89 percent of high schoolers says they've already decided they will never run for office. 85 percent doubt elected officials want to help people. 79% don’t think politicians are smart or hardworking. And when good, normal people turn away from politics, the system breaks down.

Well, be the change you want to see in the world. 

Lawless is the director of the Women & Politics Institute at American University. Her recent book, along with co-author Richard Fox, is “Running from Office: Why Young Americans Are Turned Off to Politics." Her work, which details why young people and women are increasingly turned off by a political system that badly needs their participation, has never been more essential.

This is an inspiring discussion, or at least I think it is. It's about the steps in political participation that come after Facebook posts and even marches. It's about how involving yourself directly in the daily work of politics is both easier and more meaningful than you might think. It's about the myths that keep people — and particularly keep women — from ever considering running for office. It's about recognizing that politics is much more than the presidency and the Congress, and that the opportunities it offers to make the world you live in a bit better are more numerous than you think.

Lawless practices what she preaches. She ran for Congress in Rhode Island, and her story of that race, as well as the best advice she got while running it, should not be missed. 

I hear from a lot of people who feel powerless right now. But they're not powerless. This podcast is for them. 

Books:
-Why We Lost the ERA by Jane Mansbridge
-My Life by Bill Clinton
-Hard Choices by Hillary Clinton



Ken Livingstone - Mayor of London  

Ken Livingstone is an English politician who served as Mayor of London from the creation of the office in 2000 until 2008.WATCH FOR FREE: https://londonrealacademy.com/episodes/ken-livingstone/The NEW London Real Academy: https://londonrealacademy.com/membership/Chapters:00:00 Trailer.01:58 Brian’s thoughts on the episode.05:17 Brian’s Introduction.05:48 Ken’s journey into politics.11:14 Notoriety after appointment as leader of the GLC in 1980s.14:57 If Thatcher and Reagan had studied history, we would never have had the banking crisis.16:38 Cyclical demonization of immigrants.17:31 For what Ken respected Margaret Thatcher.19:00 New Labour and Tony Blair.20:59 A Mayor for London.23:38 Reason he had to leave the Labour Party to be a mayoral candidate.26:14 Accomplishments over two terms as Mayor of London.27:58 The biggest single factor for a country’s success.30:27 Good public transport and fibre optic system for all.31:54 Olympics regeneration legacy even better than Ken hoped.32:32 What haunts him from his time as Mayor.33:54 What Boris Johnson wanted to know over dinner with Ken.35:59 Boris Johnson & Michael Gove political agenda opposites.38:28 “Politics is show business for ugly people”, does Ken agree?40:05 Boris Johnson’s part in the Brexit campaign.41:30 The growing power of the military industrial complex.43:31 The UK will be sucked into the American orbit on a grand scale.46:11 Brexit, Ken’s thoughts on why Britain voted out, the implications and his proposal.48:14 Governments have got to start listening.50:15 Where Britain will be in two years’ time.53:38 “I’m always going to state what I believe to be true, otherwise why would I be in politics.”59:36 Will the Labour Party split over Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership?1:02:30 Most dramatic period in British politics in his lifetime.1:03:23 David Cameron the most dishonest Prime Minister in his lifetime.1:04:31 Politics like ‘House of Cards’.1:06:20 The possibility of the UK becoming the 51st State.1:07:20 Donald Trump an unknown quantity.1:10:31 London as an independent city state.1:12:41 Prospect for new London Mayor Sadiq Khaan.1:13:40 Ken Livingstone, a polarising figure.1:15:25 Rupert Murdoch is the most damaging immigrant that has ever come to this country.1:19:51The influences on today’s economy.1:22:10 Does Ken enjoy media attention?1:23:59 Influence of the bankers and will they leave Britain?1:25:13 Does he feel the media was so biased towards the Remain camp?1:26:15 Because of Corbyn’s euro-sceptic views will he be the best person to negotiate on behalf of the ordinary people?1:27:13 In another 5 years what will the Tory and Labour parties look like?1:27:57 What will Ken Livingstone be like in 5 years.1:28:28 Success Secrets.1:29:11 Advice to the 20 year old Ken Livingstone.1:29:30 His career regret.1:29:47 Best advice ever received.1:31:15 Advice to the 20 year old who contemplates going into politics.1:31:59 Brian’s summing up.1:33:24 Ken’s come close to being murdered once or twice.Full Show Notes at https://londonrealacademy.com/episodes/ken-livingstone/

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