Episodes

  • In episode 330, Gareth Nicholson, deputy technology editor on the technology desk from South China Morning Post (SCMP), joined us to discuss the China Internet Report 2020 and its impact to the rest of the world. We discuss the key major trends: the impact of COVID-19 on China tech and how it transform food delivery, the accelerated self-reliance of Chinese companies due to the US and China tensions, the year of 5G for mass adoption in the Chinese domestic market, live streaming and ecommerce, and finally, why the Chinese companies are now moving their US listings back to China. Last but not least, Gareth shared the key trends that he will watch out for in 2021.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion:

    Gareth Nicholson, deputy Technology Editor on the Technology desk, South China Morning Post. Since our last conversation, what have you been up to? China Internet Report 2020 by South China Morning Post Now let’s talk about the report. It’s SCMP’s 3rd annual report, what are some of the key sections and themes that the China Internet report has always focused on? As we understand that SCMP has been delivering the China Internet Report every year since 2016, what are the key themes which the report have discussed every year till now? I love how the report starts off with ‘China in a glance’ which provides readers with a general background of the Chinese internet space. The graphic comparisons for the China vs US internet landscapes are helpful. For example, I didn’t know that China has about 3 times the number of internet users at 904M in comparison to US’s almost 300 million (298M). Can you provide us a snapshot on how the Chinese Internet is now compared with respect to the US? Who are now the key players within the Chinese tech ecosystem, as we notice that Baidu has dropped down to number 11? Trend #1: Impact of COVID-19 to China Tech Sector What is the impact of COVID-19 on China’s tech sector? How did the Ministry of Industry & Information Technology in China respond to COVID-19 pandemic? with plans along the 5 themes: building a strong infrastructure network, applying digital technology in all sectors, enhancing data security, strengthening tech innovation and optimizing broader industry development? Trend #2: China Accelerated Self-Reliance on Tech With the ongoing tension escalating between the US and China, how is China doing on the path of becoming technologically self-reliant? What are some of China’s major challenges? What is the impact of this move to self-reliance for Huawei and other Chinese companies? Where are the competencies that Chinese tech firms will need to develop to bridge the gap between them and the US? Trend #3: The year of mass adoption for 5G Is this the year for mass adoption for 5G? What will be the impact of 5G for Chinese tech in the next two to three years? Trend #4: Live Streaming's 3rd Phase in China What are the 3 phases of livestream in China and what’s after the 3rd phase? Trend #5: China companies listing back at home (Hong Kong and Shanghai) We are seeing a lot of Chinese companies looking to list in HK or Shanghai. Do you see this a part of the great trend due to the tensions between the US and China? At the same time, we see accounting scandals for example, Luckin Coffee and TAL education and this leads to more scrutiny to Chinese companies, do you think that more and more chinese companies will delist from the US and move back to China? What topics are covered in the pro-report as compared from the free report? Closing How do our audience find you?

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted and produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin) and originally created by Bernard Leong (@bernardleong, Linkedin). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack.

    analyseasia · China Internet Report 2020 with Gareth Nicholson
  • In episode 329, Jon Russell, editor of The Ken Southeast Asia, joined us in a conversation to discuss the continuing epic rivalry between Gojek and Grab in the era of COVID-19 pandemic. Starting from the perspective of Gojek, we discuss the impact and changes made after the founder's departure and how they are re-organizing to tackle Grab's onslaught in Indonesia and expanding out to other parts of Southeast Asia from Indonesia. With new investments from US tech giants, Facebook and Paypal, we discuss how Gojek is shaping itself to be a worthy rival against Grab backed by SoftBank and Alibaba in Southeast Asia. Last but not least, Jon discuss why the media streaming giants of Southeast Asia, HOOQ & iFlix failed to take on Netflix and the key takeaways for unicorn start-ups in the era of COVID-19 pandemic.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion:

    Jon Russell (@jonrussell, LinkedIn, Newsletter, Personal Site, The Ken Profile) Since we have last spoken, you have moved out of TechCrunch and now joined The Ken. Can you talk about The Ken and what is your new role there? Grab vs Gojek in 2020 Let’s start from Gojek, a lot of things have happened. Their founder and former CEO, Nadiem Makarim has left the company and become a Minister of Education & Culture under President Jokowi’s cabinet in Indonesia. What’s the impact on Gojek after his departure? (Ref: Up for Grab? Gojek after Nadiem Makarim) They have started the expansion to Southeast Asia last year but it has not grown very well. (Ref: Gojek’s stunted SE Asia expansion story), can you talk about their challenges in expanding out of Indonesia while dealing with Grab who is competing in their backyard? That being said, they have been doing well on the fundraising front: Gojek has been invested by Facebook and Paypal (Source: CNBC). What are the implications to Gojek as Google, Paypal and Facebook are lining up against Grab? (Ref: Facebook, PayPal’s payments play a super app-ortunity for Gojek) The US tech giants are in Indonesia just as the Chinese tech giants, for example, Meituan-Dianping which is a super app entering the market. What can Gojek and Grab learn from Meituan-Dianping? (Ref: The Gojek-Grab SE Asia super app battle with a Meituan twist) What is the impact of COVID-19 on Grab and Gojek? Both Gojek and Grab have done layoffs in the past month. How do you look at the approaches from both companies? (Grab CEO’s memo, Gojek’s layoffs) SoftBank has been taking a hit from Wework and Oyo. What is the downstream impact to Grab based on the current troubles in the Vision Fund? Is the race to dominate Southeast Asia going down to whether Grab or Gojek wins Indonesia and not the other countries (Vietnam, Thailand, Philippines and Malaysia, Singapore)? What will the key battleground for Grab and Gojek in the coming 2021? Impact of COVID-19 to Southeast Asia You have written a lot of media streaming companies similar to Netflix, for example HOOQ from Singapore and iFlix from Malaysia. The COVID-19 pandemic have led to HOOQ being shut down and iFlix being acquired from Tencent. What are the key learnings from HOOQ’s downfall and iFlix’s acquisition? What are the key takeaways from the COVID pandemic for Southeast Asia? (Ref: 7 takeaways from Covid-time digital winners and losers in Southeast Asia) Closing Can you recommend a book or movie or podcast or anything which recently made an impact to your work and personal life? Jon's recommendation: Sarah Frier, "No Filter: The Inside Story of Instagram" How do my audience find you?

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted and produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin) and originally created by Bernard Leong (@bernardleong, Linkedin). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack.

    analyseasia · Gojek vs Grab in Southeast Asia 2020 Edition with Jon Russell
  • Missing episodes?

    Click here to refresh the feed.

  • In episode 328, Lim Xinyi, senior director for corporate development from Pinduoduo, joined us to discuss the social ecommerce company and its impact on agriculture. Starting from the conversation, Xinyi shared her background and how she came to discover and eventually join Pinduoduo. She discuss Pinduoduo's current mission and vision and how the company pioneered social ecommerce in China. Last but not least she shared Pinduoduo's contributions to the agriculture sector in China and how they are helping farmers to get their agricultural produce to the consumers during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    Lim Xinyi (LinkedIn), Senior Director, Corporate Development at Pinduoduo (@PinduoduoInc, LinkedIn, Medium) How did you start your career? In your career journey, what are the interesting career lessons you can share with our audience. Pinduoduo’s Social E-Commerce Model and its impact in agriculture Can you briefly introduce us to your company Pinduoduo in China and its mission and vision? How do you explain Pinduoduo as a social e-commerce company to the audience out there? Before Pinduoduo came into the scene in 2015, the ecommerce industry led by Alibaba and Jingdong (JD) generated a combined revenue of $433B gross merchandise value (GMV), and within 5 years, it skyrocketed from a startup to 57B company with buying base of 585M generating $144B of GMV (reference from Pinduoduo & the rise of Social E-Commerce by YCombinator) and by 2020, it’s the 2nd largest ecommerce platform in China behind Alibaba. Can you talk about how Pinduoduo pioneered the concept of social shopping in China? What are the features of social shopping that have been introduced by Pinduoduo? (For example, 1/ creating community via team purchase, 2/ Daily Check ins, 3/ Price Chop, 4/ Card program, 5/ mini games and 6/ personalized recommendations referenced in the YC article) What are the misconceptions from the Western world which Pinduoduo has been mis-understood as a company? How does Pinduoduo contribute to the agriculture sector in China? (See reference by Parmesh Shah from World Bank) Why is Pinduoduo well-suited to help farmers and digitize agriculture? What are the benefits for the farmers in China? How does Duo Duo Farms help to alleviate poverty and create a sustainable future via the team purchase feature in Pinduoduo? Can you elaborate about the Duo Duo Farm project in Yunnan and what are the key learnings there? Given the current COVID-19 pandemic, what have been Pinduoduo’s response to the situation and what you have done to help the farmers to tide over this tough period? What are the key trends you see in the future of social commerce and does this extend beyond agriculture for Pinduoduo? Closing Can you recommend anything (a book, movie or article) which has inspired you recently? Xinyi's recommendations: understanding the Black Lives Matter movement in the United States. How do our audience find you?

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted and produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin) and originally created by Bernard Leong (@bernardleong, Linkedin). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack.

    analyseasia · Pinduoduo on Social Ecommerce & Agriculture with Xinyi Lim
  • In episode 327, Geoffrey Cain, author of "Samsung Rising" joins us in a two parts conversation on his journey across Asia as a journalist and author and discuss the backstory of his new book behind the Samsung Group and how it rise to be the most powerful Chaebol (large family-owned business conglomerate) in Korea. In the second part of the conversation, Geoffrey discuss Samsung's complicated relationship with Apple as both a supplier and competitor and how their arrogance and hierarchical culture led to the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 fiasco. He reveals why he did not include the story of Lee Boo-jin, the daughter of Lee Kun Hee who is often tapped as a potential successor to the Samsung Group and why it is unlikely that there will be a female leader to helm the Samsung Group. Last but not least, Geoffrey offered his perspectives on how Samsung is responsible for exporting culture out of Korea to the rest of the world, particularly the movie Parasite and his thoughts on whether there is a future for another Samsung-like Group emerging in another market out there.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    Geoffrey Cain, author of “Samsung Rising”, and also regular commentator on The Wall Street Journal (WSJ), Time & The New Republic and former correspondent in The Economist (Website, @geoffrey_cain, LinkedIn) Samsung Rising (Random House, Amazon, Apple Books) [0:30] What are your perspectives on Samsung’s dual relationship with Apple, as a supplier of solid state drives and OLED screens for the iPhone while competing with their flagship phones, the Galaxy series phones? [0:34] Samsung Galaxy note 7 fiasco is well covered in the press. In your view in covering that story, what lessons have Samsung learned from that disaster that almost ended their smartphone dominance? [3:56] What are the fundamental flaws that are in Samsung that are not functioning in today's world? [8:06] The battles within the Lee family for the succession to Samsung's empire. [11:28] Comments on Lee Boo-jin, the sister of Jay Lee as a potential successor to the Samsung Group, and why it is not included in the book "Samsung Rising" Samsung's family connection with the Oscar best movie in 2020 "Parasite" [22:24] Do you think that the success that Samsung has attained after 80 years of work can be replicated in other countries today? [27:40] Closing Do you have any recommendation of a book, movie, podcast or anything which have inspired you recently? [32:25] Geoffrey's recommendations: Joe Studwell "How Asia Works", James Fallows "China Airborne". Where do our audience find you? [33:45]

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted and produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin) and originally created by Bernard Leong (@bernardleong, Linkedin). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack.

    analyseasia · Samsung Rising Part Two with Geoffrey Cain
  • In episode 326, Geoffrey Cain, author of "Samsung Rising" joins us in a two parts conversation on his journey across Asia as a journalist and author and discuss the backstory of his new book behind the Samsung Group and how it rise to be the most powerful Chaebol (large family-owned business conglomerate) in Korea. In the first part of the conversation, Geoffrey discuss the inspiration and the main themes behind "Samsung Rising", and shares the origin story of Samsung and how they went from an agriculture business to a global technology giant today along with Apple and Huawei by a family owned enterprise spanning three generations.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    Geoffrey Cain, author of “Samsung Rising”, and also regular commentator on The Wall Street Journal (WSJ), Time & The New Republic and former correspondent in The Economist (Website, @geoffrey_cain, LinkedIn) [0:26] How did you start your career? [0:55] What have you learned from covering North & South Korea, China and Cambodia in your career journey? [8:35] In your career journey, what are the key lessons you can share with the younger audience? [10:55] Comments on how the history of Samsung aligns with the story of South Korea's rise as one of the top economies in Asia. Samsung Rising (Random House, Amazon, Apple Books) [15:45] What is the inspiration behind writing the book “Samsung Rising”? [16:20] Who are the intended audience of the book? [20:32] If you will to summarize the key takeaways of the book, what would they be so that you can spark their interest to learn more? [22:22] Can you talk about the origins of Samsung and what type of businesses that the family behind the company have grown from a small trading company to modern technology giant today? [25:05] What does Chaebol means in South Korea? [33:05] The family behind Samsung have gone through three generations: the founder Lee Byung-chul (or B.C Lee in short), Lee Kun-hee and recently to Jay Lee. Can you talk about how each leader has been different and what their contributions to Samsung have been? [36:50] Can Jay Lee step up for Samsung as his father and grandfather have in the past? [49:04] Jay Lee's investments in Silicon Valley and how he is thinking about Samsung's future given that the environment is currently becoming more complex with US protectionism. [52:00]

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted and produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin) and originally created by Bernard Leong (@bernardleong, Linkedin). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack.

    analyseasia · Samsung Rising Part One with Geoffrey Cain
  • In episode 325, Tim Culpan from Bloomberg joined us to dissect the most important deal that rocked the Asian business and technology landscape with Facebook investing 5.7B into Reliance Jio. We began the conversation with Tim to set the context behind the deal and what both Facebook & Reliance Jio Platforms stand to gain from this partnership and their ambitions to win the market with a super app concept that is now popular in China & Southeast Asia. Tim also examined the implications to what it means for the Chinese technology giants from Alibaba to Xiaomi in India and the US technology giants such as Google and Amazon. Last but not least, Tim discuss the recent debacles which SoftBank faced with their investments and whether there is a silver lining for the Vision Fund.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    Tim Culpan (@tculpan, Linkedin, Bloomberg), Columnist at Bloomberg [0:29] Since our last conversation, what have you been up to? [1:23] Facebook investment in Reliance Jio and its impact on India [2:39] Ref: Facebook and Ambani Can Be Happy Together by Tim Culpan and Why Facebook is betting big in India by Ravi Agrawal (Source: Foreign Policy) To start, Facebook has invested $5.7 billion for a 9.99% stake in India’s Reliance Jio Platforms, a three-and-a-half-year-old subsidiary of the nation’s most valued firm, Reliance Industries, and the biggest telecom operator in the country with more than 370 million subscribers and valued Jio at a pre-money valuation of $65.95 billion, makes Facebook the largest minority shareholder in the Indian telecom network. To help our audience to start the conversation, what does the telco Reliance Jio do and why they are influential in the India telco market? (Note: Mukesh Ambani is the richest tycoon in India - see AA episode 264 with James Crabtree who profiled him and his family in the book “The Billionaire Raj”) What is Jio Platforms and Mukesh Ambani, the person behind Jio Platforms and his ownership of Reliance Industries, the largest Indian conglomerate. [4:38] Why did Facebook invest in Jio? [6:58] How will Facebook extend its influence of its platform (and we include Whatsapp and Instagram) across India through this investment in Reliance Jio? [8:33] How would this partnership between Facebook and Reliance Jio Platforms help the small and medium businesses and jumpstart their Jio Mart initiative? [10:51] Does Jio Mart will built or be built into the super app under Whatsapp based on this alliance? [13:25] What does this alliance between Facebook and Reliance mean for the China tech giants (Bytedance, Alibaba via Paytm, Xiaomi and Tencent) in Indian market? [15:00] Will Google and Amazon consider the same path now that Facebook did the investment? [18:10] What does Reliance Jio gain from the alliance with Facebook in India? [19:51] How will ecommerce or the mobile landscape change in India with this alliance? [21:25] What does this mean for China and US tech giants entering into India which is becoming more protectionist in the past two years? [22:44] Will SoftBank’s Vision Fund fail in the end? [25:31] Ref: Masayoshi Son's Impatience Just Cost $17 Billion, Bankers Keep Vision Fund Going With Rubber Bands and Being a Sore Loser Doesn't Make WeWork’s Neumann Wrong Why did the Vision Fund experience a set of continued problems from its investees such as Wework and Oyo? [25:54] What can we learn from SoftBank’s other failed investments for example, Zume, the pizza startup in the Bay Area? (QOTD: “A visionary founder with a fire hose of money can’t solve every problem.” by Sarah McBride in the article) [28:42] What has happened to companies which have gone public such as Slack and Uber? [31:06] Are there any silver linings for the Vision Fund, for example, Grab, Didi or Bytedance? [32:43] Does the Vision Fund have a future? [35:50] Closing [37:01] Any book or stuff to recommend? [37:19] Tim's recommendations: dance music in the 1980s, 1990s & 2000s and Youtube Where can our audience find you? [38:01]

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted and produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin) and originally created by Bernard Leong (@bernardleong, Linkedin). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack.

  • In episode 324, Rui Ma, co-host of Tech Buzz China podcast and a trusted voice on China Tech joined us on a conversation to dive deeper on the anonymous report that unveiled Luckin Coffee's recent debacle. We start with a quick history of Luckin Coffee with Rui Ma breaking down the backstory on how Luckin Coffee's alleged fraud came to light and the impact after the fallout. Rui Ma dived deeper beyond the original story with an analysis of the anonymous report entitled "Luckin Coffee: Fraud + Fundamentally Broken Business". Last but not least, she discussed the implications of Luckin Coffee's debacle and how investigative reporting and corporate activism will impact the public listings of Chinese companies in the US.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    Rui Ma, Creator & Host of Tech Buzz China podcast by Pandaily produced by SupChina (LinkedIn, @ruima) [0:26] Since our last conversation, what have you been up to? [0:30] Luckin Coffee Debacle [1:36] Disclaimer: The information provided here by our host and guest are not here to encourage buying or selling any equities mentioned here and investing is strictly our audience’s own responsibility. So, please do your homework. Origins of Luckin Coffee has been covered by Matthew Brennan in Episode 279 and it was starting to challenge Starbucks Cafe in China two years back. Highly recommended: Rui Ma and Ying Ying Lu in Techbuzz China Episode 65 (Extra Buzz Special): Luckin’s luck ran out To help our audience, Luckin Coffee (瑞幸咖啡) started off with the on demand delivery model and did not have physical stores similar to Starbucks. Then it started scaling up by burning investment cash and building physical stores. The investors came from a variety of sources (according to CB Insights): venture capital (JOY Capital), asset management fund (BlackRock), private equity (Centurium Capital), China International Capital Corporation or CICC (investment bank) and GIC (the sovereign wealth fund in Singapore). Let’s start from today and work backwards to what happened that led to alleged fraud of Luckin Coffee being announced by the company. How was alleged fraud for Luckin Coffee come to public attention? (Source: Luckin Coffee’s filing of 6K) [3:04] What was the alleged fraud about and how much has been uncovered? [4:23] Who are the people behind the alleged fraud? [5:27] What is the impact given the announcement of the alleged fraud by Luckin Coffee, from stock crashing to customers rushing to claim their coffee? (Source: SCMP) [7:08] Luckin Coffee has been a strange story in China. What is the business model that led to them going public? [9:11] The Anonymous Report titled “Luckin Coffee: Fraud + Fundamentally Broken Business” [11:40] Citing the Extra Buzz Newsletter #7: “The report was very extensive 89 pages, utilized 92 full time, 1418 part time staff on the ground who recorded 11,000 hours of video, which is almost 3 years worth of store days covering 620 stores in 38 different cities.” Basically, it is this report that fanned the flames for Luckin Coffee in their present state. However, there’s a lot of confusion of who did the report, for example, 燃财经 Rancaijing and Muddy Waters leeched off from the report (and somehow Western Media mistakenly attributed to them). So, the first question, what are the key facts behind the report? [12:24] The report have two interesting parts titled “The Fraud” and “The Fundamentally Broken Business Model”. Let start from the first part “The Fraud”, what are the key smoking gun evidence and red flags cited that led to the alleged fraud claim in the report? What are the business model flaws cited in the report that claims that Luckin Coffee has the fundamentally business model? [15:16] Let’s zero in to one key red flag from the “Fraud” section: “Number of items per store per day inflated by 69% in 2019 3Q and 88% in 2019 4Q, supported by 11,260 hours of store traffic video”, can you explain how the report presents its investigation and use the numbers to get to the conclusion? [18:44] The anonymous report took a very strong look at the unit economics of Luckin Coffee (Business Flaw #3) at page 78: what are the key arguments from the report that establish that Luckin Coffee is not able to be profitable? [20:40] With such a construction of an elaborate report and this entire episode can be turned into a “Billions” TV series episode (by Showtime), the $1m dollar question: who is behind the report and what is their motivation behind it? [24:06] Aftermath Who benefits from the entire Luckin Coffee’s debacle? [25:44] The hedge funds Starbucks in China, given that 30% of their revenues came from China before Luckin’s entrance to challenge them. One interesting consequence of this Luckin Coffee episode, is the quality of investigative reporting for corporate fraud in China. The anonymous report took a lot of effort in constructing the actual picture by people going undercover to find out the actual numbers. We notice that this is getting better whenever each scandal pops up in the market. Does that mean that we will see more of these exposes? [27:16] What are your first thoughts when the report was first released into the public? [30:00] Do you think that how Chinese companies should do to dispel myths or being challenged about their businesses? [31:48] What do you think that the US investor learn from this episode? [33:30] Do you think that the English and US media have reported the Luckin Coffee narrative properly? [35:47] Closing [37:52] Rui Ma's recommendation: Dan Grover "How Chinese Apps Handled COVID-19" Carol's video on how millennials cope with COVID-19 with the apps on their smart phone.

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted and produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin) and originally created by Bernard Leong (@bernardleong, Linkedin). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack.

    analyseasia · The Anonymous Report that brought down Luckin Coffee with Rui Ma
  • In episode 323, Charles Reed Anderson, our long time guest of the show and host of TechBurst Asia joins us to discuss his latest venture, SparkLabs Connex, a new accelerator program for smart city technologies under the SparkLabs Group. Before diving deep into the new venture, Charles discuss the challenges of smart city rankings and how they did not reflect the reality of what is happening on the ground. Then he began to discuss the rationale of SparkLabs Connex and why it is time to start an accelerator program specifically on smart city technologies. Last but not least, he break down how the global program works, offered his perspectives on what types of entrepreneurs he would seek to fund and address how SparkLabs Connex will operate in a COVID-19 world.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    Charles Anderson (@CRASingapore, LinkedIn), founder of Charles Reed Anderson and Associates, host of TechBurst Asia (iTunes, Spotify, @techburstasia) and now general partner for SparkLabs Connex. [0:24] What have you been up to since we last spoke? [1:10] You have recently written an article about smart city rankings and why the rankings do not reflect reality. Can you talk about why this is the case? [1:40] SparkLabs Connex [5:45] Can you briefly introduce your new venture SparkLabs Connex from the SparkLabs Group? (Source: TechCrunch) [6:00] There are already a lot of incubators and accelerators across different geographies, but very few have succeeded. Why do you think that this is the time to start another one? [7:57] What are the industry verticals or technologies that SparkLabs Connex is looking into? (5G, IoT, Smart Cities)? [9:15] How does the model work for SparkLabs Connex and how does it work with the ecosystem, for example, partners? [10:50] Why are the vendors willing to work with you as many accelerators have been building partnerships across industries? [13:44] How does SparkLabs Connex work for entrepreneurs? [15:05] What are the traits of startup founders that you will seek to invest in? [17:05] What are the types of technologies which you will specifically look into as you invest in the space? [22:00] Omate: elderly care watch from Shenzhen and expand in France [22:40] Can you share the stories of early applicants into the program? [24:40] Can you share the geographical profiles of startups in SparkLabs Connex and whether there are preferences over some geographies? [25:40] Are there any additional things which you want the applicants to know? [27:40] Given the recent coronavirus outbreak, do you think that it will slow down the growth of IoT and 5G in the market? [28:25] How about technologies in IoT and 5G which might have come up during the COVID-19 outbreak? [29:55] Press releases: SparkLabs Group launches Connex, an accelerator program for smart city technology (TechCrunch) SparkLabs Connex, a New IoT, Smart City & PropTech Accelerator, Unites the Supply & Demand sides of the Technology Ecosystem to Accelerate Access to Innovation (Business Insider) Closing [32:30] Charles recommendations: Parag Khanna's "The Future is Asian" Where can we find him?

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted and produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin) and originally created by Bernard Leong (@bernardleong, Linkedin). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack.

  • In episode 322, Rui Ma from Techbuzz China joined us to discuss Bilibili in China and discuss how the video site has grown from a niche community of anime lovers to its now proclaimed "Youtube of China". Starting from the origin story, Rui Ma traced the backstory in how Bilibili came to be and how the site has diversified their monetisation revenues from esports, ecommerce to advertising. Last but not least, she discuss how Bilibili balances its current growth strategy against the patience of the community behind after going public.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    Rui Ma, Founder of Euzen Labs and Host of TechBuzz podcast by Pandaily produced by SupChina & Extra Buzz Newsletter (LinkedIn, @ruima) [0:28] Since our last conversation, what have you been up to? [0:31] Bilibili in China [1:19] Can you talk about the origin story of Bilibili and how it has become a platform for fans who are experts in certain niches such as anime in China? [1:40] Who are the founders of Bilibili? [5:08] What are the monetization models for Bilibili? [7:55] How much that Bilibili has ventured into e-sports after acquisition of an e-sports team? [10:24] What are the major similarities & differences between Bilibili and Youtube?[12:50] User experience on Bilibili - bullet comments [15:44] Most popular phrases that come from bullet comments in 2019 - AWSL [17:30] Can you describe how users actually register and get themselves memberships on the Bilibili? How is this different from public social networks out there such as Facebook, Wechat? [18:45] What are the interesting partnerships that Bilibili has done so far for example, New Year Gala with Xinhua Agency and ecommerce with Taobao (Alibaba)? [21:02] Do you think that the Bilibili model can be exported to the US, India or Southeast Asia? Are there already examples of similar models out there? [22:55] The balance between growth and user community interests in Bilibili [26:30] Other references: Check out Techbuzz China's Episode 57: Bilibili - The YouTube of China? Closing [28:30] Anything if you want to recommend that inspire you recently? [28:35] David Epstein "Range" How do my audience find you? [29:01]

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted and produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin) and originally created by Bernard Leong (@bernardleong, Linkedin). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack.

  • In episode 321, Gareth Nicholson and Sarah Dai from South China Morning Post discuss the recently launched China AI Report 2020. In the interview, Gareth and Sarah share the key themes and intended audience for the report and offered their perspectives to how artificial intelligence (AI) has evolved in China. We examine the key drivers behind the growth of AI in China and how China is solving the talent pipeline given it's an evolving technology and what we should expect in the next few years.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    Gareth Nicholson, (LinkedIn) senior news editor on the Technology desk and Sarah Dai (@sarah_dai, Linkedin), senior reporter from South China Morning Post (SCMP) Can you talk about your roles in SCMP and what do you do? China AI Report 2020 by South China Morning Post What are the key themes for the report? Who is the intended audience for the report? What key drivers are behind the growth of AI in China? If we look at the Chinese market on AI, how do we size the market? Are there any cultural differences between US and China in their attitudes towards AI? Do they push how the AI technology has evolved in China? What are the key verticals where AI are dominating in China? Which are the AI startup unicorns in China which we need to watch? How does China solve the talent pipeline for AI given that it is an evolving technology? Unlike the US, China has the hardware advantage that accelerates AI computations. How do they augment the AI market and how are they viewed by investors? What are your perspectives on the different verticals of AI in China? Autonomous Driving Finance Healthcare Retail Smart Cities Smart Homes Manufacturing Where do you think that the Chinese AI industry will evolve towards in the future? Closing Where can our audience find the China AI Report 2020 by South China Morning Post? (Do note that there is a 20% off till the end of the month if you click on this link) Where can our audience find you?

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted and produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin) and originally created by Bernard Leong (@bernardleong, Linkedin). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack.

  • In this episode, Carol Yin and guest host Deng Yuying, CEO of Altizen continues their conversation on the COVID-19 coronavirus and examines its impact from China to Asia Pacific. They discuss the latest updates on how the coronavirus has now spread to Korea, Japan, Italy, Iran and US, while examining how different industries from tourism, airlines ,ecommerce, pharmaceutical and health supplies are affected by the COVID-19 outbreak. Last but not least, they analyzed the short, middle and long term impact of the virus and break down the different scenarios on where this may lead in the upcoming months in 2020.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    Carol Yin (@carolyujiayin, LinkedIn), Host of Analyse Asia and guest host Deng Yuying, CEO of Altizen (@yuyingdeng, LinkedIn) [0:55] The Wuhan Coronavirus and its impact to Asia Pacific Part 2 [1:00] What has been the recent updates in China with respect to the COVID-19 virus? [1:07] Since our last conversation, what has happened with the Coronavirus globally? (US, Italy, Korea and Japan) [2:35] Which countries have closed their borders to China now in both flights and immigration? [3:25] Business Impact of COVID-19 in China and Asia Pacific How about the foreign multinationals such as Tesla, Foxconn and Apple where they are highly dependent on the Chinese supply chain? (Reference: Apple) [5:00] Can you talk about the countries in Asia Pacific which are affected? [7:21] Japan: Schools are closed and the likelihood of cancellation of the Tokyo 2020 olympics Korea: How Korea has suddenly reported a surge in cases Southeast Asia: Indonesia and Thailand [11:02] Let’s examine the short, middle and long term impact for industries in detail [12:35] Tourism [12:55] Airline Industries: There is a possibility of airlines going bankrupt as Cathay Pacific and Singapore Airlines have announced paycuts for their staff. [15:30] What are the industries benefited from the coronavirus? [16:30] Technology industry: Gaming industry (Tencent), Ecommerce (Alibaba), Zoom - remote working [16:50] Pharmaceuticals and medical supplies (shortage of masks and sanitizers) [18:50] What should we expect in the next couple of weeks and months? [19:30] McKinsey Report: COVID-19 - Implications for Business Report on 27 Feb 2020

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted and produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin) and originally created by Bernard Leong (@bernardleong, Linkedin). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack.

  • After a long hiatus, in Episode 319, our host Carol Yin takes the seat to discuss the recent COVID-19 coronavirus and examine the impact of the pandemic to the rest of Asia Pacific and globally in two part series. In the first part of the series, together with the guest host, Yuying Deng, Carol related her experience living through the challenging times in China before and after the COVID-19 virus broke out. We discuss the origins of the virus, the measures in how the Chinese government are dealing with the outbreak, the outpour of grief from the Chinese over Dr Li Wenliang's death and broke down the major misconceptions perpetuated by media outlets.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    Carol Yin (@carolyujiayin, LinkedIn), Host of Analyse Asia and guest host Deng Yuying, CEO of Altizen (@yuyingdeng, LinkedIn) The COVID-19 Coronavirus (WHO site) and its impact to Asia Pacific (Reference: Nikkei Asia Review) A view of how the pandemic with the COVID-19 virus started before and after the outbreak made public and during Chinese New Year from Carol's perspective [0:52] To start, let’s take a chronological approach to the whole incident, how did the coronavirus originated in Wuhan and started spreading across Asia Pacific and other parts of the world? [8:49] Wuhan is a major transportation hub and the city is of the size of Pittsburgh in the US. Did the Chinese New Year holidays catalyse the spread of the virus due to the large scale movement of people within China? [12:58] How about the virus? Where did it originate? How does it compare to the SARS situation in 2003 or similar outbreaks? [14:54] What are the symptoms for someone who contract the coronavirus and how do we know if we suffer from flu or the coronoavirus? [17:15] What has the Chinese government done so far in China? [19:10] How are the small and medium businesses in China coping with the outbreak? [26:21] What is the situation within Wuhan itself and the rest of China? [27:15] What are the misconceptions that the rest of the world have with regards to the coronavirus? [30:46] What is it like now living in Shanghai and dealing with the COVID-19 outbreak? [33:00] When are things likely to go normal in China such that the Chinese government will stop the pause button currently with their response to the situation? [36:03] Dr Li Wenliang's death and why the Chinese were outraged by his death. (Source: Financial Times) [37:00] As of today (and recording is accurate as of 9 Feb 2020), how many cases are confirmed in China and the rest of the world? [40:40] The impact of COVID-19 on groceries deliveries [45:25] Misinformation in the Internet across the world with tech platforms struggling to deal with them (Wechat, Twitter) [46:40] Wechat fact checking platform against Twitter's no fact checking.

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted and produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin) and originally created by Bernard Leong (@bernardleong). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack.

  • Shai Oster, the Asia Bureau Chief from The Information reviews the year of 2019 on how the technology giants in China and SoftBank have fared and offers his annual predictions to what will be happening in 2020. Shai reviewed his 2018 predictions and ranked how each of them have gone for 2019. In addition, he offered his perspectives on how Huawei and ByteDance will face constant challenges in their overseas expansion and whether SoftBank will raise their 2nd fund and the downstream impact from their debacle with Wework trickling down to Oyo, Didi and Grab in 2020. Last but not least, Shai throws forward what he thinks will happen in 2020.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    Shai Oster (@beijingscribe, LinkedIn, TheInformation Profile), Asia Bureau Chief in The Information So since your last appearance on the show, what have you been up to? 2018 predictions Didi to IPO in end 2019. ByteDance will continue to grow and fight Facebook in Southeast Asia, but will not IPO. Ant Financial’s path to IPO is not clear. What will happen to Xiaomi with their overseas expansion? First-quarter of scary growth in China and followed by the wave of government stimulus in China. State of China and SoftBank for 2019 What are the few events which you feel that 2019 has shifted the trajectory for SoftBank and Chinese tech giants? Event 1: The US and China Relationship: There is obviously a lot of tension between the two countries, and a display of that tension can be seen in what has happened to Huawei in the last year. There was the trade ban that is forcing US companies like Google & Qualcomm to stop providing to Huawei & also the FCC ban that stops the use of government fund to purchase equipment from Huawei. It seems like Huawei is always in the news these days, from their product launches, to their lawsuits, and also the recent employee detainment allegations. How has Huawei been doing and coping with all the challenges they’re facing in the U.S.? Do you think that the Huawei CEO has been responding well to the critics? What is the future of 5G for Huawei across the world? Event 2: The SoftBank debacle with Wework and Vision Fund 2 We all know that WeWork is not what used to be, so has Vision Fund 1 reached the peak with Wework’s collapse? How has that changed the way how the public markets have perceived the startup unicorns given that Uber have not performed well for their IPO and Wework failed to even go public? Will Oyo in India be the next on a similar trajectory with Wework? Will SoftBank be able to raise the 2nd Vision Fund in 2020? Are the other unicorns backed by SoftBank in danger, for example, Bytedance and Grab? Event 3: The public markets for Chinese Tech Startups Alibaba has just popped in the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, after Xiaomi and Meituan-Dianping, do you think that HKSE will be the Chinese tech startups’ port of call for IPO? With the chaos in Hong Kong and investors moving their assets from Hong Kong to Singapore, do you foresee that the HKSE will lose its pole position as a financial hub and what it means for chinese tech giants planning to go IPO? Other long term implications & effects to businesses & tech companies? Event 4: Bytedance Will Bytedance end up in the same predicament similar to Huawei? Bytedance is also getting pushback in India, does that mean that the overseas growth potential for this company will end? Event 5: Overseas expansion for Chinese Tech Titans Will the Chinese Tech Titans focus on Southeast Asia, India and the rest of the world instead of continuing its trajectory to put a foothold in the US? Can they compete with Google, Amazon and Facebook in these nascent markets? What will be your predictions for 2020 and what are the key things you will be watching out for? China & US relationship in 2020 China economy Tiktok will retreat from US, scale back & renew their focus on China, India, Southeast Asia & Africa Huawei Shift of Money out of China and US into Southeast Asia and India from VCs and PE funds. Closing How do my audience find you? Check out the Information's new app: "Tech Top 10"

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted and produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin) and originally created by Bernard Leong (@bernardleong). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack.

  • Simon Kemp, founder and CEO of Kepios joined us to discuss the recent Digital 2019 Q4 Global StatShot Report and share the major observations in how Asia Pacific has shifted social media from the west to the east. Starting from the report, Simon shares the key major observations including Asia's rising, Tik Tok vs Facebook and how 5G will shape mobile and social media in 2020. Last but not least, Simon offers his predictions on the digital world as he looks forward to 2020.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    Simon Kemp (@eskimon, LinkedIn), Founder & CEO of Kepios We met during the live show in Singapore and many thanks for coming on as one of our three mysterious guests on the show. Since our last conversation, what have you been up to? Shift to the East: We Are Social Q4 Report and Q4 2019 StatShot Report. Reference: The DataReportal library of free reports What are the key major trends that you have observed globally and then specifically to the Asia Pacific? In this Q4 report, you talk about Asia’s rising, can you break down what the key observations are? How has been the growth in social media like in Asia Pacific: is it growing, stagnating or declining? Based on the recent backlashes on Facebook, does the data show that the social media site has been on a decline? And are other platforms owned by Facebook such as Whatsup & Instagram been affected? What about Tik Tok? How has their growth in Asia Pacific like? Do you think that Tik Tok will face significant headwinds in the US similar to Huawei? Specifically, the top apps in the Asia Pacific are no longer just confined to China but also in Japan and Korea as well, is it a foreshadowing of a longer trend? What are some new social media sites/apps/networks that you are monitoring that no one else is looking at in the region? How is 5G transforming China & Asia Pacific in this quarter? What should we be looking forward to in 2020? Closing Do you have recent recommendations of books or anything else to share? Simon's recommendations: Danny Denhard’s newsletter, How can my audience find you?

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted and produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin) and originally created by Bernard Leong (@bernardleong). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack.

  • Rebecca Fannin, author of "Tech Titans of China" and founder of Silicon Dragon Ventures joined us for a conversation to discuss her new book and offered her perspectives on how China will reshape the world with their breed of tech giants: Baidu, Alibaba, Tencent and many more. Rebecca began with the story of her career and how she came to cover Chinese technology companies from its earliest days. She discussed the major themes of her new book, and how the current trade tensions will shape China's path in the technology space and why we need to start thinking of China as originators of technology rather than the misconceptions that they are copycats.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    Rebecca Fannin (@rfannin, LinkedIn), Author of “Tech Titans of China” and Founder of Silicon Dragon Ventures [0:16] As a young person who also works for a media company, I must ask, how did you start your career? [0:32] What advice would you give to young people looking to be a tech reporter or a media entrepreneur? [3:55] You have started covering China tech much earlier than most people with your first book “Silicon Dragon”, what are the major key misconceptions you have observed in how other parts of the world cover China? [5:30] As you have interacted with many key entrepreneurs such as Robin Li and Jack Ma, who is the most interesting entrepreneur in China who you have interviewed so far? [7:13] Tech Titans of China: “How China’s Tech Sector Is Challenging the World by Innovating Faster, Working Harder, & Going Global” [10:30] What are the main themes of the book and who are the intended audience? [10:40] We have known the Baidu-Alibaba-Tencent or BAT in short that are core key companies in China similar to Amazon, Google and Facebook in the US. How are they different? [13:20] From copiers to now originators, what are the key turning points for China to become a technology power in the world? [15:45] Is the government and their regulations the key reason why the tech giants in the US do not manage to penetrate into China? What are the other key reasons as to why the US tech companies have so many problems entering China? [17:50] If China has not banned Google, Facebook or Twitter, would these companies have succeeded? [20:10] We are increasingly seeing the decoupling of China and the US technology sector given the current US-China trade war. Do you think that the global supply chain which powers tech companies from both countries will break apart with what happened to ZTE and Huawei? [22:17] How does China have evolved in these three key areas [22:19]: Ecommerce [22:22] AI [25:18] Drones and robots given that they have the most established and well developed manufacturing ecosystem in Shenzhen while US manufacturing has declined over the past three decades [27:58] Where do you see the future of Chinese tech for China and will it start spilling to the rest of the world given its nascent influence in India, Southeast Asia, and Africa? [29:17] Which tech giants in China are currently interesting from your perspective? [31:20] Closing [33:42] How can my audience find you? [33:52]

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted and produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin) and originally created by Bernard Leong (@bernardleong). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack.

  • James Hull from Hullx and co-host of China Tech Investor podcast joined us in a discussion on whether we should replace Baidu with Bytedance in the BAT China. Starting with the question, James dived deep into the business structures of Baidu and Bytedance and examined whether Baidu has lost their edge as one of the three tech giants of China. In the same conversation, James offered his perspectives on how Bytedance will replace Baidu in the future.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    James Hull (@jameshullx, LinkedIn), Co-host of China Tech Investor podcast and Founder of Hullx [0:21] Since you have last appeared on the podcast, what have you been up to? [0:50] Should we replace Baidu with Bytedance in the BAT? [0:56] BAT (Baidu, Alibaba, Tencent) & TMD (Toutiao, Meituan-dianping, Didi) Let’s start with Baidu. How has Baidu performed as a public company for the past decade? [2:08] What are the key businesses of Baidu? (iQiyi is spun off as a separate company)? [3:27] Baidu's advances in AI [4:56] and in the intelligent audio input interface and speaker sector. [5:42] Is Baidu dependent on the advertising business similar to Google in the US? [6:51] Comparison between Baidu and Bytedance in terms of user information feeds [9:30] Bytedance's advantage with user feeds and recommendations through Douyin and Toutiao [11:51] Bytedance has been growing exponentially with a 75B valuation from their recent round with SoftBank, now the most valuable startup in the world followed by Didi. How are they performing as a business? [15:09] What are the key revenue drivers for Bytedance? How are they compared to Alibaba and Tencent? [18:08] What are Baidu’s competitive advantages that you think may allow them to stay competitive within the BAT? [24:30] How Baidu's search engine competes against Google and the rest of Chinese search engines. [28:24] Should we just replace Baidu with Bytedance in the BAT? [31:09] Interesting Chinese answer on the question for this podcast (in Chinese) in Zhihu (similar to Reddit and Quora in the US) which Carol has referenced and mentioned in the discussion. Closing [37:24] Recommendation for a book, movie, podcast, or any consumable content?[37:24] James' recommendation: "I love capitalism" by Ken Langone , "The Great Rebalancing" by Michael Pettis Carol's recommendation: Louis Cha's or Jin Yong's martial arts novels How does our audience find you?

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted and produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack.

  • Joyce Yang, founder of Global Coin Research, joined us in a conversation about the Asian cryptocurrency market in Asia with our new host, Carol Yin. Joyce and Carol discussed the recent publication by Global Coin Research (GCR) "The Small Handbook to Asia Cryptocurrency: On local ecosystems, trends & regulations" and identified the key important trends and currents in the Asian market, specifically China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Indonesia and Singapore.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    Joyce Yang (@JoyceInNYC , LinkedIn), Founder of Global Coin Research [0:40] Since our last conversation, what have you been up to? [1:03] The Small Handbook to Asia Cryptocurrency: On local ecosystems, trends & regulations published by Global Coin Research (GCR) [4:56] Joyce discuss the GCR's new advisory & venture fund. How did you and your team in GCR put the handbook together? [5:08] Who are the intended audience? [8:14] What are the main themes of the handbook? [10:26] Are there any common threads on cryptocurrency within Asia? For example, it seems that a lot of Asian countries have banned ICOs. Prolonged bear market, IEO. [11:22] China [13:25] China is probably the most important market for cryptocurrency whether it’s bitcoin and blockchain and have banned ICOs since 2017 and at the same time, reducing bitcoin mining towards zero, what are the key trends in 2019 which you believe that are most important? [13:46] One interesting part on China is that you have broken down the major financial institutions in the Chinese government that everyone dabbling in bitcoin and blockchain must know, which are they and why they are important to the whole ecosystem? [16:01] Are there any major differences between Hong Kong and China when it comes to cryptocurrency? [17:41] Is Hong Kong following China with respect to regulation in blockchain and bitcoin given that it has also banned ICOs now? [19:41] Japan and Korea [20:34] How has the Japanese cryptocurrency market changed after the major theft of bitcoins from Mount Gox in 2014? [20:49] Can you briefly talk about the Japanese blockchain startup ecosystem and also the Japanese enterprises in blockchain? [22:55] Who are the key players from the startup spaces and major enterprises involved in cryptocurrency within Korea? [24:44] Korea is known for the kimchi premium: can you explain what that means in the context of cryptocurrency? [26:32] Singapore and Indonesia [28:27] Indonesia is the largest market in Southeast Asia, can you talk about how the government is viewing cryptocurrency (bitcoin + blockchain)? [28:29] Who are the key players from the startup spaces and major enterprises involved in cryptocurrency within Indonesia? [29:58] How is Singapore looking at regulation in the cryptocurrency market? [31:05] We notice a lot of major cryptocurrency players (Binance) are based in Singapore, what are its competitive strengths and weaknesses? [32:54] Other interesting Asian markets: Thailand and Vietnam. [35:02] Closing [36:14] How do my audience find you? [36:28] The Global Coin Podcast

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted and produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack.

  • Fresh out of the studio, Chua Kee Lock, CEO of Vertex Holdings and managing partner of Vertex Ventures, Southeast Asia & India joined us in a conversation together with guest host Charles Reed Anderson of TechBurst Asia podcast about the venture capital firm and its footprint across Southeast Asia globally. We start with Kee Lock's story and how he eventually become a venture capitalist. Following on, Kee Lock discuss Vertex Holdings and Vertex Ventures and how the fund assembles and helps their portfolio of high growth startups such as Grab in the region. Last but not least, Kee Lock discuss the evolution of venture capital in Southeast Asia and India and where it is leading.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    Chua Kee Lock, CEO of Vertex Holdings & Managing Partner of Vertex Ventures Southeast Asia & India ( LinkedIn) [0:25] How did you start your career? [0:36] In your career journey, what are the words of wisdom you can share with my audience based on your time in Silicon Valley? [2:18] Kee Lock's thoughts on why people are central to building successful technology companies. [3:30] Vertex Holdings and Vertex Ventures [5:00] Can you give a brief introduction to Vertex Holdings and its relationship with Temasek Holdings? [5:10] What’s a typical day for you like as a VC? [11:07] Can you describe the different funds under Vertex Holdings and their current purposes? Does the different funds reflect the different stages of investment? [12:45] What are the traits of founders and startups which the investment team in Vertex seek? [14:00] What are the interesting companies within the Vertex portfolio? [16:40] Grab Licious Validus Instarem How does the Vertex network help the portfolio companies or companies who might be interested to seek funding? [21:30] Vertex has made very interesting investments globally, for example, Grab, Spacemob (acquired by Wework), Mobike (acquired by Meituan Dianping) and many others, how do you work with the founders and what help do most high growth companies need most in the early stage? Trends in venture capital across India and Southeast Asia [24:40] What are your thoughts on the investment opportunity in India and Southeast Asia? [25:00] Southeast Asia is not a homogeneous market with different countries at different stages of economic development, how does Vertex see their investments when they do their regional expansion? Do you see India with the same challenge? [26:25] Kee Lock's comments on shortage of tech talent and skills in Asia and how entrepreneurs are solving them. [28:30] Kee Lock's thoughts on returning technology talent to Asia from Silicon Valley and its impact to startup ecosystems in Asia Pacific for the next few years. [30:50] Does the lack of exits in India and Southeast Asia deter the market opportunity for venture capital to thrive? [31:35] With more global funds entering the region, do you see the potential of an overheated market with valuations going up? [33:00] Where do you see the evolution of venture capital in the next few years? [35:30] Closing [37:40] Can you recommend a book or movie or podcast or anything which recently made an impact to your work and personal life? [37:45] Kee Lock's recommendations: Ray Dalio's "Principles" and Simon Sinek's "Start from Why" How do my audience find you? [39:00]

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted by guest host Charles Reed Anderson (@CRASingapore, LinkedIn) from Techburst Asia Podcast and produced by Carol Yin and are sponsored by Ideal Workspace (Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn) with their new Altizen Desk (Twitter, Facebook, Medium). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack and this episode is fully produced by Carol Yin (@CarolYujiaYin).

    Editor's note: We thank Charles for helping us to guest host this episode before Carol starts her new role as the producer and host of Analyse Asia after the live show.

  • Steve Melhuish, co-founder of PropertyGuru and partner from Wavemaker VC, shares the lessons of his journey from an entrepreneur with PropertyGuru to now a partner in a venture capital firm. Steve started with the backstory behind on how he founded PropertyGuru and shared the lessons in scaling up the company across Southeast Asia and explained the thinking process and execution behind his transition out of the CEO role in the company. Subsequently, Steve discuss his current gig with Wavemaker VC, and the key traits in companies and founders which he invests on and his current thoughts on the proptech space.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    Steve Melhuish, co-founder of PropertyGuru and partner in Wavemaker VC (LinkedIn) [0:12] How did you start your career? [0:30] In your career journey, what are the most interesting lessons that you can share with my audience? [5:07] PropertyGuru [10:17] Can you talk about the backstory when you founded PropertyGuru? [10:42] From the creation of the company till you moving over to be a venture capitalist, what are the most interesting milestones that PropertyGuru? [14:07] What is the rationale for you to step down as CEO and what's the thinking and execution phase to bring in a professional CEO and make that transition happen? [22:52] How are you involved with PropertyGuru now? [29:00] Wavemaker VC [30:00] Can you introduce Wavemaker, the venture capital firm in Southeast Asia to my audience? [30:05] What’s your current role and coverage as a venture partner in Wavemaker VC? [32:31] What is a typical day for you as a venture capitalist? [35:05] What are the attributes in founders from startups that you look for before investing in them? [36:05] Which are the interesting verticals that you are now looking into startups for investment? [39:15] Can you talk about your perspectives on the current wave of startups in proptech, and what are the key opportunities there for startups to solve? [41:10] How would you advise a startup to expand into Southeast Asia? [44:49] Closing [46:30] Can you recommend a book, movie, podcast or anything else that has recently impact your personal or work life? [46:39] Steve's recommendation: "Blue Planet 2" documentary by David Attenborough and the movie "Vice", books such as "Delivering Happiness" by Tony Hsieh, "Start from Why" by Simon Sinek, "Good to Great" by Jim Collins, "Mastering the Rockefeller Habits" by Verne Harnish.

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted by Bernard Leong (@bernardleong & weibo) until 30 June 2019 and are sponsored by Ideal Workspace (Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn) with their new Altizen Desk (Twitter, Facebook, Medium). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack and this episode is edited by Carol Yin, and co-produced by Carol Yin and Bernard Leong. This episode is recorded and produced in June 2019.

  • Grace Park, co-founder & president of DocDoc joined us in a conversation about leadership and regional expansion of DocDoc in Asia. Grace started the conversation, narrating her background as a military officer with the US army and how she moved subsequently from a military career into a business executive in notable healthcare companies. Grace shared the backstory behind the founding of DocDoc as a leading patient intelligence company from her perspective and offered her perspectives in how she utilized her experience to expand DocDoc regionally across Asia. Last but not least, Grace offered her thoughts on leadership and the importance of how to lead teams to success in different settings.

    Editor's note: This interview was conducted in June 2019, and recently DocDoc has raised their series B funding of US$13M.

    Here are the interesting show notes and links to the discussion (with time-stamps included):

    Grace Park (Facebook, LinkedIn), co-founder & President of DocDoc [0:19] How did you start your career? [1:12] Before Docdoc, you have been taken senior executive roles in medical and healthcare sector with Bristol-Myers Squibb and Medtronic, can you talk about what you have done in these companies and how that experience shapes the way in how you operate in Asia Pacific markets? [4:15] In your career journey, what are the interesting life lessons you can share with my audience? [6:34] DocDoc & Perspectives on Regional Expansion of Digital Healthcare in Asia Pacific [8:08] I am curious to know the backstory of Docdoc from your perspective given Cole has offered the same story in an earlier episode. Can you articulate the founding story from your perspective and how did that translate to founding of Docdoc? [8:24] Let's help our audience to refresh their understanding of the company DocDoc, can you describe the company and its vision and mission? [12:44] What is your current role and coverage as the President of DocDoc? [15:34] What keeps you awake at night or gets you excited every morning about DocDoc’s mission? [16:35] Given DocDoc focus on to be the leader in patient intelligence, how do you build the trust and bringing the doctors in DocDoc’s network? From your engagement with the doctors, what are the doctors’ major pain points as providers of medical care in the entire healthcare supply chain?[17:56] You have led in expanding DocDoc’s business across Asia Pacific, can you talk about how you think strategically on the go to market and build the right teams to expand into countries such as Korea and Hong Kong? [21:56] What are the most interesting lessons you have learned in working in a startup environment with DocDoc? What will you have done differently? [23:15] Leadership [25:37] I understand that you are a great student on leadership. What are the books in leadership which have inspired you and further your thinking on the subject? [26:09] Viktor Frankl's "Man Search for Meaning" Warren G Bennis "On Becoming a Leader" Ron Heifetz "Leadership without Easy Answers" You have an interesting career before Harvard Business School in the US military, and you were based in Korea as an officer, how did the experience shape you as a leader in the military and subsequently in the corporate world? [28:50] In your opinion, what are the most important traits for a leader? [32:40] Do you think that a team learn more by going thru a crisis than going thru the regular motion of the day? [33:40] Do you see a difference between a manager and a leader? [35:13] Can you talk about your style of leadership and how did it come about? [36:18] Closing [38:22] Can you recommend a book or movie or podcast or anything which recently made an impact to your work and personal life? [38:35] Grace's recommendations: Eric Topol, "Deep Medicine" and two articles: (a) Tampa Bay Times, "Heartbroken" and NY Times "Listen to What Doctors in 'times of crisis' said behind doors" How can my audience find you? [41:13]

    Podcast Information:

    RSS Feed Apple Podcasts Himalaya Spotify Libsyn Google Play Overcast FM SoundCloud Luminary Twitter Facebook Video Facebook Page Linkedin Stitcher Castbox RadioPublic Acast PodBean ListenNotes TuneIn

    The show is hosted by Bernard Leong (@bernardleong & weibo) until 30 June 2019 and are sponsored by Ideal Workspace (Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn) with their new Altizen Desk (Twitter, Facebook, Medium). Sound credits for the intro music: Taro Iwashiro, "The Beginning" from Red Cliff Soundtrack and this episode is edited by Carol Yin, and co-produced by Carol Yin and Bernard Leong. This episode is recorded and produced in June 2019.