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  • Fashion Revolution Week 2017 has arrived and with it, this special 7-part podcast series hosted by Clare Press of Wardrobe Crisis, highlighting the stories behind some of our region's most ethical clothing labels. 

    Much of what we think of as ethical fashion is the external, the obvious - shirts, dresses, denim, bags, jewellery - but what about the most everyday item of clothing? What about ethical underwear?

    In the final episode (sniff!) of this series, Clare chats with Hannah Parris, one of the founders of Mighty Good Undies, the ethical label that exploded on to the scene in 2016 with their Fair Trade, organic cotton undies. Hannah and Clare speak about the environmental activism that lead to the creation of Mighty Good Undies, why collaboration has been absolutely vital in its success and why people are now paying more attention to the stories behind the clothes they wear.

    Such a great end to what's been a great series. Thanks to everyone whose been involved and here's to continuing to ask, "Who made my clothes?"  

    For more information on everything in today's episode visit:

    Mighty Good Undies - http://mightygoodundies.com.au/Fashion Revolution - http://www.fashionrevolution.org Or search for #whomademyclothes on social media and be the change! 

     

  • Fashion Revolution Week 2017 has arrived and with it, this special 7-part podcast series hosted by Clare Press of Wardrobe Crisis, highlighting the stories behind some of our region's most ethical clothing labels. 

    So many of the garments we wear (even the ethical ones!) are made off-shore, so it's a rare treat to talk with someone whose passion is in local manufacturing. In this episode Clare speaks with Celia Morris, founder of Dragstar. 

    Dragstar has always remained true to Celia’s personal values and vision, with a timeless style, local production and garments that will stand the test of time central to both Dragstar’s design ethos, and Celia’s ongoing rebellion against ‘landfill fashion’. She and Clare chat about the factories Dragstar single-handedly supports and the impact local proudction has on both the label and the people who make it. 

    For more information on everything in today's episode visit:

    Dragstar - https://www.dragstar.com.au/Fashion Revolution - http://www.fashionrevolution.org Or search for #whomademyclothes on social media and be the change! 

     

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  • Fashion Revolution Week 2017 has arrived and with it, this special 7-part podcast series hosted by Clare Press of Wardrobe Crisis, highlighting the stories behind some of our region's most ethical clothing labels. 

    The nature of ethical fashion is often tied most closely to the people who make the garments, but it doesn't stop there. What about animal welfare and environmental stewardship? Farming practices and the biodegradable fabrics?

    Clare speaks with Pip Smith of Love Merino - a family-owned label crafting scarves made from the finest Merino grown right on their farm in Wellington, NSW. They chat about the Smith's holistic management of the land, the way they use a sustainable sheep breed in order to stop any need for mulesing, and also the steps they take to ensure that each step of the process in producing their scarves is ethical and in support of small Australian businesses.  

    For more information on everything in today's episode visit:

    Love Merino - https://www.lovemerino.com.au/Fashion Revolution - http://www.fashionrevolution.org Or search for #whomademyclothes on social media and be the change! 

     

  • Fashion Revolution Week 2017 has arrived and with it, this special 7-part podcast series hosted by Clare Press of Wardrobe Crisis, highlighting the stories behind some of our region's most ethical clothing labels. 

    In today's episode, Clare chats with Rachel Pines, founder of Moonbird - a Fair Trade, B Corp certified sleepwear label based in Sydney. Not only do Clare and Rachel talk about what Fair Trade and B Corp certifications actually mean, but also why diversity and body positivity should be included under the umbrella of ethical fashion too.

    Rachel shares some of her personal experiences working with the inspiring organisation Freeset, as well as the reasons she continues to source her organic cotton from India. 

     

    For more information on everything in today's episode visit:

    Moonbird - https://www.moonbird.com.au/Fashion Revolution - http://www.fashionrevolution.org Or search for #whomademyclothes on social media and be the change! 

     

  • Fashion Revolution Week 2017 has arrived and with it, this special 7-part podcast series hosted by Clare Press of Wardrobe Crisis, highlighting the stories behind some of our region's most ethical clothing labels. 

    Dr Hassan Ahmed is the co-founder of Conscious Step, an organisation that takes an everyday product that we all buy and wear - the humble sock - manufactures it ethically (Fair Trader certified) and then shares profits of each pair sold with a variety of world-changing charities. 

    In this conversation with Clare, Ahmed talks about the history of Conscious Step, how they choose the charities they support, and why he thinks ethical fashion is becoming more prevalent in both women and menswear. 

    For more information on everything in today's episode visit:

    Conscious Step - https://consciousstep.com/Fashion Revolution - http://www.fashionrevolution.org Or search for #whomademyclothes on social media and be the change! 

     

  • Fashion Revolution Week 2017 has arrived and with it, this special 7-part podcast series hosted by Clare Press of Wardrobe Crisis, highlighting the stories behind some of our region's most ethical clothing labels. 

    Can a clothing label help rescue women from human trafficking? The short answer is yes.

    Today Clare talks to Jeff Ward of Liminal - an NZ company drastically changing the face of merch and branded apparel. By partnering with Freeset, an organisation in India working to free women from human trafficking, Liminal is able to create organic, Fair Trade tshirts, bags and promo wristbands which create a better world not only for the women who work for them but also for the planet at large. 

    For more information on everything in today's episode visit:

    Liminal - http://liminal.org.nz/Fashion Revolution - http://www.fashionrevolution.org Or search for #whomademyclothes on social media and be the change! 

     

  • Fashion Revolution Week 2017 has arrived and with it, this special 7-part podcast series hosted by Clare Press of Wardrobe Crisis, highlighting the stories behind some of our region's most ethical clothing labels. 

    In this episode Clare chats with Anna Robertson, founder of YEVU - a socially responsible clothing line made in Ghana, West Africa. 

    YEVU creates full time jobs, and is able to pay its workers above Ghana's living wage. Anna talks about what that 'living wage' looks like, and the many ways YEVU is helping its people to lift themselves out of the poverty cycle. 

    Listen as Anna shares stories of the people behind the clothes and the social impact YEVU is having, in this inspiring conversation.

    For more information on everything in today's episode visit:

    YEVU Clothing - https://www.yevuclothing.com/Fashion Revolution - http://www.fashionrevolution.org Or search for #whomademyclothes on social media and be the change! 

     

  • Who Made My Clothes is a new podcast series produced by Fashion Revolution Australia New Zealand and Jackrabbit.FM, and hosted by ethical fashion advocate and journalist Clare Press of Wardrobe Crisis.

    It's for anyone who loves fashion but who doesn't want their wardrobe to come at the cost of people or planet.

    In this first episode Clare and Mel Tually of Fashion Revolution chat about this year's Fashion Revolution Week, why they are both such passionate advocates for ethical, sustainable fashion, and what you can expect in this special 7-part series, launching April 24th. 

    Every episode will explore the question of "who made my clothes" and offers an insight in to the people behind some of the region's most ethical fashion labels, putting a human face to the clothes we wear and the impact it can have.  

    For more information on the revolution and how to get involved, head over to http://www.fashionrevolution.org or search for #whomademyclothes on social media and be the change!