Episodes

  • Mushroom forager Daniel Butler shares his tips on your favorite funky fungi.

    If you’ve ever gone on a forest hike on a wet day in autumn, it’s likely that you encountered many different species of mushrooms growing along the forest floor or on rotting logs. As you marveled at their myriad shapes, sizes and colors, you may have wondered – are these edible? Poisonous? In this episode, I chat with mushroom forager Daniel Butler about this and more! From sustainable harvesting techniques to tips on how to learn more about the edible mushrooms found across the US and Europe, we cover some fascinating topics on the world of fungi. Whether you are a seasoned forager, or a novice curious to learn more, there is something for all to learn in this episode.

    About Daniel Butler
    Daniel Butler is a Cambridge history graduate who has spent the last 26 years living on a 17th century smallholding in the mountains of Wales. He leads guided mushroom forays every autumn, flies hawks during the winter and writes books and articles when these become too boring.
    @fungiforays on Instagram
    @DanielButler11 on Twitter
    Website: http://www.fungiforays.co.uk/
    About Cassandra Quave
    Prof. Cassandra Quave is best known for her ground-breaking research on the science of botanicals. Scientists in her research lab work to uncover some of nature’s deepest secrets as they search for new ways to fight life-threatening diseases, including antibiotic resistant infections. Working with a global network of scientists and healers, Cassandra and her team travel the world hunting for new plant ingredients, interviewing healers, and bringing plants back to the lab to study. Besides research, Cassandra is an award-winning teacher, and has developed and taught the college classes “Food, Health and Society” and “Botanical Medicine and Health” at Emory University.
    @QuaveEthnobot on Twitter
    @QuaveEthnobot on Instagram
    @QuaveMedicineWoman and “Foodie Pharmacology with Cassandra Quave” on Facebook

  • The word “tonic” elicits thoughts of something bitter, beneficial to health, or perhaps even a favored cocktail base. When it comes to tonic water, the bitter tasting alkaloid “quinine” is the key ingredient – and it has a fascinating history. You may know that quinine was used in the battle against malaria – but did you know that the pairing of gin with tonic came long after years of consuming it with brandy, rum or wine? On this episode, I speak with Kim Walker and Mark Nesbitt – the authors of a new book on the topic of tonic, entitled Just the Tonic.
    Just the Tonic: a Natural History of Tonic Water

    Did you know that tonic water was originally consumed as a digestive? And that quinine, the bitter tasting alkaloid that flavours tonic water was first mixed with brandy, rum or wine, rather than gin as the common belief states. Just the Tonic reveals the colourful history and truth behind the myths of this everyday drink.

    Authors Kim Walker and Mark Nesbitt take us on a journey from the discovery of quinine, an antimalarial extract from the bark of the cinchona tree that soon became a tool of empires, to the origins of gin and tonic and its rise and fall, and rise again to current popularity. The book also includes cocktail recipes inspired by historical events, and is beautifully illustrated throughout with archival posters, advertisements, photographs and botanical art.

    UK book link: https://shop.kew.org/justthetonic
    US book link: https://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/distributed/J/bo45864047.html
    About Kim Walker
    Kim Walker trained as a medical herbalist, and now specializes in the history of plant medicines. She is currently working on a PhD on cinchona at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and Royal Holloway, University of London. She is on the committee of the Herbal History Research Network, the British Society for the History of Pharmacy and is a member of the Association of Foragers. She is the co-author of The Handmade Apothecary (Kyle Books, 2017) and The Herbal Remedy Handbook (Kyle Books, 2019).

    Twitter: @kim_wyrt
    Instagram: : @kim_walker_research and @handmade_apothecary
    Website: www.kimwalkerresearch.co.uk

    About Mark Nesbitt
    Dr. Mark Nesbitt is curator of the Economic Botany Collection at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. His research centres on botany and empire in the 19th Century, and on the history and current-day relevance of botanical collections. He is the co-author of Curating Biocultural Collections (Kew Publishing, 2014) and The Botanical Treasury (Andre Deutsch, 2016). Mark is a Visiting Professor in the Department of Geography, Royal Holloway, University of London.
    Twitter: @economicbotany
    Website: www.marknesbitt.org.uk

    About Cassandra Quave
    Prof. Cassandra Quave is best known for her ground-breaking research on the science of botanicals. Scientists in her research lab work to uncover some of nature’s deepest secrets as they search for new ways to fight life-threatening diseases, including antibiotic resistant infections. Working with a global network of scientists and healers, Cassandra and her team travel the world hunting for new plant ingredients, interviewing healers, and bringing plants back to the lab to study. Besides research, Cassandra is an award-winning teacher, and has developed and taught the college classes “Food, Health and Society” and “Botanical Medicine and Health” at Emory University.

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  • Though its ingredients core are simple – barley, yeast and water – the final product that comes about after years of aging is incredibly unique. The distinctive flavor of Scotch whisky is influenced by the way it is malted, how the malt is dried, the distillation process, and lastly the aging process! The type of wood and its prior use in former casks – whether for sherry or bourbon – also influences the final flavor. Whisky is an amazing case study in how plant chemistry and extraction methods influence the chemical character of the final product! In this episode, I dive into the chemistry and flavor of one of my favorite spirits and speak with Gordon Motion, the master whisky maker for Highland Park.

    About Gordon Motion
    Gordon Motion, Highland Park Whisky Maker - a postgraduate in malting, brewing and distilling from the International Centre for Brewing and Distilling at Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh – has worked in the beverage industry his entire career and in the Scotch whisky industry in particular, since 1998.

    Before venturing into the world of Scotch whisky, Gordon held a number of positions with some well-known breweries including Mount Murray (Isle of Man); Tom Hoskin’s (Leicester); Belhaven (Dunbar), before becoming assistant maltster with Pauls Malt Glenesk Maltings at Montrose. He then joined Edrington in 1998 and has had experience working on all Edrington brands including The Macallan, The Famous Grouse, Glenrothes and Glenturret.

    Today, his main role is Master Whisky Maker for Highland Park. As well as the day-to-day job of ensuring the quality of our whisky – from new make spirit through maturation, blending and finally into bottle - Gordon is extremely busy developing and crafting new whiskies for the brand, a very important aspect of the role.

    Outside of work, Gordon also uses his craftsmanship skills in DIY projects. Not only has he designed and built his own house, he is currently involved in designing and creating a bespoke sample room at the Highland Park distillery on Orkney!

    A true, skilled master with an eye for detail.

    About Cassandra Quave
    Prof. Cassandra Quave is best known for her ground-breaking research on the science of botanicals. Scientists in her research lab work to uncover some of nature’s deepest secrets as they search for new ways to fight life-threatening diseases, including antibiotic resistant infections. Working with a global network of scientists and healers, Cassandra and her team travel the world hunting for new plant ingredients, interviewing healers, and bringing plants back to the lab to study. Besides research, Cassandra is an award-winning teacher, and has developed and taught the college classes “Food, Health and Society” and “Botanical Medicine and Health” at Emory University.

  • Have you ever considered how the biochemistry of taste influences our food choices? The food industry spends millions on scientific research in efforts of achieving the ultimate bliss points in our food experiences – from the perfect potato chip to the soda that has just the right amount of carbonation and sweetness. But, is this food “bliss” point achievable outside of the industrial food context? I definitely think so! On this 24th episode of the show, I chat with business owner and chef, Ben Reade, from the beautiful city of Edinburgh, Scotland. We discuss food pairings, traditional Scottish dishes, and the fascinating origins of Scotland’s most famous dish – Haggis!

    About Ben Reade
    Benedict Reade completed his Masters at the University of Gastronomic Sciences in Italy, where he also met his wife and cofounder of Edinburgh Food Studio, Sashana Souza Zanella. Edinburgh Food Studio is a creative venue, where they combine eating and drinking with arts, sciences, fun times and banter. In addition to Edinburgh Food Studio, Ben is also involved in other Edinburgh Food initiatives, such as the Company Bakery, a wholesale bread company in Edinburgh, and Eating House – a popup restaurant in the city. Read more about Ben’s work in this article from the magazine, Great British Chefs.

    Instagram: @benedictreade

    About Cassandra Quave
    Prof. Cassandra Quave is best known for her ground-breaking research on the science of botanicals. Scientists in her research lab work to uncover some of nature’s deepest secrets as they search for new ways to fight life-threatening diseases, including antibiotic resistant infections. Working with a global network of scientists and healers, Cassandra and her team travel the world hunting for new plant ingredients, interviewing healers, and bringing plants back to the lab to study. Besides research, Cassandra is an award-winning teacher, and has developed and taught the college classes “Food, Health and Society” and “Botanical Medicine and Health” at Emory University.
    @QuaveEthnobot on Twitter
    @QuaveEthnobot on Instagram
    @QuaveMedicineWoman and “Foodie Pharmacology with Cassandra Quave” on Facebook

  • Have you ever heard the term “blue zone”? It refers to a few places on Earth where a large number of locals live to be a hundred years old or older. Lifespan and even healthspan are influenced by many different factors ranging from genetics, to physical activity, social factors, and diet. In this episode – we’re going to explore a special citrus species consumed in the traditional diet of Okinawa, which happens to be rich in compounds known as polymethoxy flavonoids, which may have some health boosting effects. I also speak with Dr. Lukasz Ciesla to learn more about the impact of these compounds on measures of resilience, and what this may mean for healthy aging.


    About Lukasz Cielsa
    Lukasz Ciesla obtained his PhD at the Medical University of Lublin in 2011. After defending his thesis, he worked 18 months at the Department of Plant Biochemistry and Crop Quality, Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation, Poland. From 2012–2014 he worked in Foundation for Polish Science project “Multidisciplinary development of drugs acting on selected neuronal receptors” in the Laboratory of Neuroengineering at the Medical University of Lublin. In 2014 he became a laureate of the Foundation for Polish Science program SKILLS-Mentoring, mentor: Prof. Christian Zidorn, University of Innsbruck, Austria. From 2014 to 2017 he worked as a visiting fellow at the National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, USA. In August 2017 he was appointed an assistant professor at the Department of Biological Sciences, the University of Alabama. His lab currently focuses on dietary phytochemicals and their role in healthy aging as well as on the development of novel techniques speeding up the process of identification of health promoting compounds produced by plants.

    About Cassandra Quave
    Prof. Cassandra Quave is best known for her ground-breaking research on the science of botanicals. Scientists in her research lab work to uncover some of nature’s deepest secrets as they search for new ways to fight life-threatening diseases, including antibiotic resistant infections. Working with a global network of scientists and healers, Cassandra and her team travel the world hunting for new plant ingredients, interviewing healers, and bringing plants back to the lab to study. Besides research, Cassandra is an award-winning teacher, and has developed and taught the college classes “Food, Health and Society” and “Botanical Medicine and Health” at Emory University.
    @QuaveEthnobot on Twitter
    @QuaveEthnobot on Instagram
    @QuaveMedicineWoman and “Foodie Pharmacology with Cassandra Quave” on Facebook

  • Have you ever considered plant biodiversity through the lens of your taste buds? On this 22nd episode of Foodie Pharmacology, I chat with Drs. Rachel Meyer and Dr. Ashley DuVal about their work in the world of bitters and other botanical beverage ingredients. Along with Dr. Selena Ahmed, they are co-founders of Shoots and Roots Bitters and co-authors of their new book “Botany at the Bar: The Art and Science of Making Bitters”. We discuss the pharmacology behind some fascinating botanical ingredients that span the food-medicine continuum and offer some simple recipes on how to make your own non-alcoholic vinegar “shrubs” at home!

    About ‘Botany at the Bar”
    Botanists Selena Ahmed, Ashley DuVal and Rachel Meyer from the New York based craft bitters-making company, Shoots & Roots Bitters, take us on an enlightening trip throughout the plant world as they share their unique expertise on the ecology, cultural practices, and medicinal properties just waiting to be discovered at the bottom of your glass.

Notes on the origins of bitters, the science of taste and phytochemistry are followed by a neat guide on how to extract and make herbal infusions at home. Add enlightening plant profiles with a mix of unique botanical drink recipes, and this is a truly fascinating experiential insight into the vital meaning of biodiversity today.

    Twitter: @ShootsnRoots
    Instagram: @shootsandrootsbitters
    About Rachel Meyer
    Rachel Meyer is an adjunct assistant professor at the University of California Santa Cruz in the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. She's been directing the UC Conservation Genomics Consortium running a citizen science program to use DNA to catalog California's biodiversity, and working on oak and rice genomics. Her PhD was at City University of New York and the New York Botanical Garden where she studied the domestication of eggplant.

    About Ashley DuVal
    Ashley DuVal has worked as a scientific consultant on management and use genetic diversity for UNESCO, Bioversity International, and the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations. Her research focuses on domestication and use of cultural keystone tree species. She currently works as a Cacao Geneticist in Davis, California.

    About Cassandra Quave
    Prof. Cassandra Quave is best known for her ground-breaking research on the science of botanicals. Scientists in her research lab work to uncover some of nature’s deepest secrets as they search for new ways to fight life-threatening diseases, including antibiotic resistant infections. Working with a global network of scientists and healers, Cassandra and her team travel the world hunting for new plant ingredients, interviewing healers, and bringing plants back to the lab to study. Besides research, Cassandra is an award-winning teacher, and has developed and taught the college classes “Food, Health and Society” and “Botanical Medicine and Health” at Emory University.

    @QuaveEthnobot on Twitter
    @QuaveEthnobot on Instagram
    @QuaveMedicineWoman and “Foodie Pharmacology with Cassandra Quave” on Facebook

  • Apples have a long history in folklore – from being called the forbidden fruit to associations with witches. Since their domestication in Central Asia thousands of years ago, thousands of cultivars have been developed by people across the globe. Today, we eat them raw, or process them into dry form, as apple cider, apple cider vinegar, apple juice, apple sauce, apple butter. We cook them stewed or in savory or sweet dishes. They are both versatile and full of key phytonutrients, including flavonoids that may help combat the oxidative damage that is a hallmark of chronic disease. In this episode, I speak with Dr. Will McClatchey – an ethnobotanist and pharmacist with a sweet spot for this intriguing crop. Join us as we explore the amazing history of cultivation and health values of America’s favorite fruit.

    About Will McClatchey
    Will McClatchey is Manager and Co-Owner of Woodland Valley Meadows Farm near Eugene Oregon, U.S.A. He is a long-term care pharmacist and botanical consultant on projects such as the Flora of Oregon. He is former Professor of Botany, University of Hawaii at Manoa where he developed educational and research programs in ethnobotany. His past research has largely taken place in the Western Pacific region with emphasis on plant systematics and conservation of traditional plant and ecosystem management strategies. His current research investigates resilience of artificial ecosystems such as traditional Mediterranean orchards and Central European woodland meadows as transported landscapes in other parts of the earth.

    About Cassandra Quave
    Prof. Cassandra Quave is best known for her ground-breaking research on the science of botanicals. Scientists in her research lab work to uncover some of nature’s deepest secrets as they search for new ways to fight life-threatening diseases, including antibiotic resistant infections. Working with a global network of scientists and healers, Cassandra and her team travel the world hunting for new plant ingredients, interviewing healers, and bringing plants back to the lab to study. Besides research, Cassandra is an award-winning teacher, and has developed and taught the college classes “Food, Health and Society” and “Botanical Medicine and Health” at Emory University.
    @QuaveEthnobot on Twitter
    @QuaveEthnobot on Instagram
    @QuaveMedicineWoman and “Foodie Pharmacology with Cassandra Quave” on Facebook

  • Cheese is gooey, delicious, and comes in so many flavors and forms! But, how does this food, which starts with the simple base ingredient of milk, acquire this diversity in flavor? The credit goes to a variety of microbes that not only alter the color, smell, texture and flavor of cheese – but also do it via complex molecular signaling networks. Join me as I meet with Dr. Laura Sanchez - a rising star in the field of natural products chemistry who is applying advanced tools in chemistry to listen in on those microbial conversations underway in Bayley Hazen Blue cheese.

    Cassandra Quave
    Dr. Cassandra Quave is best known for her ground breaking research on the science of botanicals. Scientists in her research lab work to uncover some of nature’s deepest secrets as they search for new ways to fight life-threatening diseases, including antibiotic resistant infections. Working with a global network of scientists and healers, Cassandra and her team travel the world hunting for new plant ingredients, interviewing healers, and bringing plants back to the lab to study. She works closely with international collaborators to support access and benefit sharing initiatives in the communities that contribute to these studies. Besides research, Cassandra is an award-winning teacher, and has developed and taught college classes like “Food, Health and Society” and “Botanical Medicine and Health” at Emory University.

    @QuaveEthnobot on Twitter and Instagram
    @QuaveMedicineWoman and “Foodie Pharmacology with Cassandra Quave” on Facebook

    About Laura Sanchez
    Dr. Sanchez was born and raised in Northern California. She attended Whitman College in Walla Walla, WA where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Chemistry (2007) and three dodgeball championships. She pursued a Ph.D. in Chemistry at the University of California, Santa Cruz after an amazing NSF Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (2006) in Prof. Phil Crews' lab. In the Fall of 2007, she returned to UCSC to work with Prof. Roger Linington where her graduate studies encompassed two main projects including: (1) using the natural product almiramide C as a basis for structure activity relationship and mechanism of action studies; and (2) exploring the fish microbiome as a niche environment for isolating microbes. In the Fall of 2012, she continued to move south to join Prof. Pieter Dorrestein's lab at UC San Diego as an NIH K12 IRACDA Fellow. Her postdoctoral research focused on establishing methods for probing and characterizing metabolic exchanges in polymicrobial communities, specifically those associated with cheese rinds. She has been in her independent position since 2015 and strives to support a rigorous, innovative laboratory environment.

    @DrLauraSanchez on Twitter

  • Did you know that there is a fragrant shrub with medicinal properties against respiratory infections, pain and diabetes that has been used by indigenous people spanning North America, Europe and Asia for centuries? Labrador tea is still valued today in the treatment of many ailments and is consumed as a traditional beverage. It is just one of many wild plants that make up the indigenous cuisine of Native peoples in the US and Canada. In this episode, we will chat with award-winning chef and indigenous activist, Chef Sean Sherman, who is raising awareness about the cultural and medicinal value of this and many other unique wild ingredients with his company “The Sioux Chef” and nonprofit North American Traditional Indigenous Food Systems.

    Cassandra Quave
    Dr. Cassandra Quave is best known for her ground breaking research on the science of botanicals. Scientists in her research group work to uncover some of nature’s deepest secrets as they search for new ways to fight life-threatening diseases, including antibiotic resistant infections. Working with a global network of scientists and healers, Cassandra and her team travel the world hunting for new plant ingredients, interviewing healers, and bringing plants back to the lab to study. Besides research, Cassandra is an award-winning teacher, and has developed and taught college classes like “Food, Health and Society” and “Botanical Medicine and Health” at Emory University.

    @QuaveEthnobot on Twitter and Instagram
    @QuaveMedicineWoman and “Foodie Pharmacology with Cassandra Quave” on Facebook

    About Chef Sean Sherman
    Chef Sean Sherman, Oglala Lakota, born in Pine Ridge, SD, has been cooking across the US and Mexico over the past 30 years, and has become renowned nationally and internationally in the culinary movement of indigenous foods. His main focus has been on the revitalization and evolution of indigenous foods systems throughout North America. Chef Sean has studied on his own extensively to determine the foundations of these food systems to gain a full understanding of bringing back a sense of Native American cuisine to today’s world. In 2014, he opened the business titled, The Sioux Chef as a caterer and food educator in the Minneapolis/Saint Paul area. He and his business partner Dana Thompson also designed and opened the Tatanka Truck, which featured pre-contact foods of the Dakota and Minnesota territories.

    In October 2017, Sean was able to perform the first decolonized dinner at the James Beard House in Manhattan along with his team. His first book, The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen was awarded the James Beard medal for Best American Cookbook for 2018 and was chosen one of the top ten cookbooks of 2017 by the LA Times, San Francisco Chronicle as well as the Smithsonian Magazine. This year, Chef Sean was selected as a Bush Fellow, as well as receiving the 2019 Leadership Award by the James Beard Foundation. The Sioux Chef team of twelve people continues with their mission to help educate and make indigenous foods more accessible to as many communities as possible through the recently founded nonprofit North American Traditional Indigenous Food Systems (NATIFS). Learn more at www.natifs.org.Did you know that there is a fragrant shrub with medicinal properties against respiratory infections, pain and diabetes that has been used by indigenous people spanning North America, Europe and Asia for centuries? Labrador tea is still valued today in the treatment of many ailments and is consumed as a traditional beverage. It is just one of many wild plants that make up the indigenous cuisine of Native peoples in the US and Canada. In this episode, we will chat with award-winning chef and indigenous activist, Chef Sean Sherman, who is raising awareness about the cultural and medicinal value of this and many other unique wild ingredients with his company “The Sioux Chef” and nonprofit North American Traditional Indigenous Food Systems.

  • With special guest Susanne Masters

    In our 15th episode on the show, we’re going to investigate an interesting groups of plants that we’ve been hunting for in the wild across the mountainous terrain of Kosovo, which is a small country situated in the Balkans that borders with Albania, Montenegro, Macedonia, and Serbia. Orchids belong to the Orchidaceae family. Many of you plant lovers may even have a lovely orchid decorating your home, or office or garden. Many of the orchids sold commercially are propagated through cell culture techniques so as not to deplete wild collections. Orchids aren’t just for beauty though – some of them are even edible. One edible example you may be familiar with is vanilla – this comes from the fruit pod of an orchid species that is native to Central America. Here in the Balkans, there are several species that are consumed, with the underground tubers being harvested to create a special beverage called salep. Are you intrigued yet?

    Orchids are a plant lover’s delight – they bring this amazing level of beauty to home interiors and gardens. In the Eastern Mediterranean, spanning the Balkans and Anatolia, there are some species found in the wild that also serve as a special food ingredient known as salep. In this episode, I join an orchid expert in the Balkans to learn more.
    ***
    Have you ever wondered where your food comes from? Not just where it’s grown today, but where it originally popped up in the world? Have you ever bit into a delicious, red juicy ripe fruit and wondered, hey – why is it this color? What’s responsible for this amazing flavor? Or – is this good for my health? Could it even be medicinal?

    Foodie Pharmacology is a food podcast built for the food curious, the flavor connoisseurs, chefs, science geeks, foodies and adventurous taste experimenters out in the world! So, join me on this adventure through history, medicine, cuisine and molecules as we explore the amazing pharmacology of our foods.

    Dr. Cassandra Quave is an American ethnobotanist, herbarium curator, and assistant professor at Emory University. Her research focuses on analyzing wild plants used in traditional cultures for food and medicine to combat some of the greatest challenges we face today in medicine: antibiotic resistant infections and cancer.

  • Hello fellow foodies! This is Dr. Cassandra Quave, and you’re listening to the Foodie Pharmacology podcast! This was such a fun episode to tape for a couple of reasons. First – I absolutely love green cardamom as an ingredient in sweet desserts and in flavorful chai lattes, Turkish coffee, or golden milk where I combine it with turmeric and ginger, or even in a Middle-Eastern inspired apple turnover dish I like to cook in the fall. It’s been such fun to learn more the history and pharmacology of this flavorful exotic spice! Second, I had an opportunity to tour a new icecream factory in Atlanta – the IceCream Walla Company – where I met Reza Bhiwandiwalla and had the opportunity to taste test their delicious Badam Milk ice cream, which incorporates fresh ground cardamom pods with crunchy almonds into a rich sweet cream, creating a distinctive and delicious dessert as a result! Are you hungry for more? I am! Let’s dig in.

    Green cardamom belongs to the ginger family and is known as true cardamom – to be distinguished from black cardamom, which actually comes from another species. It is commonly used in sweet desserts in Middle Eastern and Indian cuisine, and is the third most expensive spice in the world! If you’ve ever enjoyed a dark, rich Turkish coffee – that extra special flavor of the brew comes from the single cardamom pod included in the recipe.
    ***
    Have you ever wondered where your food comes from? Not just where it’s grown today, but where it originally popped up in the world? Have you ever bit into a delicious, red juicy ripe fruit and wondered, hey – why is it this color? What’s responsible for this amazing flavor? Or – is this good for my health? Could it even be medicinal?
    Foodie Pharmacology is a food podcast built for the food curious, the flavor connoisseurs, chefs, science geeks, foodies and adventurous taste experimenters out in the world! So, join me on this adventure through history, medicine, cuisine and molecules as we explore the amazing pharmacology of our foods.

    Dr. Cassandra Quave is an American ethnobotanist, herbarium curator, and assistant professor at Emory University. Her research focuses on analyzing wild plants used in traditional cultures for food and medicine to combat some of the greatest challenges we face today in medicine: antibiotic resistant infections and cancer.

  • Lemon balm belongs to the mint family and is also known by the names of balm, common balm, garden balm, or balm mint. This fragrant herb is native to a range spanning southern Europe to Central Asia, but today it can be found in home gardens around the world. The leaves are used as a tea ingredient and the leaf essential oil is also used in aromatherapy.
    ***
    Have you ever wondered where your food comes from? Not just where it’s grown today, but where it originally popped up in the world? Have you ever bit into a delicious, red juicy ripe fruit and wondered, hey – why is it this color? What’s responsible for this amazing flavor? Or – is this good for my health? Could it even be medicinal?

    "Foodie Pharmacology" is a food podcast built for the food curious, the flavor connoisseurs, chefs, science geeks, foodies and adventurous taste experimenters out in the world! So, join me on this adventure through history, medicine, cuisine and molecules as we explore the amazing pharmacology of our foods.

    Dr. Cassandra Quave is an American ethnobotanist, herbarium curator, and assistant professor at Emory University. Her research focuses on analyzing wild plants used in traditional cultures for food and medicine to combat some of the greatest challenges we face today in medicine: antibiotic resistant infections and cancer.

  • Join Cassandra and Chef Steven Satterfield and they talk about even's favorite, not-actually-a-nut, the peanut!

    Chef Satterfield is the executive chef and owner of Miller Union, an award-winning, seasonally-driven restaurant located in Atlanta's Westside neighborhood. Since opening in 2009, the restaurant has received various honors on many national lists including Eater, Bon Appetit, Food & Wine, Esquire and James Beard Foundation. In 2015, Satterfield released his first cookbook, Root to Leaf, to broad critical acclaim. Peanuts, his second book, is a delightful collection of recipes that offers ingenius ways to cook peanuts, from childhood snack, to kitchen condiment and even the centerpiece of a meal. Satterfield's dedication to seasonal cooking and his unwavering support for local farmers is the driving philosophy behind his restaurant and everything he does.

    Peanuts belong to the legume family and are also known by the names of groundnut, goobers and monkey nut. The crop was domesticated thousands of years ago in South America, but now is sold across the globe in the forms of roasted or boiled nuts, oil, butter or even peanut flour. While they are a tasty treat to many, they are also implicated in food allergies for some, which can range from mild symptoms to life-threatening anaphylactic shock.

    ***

    Have you ever wondered where your food comes from? Not just where it’s grown today, but where it originally popped up in the world? Have you ever bit into a delicious, red juicy ripe fruit and wondered, hey – why is it this color? What’s responsible for this amazing flavor? Or – is this good for my health? Could it even be medicinal?

    Foodie Pharmacology is a food podcast built for the food curious, the flavor connoisseurs, chefs, science geeks, foodies and adventurous taste experimenters out in the world! So, join me on this adventure through history, medicine, cuisine and molecules as we explore the amazing pharmacology of our foods.

    Dr. Cassandra Quave is an American ethnobotanist, herbarium curator, and assistant professor at Emory University. Her research focuses on analyzing wild plants used in traditional cultures for food and medicine to combat some of the greatest challenges we face today in medicine: antibiotic resistant infections and cancer.

  • Cannabis is known by many names, from hemp to marijuana. It has been used for everything from a fiber plant, a food, as a psychoactive, and as a medical remedy for epilepsy and pain relief. The legal framework regarding the regulation and use of the Cannabis plant is undergoing a state of rapid change across the US. In this episode, we explore the changing legal landscape and pharmacology of edible cannabis.

    In Ep. 10 of #FoodiePharmacology, Cassandra interview 2 experts on cannabis #chemistry & law - John de la Parra and Ernest Anemone! 4/20

    ***
    Have you ever wondered where your food comes from? Not just where it’s grown today, but where it originally popped up in the world? Have you ever bit into a delicious, red juicy ripe fruit and wondered, hey – why is it this color? What’s responsible for this amazing flavor? Or – is this good for my health? Could it even be medicinal?

    Foodie Pharmacology is a food podcast built for the food curious, the flavor connoisseurs, chefs, science geeks, foodies and adventurous taste experimenters out in the world! So, join me on this adventure through history, medicine, cuisine and molecules as we explore the amazing pharmacology of our foods.

    Dr. Cassandra Quave is an American ethnobotanist, herbarium curator, and assistant professor at Emory University. Her research focuses on analyzing wild plants used in traditional cultures for food and medicine to combat some of the greatest challenges we face today in medicine: antibiotic resistant infections and cancer.

  • How sweet it is! This grass grows to a height of 10-13 feet high and supplies most of the world’s sugar market. A native of New Guinea, it has spread across the tropics and subtropics Westward, where it is now also cultivated in the Americas and Caribbean.
    ***
    Have you ever wondered where your food comes from? Not just where it’s grown today, but where it originally popped up in the world? Have you ever bit into a delicious, red juicy ripe fruit and wondered, hey – why is it this color? What’s responsible for this amazing flavor? Or – is this good for my health? Could it even be medicinal?

    Foodie Pharmacology is a food podcast built for the food curious, the flavor connoisseurs, chefs, science geeks, foodies and adventurous taste experimenters out in the world! So, join me on this adventure through history, medicine, cuisine and molecules as we explore the amazing pharmacology of our foods.

    Dr. Cassandra Quave is an American ethnobotanist, herbarium curator, and assistant professor at Emory University. Her research focuses on analyzing wild plants used in traditional cultures for food and medicine to combat some of the greatest challenges we face today in medicine: antibiotic resistant infections and cancer.