Episoder

  • Jim Mattis: Call Sign Chaos
    Jim Mattis served more than four decades as an infantry officer in the United States Marines, rising to the rank of 4-star general. In 2017, he was nearly unanimously confirmed as the 26th Secretary of Defense of the United States, a position he held for almost two years.

    Today, he is a distinguished fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and the author of the new book with Bing West: Call Sign Chaos: Learning to Lead*.

    In this conversation, Jim and I discuss his career in the Marines and the leadership lessons that emerged during combat. Jim shares the mistake he made in soliciting support for his plan to capture Osama Bin Laden in Tora Bora and discusses how he handled disagreements on strategy in Fallujah. Finally, Jim recommends three books and reflects on the greatest threat to America today.
    Key Points

    Creating “focused telescopes” outside the normal chain of command were useful in discovering concerns that might not otherwise have become known.
    Keep key stakeholders in the loop with these three questions: What do I know? Who needs to know? Have I told them?
    “You cannot order someone to abandon a spiritual burden they’ve been wrestling with.”
    Even in a war zone, command was only a small portion of the daily tasks. Most of the time was spent coaching.
    “History teaches that we face nothing new under the sun.” Books will help you take advantage of the accumulated experiences of leaders who came before you.

    Resources Mentioned

    Meditations* by Marcus Aurelius
    Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant* by Ulysses S. Grant and Mark Twain
    Long Walk to Freedom* by Nelson Mandela

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Call Sign Chaos in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    The Way to Stop Rescuing People From Their Problems, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 284)
    Develop Leaders Before You Leave, with David Marquet (episode 405)
    Influence Through Overlapping Networks, with Sandie Morgan (episode 422)
    How to Start Seeing Around Corners, with Rita McGrath (episode 430)

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  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions.
    Listener Questions

    David asked about how to replace his manager who’s had 20 years of experience.
    Said wondered what he should do to overcome the fear of leading someone smarter than him.
    James asked about the best ways to prepare how more opportunities to influence others.

    Resources Mentioned

    Leaders Need “User Manuals” – and What I Learned By Writing Mine
    What If You Had to Write a "User Manual" About Your Leadership Style?
    Business Model Generation* by Alexander Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur

    Related Episodes

    Seven Principles for Leading People Older Than You, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 59)
    An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth, with Chris Hadfield (episode 149)
    Do This for a Productive Week (episode 180)
    How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192)
    How to Actually Move Numbers, with Chris McChesney (episode 294)
    The Path to Start Leading Your Team, with John Piñeiro (episode 349)
    Develop Leaders Before You Leave, with David Marquet (episode 405)

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  • Lori Gottlieb: Maybe You Should Talk to Someone
    Lori Gottlieb is a psychotherapist and New York Times bestselling author of Maybe You Should Talk to Someone*. In addition to her clinical practice, she writes The Atlantic’s weekly Dear Therapist advice column and contributes regularly to The New York Times and many other publications.

    Lori has written hundreds of articles related to psychology and culture, many of which have become viral sensations. She is a sought-after expert in media appearing on The Today Show, Good Morning America, and NPR’s “Fresh Air.”

    In this conversation, Lori and I explore what to do with our feelings, how make the transition from idiot compassion towards wise compassion, and where a therapist can help. When a therapist is the right resource, Lori teaches us how to gain the most from therapy by stepping into both vulnerability and accountability.
    Key Points

    It’s important to make the transition from “idiot compassion” to wise compassion — and to find others who can do that for us.
    Sometimes people say they want to stop the difficult feelings, but you can’t mute some feelings without muting all of them.
    We keep secrets from our therapists — and we keep secrets from ourselves. The more we are able to be vulnerable, the more that people are able to help ourselves.
    Insight alone is not valuable without accountability to do better with new insight.
    What matters most in the success of therapy is the relationship with your therapist, more so than any other factor or credentials.

    Resources Mentioned

    Maybe You Should Talk to Someone* by Lori Gottlieb
    Dear Therapist in The Atlantic

    Related Episodes

    How to Manage Your Inner Critic, with Tara Mohr (episode 232)
    Four Steps to Get Unstuck and Embrace Change, with Susan David (episode 297)
    The Way to Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee (episode 344)

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  • Art Markman: Bring Your Brain to Work
    Art Markman is the Annabel Irion Worsham Centennial Professor Centennial Professor of Psychology and Marketing at the University of Texas at Austin. He is also the Founding Director of the Program in the Human Dimensions of Organizations, which brings the humanities and the social behavioral sciences to people in business.

    Along with Bob Duke, Art hosts the radio show Two Guys on Your Head for KUT Radio in Austin, also available as a podcast. He’s the author of many books, most recently: Bring Your Brain to Work: Using Cognitive Science to Get a Job, Do it Well, and Advance Your Career*.

    In this conversation, Art and I explore the science behind what we know and how we can both better recognize what we don’t know and increase our knowledge in that area. Research shows that others are one of our best sources of knowledge and we discuss how to make intentional connections through mentoring to accomplish this.
    Key Points

    Metacognition is the awareness of one’s own knowledge.
    The Dunning-Kruger explains how sometimes feels like we know more about something than we actually do.
    The success of expert generalists demonstrates the value of leveraging connections with others in the organization and industry.
    The most powerful source of knowledge is the people around you.
    Traditional mentoring programs aren’t ideal since they are inorganic.
    Seek these five kinds of people when building a team that can mentor you: coach, superstar, connector, librarian, and teammate.

    Resources Mentioned

    Bring Your Brain to Work: Using Cognitive Science to Get a Job, Do it Well, and Advance Your Career* by Art Markman

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Bring Your Brain to Work in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Find a Mentor (episode 105)
    How to Grow Your Professional Network, with Tom Henschel (episode 279)
    What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398)

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  • Michal Holliday: United States Air Force
    Mike is a 26-year career military officer and colonel in the United States Air Force. He’s been a commander at the squadron and group level. Today, he is chief of engineering overseeing design and construction across the entire Pacific theatre. He’s also a longtime listener of Coaching for Leaders.

    In this conversation, Mike and I discuss how his view of leadership has changed over time and how he’s used personal leadership to guide his journey. We highlight how he’s inspired vivid visions in his organization, created team expectations, and embrace a culture of more immediate coaching and feedback.
    Key Points

    “Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.” -Viktor Frankl
    “The unexamined life is not worth living.” -Socrates
    Vision statements often end up in a drawer. The vivid vision process taught by Cameron Herold has helped the vision to come alive.
    Giving coaching and feedback more immediately is essential for learning and cultivating the right culture. “When I see something, I do something.”
    There is a time and place for order-giving. Spending more time coaching, giving feedback, and listening well helps build trust for orders to be followed when that time comes.

    Resources Mentioned

    Man's Search for Meaning* by Viktor Frankl
    Vivid Vision* by Cameron Herold
    Radical Candor* by Kim Scott

    Related Episodes

    How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192)
    The Way to Make New Behaviors Stick, with Marshall Goldsmith (episode 196)
    How to Make Deep Work Happen, with Cal Newport (episode 233)
    How to Challenge Directly and Care Personally, with Kim Scott (episode 302)
    The Power of Solitude, with Mike Erwin (episode 308)
    How to Create a Vivid Vision, with Cameron Herold (episode 345)
    The Way to Stay Grounded, with Parker Palmer (episode 378)

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  • Mark Allen: Pepperdine University
    Mark Allen is an educator, speaker, consultant, and author who specializes in talent management, corporate universities, and human resources. He is the author of Aha Moments in Talent Management*, The Next Generation of Corporate Universities*, and The Corporate University Handbook*.

    Mark is a professor at Pepperdine University’s Graziadio School of Business and Management, where he also serves as Academic Director of the Master of Science in Human Resources program. He is also a senior faculty member of the Human Capital Institute.

    In this conversation, Mark and I explore the changing demographics of the workforce and why it matters for talent acquisition and leadership development today. Mark shares the key strategies he uses with clients to ensure that leadership development ties directly to organizational results.
    Key Points

    10,000 baby boomers a day are turning 73 and will continue to do so for the next 18 years. The competition for talent will become even more intense than it is today.
    Research shows that 60-90% of all learnings from development programs are never used on the job.
    Leadership development programs should not be designed to create better leadership. Leadership is not a business outcome - it's a means to an end.
    Begin with the end in mind. What’s the business result your leadership development program aims to achieve? Get alignment there before you start building or hire someone to build it.
    Use the 70-20-10 rule to develop people. 70% of time doing experiential learning, 20% of time in coaching and mentoring, and 10% classroom instruction.

    Resources Mentioned

    The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People* by Stephen Covey
    Evaluating Training Programs: The Four Levels* by Donald Kirkpatrick and James Kirkpatrick
    Mark’s consulting work

    Related Episodes

    The Best Way to Do On-the-Job Training (episode 32)
    How to Use Strategy and Evaluation in Training, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 33)
    How to Hire a Trainer or Training Company, with Aaron Kent (episode 35)
    Three Strategies To Build Talent In Your Organization, with Mark Allen (episode 155)

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  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions.
    Listener Questions

    Jules asks about how transparent she should be with her boss on her long-term career aspirations.
    Megan is wondering what she can do when reporting to a leader who seems to have checked out.
    Mason facilitated a strategy meeting with his team is asks for our advice on how he might improve.
    Julie’s organization is changing and she is seeking input on the best path forward to determine if her current team can go the distance.

    Resources Mentioned

    11 Ways to Facilitate Great Conversations
    How to Better Control Your Time by Designing Your Ideal Week by Michael Hyatt
    Audio Course: How to Create Your Personal Vision
    Drive* by Daniel Pink
    The Empowered Manager* by Peter Block
    Analyzing Performance Problems* by Robert F. Mager and Peter Pipe
    Gallup’s StrengthsFinder instrument

    Related Episodes

    How Teams Use StrengthsFinder Results, with Lisa Cummings (episode 293)
    How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block (episode 328)
    How to Lead an Offsite, with Tom Henschel (episode 377)
    Align Your Calendar to What Matters, with Nir Eyal (episode 431)

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  • Tom Henschel: The Look & Sound of Leadership
    Tom Henschel of Essential Communications grooms senior leaders and executive teams. An internationally recognized expert in the field of workplace communications and self-presentation, he has helped thousands of leaders achieve excellence through his work as an executive coach and his top-rated podcast, The Look & Sound of Leadership.

    Recently, I’ve received a number of questions about “managing up” and “coaching up.” In this conversation, Tom and I discuss the art and practice of managing up, how it is different than coaching up, and where to focus your mindset and time for the best results to influence effectively.
    Key Points

    Managing up happens when you want to influence how you’re perceived by your manager. Coaching up happens when you want to create change in the relationship with your manager.
    A useful phrase to start with when speaking truth to power: “I think differently about that…”
    Set aside the emotion when addressing a business issues and lead with data and evidence.
    “Appeal to the nobler motives.” -Dale Carnegie
    Come to the table with solutions — or at least a first step. Most people know this rule, but far fewer do it consistently.
    Ask yourself: how is my boss being measured for success?
    A cardinal rule when managing up: take more off your boss’s plate that you add to it.

    Bonus Audio

    How is your boss being measured?

    Resources Mentioned

    How to Win Friends and Influence People* by Dale Carnegie
    Managing Your Boss by John Gabarro and John Kotter

    Related Episodes

    How to Handle a Boss Who’s a Jerk, with Tom Henschel (episode 164)
    Managing Up (The Look & Sound of Leadership)
    Managing Your Boss (The Look & Sound of Leadership)
    Upward Feedback (The Look & Sound of Leadership)
    Green Lights Always Change (Dave’s Journal)

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  • Denice Hinden: Managance Consulting & Coaching
    Denice is the president of Managance Consulting & Coaching, a firm that helps transform organizations with provocative strategic planning and coaches leaders and leadership teams. She was lead researcher and co-designer of Executive Transition Management (ETM), a now widely used methodology for effectively supporting nonprofits through leadership transitions.

    Denice is the author of The Nonprofit Organizational Culture Guide: Revealing the Hidden Truths that Impact Performance* and Taking Leadership to the Next Level: A Year of Stimulating Essays to Discover More Joy in Leading & Inspiring Others* has a tremendous amount of experience helping leaders and boards find alignment and succeed.

    In this conversation, Denice and I discuss the purpose of a board and how leaders can build relationships with board members. We explore the importance of transparency, how to keep initiatives moving forward, and the practice of regularly providing context.
    Key Points

    Six purposes of a board: (1) set policy and direction, (2) monitor operations for compliance and mission, (3) represent the organization, (4) serve as strategy partners, (5) keep records for the organization, and (6) develop current and future leaders.
    Leaders who lean into full transparency with their boards will build relationships that weather difficult times.
    Be cautious of making assumptions about what board members want to know.
    When meeting one on one, communicate what has happened in conversations with other board members to help keep things moving forward.
    Connecting board members to context regularly will help them find movement, especially when the board is in a volunteer capacity.

    Resources Mentioned

    The Nonprofit Organizational Culture Guide: Revealing the Hidden Truths that Impact Performance* by Denice Hinden
    Taking Leadership to the Next Level: A Year of Stimulating Essays to Discover More Joy in Leading & Inspiring Others* by Denice Hinden

    Related Episodes

    How to Increase Your Conversational Intelligence, with Judith Glaser (episode 271)
    Executive Presence with Your Elevator Speech, with Tom Henschel (episode 316)
    How to Find Confidence in Conflict, with Kwame Christian (episode 380)

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  • Nir Eyal: Indistractable
    Nir Eyal is one of the most respected experts on the intersection of psychology, technology, and business. The MIT Technology Review has called him, “The Prophet of Habit-Forming Technology.”

    He previously authored the Wall Street Journal bestseller Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products* which received tremendous traction in the technology and entrepreneurial communities. Now, he’s turned his attention to how we can control our attention in a world of complexity.

    His new book, Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life*, challenges some of the traditional misconceptions about distractions. In this conversation, Nir and I discuss the practical steps on how to align your calendar with what matters most.
    Key Points

    Being a professional is doing what you say you’re going to do.
    Most people don’t know what they are going to do. Research shows only a third of Americans keep a daily schedule.
    If you don’t plan your time, someone else will plan it for you.
    Look to executive leaders for inspiration on being intentional with time.
    Move away from the to-do list and instead begin the discipline of timeboxing your calendar.

    Resources Mentioned

    Resources Nir mentioned in our conversation
    Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life* by Nir Eyal

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Indistractable in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    Getting Things Done, with David Allen (episode 184)
    How to Transform Your Limitations Into Advantages, with Mark Barden (episode 207)
    The Way to Stop Spinning Your Wheels on Planning (episode 319)

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  • Rita McGrath: Seeing Around Corners
    Rita McGrath is a best-selling author, a sought-after speaker, and a longtime professor at Columbia Business School. She is one of the world’s top experts on innovation and growth and is one of the most regularly published authors in the Harvard Business Review. Rita is consistently ranked among the top 10 management thinkers in the world and was ranked #1 for strategy by Thinkers50.

    Rita is the author of the bestseller The End of Competitive Advantage*. Her newest book is titled Seeing Around Corners: How to Spot Inflection Points in Business Before They Happen*.

    In this conversation, Rita and I explore how it feels like change happens overnight, but why that’s not usually accurate. We detail four basic stages of inflection points, why it’s critical to be present at the edges, and what leaders can do practically to see around corners.
    Key Points

    Strategic inflection points feel like they happen overnight, but in reality there are many indicators over time that inflection points are coming.
    The four basic stages of almost every inflection point: hype, dismissive, emergent, maturity.
    Snow melts from the edges. The most effective leaders can and will see this if they are present at the edges.
    To see early warning signs, create information flows that reach directly from leaders offices into the frontlines of the business.
    Create incentives that reward useful (and awkward) information.
    Talk to the future that is unfolding now. There are people, customers, and businesses where the future is already happening.

    Resources Mentioned

    Seeing Around Corners by Rita McGrath
    Rita McGrath on LinkedIn
    Breaking Up the Degree Stranglehold: Disruption in Higher Education
    Only the Paranoid Survive* by Andrew Grove

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Seeing Around Corners in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Lead a 100-Year Life, with Lynda Gratton (episode 266)
    The Truth and Lies of Performance Management, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 361)
    The Way to Nurture New Ideas, with Safi Bahcall (episode 418)

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  • Amy McPherson: Advisors for Change
    Amy McPherson is the managing partner and founder of Advisors for Change. Since 2007, Advisors for Change has developed financial management systems for non-profit organizations so they can spend more time on their mission and less time on their administration.

    Amy is also a member of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. After discovering this podcast three years ago, Amy sought a practical way to implement the leadership ideas she was discovering.

    In this conversation, Amy and I discuss how her aim to create more margin for her family has driven more intention for staff development, coaching, and transparency. We also discuss what she’s discovered from expert guests and how she utilized the framework of the Academy to create movement.
    Key Points

    The seven questions from The Coaching Habit provided a framework for the kind of culture that would best serve the non-profit partners of Advisors for Change.
    Shifting focus from lagging indicators to leading indicators helped zero in on the behaviors needed today for success tomorrow.
    Find the bigger “why” behind what you are doing. In Amy’s case, her leadership growth was fueled by her desire to spend more time with her teenage children.
    The Coaching for Leaders Academy provided Amy with the framework for deliberate, consistent movement on what was most important for the business.

    Resources Mentioned

    Advisors for Change
    Amy McPherson on LinkedIn

    Related Episodes

    These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237)
    How Teams Use StrengthsFinder Results, with Lisa Cummings (episode 293)
    How to Actually Move Numbers, with Chris McChesney (episode 294)
    How to Challenge Directly and Care Personally, with Kim Scott (episode 302)
    Growth Mindset Helps You Rise From the Ashes, with Jeff Hittenberger (episode 326)

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  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions.
    Key Points
    In this episode, Bonni and I celebrate Coaching for Leaders recently passing the milestone of 10 million episode downloads since we began airing this podcast in 2011. Today, this podcast is regularly ranked as a Top 50 business show on Apple Podcasts.

    The growth of the show has been the direct result of listeners like you who have put your trust in us to support your development. As a result, we invited listeners to be featured in this episode by telling us what they’ve gained from the show.

    Thank you for supporting Coaching for Leaders and for sharing it with others in your professional network. There is no greater compliment to our work.
    Resources Mentioned

    Essential Communications with Tom Henschel
    StrengthsFinder with Isabeau Iqbal
    Lead Through Strengths with Lisa Cummings
    Sequentia Solutions with Steve Chase
    Aid for Aid Workers with Torrey Peace

    Related Episodes

    The Power of Introverts, with Susan Cain (episode 44)
    How to Improve Your Coaching Skills, with Tom Henschel (episode 190)
    These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237)
    How to Write a Killer LinkedIn Profile, with Brenda Bernstein (episode 285)
    Move From Theory to Practice, with Steve Schroeder (episode 369)
    Unconscious Mistakes Women Make, with Lois Frankel (episode 386)

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  • Pete Mockaitis: How to be Awesome at Your Job
    Pete Mockaitis is an award-winning trainer and coach who helps professionals perform optimally at work. He hosts the How to be Awesome at Your Job podcast, a show that has been downloaded eight million times and consistently ranks as a top business show in Apple Podcasts.

    Pete facilitates training for organizations on enhanced thinking and collaboration to increase clarity and reduce rework. He helps teams save an average of 1.4 hours per person per week.

    In this conversation, Pete and I explore some of the key mindsets and questions that are helpful when getting alignment with your boss. We explore the areas you’ll want to generate clarity, as well a few key questions to consider.
    Key Points
    Six areas where clarity is critical:

    Deliverables
    Timing
    Process
    Resources
    Audience
    Motive

    Questions you may consider when getting alignment with your boss:

    How do you want this to look when complete?
    What does the organization value on metrics and deliverables?
    What’s an example of a time this expectation was not met?
    What metrics are my boss being measured on for their own success?

    Resources Mentioned

    How to be Awesome at Your Job

    Related Episodes

    Seven Principles for Leading People Older Than You, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 59)
    How to Influence Numerous Stakeholders, with Andy Kaufman (episode 240)
    Effective Delegation of Authority, with Hassan Osman (episode 413)

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  • Ginger Hardage: Unstoppable Cultures
    Ginger Hardage is the former senior vice president of culture at Southwest Airlines. She led a team responsible for building and sustaining the organization’s legendary culture and communications enterprise, resulting in 23 consecutive years on Fortune’s list of Top 10 Most Admired Companies in the World.

    Today, Ginger leads Unstoppable Cultures, a firm designed to help organizations create and sustain cultures of enduring greatness. She facilitates the annual Unstoppable Cultures Fellowship to help leaders of all kinds take practical steps to create the culture that will help their organization thrive.

    In this conversation, Ginger and I discuss the five lies she’s seen come up again and again in her work with leaders who are struggling with culture. Perhaps most importantly, Ginger emphasizes that leaders need not accept the default culture, but should work to define the culture.
    Key Points
    The five lies Ginger has uncovered about culture:

    Culture is someone else’s job.
    Our values are on the wall.
    Culture is fluffy.
    If I empower my employees, I might lose control.
    We can’t afford culture.

    Bonus Audio

    Defining a culture

    Resources Mentioned

    5 Lies About Corporate Culture document
    Unstoppable Cultures Fellowship

    Related Episodes

    The Four Critical Stories Leaders Need For Influence, with David Hutchens (episode 148)
    Notice and Change Dysfunctional Culture, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 327)
    How to Create an Unstoppable Culture, with Ginger Hardage (episode 350)

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  • Leonardo Baumworcel: Hospital São Lucas
    Leonardo Baumworcel is the director of Hospital São Lucas in Brazil. He oversees a 200-bed hospital and emergency room seeing 10,000 patients a month. He also oversees the work of 2,500 staff. He is a cardiologist by training and a recent alum of the Coaching for Leaders Academy.
    Key Points

    One way to utilize the podcast is to leverage if for staff training to get the entire team on the same page.
    Resilience is key when working to achieve your vision through change — beware of giving up too quickly.
    Leaders need to establish the frameworks and limitations for what to do — and then help people to have the freedom to work within it.
    Peer mentoring allows both leaders to learn from each other, instead of limiting the professional development to one person.

    Resources Mentioned

    Leading Change* by John Kotter
    Our Iceberg Is Melting* by John Kotter and Holger Rathgeber

    Related Episodes

    The Power of Vulnerability in Leadership, with Jason Brooks (episode 385)
    How to Create an Unstoppable Culture, with Ginger Hardage (episode 350)
    How to Succeed with Leadership and Management, with John Kotter (episode 249)
    Move From Theory to Practice, with Steve Schroeder (episode 369)

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  • Scott Anthony Barlow: Happen to Your Career
    Scott Anthony Barlow is the founder of Happen to Your Career. He’s been featured on CNBC, Yahoo, CareerBuilder, Fast Company, and Huffington Post and various colleges and universities as a top expert on career happiness. He's held executive roles in human resources, business development, and career coaching.

    Scott is the host of the Happen to Your Career podcast, featuring the career stories of many successful professionals. He and his team have worked with over 25,000 people to help them stop settling, find their signature strengths, and start doing meaningful work they are enamored with.
    Key Points

    Many people frame career choices only as, “Should I take this offer or not?” or, “Should I quit this job and go and get another?”
    Skills are not necessarily strengths. People who are successful and happier are spending more time in their strengths.
    Gallup’s StrengthsFinder assessment (now called CliftonStrengths) is a useful tool for getting clarity.
    Change to a role/company that allows you spend more time in your strengths or decide to design your career from the inside.
    Stop pursuing marginal improvements of your weaknesses.

    Resources Mentioned

    The Ultimate Guide to Using Your Strengths to Get Hired*
    8-Day Video Course to Figuring Out What You Love

    Related Episodes

    How to Figure Out Your Career, with Scott Anthony Barlow (episode 259)
    How Teams Use StrengthsFinder Results, with Lisa Cummings (episode 293)
    Move From Caretaker to Rainmaker, with May Busch (episode 390)

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  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly-traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions.
    Listener Questions

    Samantha asks about how to confront an employee who is not willing to take direction for her.
    Cathy is wondering how she can lead on a team where she does not have formal authority.
    Amir is seeking advice on how to step into a director role with confidence and managing former peers.
    Kelly asks about responding to stakeholders who give suggestions when it doesn’t align with organizational strategy.

    Resources Mentioned

    Let's Get Real or Let's Not Play* by Mahan Khalsa, Randy Illig, and Stephen R. Covey
    Working Wardrobes*

    Related Episodes

    How to Manage Former Peers, with Tom Henschel (episode 257)
    How to Actually Move Numbers, with Chris McChesney (episode 294)
    The Path to Start Leading Your Team, with John Piñeiro (episode 349)
    Finding Joy Though Intentional Choices, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 417)

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  • Sandie Morgan: Global Center for Women & Justice
    Sandie Morgan is the director of the Global Center for Women and Justice at Vanguard University of Southern California. She is recognized globally for her expertise on combatting human trafficking and working to end violence against women. Sandie is professor, researcher, and partner to many organizations and agencies across the globe including governments, law enforcement, and non-profits.

    Since 2011, she has hosted along with me the bimonthly Ending Human Trafficking podcast which was recognized by The National Clearinghouse on Families & Youth at the Department of Health and Human Services as a great way to “get up to speed on human trafficking.”
    Key Points

    Culture often changes from the top down. Engage “elites” who are outside of the centermost position of prestige.
    Find avenue of agreement instead of focusing on differences.
    Influence happens in exciting ways when the networks of elites and the institutions they lead overlap.
    Change will mean conflict — don’t be scared of this.
    The more diverse your partnerships are, the stronger your net is going to be.

    Bonus Audio

    Why learning from elites is so important

    Resources Mentioned

    To Change the World* by James Davison Hunter
    How to Win Friends and Influence People* by Dale Carnegie
    Global Center for Women and Justice
    2019 Trafficking in Persons Report

    Related Episodes

    How Storytelling Helps You Lead, with Sandie Morgan (episode 51)
    How to Collaborate Across Organizations, with Kirsten Foot (episode 215)
    How to Grow Your Professional Network, with Tom Henschel (episode 279)
    The Power of Weak Connections, with David Burkus (episode 347)

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  • Pooja Agarwal: Powerful Teaching
    Pooja Agarwal is an expert in the field of cognitive science and is passionate about bridging gaps between education and the science of learning. She is the founder of RetrievalPractice.org and Assistant Professor at the Berklee College of Music, teaching psychological science to exceptional undergraduate musicians.

    She also serves as a consultant and facilitates professional development workshops on the science of learning around the world. Pooja is the author with Patrice Bain of the book Powerful Teaching: Unleash the Science of Learning*.

    In this conversation, Pooja and I discuss the key strategies that leaders can use in order to maximize their effectiveness as teachers. Since almost every leader is responsible for talent development in some capacity, becoming a more powerful teacher will help you develop others more successfully.
    Key Points

    The three stages of the learning process are encoding, storage, and retrieval. We tend to focus too much on getting information into peoples’ heads (encoding) and not enough on getting it out (retrieval).
    Stop reviewing past discussions and meetings. Instead, invite people to recall and articulate prior interactions.
    Cramming works, but only in the short-term. For long-term retention, spacing is much more effective.
    There is no significant evidence that visual, auditory, and kinetic preferences correlate to actual learning. Instead, effective learning combines all these methods.

    Bonus Audio

    Why struggling is a good thing for learning

    Resources Mentioned

    RetrievalPractice.org
    PowerfulTeaching.org
    Powerful Teaching: Unleash the Science of Learning*
    Are You a Visual or an Auditory Learner? It Doesn’t Matter

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Powerful Teaching in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    The Best Way to Do On-the-Job Training (episode 32)
    These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237)
    Essentials of Adult Development, with Mindy Danna (episode 273)
    Develop Leaders Before You Leave, with David Marquet (episode 405)

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