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062-Marconi Catches a Murderer  

The discovery of the gruesome remains of a human body buried in a doctor's cellar shocked London in 1910. In this week's podcast we'll recount the dramatic use of the recently invented wireless telegraph in capturing the main suspect in the crime.

We'll also hear a letter that Winston Churchill wrote to Winston Churchill and puzzle over why a sober man is denied a second beer.

Sources for our feature on the telegraphic nabbing of Edwardian uxoricide Hawley Harvey Crippen:

Erik Larson, Thunderstruck, 2006.

Associated Press, "Wireless Flashes Crippen and Girl Aboard Montrose," Los Angeles Herald, July 29, 1910.

"Captain Sure Suspects are Pair Police Seek," Los Angeles Herald, July 29, 1910.

Proceedings of Crippen's 1910 trial at Old Bailey Online.

"Crippen Mystery Remains Despite DNA Claim," BBC News, Oct. 18, 2007 (accessed June 16, 2015).

Mark Townsend, "Appeal Judges Asked to Clear Notorious Murderer Dr. Crippen," Guardian, June 6, 2009 (accessed June 16, 2015).

Here's Winston Churchill's June 1899 letter to American author Winston Churchill:

Mr. Winston Churchill presents his compliments to Mr. Winston Churchill, and begs to draw his attention to a matter which concerns them both. He has learnt from the Press notices that Mr. Winston Churchill proposes to bring out another novel, entitled Richard Carvel, which is certain to have a considerable sale both in England and America. Mr. Winston Churchill is also the author of a novel now being published in serial form in Macmillan’s Magazine, and for which he anticipates some sale both in England and America. He also proposes to publish on the 1st of October another military chronicle on the Soudan War. He has no doubt that Mr. Winston Churchill will recognise from this letter — if indeed by no other means — that there is grave danger of his works being mistaken for those of Mr. Winston Churchill. He feels sure that Mr. Winston Churchill desires this as little as he does himself. In future to avoid mistakes as far as possible, Mr. Winston Churchill has decided to sign all published articles, stories, or other works, ‘Winston Spencer Churchill,’ and not ‘Winston Churchill’ as formerly. He trusts that this arrangement will commend itself to Mr. Winston Churchill, and he ventures to suggest, with a view to preventing further confusion which may arise out of this extraordinary coincidence, that both Mr. Winston Churchill and Mr. Winston Churchill should insert a short note in their respective publications explaining to the public which are the works of Mr. Winston Churchill and which those of Mr. Winston Churchill. The text of this note might form a subject for future discussion if Mr. Winston Churchill agrees with Mr. Winston Churchill’s proposition. He takes this occasion of complimenting Mr. Winston Churchill upon the style and success of his works, which are always brought to his notice whether in magazine or book form, and he trusts that Mr. Winston Churchill has derived equal pleasure from any work of his that may have attracted his attention.

From Richard M. Langworth, The Definitive Wit of Winston Churchill, 2009.

This week's lateral thinking puzzle appeared originally on NPR's Car Talk, contributed there by listener George Parks.

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Winston Churchill – mannen som visste betydelsen av kall champagne och rosa sidenkalsonger (och en hel del annat)  

Att Winston Churchill (1874 -1965) gillade sin champagne kall, torr och gratis vet många. Men färre känner kanske till att denne brittiske politiker och Nobelpristagande författare faktiskt designade egna plagg som han lät sy upp, en sorts allroundoverall som han ofta bar. Ännu mindre känt är kanske även att han spenderade en förmögenhet på rosa sidenkalsonger. I veckans STIL berättar vi mer om denne man med både makt, och stil.

Winston Churchill avled 1965 - 90 år gammal - men hans liv, och stil, fortsätter att fascinera. Förra året kom flera nya böcker om Winston Churchill som lyckades ge det krigsdrabbade Storbritannien mod under andra världskriget genom inspirerande tal, och brutal uppriktighet. "Jag har ingenting att erbjuda förutom blod, hårt arbete, tårar och svett", som han sade, i maj 1940. Men det hade han visst det. I veckans program undersöker vi hur han lyckades bli en karismatisk ledare genom att titta närmare på just hans stil, i flera bemärkelser. Kan kanske dagens gråmelerade politiker, rädda för att sticka ut, ha något att lära av honom? Vi har bland annat ringt upp Barry Singer, som förra året publicerade boken Churchill Style - the art of being Winston Churchill". Han driver sedan 25 år en bokhandel i New York specialiserad på verk om, och av, Winston Churchill. Chartwell Booksellers, heter den. Han vet med andra ord en hel del om denne man. Winston Churchill älskade även att äta middag, det var dagens höjdpunkt. Han var övertygad om att det personliga mötet - gärna under intag av mat och dryck - var oöverträffat när det gällde att främja relationer, både personliga och politiska. "Om jag bara kunde äta middag med Josef Stalin en gång i veckan, då skulle vi inte ha några problem", sa han. Om den middagen berättar vi programmet. Vi har även träffat den erfarne diplomaten, och numera författaren, Jan Mårtensson (hans deckare, om antikhandlaren Johan Kristian Homan, firar faktiskt i år 40-årsjubileum) som delar med sig av egna middagserfarenheter i den politiska sfären. Vi har också besökt Almgrens Sidenväveri i Stockholm för att ta reda på poängen med just siden. Varför är det så skönt att ha mot kroppen? Och så har vi mött Karl Oskar Källsner som säljer klassiska tweedkläder, sinnebilden av brittisk landsbygdsstil. Veckans gäst är Katarina Barrling Hermansson, forskare i statskunskap vid Uppsala universitet.

Stil i P1 0

Winston Churchill  

Winston Churchill's is the Great Life chosen by Lord Digby Jones, former Director General of the CBI. Expert contribution comes from Professor David Reynolds. Both men have vivid memories of the day in 1965 when, as children, they heard that Churchill had died. Surprisingly this is the first time that Churchill has been nominated in the series. Considered by many a busted flush in the 1930s, Churchill is now remembered as our greatest wartime leader - his speech before the Battle of Britain still sends a shiver down the spine. But his great qualities and personal flaws remained inextricably linked. David Reynolds has uncovered a stark revelation about Churchill's real state of mind at the time he made that speech, while Digby Jones argues that the ability to instil confidence in people even when there is little rational hope of victory is one of the signs of a great leader. He believes that no one made his mark on the last century in the way that Churchill did. David Reynolds does not subscribe to the Great Man theory of history. He is the Professor of International History at Cambridge University. Known to Radio 4 listeners as the writer and presenter of "America, Empire of Liberty", he has also written extensively on Churchill, including the book "In Command of History" about Churchill's memoirs of World War Two. The presenter is Matthew Parris.

"Why Churchill's Portrait was Burned" - Digital Photography Podcast 568  

This is The Digital Story Podcast #568, Jan. 24, 2017. Today's theme is "Why Churchill's Portrait was Burned." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

When a subject allows us to photograph them, they are putting their hearts in our hands. And the decisions that we, the photographer, make in those moments together bear great weight on the final outcome. Is our goal to solely please the subject? Do we have a responsibility to integrate our own artistic vision into the work? Or should we ignore the desires of others and portray what we believe to be honest? I grapple with these questions in today's show.

Digital Photography Podcast 568

Why Churchill's Portrait was Burned

For Winston Churchill's 80th birthday, House of Commons and House of Lords commissioned a formal portrait by modern painter Graham Sutherland. The painting showed Churchill seated in a chair with his hands resting on its arms with him slightly slumped and portrayed in dark wintery tones.

Churchill hated the painting. Sutherland argued that he had painted what he honestly saw. During its public unveiling, Churchill quipped that it was, "a remarkable example of modern art."

The painting was never hung in public. And as the story goes, it was hidden away in the cellar of their Chartwell estate... until in the middle of one unparticular night, it was smuggled out and burned.

Years later, when Sutherland learned of the destruction of his work, he is claimed to have said, "without question an act of vandalism."

So who was right? Winston Churchill, who had tried to guide the artist toward a more flattering portrayal, but upon failing to do so, chose to destroy the work? Or Graham Sutherland, who despite pressure from his subject, stuck to his beliefs that his responsibility was to show the famous statesman as he truly looked in his 80th year?

I think the question comes down to what is honesty, and does it only exist on the exterior? Or should we as artists consider the human being beneath the surface when making our choices on how to portray them?

In the News

Fujifilm X100F steps up to 24.3MP, adds AF joystick. Fujifilm is taking the wraps off the X100F, the fourth generation of its popular enthusiast-focused compact series. It updates the house that the X100 built with a 24.3MP X-Trans III APS-C sensor and X-Processor Pro image processor borrowed from the X-T2.

Changes can also be seen on the top and rear panels of the camera - notably, an AF joystick makes its first appearance on the X100 series. Other controls have been shifted to the right of the LCD, and up top the shutter speed dial has been modified to include ISO controls. A front control dial has also been added. The hybrid viewfinder has also been updated, and now offers image magnification when using the electronic rangefinder mode.

The Fujifilm X100F will be available February 16th in black or silver for $1299/£1249. (As reported by DPReview.com).

87% of UK Freelance Photogs Asked to Work for Free in 2016; 16% Said Yes

The issue of businesses asking photographers to work for free has been a hot issue in recent years, and now we have some citable statistics that shed more light on it. According to a new study in the UK, 87% of photographers were asked to work for free in 2016, and 16% said yes.

The research was conducted by the UK startup Approve.io, which surveyed 1,009 part-time and full-time freelancers in the UK who have taken on freelance contracts over the past 5 years.

The study "reveals an alarming trend for corporate 'entitlement' when it comes to how freelance professionals are treated," Approve.io tells PetaPixel.

You can read the entire story on Petapixel.

Updates and Such

The registration forms for the The Chicago to New Orleans Rail Adventure - June 26-29, 2017 - have been sent out to members of our reserve list. This workshop begins the day after Out of Chicago concludes. So if you're going to OOC, just add Sunday night to your hotel reservation if you plan on joining us. You can still get on the reserve list for this event, and for our others, by visiting the TDS Workshops Page and using the Send Me Info form on that page.

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server

Churchill en de Hollanders, 11.09  

‘Ze zijn volkomen egoïstisch en vochten pas toen ze werden aangevallen en slechts voor een paar uur.’ Zo oordeelde Winston Churchill over Nederland in de meidagen van 1940. Churchill was geen fan van het landje achter de dijken. Want hadden die Nederlanders in de negentiende eeuw ook niet de eigenwijze boeren in Zuid-Afrika gesteund die in opstand kwamen tegen het Engelse gezag. En kwam niet een groot deel van die Zuid-Afrikaanse boeren van oorsprong uit Holland? Winston Churchill maakte van zijn reserve tegenover de Hollanders zogezegd geen geheim. Toch schonk de Leidse universiteit hem in 1946 een eredoctoraat. Hij nam het zonder blikken of blozen in ontvangst, nu precies zeventig jaar geleden. Journalist en Churchill-kenner Oebele de Jong schreef Churchill en de Nederlanders, dat deze week uitkomt. De auteur is te gast.

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Bonus Episode - The Wit And Wisdom Of Winston Churchill  

In yesterday's podcast, Churchill on Leadership, I talked with Dr. Steven F. Hayward about the leadership qualities that made Winston Churchill one of the greatest men in history.  In this short bonus podcast, I'll take a look at the lighter side of Sir Winston with a collection of some of my favorite quotes and anecdotes that highlight the razer sharp wit of Winston Churchill.

  Be sure to subscribe to the podcast and leave us a review on iTunes.  For more information, visit www.KickAssPolitics.com, and if you enjoyed the show and would like to help keep us on the air, then please show your support at www.gofundme.com/kickasspolitics.

 

121º Podcast Mises Brasil - Winston Ling  

Há pelo menos três ótimos motivos para você ouvir este Podcast do IMB com o empreendedor e mestre em economia pela Universidade de Chicago, Winston Ling: conhecer uma parte relevante da história das ideias da liberdade no Brasil na década de 1980, quando o país ainda vivia sob o regime militar, e o trabalho fundamental do Instituto Liberal do Rio de Janeiro e do seu presidente Donald Stewart Jr.; saber detalhes da atuação de dois gigantes da defesa do liberalismo o Brasil, Henry Maksoud e José Stelle (o podcast foi gravado na semana anterior à morte de Maksoud); e a importante atuação de Winston no movimento liberal no país, que inclui também a criação do Instituto Liberal do Rio Grande do Sul (que depois se tornou o atual Instituto Liberdade) e do Instituto de Estudos Empresariais, fundado por iniciativa de seu irmão, William Ling. Membro da família Ling, que há décadas desenvolve um valioso trabalho de promoção e defesa das ideias da liberdade e mantém o instituto que concede bolsas de estudo, além dos três tópicos citados no parágrafo anterior, Winston conta nesta entrevista como era ser um interessado nas ideias da liberdade no Brasil numa época em que não havia livros traduzidos e publicados no país e comunicar-se e conhecer outros liberais era difícil e custoso. Tente imaginar o que era viver num país sob uma ditadura militar, sem ter acesso a livros de autores liberais e Austríacos, com todo um ambiente político, intelectual e empresarial contrário às ideias da liberdade e sem a formidável tecnologia que hoje nos permite ter e acessar a internet? A divulgação das ideias, por isso, era mais difícil e estava quase limitada às páginas dos jornais e aos restritos contatos pessoais. Winston conta a história de como fez com que cada um do grupo 30 empresários brasileiros em viagem de negócios para Taiwan comprasse o livro Quem é John Galt?, de Ayn Rand durante o vôo (em 2010, o romance foi republicado em nova tradução e com o título A Revolta de Atlas). Um dia antes da viagem, ele ligou para cada um e orientou que levasse o livro na mão para ler na viagem. E durante o trajeto aéreo, de uma em uma hora, Winston fazia rondas regulares para saber em que página cada um deles estava. “No final, todo mundo leu”. Morando em Xangai há 13 anos, Winston também aborda o panorama político na China, explica a batalha entre a ala liberal e a ala conservadora dentro do Partido Comunista, e fala do livro China Lectures, de autoria de José Stelle, que trata sobre os problemas e defeitos da democracia e cuja tradução Winston planeja publicar este ano. Todos os Podcasts podem ser baixados e ouvidos pelo site, pela iTunes Store e peloYouTube. E se você gostou deste e/ou dos podcasts anteriores, visite o nosso espaço na iTunes Store, faça a avaliação e deixe um comentário.

121º Podcast Mises Brasil - Winston Ling  

Há pelo menos três ótimos motivos para você ouvir este Podcast do IMB com o empreendedor e mestre em economia pela Universidade de Chicago, Winston Ling: conhecer uma parte relevante da história das ideias da liberdade no Brasil na década de 1980, quando o país ainda vivia sob o regime militar, e o trabalho fundamental do Instituto Liberal do Rio de Janeiro e do seu presidente Donald Stewart Jr.; saber detalhes da atuação de dois gigantes da defesa do liberalismo o Brasil, Henry Maksoud e José Stelle (o podcast foi gravado na semana anterior à morte de Maksoud); e a importante atuação de Winston no movimento liberal no país, que inclui também a criação do Instituto Liberal do Rio Grande do Sul (que depois se tornou o atual Instituto Liberdade) e do Instituto de Estudos Empresariais, fundado por iniciativa de seu irmão, William Ling. Membro da família Ling, que há décadas desenvolve um valioso trabalho de promoção e defesa das ideias da liberdade e mantém o instituto que concede bolsas de estudo, além dos três tópicos citados no parágrafo anterior, Winston conta nesta entrevista como era ser um interessado nas ideias da liberdade no Brasil numa época em que não havia livros traduzidos e publicados no país e comunicar-se e conhecer outros liberais era difícil e custoso. Tente imaginar o que era viver num país sob uma ditadura militar, sem ter acesso a livros de autores liberais e Austríacos, com todo um ambiente político, intelectual e empresarial contrário às ideias da liberdade e sem a formidável tecnologia que hoje nos permite ter e acessar a internet? A divulgação das ideias, por isso, era mais difícil e estava quase limitada às páginas dos jornais e aos restritos contatos pessoais. Winston conta a história de como fez com que cada um do grupo 30 empresários brasileiros em viagem de negócios para Taiwan comprasse o livro Quem é John Galt?, de Ayn Rand durante o vôo (em 2010, o romance foi republicado em nova tradução e com o título A Revolta de Atlas). Um dia antes da viagem, ele ligou para cada um e orientou que levasse o livro na mão para ler na viagem. E durante o trajeto aéreo, de uma em uma hora, Winston fazia rondas regulares para saber em que página cada um deles estava. “No final, todo mundo leu”. Morando em Xangai há 13 anos, Winston também aborda o panorama político na China, explica a batalha entre a ala liberal e a ala conservadora dentro do Partido Comunista, e fala do livro China Lectures, de autoria de José Stelle, que trata sobre os problemas e defeitos da democracia e cuja tradução Winston planeja publicar este ano. Todos os Podcasts podem ser baixados e ouvidos pelo site, pela iTunes Store e peloYouTube. E se você gostou deste e/ou dos podcasts anteriores, visite o nosso espaço na iTunes Store, faça a avaliação e deixe um comentário.

Did Churchill know Coventry was about to be bombed?  

November 2015 In the throes of war, difficult decisions have to be made. Prime Minister Winston Churchill was fully aware that Bletchley Park was breaking German codes, and even received regular digests of the intelligence gleaned, known as Hut 3 Headlines. However, a myth was born in the mid-1970s that remains in circulation even now. The theory was that messages decoded by Bletchley Park warned Churchill that the Luftwaffe was heading for Coventry on 14 November 1940, and that he allowed the bombing go ahead in order to protect his secret source of vital information. It has since been debunked, however, and in this month’s episode of the Bletchley Park Podcast, you can find out how. Here is an extract of this month’s episode, The Coventry Myth. Image: Prime Minister Winston Churchill inspecting members of Coventry's Warden Service in Broadgate during his visit to Coventry in September 1941. ©Mirrorpix #BPark, #Bletchleypark, #Enigma, #WW2Veteran, #History, #Churchill

Churchill on Leadership with guest Dr. Steven F. Hayward  

50 years ago this past Saturday, the world mourned the passing of the greatest leader of the 20th Century - Sir Winston S. Churchill.  On the anniversary of Churchill's death, I'll sit down with Dr. Steven F. Hayward, author of Churchill on Leadership to discuss some of the qualities that made Winston Churchill a remarkable leader and a towering figure in history.

  Be sure to subscribe to the show on iTunes and leave us a review.  For more information, visit www.KickAssPolitics.com, and if you enjoyed the show and would like to help keep us on the air, then please show your support at www.gofundme.com/kickasspolitics.
Danny Carlson: John Lennon 2014 09 05  

Danny Carlson: Adventures of Dr. Winston O'Boogie and His Amazing Friends: The Untold Story Behind John Lennon's Murder! Dr. Winston O’Boogie® brings to life the untold true story behind a young fan’s quest to meet John Lennon, leader of the most famous Rock and Roll band in the world, The Beatles. But instead was unknowingly introduced to a disguised John Lennon posing as Winston or Dr. Winston O’Boogie® a 1970’s radical complete with his new band of counter culture rebels called the Yippies. All during a failed Beatles reunion concert originally planned to be held during the 1979 May Day Smoke-In at Washington Square Park. Discover how the Author quickly hits it off with Winston as he’s brought into John Lennon’s inner circle and meets his famous friends and ex-partners. All the while as he’s slowly becoming like a son and a personal muse to Lennon. Then for the next eighteen months, the young Author unknowingly witnessed first hand the final events leading towards Lennon’s tragic planned assassination. Plus the book also divulges how the young Author was also threatened with his own murder if he didn’t keep quiet about what he knew and witnessed... until now. About The Author The Author Danny Carlson was honored when he was made the Last 5th Beatle and also won John Lennon’s greatest fan contest. The Adventures of Dr. Winston O’Boogie® and His Amazing Friends will finally prove to the world what really happened to this talented musical genius... John Lennon. This multi-media 744 page book included with a FREE companion CD contains hundreds of newly and previously released declassified FBI, CIA and INS files that help take the reader behind the scenes of John Lennon’s secret radical lifestyle. http://www.amazon.com/Adventures-Winston-OBoogie-Amazing-Friends-ebook/dp/B00F72CGQ2/ref=as_sl_pc_qf_sp_asin_til?tag=theopprep-20&linkCode=w00&linkId=SSMX7V5HMDN27HYZ&creativeASIN=B00F72CGQ2

Churchill, chance and the black dog  

"For a couple of days in May 1940, the fate of the world turned on the fall of a leaf" says John Gray. He outlines the strange conjunction of events - and the work of chance - that led to Churchill becoming Prime Minister. He muses on how Churchill was found by one of his advisers around one o'clock on the morning of May 9th "brooding alone in one of his clubs". He was given a crucial bit of advice which may have secured him the job. What would have happened Gray wonders if he hadn't been found and that advice - to say nothing! - not been passed on? He also ponders whether it was it Churchill's recurring melancholy which made for his greatness? "It's hard to resist the thought that the dark view of the world that came on Churchill in his moods of desolation enabled him to see what others could not". "Churchill had not one life but several" says Gray. Without them all, "history would have been very different, and the world darker than anything we can easily imagine". Producer: Adele Armstrong.

Show 1716 The Bureaucrat Kings, The Capitalist Manifesto, and Churchill’s Trial  

Show 1716 The Bureaucrat Kings, The Capitalist Manifesto, and Churchill’s Trial

This ACU show consists of four selections.

Segment 1-   They’re unelected, unaccountable, and out of control, and Paul D. Moreno takes them on in The Bureaucrat Kings: The Origins and Underpinnings of America’s Bureaucratic State. Discuss this podcast at Ricochet.

http://www.nationalreview.com/media/bookmonger/bookmonger-paul-d-moreno

 

Segment 2- The Bureaucrat Kings Professor Paul Moreno talked about his book, The Bureaucrat Kings: The Origins and Underpinnings of America’s Bureaucratic State. This interview, part of Book TV’s College Series, was recorded at Hillsdale College in Michigan.

To watch the video of this interview visit-

https://www.c-span.org/video/?414716-4/bureaucrat-kings

 

Segment 3- A Capitalist Manifesto Professor Gary Wolfram talked about this book, A Capitalist Manifesto: Understanding the Market Economy and Defending Liberty. The interview, conducted at Hillsdale College in Michigan, is part of Book TV’s College Series.

To watch the video of this interview visit-

https://www.c-span.org/video/?414716-8/capitalist-manifesto

 

Segment 4- Churchill's Trial Larry Arnn talked about his book, Churchill’s Trial: Winston Churchill and the Salvation of Free Government. This interview, part of Book TV’s College Series, was recorded on the campus of Hillsdale College in Michigan.

To watch the video of this interview visit-

https://www.c-span.org/video/?414716-7/churchills-trial

Churchill – the ‘glowworm’ who changed the fate of modern Europe  

At the end of World War II, Winston Churchill lost his reelection bid for Prime Minister of England. The British Bulldog was down, but not out. He worried of a coming conflict with Stalin and the growing Soviet Empire, and he wanted the world to listen. On this week’s War College, author Lord Alan Watson argues that two speeches Churchill gave after the war laid the intellectual groundwork for Western geopolitical thought during the Cold War. More than that, he says they saved the world. His new book – Churchill’s Legacy: Two Speeches to Save the World tells the story of the former Prime Minister’s post-war career and how his legacy shaped the West. Without Churchill, Watson argues, there would be no European Union, no NATO and no peace.

E50 - Action This Day  

September 2016 Action This Day! In our historic anniversary-based series, It Happened Here, we look at a paper-based act of daring which changed the course of history. Seventy five years ago Winston Churchill visited Bletchley Park, amid the utmost secrecy. He understood how important the intelligence being produced was, and valued it highly. He gave a morale-boosting speech to the Codebreakers, and we hear from Sir Arthur Bonsall, who stumbled across the PM on his way to lunch. Once the euphoria of the VIP visit had worn off, a group of young men who were feeling the weight of the task on their shoulders cooked up a plan to try to channel Churchill’s enthusiasm for Bletchley Park, to help them overcome administrative and fiscal issues they were facing on the front line of codebreaking. A letter signed by Alan Turing, Gordon Welchman, Hugh Alexander and Stuart Milner-Barry, politely outlined the need for more staff and resources. One passage read: “The trouble to our mind is that as we are a very small section with numerically trivial requirements it is very difficult to bring home to the authorities finally responsible either the importance of what is done here or the urgent necessity of dealing promptly with our requests.” Stuart Milner-Barry of Hut 6 was volunteered by his colleagues to deliver the letter to Downing Street. It was 40 years before he saw the Churchill’s memo: “Make sure they have all they want on extreme priority and report to me that this had been done.” The original memo lives in The National Archive and a copy is on display in the Visitor Centre at Bletchley Park. Then we fast forward 50 years to 1991 and the party that saved Bletchley Park. The very first reunion for Veterans started as a fond farewell to a semi derelict site that was about to be bulldozed, but turned into a call to action to save it. Fourteen hours of audio recordings made that day that were feared lost, were in fact safely stashed away in Bletchley Park’s Archive, and digitised only recently. From next month, we’ll bring you highlights. The episode also features an exclusive interview with Geoffrey Welchman, whose grandfather Gordon was Head of Hut 6 and reputedly the instigator of the letter to Churchill. Find out what happened when Geoffrey visited Bletchley Park for the first time, and discovered how well celebrated his grandfather is. Visit Bletchley Park. It happened here. Book now. Image: ©Bletchley Park Trust #BPark, #Bletchleypark, #Enigma, #WW2Veteran, #History, #Churchill

Show 1866 Ann Coulter Highlights and Interview  

Show 1866 Ann Coulter Highlights and Interview

Segment 1- 38 Minutes Of The Best Of Ann Coulter Compilation. Thanks to Ellie Walkers.

To watch the video visit-

https://youtu.be/yfH155T8Mck

 

Segment 2- Ann Coulter on The Mark Simone Show (7 5 2017)

To watch this interview visit-

https://youtu.be/4bkX6dF3xUM

Ann coulter interviewed by mark simone. July 5th 2017.

CNN has done it again. Now, they're blackmailing reddit users for making pretty simple gifs.

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Introduction to the Constitution—Available Now!

This twelve-lesson course explains the principles underlying the American founding as set forth in the Declaration of Independence and secured by the Constitution. The Founders believed that the principles in these documents were not simply preferences for their own day, but were truths that the sovereign and moral people of America could always rely on as guides in their pursuit of happiness through ordered liberty.

 

Theology 101: The Western Theological Tradition

The Western theological tradition stretches back thousands of years to the time of the ancient Hebrews. This tradition has had a profound impact on the development of Western Civilization as a whole. This course will consider the origins and development of Western religious theology from the Old Testament through the twentieth century.

American Heritage—From Colonial Settlement to the Current Day

On July 4, 1776, America—acting under the authority of “the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God”—declared its independence from Great Britain. The new nation, founded on the principle that “all Men are created equal,” eventually grew to become the most prosperous and powerful nation in the world. This course will consider the history of America from the colonial era to the present, including major challenges to the Founders’ principles.

 

The U.S. Supreme Court

Article III of the U.S. Constitution vests the judicial power “in one supreme Court, and in such inferior Courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish.” According to Federalist 78, the judicial branch “will always be the least dangerous” to the liberty of the American people. Yet, judicial decisions have done much to advance a Progressive agenda that poses a fundamental threat to liberty. This course will consider several landmark Supreme Court cases in relation to the Founders’ Constitution.

 

Shakespeare: Hamlet and The Tempest

One of the world’s greatest poets, William Shakespeare is the author of plays that have been read and performed for more than 400 years. A close study of his works reveals timeless lessons about human nature, which offer a mirror for examining one’s own character. In Hamlet and The Tempest, Shakespeare considers those virtues and vices that make self-government and statesmanship possible or impossible to achieve.

 

Public Policy from a Constitutional Viewpoint

The American Founders wrote a Constitution that established a government limited in size and scope, whose central purpose was to secure the natural rights of all Americans. By contrast, early Progressives rejected the notion of fixed limits on government, and their political descendants continue today to seek an ever-larger role for the federal bureaucracy in American life. In light of this fundamental and ongoing disagreement over the purpose of government, this course will consider contemporary public policy issues from a constitutional viewpoint.

 

Athens and Sparta

A study of the ancient Greek cities of Athens and Sparta is essential for understanding the beginning of the story of Western Civilization. Moreover, such a study reveals timeless truths about the human condition that are applicable in any age. This course will consider life and government in Athens and Sparta, examine their respective roles in the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, and offer some conclusions regarding their continuing relevance.

 

An Introduction to C.S. Lewis: Writings and Significance

C.S. Lewis was the greatest Christian apologist of the twentieth century. He was also the author of works of fiction, including the Chronicles of Narnia, and of philosophy, including The Abolition of Man. This course will consider Lewis’s apologetics and his fiction, as well as his philosophical and literary writings, and their continuing significance today.

Winston Churchill and Statesmanship

Winston Churchill was the greatest statesman of the 20th century, and one of the greatest in all of history. From a young age, Churchill understood the unique dangers of modern warfare, and he worked to respond to them. Though best known for his leadership during World War II, he was also a great defender of constitutionalism. A close study of Churchill’s words and deeds offers timeless lessons about the virtues, especially prudence, required for great statesmanship.

 

The Federalist Papers

Written between October 1787 and August 1788, The Federalist Papers is a collection of newspaper essays written in defense of the Constitution. Writing under the penname Publius, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay explain the merits of the proposed Constitution, while confronting objections raised by its opponents. Thomas Jefferson described the work as “the best commentary on the principles of government, which ever was written.” This course will explore major themes of The Federalist Papers, such as the problem of majority faction, separation of powers, and the three branches of government.

 

A Proper Understanding of K-12 Education: Theory and Practice

The American Founders recognized the central importance of education for the inculcation of the kind of knowledge and character that is essential to the maintenance of free government. For example, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 states, “Religion, morality, and knowledge, being necessary to good government and the happiness of mankind, schools and the means of education shall forever be encouraged.” This course will consider the older understanding of the purpose of education, the more recent Progressive approach that has become dominant today, and some essential elements of K-12 education.

The Presidency and the Constitution

This free, 10-week, not-for-credit course, taught by the Hillsdale College politics faculty, will help you understand the structure and function of executive power in the American constitutional order. The course begins with the place of the president in the constitutionalism of the Founding Fathers and examines how that role has changed with the rise of the modern Progressive administrative state.

Great Books 102: Renaissance to Modern

This 11-week, not-for-credit course, taught by Hillsdale College faculty, will introduce you to great books from the Renaissance through the modern era. You will explore the writings of Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, Austen, Twain, and more. This course will challenge you to seek timeless lessons regarding human nature, virtue, self-government, and liberty in the pages of the great books. 

Constitution 101: The Meaning & History of the Constitution

Taught by the Hillsdale College Politics faculty, this course will introduce you to the meaning and history of the United States Constitution. The course will examine a number of original source documents from the Founding period, including especially the Declaration of Independence and The Federalist Papers. The course will also consider two significant challenges to the Founders’ Constitution: the institution of slavery and the rise of Progressivism.

Great Books 101: Ancient to Medieval

This 11-week, not-for-credit course, taught by Hillsdale College faculty, will introduce you to great books from antiquity to the medieval period. You will explore the writings of Homer, St. Augustine, Dante, and more. This course will challenge you to seek timeless lessons regarding human nature, virtue, self-government, and liberty in the pages of the great books. 

Economics 101: The Principles of Free Market Economics

 

This is a free, ten-week, not-for-cred

Winston Churchill avait écrit sur la vie extraterrestre en 1939, en étant très pertinent  

On connait de Winston Churchill son rôle éminent à la tête du Royaume Uni durant la seconde guerre mondiale, on le connaît aussi orateur hors pair, écrivain, historien, amateur de cigares et peintre à la fin de sa vie, mais ce que l'on connaît moins de Churchill, c'est son grand attrait pour les sciences et la technologie, et notamment les sciences de l'Univers. Un manuscrit de Churchill vient d'être redécouvert où il s'essaye à une analyse scientifique de l'existence de la vie extraterrestre, et ça tient la route.

#240: The Making of Winston Churchill  

On today’s show Candice Millard and I discuss the supreme confidence Winston Churchill had as a young man that he was destined for greatness and how he intentionally sought after dangerous military missions that would catapult him to fame. We also discuss the compelling leadership and persuasion ability Churchill displayed during the Boer War that would later propel his political career, as well as the similarities between Churchill and Teddy Roosevelt.

Show 1383  NRO 11 National Review Online. The Bookmonger.  

Show 1383  NRO 11 National Review Online. The Bookmonger.

 

For a great archive of past shows from The Bookmonger visit-

http://www.nationalreview.com/media/between-covers

 

Ep. 51: Is Washington killing you?

That's the question Darcy Olsen raises in her new book, The Right To Try: How the Federal Government Prevents Americans from Getting the Lifesaving Treatments They Need.  11/9/2015. 10 minutes 34 seconds

 

Ep. 46: Grow Up and Get a Job.

Life doesn't end when guys marry and have kids--that's when life begins, say Jim Geraghty, co-author with Cam Edwards of Heavy Lifting: Grow Up, Get a Job, Start a Family, and Other Manly Advice. 11:07  10/26/2015

 

Ep. 45: Larry P. Arnn on Winston Churchill 

You've heard about the Winston Churchill who won the Second World War. Have you also heard about the one who spent his life fighting socialism? Hillsdale College president Larry P. Arnn describes them both in his new book, Churchill's Trial: Winston …    10:34   10/19/2015

Ep. 44: Fault Lines    "It will become a classic," says Dominic Green in the current issue of Commentary, in a review of Fault Lines, a memoir by David Pryce-Jones. In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Pryce-Jones describes his boyhood during the Second World War… 12:23   10/12/2015     

What Is Conservatism? With Buckley, Hayek & Goldberg          What Is Conservatism? It's not a hard question -- it's a title that proves everything old is new again. ISI Books has reissued What Is Conservatism? It's the 1964 classic edited by Frank S. Meyer and featuring contributions from the likes of William F. Buckley…   13:40   10/5/2015

Ep. 42: Empire & Revolution: The Political Life of Edmund Burke                   Bourke on Burke -- say that ten times fast. Or better yet, listen to the Bookmonger's 10-minute conversation with Richard Bourke, author of "Empire & Revolution: The Political Life of Edmund Burke." We discuss why American conservatives admire Burke so much. 11:51   9/28/2015       

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