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kudlow 5-27-17 Dan Clifton & Mike Solon: Trump's new budget: back to Clinton welfare reform; make it pay to work. There are no cuts. Just slower growth  

Dan Clifton & Mike Solon: Trump's new budget: back to Clinton welfare reform; make it pay to work. There are no cuts. Just slower growth. What about tax cuts? Ryan gives up BAT tax? Senate? Detailed plan from WH? Parental leave? Joe Rago & Hadley Heath Manning: Repeal & Replace: when, what, how? Messaging? Risk pools? Premiums? Keep your doctor? GOP promise to fund poor, ill, pre-conditions? Medicaid? Senate: not 50 votes yet. Brian Kelly & Peter Costa: Stocks: domestic profits falling, so are profit margins. Commodities? Bitcoin? Fed rate hikes? Fed shrinks balance sheet: retire reserves. Flat curve? April capex not good. Gen Jack Keane: Trump changes policies in Mid-East. From Iran to Saudis & Israel. Sunni-Arab-Israel NATO? $100b to Saudis. Iran-Hezbolla-Hamas real enemy. What about campaign to destroy ISIS? NATO not taking terrorism seriously. Moore-Pethokoukis-McIntyre: Money Politics: Lawyers stop Trump tweets? Staff shake-up? War Room? Corey Lewandowsky, Dave Bossie, David Urban. How about econ side? Kushner-Russia?

E-records boost outcomes for companion animals  

Data will reveal which disorders individual breeds are susceptible to and the risk factors which affect health and welfare over dogs’ lives.

Pod Two - Theresa May must take responsibility for terror attacks after police cuts! 26th May  

We can't keep our streets safe from terror without putting the army on the streets, and it's all because of Theresa May's police cuts! Why do people think May will keep us safe, when she proved useless as home secretary, letting in hundreds of thousands of more immigrants, and put us at more risk of terror! I spoke to former police officer, now broadcaster and commentator, Clive Chamberlain, to hear why he thinks May has made us less safe!

We need to close the borders if we're going to get serious about challenging terrorism! Yes, bomber Salman Abedi was born in Britain, but he was radicalised by his trips to Libya. Suddenly Trump's travel ban doesn't seem such a bad idea, does it? I spoke to Rob Dew, news director of Nightly News on Alex Jones' InfoWars.

Thanks to everyone who contributed to our US tour, and thanks to our corporate US sponsor http://www.theglobemaster.com/. Check them out at facebook.com/theglobemaster or at https://twitter.com/GlobeMasterGame

The Jon Gaunt Show is brought to you in association with Financial Resolver. If you think you've been missold your pension, check them out at http://www.financialresolver.com/ or call Mark and the team on 0116 283 5032

FREE speech wants your view so get involved 020 38 29 1234, jon@talk2meradio.com, @talk2meradiouk @jongaunt. Listen LIVE from 4pm every afternoon and download the talk2meradio app to hear all our shows.

Virtual school supports out-of-home care students in Victoria  

The Victorian Government has established Australia's first virtual school for children in out of home care. The Lookout Centre was trialled in the south-west region and then rolled out state-wide this year to help vulnerable students. The peak advocacy group hopes the program could be expanded nationally and continue to break down barriers for at-risk kids.

The New Adventures Of Nero Wolf - The Case Of The Calculated Risk (01-19-51)  


The Case Of The Calculated Risk (01-19-51)
Nero Wolf is a fictional detective created by American author Rex Stout in the 1930s and featured in dozens of novels and novellas.In the stories, Wolfe is one of the most famous private detectives in the United States. He weighs about 285 pounds and is 5'11" tall. He raises orchids in a rooftop greenhouse in his New York City brownstone on West 35th Street, helped by his live-in gardener Theodore Horstmann. Wolfe (Wolf) drinks beer throughout the day and is a glutton. He employs a live-in chef, Fritz Brenner. He is multilingual and brilliant, though apparently self-educated, and reading is his third passion after food and orchids. He works in an office in his house and almost never leaves home, even to pursue the detective work that finances his expensive lifestyle. Instead, his leg work is done by another live-in employee, Archie Goodwin. While both Wolfe and Goodwin are licensed detectives, Goodwin is more of the classic fictional gumshoe, tough, wise-cracking, and skirt-chasing. He tells the stories in a breezy first-person narrative that is semi-hard-boiled in style.


How Can We Make Our Cities Safe?  

In the wake of the suicide bomb attack at a concert venue in Manchester, Newshour Extra this week is asking how major cities around the world can minimise the risk to their citizens from such atrocities. Owen Bennett Jones and his guests consider urban security, counter-terrorism, and the compromises different cities make between civil liberties and public safety. Photo: an armed policeman and a soldier patrol the streets of London, 24th May 2017. Credit: Getty Images

An 'inexcusable distraction': US lambasted over Manchester intelligence leaks  

As investigators continue to search for co-conspirators in the Manchester terrorist bombing, a diplomatic row has broken out between the US and the UK over the leaking of sensitive police evidence. At the NATO leaders' meeting in Brussels, British Prime Minister told the US President that the investigation was being put at risk - and so was trust between the two countries. Eight people have so far been arrested in the wake of Tuesday's bombing at a pop concert.

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Debate continues over tourists climbing Uluru  

The perennial debate about scaling Uluru may not be new, but it's one that continues to upset the Anangu people and divide tourists to the iconic rock. While there are talks to close the climb when the number of climbers fall below 20 per cent, authorities say that number is hard to determine. In the meantime, around 300,000 visitors come in to Uluru every year and many risk their lives to reach the top of the monolith, which sits 348 metres above the ground.

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135: How To Figure Out What's Next!  

Earn Your Happy Quickie – ep. 135 – How to Figure Out What’s Next

“There comes a time to stop looking back and trying to figure out why. At some point, we need to shift our attention to what’s next.” – Unknown

Are your thoughts or fears paralyzing you before you’ve even reached a goal? Are you asking yourself questions, such as: Why am I unclear? Why don’t I know what I want to do? Why can’t I move forward? Yikes. I get anxious just thinking about it. 

Today, I want to talk about removing those types of disempowering questions from your brain and replacing them instead with “what’s next?” Sure, I get it. Those questions come from a place of uncertainty and fear and they’re hard to stop. But know that most entrepreneurs (including myself) are willing to explore their curiosity even if that nagging voice in their heads tells them they’re crazy or that it doesn’t fit in with “where they’re at.” They don’t let themselves get STUCK. If they feel called to try something new, they do it regardless of the risk.

“The people who are the happiest are the ones who are most willing to explore all the little soul hits.”

Take the Earn Your Happy podcast as an example. It wasn’t something that I had on my to-do list. At the end of the day,

“I wanted to have epic conversations with people and I wanted an excuse to do it,” 

And well, you know the ending to that story because here we are. You don’t have to have a plan to move forward. You just have to,

“Be willing to put yourself out there and fail.” 

By avoiding any possibility of failure, you risk missing the message you were supposed to hear and possibly something you were called to do.

So, what’s next? My advice… Ask more empowering questions (ditch those that don’t serve you anything more than a side of anxiety) and explore the resources around you. Run toward the failure and thank it for what it’s teaching you.

And one more Earn Your Happy Tip for the road…the more you can fail the better.

 

In This Episode You Will Learn:

Future

Resistance

Fear

Failure

Curiosity

Entrepreneurs

Podcast

Resources:

 

Checkout my website at loriharder.com. Follow me on social media @LoriHarder on Instagram and Lori Harder on Facebook.

'Texas bathroom bill': mental health of transgender children at risk, advocates say  

Advocates have raised concerns about the mental health of transgender children as debate continues in the Unites States about where they go to the toilet. A decision is due in the coming days on the so-called Texas bathroom bill, which is continuing to divide Americans.

Economic worries on South Shore over ticks, Lyme disease  

Reported cases of Lyme disease have increased substantially over past few years. The south shore is a high risk area for ticks, and some are worried about economic consequences. The CBC's Emma Smith explains.

Sydney siege prompts rethink of police contain and negotiate strategy  

Contain and negotiate is the strategy that's guided New South Wales Police through high-risk situations including the Sydney siege. But the state's former assistant police commissioner Clive Small says it needs a rethink. The inquest into the 2014 siege found officers were reluctant to take proactive steps to end the crisis. Coroner Michael Barnes has recommended more forceful responses to terrorist attacks be considered in future.

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Aktier er tilbage – vigtige nøgletal forude  

Aktierne er kommet stærkt igen efter den politiske uro omkring Trump er stilnet lidt af. Men den amerikanske dollar er fortsat svækket over for euroen. Hør med når Cheføkonom Helge Pedersen og Chefanalytiker Jan Størup Nielsen diskuterer de vigtigste begivenheder på de finansielle markeder i den kommende uge. Her ser vi bl.a. frem mod vigtige inflationstal for euroområdet og en særdeles spændende arbejdsmarkedsrapport fra USA, som kan blive afgørende for om den amerikanske centralbank sætter renten op i næste måned. Disclaimer: All opinions and estimates in this podcast are, regardless of source, given in good faith, and may only be valid as of the stated publication date and are subject to change without notice. The podcast is intended only to provide general and preliminary information to investors and shall not be construed as the basis for any investment decision. This publication or report has been prepared by Nordea Markets as general information for private use of investors to whom the publication or report has been distributed, but it is not intended as a personal recommendation of particular financial instruments or strategies and thus it does not provide individually tailored investment advice, and does not take into account the individual investor’s particular financial situation, existing holdings or liabilities, investment knowledge and experience, investment objective and horizon or risk profile and preferences. The investor must particularly ensure the suitability of an investment as regards his/her financial and fiscal situation and investment objectives. The investor bears the risk of losses in connection with an investment. Before acting on any information in this publication or report, it is recommendable to consult one’s financial advisor.

Money Box Live - Problem Gambling  

John Hartson was a premier league superstar, and he got paid a premier league salary. But that didn't stop him spending it all on his gambling problem. Six years clean, with his life and his finances back on an even keel, he's on a mission to raise awareness about the risk that gambling poses to personal finances. He talks to Louise Cooper about what a gambling addiction really costs. Meanwhile the gambling industry continues to grow. Punters lost over £13 billion last year, and an increasing share of that has come from online gambling. Some experts are worried this could spark a rise in problem gambling. Are they right? And are we doing enough to protect a new generation of problem gamblers from emerging? Presenter: Louise Cooper Producer: Matt Bardo Editor: Andy Smith.

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Episode 20:  Finding Shelley Desrochers: Part 3 - What Happened To Shelley?  

Shelley Desrochers hasn’t been seen since January 2016. She’s one of three women who lived a “high-risk lifestyle” to go missing from London, Ontario, Canada in the last decade. In this series, we go beyond the police and news reports to take an in-depth look at Shelley’s life, ask questions surrounding the case and speak with guests and experts such as Mike Arntfield, host of “To Catch A Killer” and former London police officer.

Part 3 explores the difficult question of “What happened to Shelley Desrochers?”

The list of possibilities is long, but you’ll be shocked to hear just what kind of a picture Mike Arntfield can paint using his experience and statistics. We also speak with Shelley’s friends & family who have thoughts of their own, and some eerie comments made by Shelley in the past that may serve as clues.

Have you seen Shelley Desrochers? E-mail findshelleynow@gmail.com
London Police Missing People: https://www.londonpol [...]

Episode 20:  Finding Shelley Desrochers: Part 3 - What Happened To Shelley?  

Shelley Desrochers hasn’t been seen since January 2016. She’s one of three women who lived a “high-risk lifestyle” to go missing from London, Ontario, Canada in the last decade. In this series, we go beyond the police and news reports to take an in-depth look at Shelley’s life, ask questions surrounding the case and speak with guests and experts such as Mike Arntfield, host of “To Catch A Killer” and former London police officer.

Part 3 explores the difficult question of “What happened to Shelley Desrochers?”

The list of possibilities is long, but you’ll be shocked to hear just what kind of a picture Mike Arntfield can paint using his experience and statistics. We also speak with Shelley’s friends & family who have thoughts of their own, and some eerie comments made by Shelley in the past that may serve as clues.

Have you seen Shelley Desrochers? E-mail findshelleynow@gmail.com
London Police Missing People: https://www.londonpol [...]

013: Glyphosate, Gut Dysbiosis, and Chronic Disease with Dr. Stephanie Seneff  

I fundamentally believe that when people are well they can change the world, and I work everyday to help reduce the risk of chronic disease in my patients. So when I heard today’s guest, Dr. Stephanie Seneff, speak, I knew that I had to have her on the podcast. Dr. Seneff presented me with an inconvenient truth; that the food I was eating and feeding to my family was not only killing us, but the people who were coming to see me for help. Our interview today is slightly more technical than you might be used to, but if you eat food, this interview is crucial to your survival.

 

Key Takeaways:

[:54] Please join our Facebook community, Legacy, a group of bad-ass women collectively committed to leaving the world better than we found it.

[4:10] Glyphosate is the most important toxic chemical in our environment and we must ban glyphosate worldwide.

[5:51] Glyphosate is the active ingredient in the herbicide RoundUp.

[6:19] Some crops have been genetically modified to be resistant to RoundUp.

[6:58] How is so much glyphosate getting into our food?

[8:12] Even organic foods will contain some glyphosate.

[9:11] Why would organic lentils contain high levels of glyphosate?

[10:18] Monsanto’s own studies have shown how glyphosate accumulates in body tissue.

[12:45] Glyphosate is getting into proteins by mistake.

[14:02] In North America we do not respect the Precautionary Principle.

[14:51] Is there a link between glyphosate and autism?

[17:20] Glyphosate hit the market in 1975 but its use wasn’t widespread until the late 1990s.

[18:56] Glyphosate causes gut dysbiosis.

[20:48] How is glyphosate connected to Celiac Disease and other food allergies?

[23:21] Glyphosate crosses the placenta.

[23:39] Glyphosate is sneaking into the body in place of glycine.

[25:14] Some people are genetically more susceptible to the effects of glyphosate.

[26:33] What is the relationship between glyphosate and sulphur?

[27:17] We desperately need sun exposure.

[29:50] Glyphosate can not be washed off of produce because it is embedded in the proteins of the plants.

[31:03] It is very difficult to reduce glyphosate exposure without committing to buy organic.

[32:43] Sri Lanka banned glyphosate after it became obvious that it had killed many young agricultural workers. It will be a miracle if the U.S.A. ever bans it.

[34:28] We can test for glyphosate in our bodies with urine samples.

[35:16] Can we detox glyphosate out of our tissues?

[37:51] How can we take action to remedy the problems we have created with glyphosate use?

[41:40] Take this month’s quiz about toxicity and detox at meghanwalker.com/entrepologyquiz.

[42:16] Health is feeling good.

[43:08] Dr. Seneff’s morning routine includes doing a Sudoku puzzle.

[44:48] Dr. Seneff reads research papers constantly.

[45:18] Dr. Seneff loves taking walks in the woods and playing with her grandchildren.

[45:50] Creativity is born in all of us, but the educational system tries to beat it out of us.

[48:27] If you enjoyed our conversation and would like to hear more, please subscribe to The Entrepology Podcast on Stitcher or iTunes. We would also appreciate a review.

 

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Legacy Facebook Group

Dr. Seneff’s MIT Webpage

SNR #180: Jason Gill, PhD - Role of Ethnicity in Cardio-Metabolic Disease Risk  

Dr Jason Gill is a Reader in Exercise and Metabolic Health in the Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences at the University of Glasgow. He leads an active multi-disciplinary research group investigating the effects of exercise and diet on the prevention and management of vascular and metabolic diseases from the molecular to the whole-body level. Major research interests include: why certain population groups (particularly South Asians) appear to be particularly susceptible to the adverse effects of a `Westernised' lifestyle, and how lifestyle interventions can modulate this excess risk; the interactions between physical activity, energy balance, adiposity and disease risk; and the mechanisms by which exercise regulates lipoprotein metabolism.

He is a past Chair of the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES) Division of Physical Activity for Health and a member of the development groups for the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) guidelines for the prevention and treatment of obesity and for prevention of cardiovascular disease. Jason is Director of the MSc programme in Sport and Exercise Science & Medicine, and also plays an active role in communicating the science of physical activity, diet, obesity and cardio-metabolic risk to the widest possible audience including a number of appearances on TV documentaries and organisation of Understanding of Science events for the general public.

In This Episode We Discuss: Modifiable factors that influence cardio-metabolic disease risk Differences in diabetes and cardio-metabolic disease risk between different ethnic groups Is this increased disease risk a function of ethnicity alone or a mismatch between the environment and that populations evolutionary past? How different BMI values correspond to different levels of risk between ethnic groups Differences in cardiorespiratory fitness levels and capacity for fat oxidation potentially contribute to ethnic differences in the cardio-metabolic risk profile Do we need ethnicity-specific physical activity guidelines? Research questions that remain unanswered
a16z Podcast: What Technology Wants, Needs, Does  

Turnabout is fair play: That's true in politics, and it's true at Andreessen Horowitz given our internal (and very opinionated!) culture of debate -- where we often agree to disagree, or more often, disagree to agree. So in this special "turnabout" episode of the a16z Podcast, co-founder Marc Andreessen (who is most often in the hot seat being interviewed), got the chance to instead grill fellow partners Frank Chen (who covers AI and much more), Vijay Pande (who covers healthcare for the bio fund), and Alex Rampell (who covers all things fintech). None of the partners had any idea what Marc would ask them. Putting them in the hot seat at our recent a16z Tech Policy Summit, in Washington, D.C., Marc asked them policy questions such as the implications for tech of the American Health Care Act or AHCA (which itself was being hotly debated that exact same day, just a few miles away); the role of regulatory arbitrage; and what happens to companies big and small if Dodd-Frank is repealed. Oh, but they also covered so much more: the pros and cons of using tech to "discriminate" for better risk pooling; the role of genetics in addiction (can/should it be used to determine risk?); the opioid crisis (can tech help?); applying AI as a "salve" for everything (what's hyped, what's real, what's easy, what's hard?); the line between redlining and predatory lending (and where/when did sentiment flip?); and the ethics of artificial intelligence (beyond the ole Trolley Problem). Throw in a classic nature vs. nurture debate, a bit of 2-D vs. 3-D, and some fries (yes)... and the future arrives in this episode in 35 minutes or less.

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