Episodes

  • This summer four missions will launch to Mars setting up an extraordinary year for the exploration of the red planet.

    My guest this week on the SpaceQ podcast is Chris Carberry, the CEO of Explore Mars, a not-for-profit that engages stakeholders in an effort to make a Humans to Mars mission a reality.

    The organizations holds a variety of events to engage stakeholders including its annual Humans to Mars Summit in Washington every May.

    Today, Chris will get us caught up on what the organization is doing, the status of a future human mission to Mars, and we’ll talk about the exciting year 2020 will be for Mars.

    The four missions are NASA’s Mars 2020 rover which includes the first ever helicopter, China’s HX-1 mission which consists of an orbiter and small rover, the European Space Agency's ExoMars lander and rover which has Russia and Canada participation, and lastly the United Arab Emirates (UAE) is sending an orbiter on what they’re calling the Hope Mars Mission. The Japanese are providing the launch for the UAE mission.

    By my count that’s two new orbiters around Mars, three new rovers, a lander and a helicopter. They join 6 operational orbiters, 4 American, 1 European and 1 Indian, along with 1 rover that’s operational, that being NASA’s Curiosity rover.

    Listen in.

    Explore Mars
    https://www.exploremars.org/

  • Happy New Year, this is the first SpaceQ podcast of 2020 and the last in our three part Winter Series from other creators.

    Today our podcast is from the Perimeter Institute and features Elizabeth Tasker in a live public lecture from November 6, 2019. Her lecture is titled "Home away from home, the hunt for habitable planets."

    Tasker is a British astrophysicist, science writer and an Associate Professor at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

    As you’ll hear, Tasker is a very good science communicator. In this lecture, she takes a very complicated topic, the hunt for exoplanets, and in particular habitable worlds, and provides the listener with a true appreciation of what we know and don’t know, how we search and where we might find life. I was enlightened by her lecture, and I think you will be as well.

    Listen in.

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  • Welcome to the second of 3 podcasts for our annual Winter Series. As with our Summer Series, we’ll be bringing you recent important news updates and talks on topics we think you’ll find interesting from other creators. Our regular interviews will resume on January 14th.

    On December 4th NASA announced the first results from the Parker Solar Probe mission. The mission is a first of its kind with the probe flying closer to the sun than any other spacecraft before. It’s a risky mission, but with rich scientific rewards expected. And in this news conference, the principal investigators confirm some long thought theories about our star, but also reveal some new mysteries.

    The seven year mission continues, and just five days ago the spacecraft successfully completed its second flyby of Venus. NASA says the spacecraft used Venus to slow itself down, approaching the planet at a distance of about 3,009 km (1,870 miles) from Venus’s surface during the second gravity assist of the mission. This gravity assist maneuver adjusted Parker Solar Probe’s trajectory to set it up for its fourth orbit around the Sun, or perihelion, which will occur on January 29.

    Listen in.

    Time line:

    0:00 - Intro

    2:52 - Nicola Fox, director of the Heliophysics Division in the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington

    5:16 - Stuart Bale, principal investigator of the FIELDS instrument at the University of California, Berkeley

    9:21 - Justin Kasper, principal investigator of the Solar Wind Electrons Alphas and Protons (SWEAP) instrument at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor

    15:19 - Russ Howard, principal investigator of the Wide-Field Imager for Parker Solar Probe (WISPR) instrument at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory in Washington

    21:04 - David McComas, principal investigator of the Integrated Science Investigation of the Sun (ISOIS) instrument at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey

    28:04 - Questions and Answers

  • In our first SpaceQ podcast episode of our annual Winter Series we're featuring a Future In-Space Operations teleconference on Maxar's Power and Propulsion Element for the Lunar Gateway.

    Our annual Winter Series podcast special runs for three weeks during the holiday and features important news updates or talks on topics we think you’ll find interesting from other creators. Our regular interviews will resume on January 14th.

    In this episode Scott Tilley and Ty Lee of Maxar Technologies discuss a critical Lunar Gateway technology, the Power and Propulsion Element, being developed for NASA.

    The Power and Propulsion Element is the first element in NASA’s Lunar orbiting Gateway which will form the basis of a sustainable human return to the moon and beyond. It's an important program for Maxar which could lead to years of sales to both NASA and potential future commercial customers. The program is currently in Preliminary Design Phase with the first demonstration element to be launched in 2022.

    Link to the presentation:
    https://spaceq.ca/podcast-maxars-power-and-propulsion-element-for-the-lunar-gateway/

    Listen in.

  • This is our last interview of the year before we start our annual 3 week Winter Series podcasts where we feature lectures or news events from other creators. We’ll be back with a new interview on January 14.

    Ok, my guest this week is Chad English who is an Industrial Technology Advisor for the Industrial Research Assistance Program at the National Research Council. I ran into Chad at the recent Canadian Space Summit where he was a speaker in the “I have 50Mbps! Now what?” session. That session focused on the coming broadband internet to rural and remote locations via Low Earth Orbit satellite constellations like the one Canada's Telesat is trying to build. Other companies looking to this marketplace include OneWeb, SpaceX and others.

    Chad and I discuss what LEO satellite constellations will mean to those people living in rural and remote communities along with new business opportunities that will be available.

    Listen in.

  • This weeks podcast is another live recording from the Canadian Space Summit. The speaker is Rob Postma, Vice President and Head of Governmental Export, Space Systems, Airbus.

    As you’ll hear Rob say, this talk, titled, Airbus 50 years pioneering progress, is meant to provide a picture of what Airbus has accomplished but more importantly what it’s planning.

    Listen in.

  • This weeks podcast is a live recording from the Canadian Space Summit. The opening keynote speaker for the conference was Sergy Mummert, Senior Vice President, Global Cloud & Strategic Partnerships, SES Networks.

    While the focus of the talk is on SES Networks with an emphasis on the how they’re building a Cloud-Optimized Satellite Ecosystem and their O3b Medium Earth Orbit constellation, it’s important to note why they were a key sponsor to the conference.

    While SES has been doing business in Canada for many years, including owning a majority stake in Ciel Satellite Group, they're now opening a new Canadian office with the aim of having a greater presence in Canada. They’ve hired their first Canadian employee, John Clarke, an industry veteran, as their Senior Sales Director.

    Listen in.

  • Today we’re doing something a little different. On this episode I’m going to provide a recap of last weeks Canadian Space Summit. Listen in.

  • Today our guest is Jessica West of Project Ploughshares, the editor of the 2019 Space Security Index. The index, in its 16th edition, looks at the global space sector to track trends in the use of outer space from a sustainability perspective.

    The 2019 index covers the 2018 calendar year and includes the following data from the report. "Space activity is flourishing. In 2018, 71 countries owned satellites. Seventy-two national space agencies spent a combined $70 billion. Eleven new agencies were created or announced. Some of the 2,062 active satellites saved 2,700 lives. The satellite industry earned $277 billion, while startups secured $3 billion in private investment.”

    The new report contains positive developments, but clearly shows more work needs to be done.

    Listen in.

  • Jupiter's moon Europa appears to have a salt water ocean. This excites scientists at it opens up the possibility there may be life. The Europa Clipper mission will try to gather more evidence to substantiate the theory.

    Europa has fascinated us since Galileo discovered it in 1610. In popular science fiction, Sir Arthur C. Clarke made it the centre piece of his novel 2010: Odyssey Two which was published in 1982. Odyssey Two was a follow-up to the original and classic 1968 movie, 2001: A Space Odyssey, directed by Stanley Kubrick.

    This weeks SpaceQ podcast is the last of our coverage from the recent international Astronautical Congress in Washington. It is plenary 6, Europa Clipper: Making a Mission to Understand Our Place in the Universe.

    Europa is slightly smaller than the Earth’s moon but scientist think it could have twice as much ocean water as the Earth! Today’s podcast will provide insight into Europa and NASA’s Europa Clipper mission. It should also be noted that the European Space Agency is also sending a mission to Europa, the Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer mission.

    It is hoped that one day we’ll send a lander to the surface of Europa.

    The panel is moderated by Dipak Srinivasan, Europa Clipper Telecommunications Manager, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.

    The panelists include:

    7:03 - Robert (Bob) Pappalardo, Europa Clipper Project Scientist, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    15:39 - Karen Kirby, Europa Clipper Deputy Project System Engineer, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.

    22:12 - Jennifer Dooley, Europa Clipper Project Systems Engineer, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    30:19 - Thomas Magner, Manager, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.

    38:16 - And Bill Nye, The Planetary Society.

    We’ve edited the recording to keep the podcast within a reasonable length.

    Listen in.

  • Hi, I’m Marc Boucher and this is the SpaceQ podcast.

    We have a special podcast from the recent International Astronautical Congress in Washington, the Heads of Emerging Agencies plenary.

    This a new plenary session at the IAC. And while we’re accustomed to a plenary featuring the heads of legacy national space agencies from the US, Russia, Japan, India, Europe, China and Canada, it’s only in the past few years that the voices of emerging space nations are starting to reach a global audience.

    This panel offers the listener an opportunity to learn about programs from some of the emerging space nations along with their thoughts on a host of issues facing all nations.

    In this panel you’ll hear from space leaders from the United Arab Emirates, South Africa, Thailand, Brazil and Angola.

    The panel is moderated by Pontsho Maruping, Chair of the Scientific and Technical Committee, United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA), South Africa.

    The panelists include:
    * Mohammed Nasser Al Ahbabi, Director General, UAE Space Agency (UAESA),United Arab Emirates.
    * Valanathan Munsami, CEO, South African National Space Agency (SANSA), South Africa.
    * Anond Snidvongs, Executive Director, Geo-Informatics and Space Technology Development Agency (GISTDA), Thailand.
    * Carlos Augusto Teixeira de Moura, President, Brazilian Space Agency (AEB), Brazil.
    * Zolana Rui Joao, General Manager, National Space Program Management Office (GGPEN), Angola.

    We’ve edited the recording removing individual introductions to keep the podcast within a reasonable length.

    Listen in.

    Panel timeline:

    Panel introduction - 3:11
    United Arab Emirates introduction - 4:44
    South Africa introduction - 8:34
    Thailand introduction - 11:17
    Brazil introduction - 15:09
    Angola introduction - 18:36
    Panel discussion - 21:50

  • This week we have a special podcast from the International Astronautical Congress in Washington that discusses a very important topic: The Long-Term Sustainability of Outer Space: Advancing the Space Economy and Sustaining Space Industry Through Solutions to Space Security Issue.

    The panel is moderated by Fatih Ozmen, Owner and CEO, Sierra Nevada Corporation.

    The panelists include:
    - Jean-Loïc Galle, President and CEO, Thales Alenia Space,
    - Daniel S. Goldberg, President and CEO, Telesat
    - Etienne Schneider, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Economy and Space, The Luxembourg Government
    - Kay Sears, Vice President and General Manager, Lockheed Martin
    - Scott Pace,Executive Director, National Space Council

    We’ve edited the recording removing individual introductions to keep the podcast within a reasonable length.

    Listen in.

  • Hi, I’m Marc Boucher and this is the SpaceQ podcast.

    This weeks podcast has two segments. The first is an interview with Launch Canada’s Adam Trumpour who provides an update on the Launch Canada Challenge. Of note, and subsequent to this interview, Adam told SpaceQ that the November event had to be postponed as not all the approvals could be done in time.

    In the second segment I speak with Lawrence Reeves the founder and leader of the Canadian Satellite Design Challenge which engages students from universities across Canada.

    I’ll point out that both Launch Canada and the Canadian Satellite Design Challenge are not-for profits that did not start with government, nor do they get government funding, though the Canadian Satellite Design Challenge does get in-kind government contributions and Launch Canada is likely going to get in-kind government contributions.

    Listen in.

    - Adam Trumpour, Launch Canada (Starts at 2:03)
    http://www.launchcanada.org/

    - Lawrence Reeves, Canadian Satellite Design Challenge (Starts at 13:35)
    http://www.csdcms.ca/

  • Hi everyone. Now that SpaceQ is publishing two podcasts, Terranauts and the original SpaceQ podcast, we’re going to change our scheduling starting this week.

    We just released episode 2 of Terranauts today with host Iain Christie talking with Canadian space pioneer Mac Evans. Terranauts will now published every other Thursday, for now.

    The original SpaceQ podcast is moving to Tuesday’s with the next episode dropping on Tuesday, October 22.

    As with SpaceQ, Terranauts is available on Apple Podcasts and other podcast services and apps.

    Thanks, and see you next Tuesday for another episode of SpaceQ!

  • This weeks podcast has two segments. The first is my short interview with Conservative Party MP Erin O’Toole from the Aerospace Industries Association of Canada’s Election 2019 All Candidates Town Hall in Toronto that was held on October 3rd. As you’ll hear, Mr. O’Toole was forthcoming in discussing key issues of interest to the space community. Comments from other candidates are in my story on our website. A link to the story will be in the show notes.

    The second segment of today’s podcast was recorded on Monday, October 7 at Western University where the new Institute for Earth and Space Exploration was officially launched. The segment includes a brief comment from Western’s new president, Alan Shepard, no relation folks, and former Canadian astronaut Dr. Dave Williams. The comments are followed by an interview with the new Director of the Institute for Earth and Space Exploration, Dr. Gordon Osinski.

    Segment 1
    1:33 - Conservative Party MP Erin O'Toole

    Segment 2
    8:10 - Alan Shepard, president, Western University
    8:45 - Astronaut Dave Williams
    9:58 - Dr. Gordon Osinski

    Related stories:

    A Conservative Government Would Likely Proceed with Canada’s Commitment to the Lunar Gateway
    http://spaceq.ca/a-conservative-government-would-likely-proceed-with-canadas-commitment-to-the-lunar-gateway/

    Western University Launches Institute for Earth and Space Exploration With Aim to be a Global Leader in Space Research and Training
    http://www.spaceq.ca/western-university-launches-institute-for-earth-and-space-exploration-with-aim-to-be-a-global-leader-in-space-research-and-training/

    Listen in.

  • Terranauts is a new podcast from SpaceQ.

    This week we're launching the first episode on the SpaceQ channel however you can now find Terranauts on iTunes, Spotify, Google Play Music, Soundcloud and your favourite podcast app.

    Ian Christie is the host of Terranauts. When most people think about space they think of astronauts, names like Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Chris Hadfield are familiar to an awful lot of people. But for every astronaut that makes it to space there are legions of smart, dedicated, and interesting people who plan, design, build and operate the mission, spacecraft and instruments that make up the space program. Terranauts is about those people. The ones that go to space all the time, without ever leaving the planet. I hope you'll join me to hear about their stories.

    Today's guest is GHGSat founder and president Stephane Germain.

    Listen in.

  • My guest today is Aram Daniel Kerkonian, a lawyer with Ardaker Space Consultants and the co-author of the government mandated 2017 independent review of the Remote Sensing Space Systems Act.

    Today we’re going to be talking about the opportunity a federal election presents for the space community in seeking changes to existing regulations and what new regulations, and possibly even new legislation, could come from the next government.

    You might think is dry stuff, on the contrary. For anyone working in the business of space, or new companies to the space sector, this is an important topic and time. Why? Because the space sector is rapidly evolving and the government needs to adapt to those changes so that Canadian businesses can remain competitive on a global scale. It also has a direct impact on whether foreign investors see Canada as a place to do business.

    Recently SpaceQ Intel, a new division within SpaceQ hosted a one day roundtable that brought together government and industry. For the most part, government was in listen mode due to the elections being called. It was an opportunity for industry to express their thoughts on current regulations and any changes that might be needed along with any new potential legislation that should be contemplated. For government it was an opportunity to see what, if any consensus would come from industry. This in turn will help the civil service in advising a new government and those incoming ministers of departments with a space mandate

    Today Aram and I will discuss election 2019 and the opportunities it presents for regulatory reform.

    Listen in.

  • Hi, I’m Marc Boucher and this is the SpaceQ podcast.

    My guest today is Grant Bonin, Chief Engineer, Space Systems at Rocket Lab. Grant is making his second appearance on the SpaceQ podcast. The last time was in the spring of 2018 when he was the Chief Technology Officer at Deep Space Industries.

    In today’s podcast we find out more about Grant's departure from Deep Space Industries and his current activities at Rocket Lab including their new Photon small satellite initiative.

    Listen in.

  • Hi, I’m Marc Boucher and this is the SpaceQ podcast.

    Today is the second part of our two part series focusing on the commercialization of Low Earth Orbit with a focus on the International Space Station and other potential commercial habitats. My guest as in the first episode last week is Adrian Mangiuca, the Commerce Director at NanoRacks. NanoRacks describes themselves as both the largest commercial user and private investor on the International Space Station with customers from over 30 nations.

    Recently NanoRacks released a NASA commissioned study titled An In-Orbit Commercial Space Station Habitat Development Enabling Cost-Effective and Sustainable U.S. Presence in Low-Earth Orbit. NanoRacks partnered with 14 other organizations to create the 170 page report.

    In my conversation with Adrian we go over some of the key findings of the report and delve into what the real world LEO space station habitat marketplace is.

    As we start the second episode Adrian just answered the question of how the marketplace will react to other foreign entities, be it commercial or state, enter the LEO marketplace. Now he answer the question of why the ISS should be the “final government owned and operated space station in Low Earth Orbit” as stated in the report.

    Listen in.

  • Hi, I’m Marc Boucher and this is the first episode of season 3 of the SpaceQ podcast.

    We’ve got an exciting season planned where we’ll interview the people pushing the boundaries of the space economy, making discoveries in space science, observing the Earth to better understanding our planet and manage our resources, and so much more.

    Later this month we’re also be launching our new pop-up podcast Terranauts hosted by Iain Christie. Iain’s first interview will be with Stephane Germain, the CEO of GHGSat. If you haven’t listened to my interview with Iain about Terranauts it’s available in our feed.

    The SpaceQ and Terranauts podcasts are partially advertiser supported but that revenue isn’t enough for a viable business. That’s why it’s really important to us that you support us through Patreon. And starting this fall we’re going to provide subscriber only content available to our patrons on Patreon. To support SpaceQ please make your monthly pledge at https://patreon.com/spaceq.

    Ok, now on to today’s podcast.

    Today we’re focusing on the commercialization of Low Earth Orbit with a focus on the International Space Station and other potential commercial habitats. This is the first part of a two part series and my guest is Adrian Mangiuca, the Commerce Director at NanoRacks. NanoRacks describes themselves as both the largest commercial user and private investor on the International Space Station with customers from over 30 nations.

    Recently NanoRacks released a NASA commissioned study titled An In-Orbit Commercial Space Station Habitat Development Enabling Cost-Effective and Sustainable U.S. Presence in Low-Earth Orbit. NanoRacks partnered with 14 other organizations to create the 170 page report.

    In my conversation with Adrian we go over some of the key findings of the report and delve into what the real world LEO space station habitat marketplace is.

    Listen in.