Episodes

  • Hi, I’m Marc Boucher and this is the SpaceQ podcast.

    Today is the second part of our two part series focusing on the commercialization of Low Earth Orbit with a focus on the International Space Station and other potential commercial habitats. My guest as in the first episode last week is Adrian Mangiuca, the Commerce Director at NanoRacks. NanoRacks describes themselves as both the largest commercial user and private investor on the International Space Station with customers from over 30 nations.

    Recently NanoRacks released a NASA commissioned study titled An In-Orbit Commercial Space Station Habitat Development Enabling Cost-Effective and Sustainable U.S. Presence in Low-Earth Orbit. NanoRacks partnered with 14 other organizations to create the 170 page report.

    In my conversation with Adrian we go over some of the key findings of the report and delve into what the real world LEO space station habitat marketplace is.

    As we start the second episode Adrian just answered the question of how the marketplace will react to other foreign entities, be it commercial or state, enter the LEO marketplace. Now he answer the question of why the ISS should be the “final government owned and operated space station in Low Earth Orbit” as stated in the report.

    Listen in.

  • Hi, I’m Marc Boucher and this is the first episode of season 3 of the SpaceQ podcast.

    We’ve got an exciting season planned where we’ll interview the people pushing the boundaries of the space economy, making discoveries in space science, observing the Earth to better understanding our planet and manage our resources, and so much more.

    Later this month we’re also be launching our new pop-up podcast Terranauts hosted by Iain Christie. Iain’s first interview will be with Stephane Germain, the CEO of GHGSat. If you haven’t listened to my interview with Iain about Terranauts it’s available in our feed.

    The SpaceQ and Terranauts podcasts are partially advertiser supported but that revenue isn’t enough for a viable business. That’s why it’s really important to us that you support us through Patreon. And starting this fall we’re going to provide subscriber only content available to our patrons on Patreon. To support SpaceQ please make your monthly pledge at https://patreon.com/spaceq.

    Ok, now on to today’s podcast.

    Today we’re focusing on the commercialization of Low Earth Orbit with a focus on the International Space Station and other potential commercial habitats. This is the first part of a two part series and my guest is Adrian Mangiuca, the Commerce Director at NanoRacks. NanoRacks describes themselves as both the largest commercial user and private investor on the International Space Station with customers from over 30 nations.

    Recently NanoRacks released a NASA commissioned study titled An In-Orbit Commercial Space Station Habitat Development Enabling Cost-Effective and Sustainable U.S. Presence in Low-Earth Orbit. NanoRacks partnered with 14 other organizations to create the 170 page report.

    In my conversation with Adrian we go over some of the key findings of the report and delve into what the real world LEO space station habitat marketplace is.

    Listen in.

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  • This week we have the final episode in this years Summer Series podcast where we feature three compelling talks from other creators.

    Hi, I’m Marc Boucher and this is the SpaceQ podcast. In this weeks Summer Series podcast we hear from Stephanie Thomas who will speak on "Direct Fusion Drive for Rapid Deep Space Propulsion." Thomas is Vice President of Princeton Satellite Systems.

    This talk was featured on the May 29 Future In-Space Operations weekly teleconference. The slides are available with the podcast on our website:

  • Hi, I’m Marc Boucher and this is the SpaceQ podcast. Welcome to the second episode in this years Summer Series where we feature three compelling talks from other creators.

    In this weeks episode we hear from Jennifer Fogarty who will speak on "The Human System: Protecting Human Health and Performance to Enable Deep Space Exploration.” Dr. Fogarty is NASA's Human Research Program Chief Scientist.

    This talk was featured on the August 14 Future In-Space Operations weekly teleconference. The slides are available with the podcast on our website with the URL link in the show description.

    Podcast and slides on our website;
    https://spaceq.ca/the-human-system-for-deep-space-exploration-summer-series-podcast/

    Listen in.

  • Hi, I’m Marc Boucher and this is the SpaceQ podcast. Welcome to first episode in this years Summer Series where we feature three compelling talks from other creators.

    In this weeks episode we hear from George Sowers who will speak on "Mining the Moon for Fun and Profit.” Dr. Sowers is a Professor of Practice at the Colorado School of Mines who works on the world’s first and only graduate program in Space Resources.

    This talk was featured in the mid-June Future In-Space Operations weekly teleconference. The slides are available with the podcast on our website from the link below.

    Listen in.

  • Hi, I’m Marc Boucher and this is the SpaceQ podcast.

    What happens when you bring Iain Christie and Marc Boucher together? Well, naturally they’re both going to want to talk, a lot.

    One of the outcomes of that June meeting was the idea to start a new podcast. That podcast idea is now Terranauts, which will join the SpaceQ family in September.

    Ok, so what is Terranauts going to be about? Well…

    How do you inspire the next generation of workers in the space sector? One way is to tell the compelling stories of those people who are firmly rooted here on Earth, unlikely to ever fly into space. We call these people Terranauts. They are 99.9% of the workforce, a vast majority of which you rarely hear about. Their contributions are essential to our knowledge of space and its use to benefit humanity.

    Today, in introducing Terranauts, I’m going to turn the tables on the host of the new SpaceQ pop-up podcast, Iain Christie, and interview him. Iain’s first episode will air in September.

    Listen in.

  • This week we have our final special recording from the recent Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute ASTRO 2019 conference in Laval, Quebec.

    In this podcast you’ll hear from Dr. Sarah Gallagher who splits her time between Western University where she’s professor studying black holes and the Canadian Space Agency where she became the first Science Advisor to the President.

    In this after dinner talk, Dr. Gallagher spoke on the topic of leveraging science for innovation. Today’s recording includes both her talk and an interesting Q&A session moderated by CASI Executive Director Geoff Languedoc.

    You can follow Dr. Gallagher on Twitter at @scgQuasar.

    Listen In.

    - The Q&A starts at 28:23

  • This week we have another special recording from the recent Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute ASTRO 2019 conference in Laval, Quebec.

    In this podcast you’ll hear from start-ups and veterans on how to scale up your space business.

    The panel was moderated by Christine Tovee of CATx Technology who is also a member of the Canadian government appointed Space Advisory Board. The panelists included startups QEYNet and its CEO Cordell Grant, Reaction Dynamics CEO Bachar Elzein, GHGSat’s CEO Stephane Germain whose company qualifies as a startup through Stephane has been in the business a long time and also serves on the Space Advisory Board. Lastly, Daniel Schulten of MDA was the big company representative on the panel. He is however leading MDA's new LaunchPad initiative which aims accelerate and grow partnerships from small and medium businesses and academia in Canada.

    Listen In.

  • This week we’re featuring a Future in Space Operations teleconference with former NASA historian Roger Launius who spoke about his new book "Apollo's Legacy: Perspectives on the Moon Landings.”

    A we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission it’s important to look back at the time of the Apollo program in the 60’s and early 70’s to better understand the motivations of the Apollo program and what was happening in the world at that time. Launius provides that unique view.

    Listen in.

  • Hi, I’m Marc Boucher and this is the SpaceQ podcast. This week we have another special recording from the recent Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute ASTRO 2019 conference in Laval, Quebec. In this podcast, the topic is Commercial Lunar Exploration. The panel was divided into two sections, presentations by each panelist followed by a moderated question and answer session. We will post the video of the presentations when it's available, but the focus for this podcast is the excellent Q&A discussion.The panel was moderated by Jan Clarence Dee a Space Consultant at Euroconsult. The panelists were Erick Dupuis, Director, Space Exploration Development, Canadian Space Agency; Michele Faragali, CTO, Mission Control Space Services; and John Walker, VP Lunar Surface Operations, ispace Inc.Note that subsequent to this talk and later in the conference Erick Dupuis announced that the Treasury Board of Canada had approved the requested $150 million over five years for the Canadian Lunar Exploration Accelerator Program. Listen In.

  • Hi, I’m Marc Boucher and this is the SpaceQ podcast.

    This week we have another special recording from the recent Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute ASTRO 2019 conference in Laval, Quebec.

    In this podcast we hear from BGen Kevin Whale, Director General and Joint Force Component Commander for Space, RCAF who talked about Delivering The Space Objectives of Canada’s Defence Policy. Some of the interesting points you’ll hear include that Canada should consider creating a National Space Council similar to what the US has. As well, it was clear by his remarks that Canada needs a national launch capability. It’s not something the RCAF will do, but if there’s a commercial provider operating in Canada, the RCAF will seriously consider using that service. And to make that point, General Whale said he would like responsive capability, meaning if they need to launch something fast, an option is available commercially in Canada.

    BGen. Whale’s presentation is available on our website.

    Listen in.

  • Hi, I’m Marc Boucher and this is the SpaceQ podcast.

    This past week we were at the Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute ASTRO 2019 conference in Laval, Quebec. The theme was “Space for Business”.

    One of the plenary sessions we recorded and present here is the speech of Canadian Space Agency president Sylvain Laporte. It is a very different speech from what he said a year ago at this conference when the government had yet again rejected the space plan as proposed.

    While the listener will come away feeling good about Canada’s space program, as they should compared to a year ago, we’ve added some context to the speech in an article we’ve posted to the SpaceQ website.

    Listen in.

    Related story - Don’t Let Go Canada and Changes at the Canadian Space Agency Resulted in Government Funding Commitment;
    https://sqm.me/2LstPIQ

    ASTRO 2019 stories on SpaceQ;
    https://sqm.me/2Jbkqmd

  • If you're a serial entrepreneur and you want to start a New Space company, what type of business should you start? Well, how about Gas Stations in Space?

    In this weeks SpaceQ podcast we're featuring a Future in Space Operations weekly teleconference from earlier this year with Daniel Faber, CEO of startup Orbit Fab.

    Daniel, an Australian who become a Canadian citizen, was most recently the CEO of Deep Space Industries which he helped build, and which reached $10 million in revenues before he left.

    It was during his time at Deep Space Industries that he saw an opportunity in the on-orbit servicing market. Why not build gas stations in different orbits so that satellites can fill up on fuel.

    Listen in

  • My guest today is Adam Gilmour the founder and CEO of Gilmour Space Technologies, an Australian startup building launch vehicles, starting with a small satellite launcher.

    Adam’s career as a managing director at CITI Bank was going just fine until Elon Musk came along with his ideas on how to lower the cost of sending payloads to space. Musk inspired Adam so much so that he left his nice job at CITI Bank to start his own rocket company.

    Now the company is about to launch its first suborbital rocket followed by plans to test a follow-on orbital launch vehicle. His story is one of perseverance, lot’s of hard work and with no guarantee of success.

    Listen in.

  • My guest today is Steve Iris, the RADARSAT Constellation Mission Manager at the Canadian Space Agency. Today we’ll be discussing the RADARSAT Constellation Mission, its primary uses and benefits to Canadians and the international community. RCM is a $1.2B mission follow-on to the very successful RADARSAT-1 and RADARSAT-2 satellites.

    The RADARSAT Constellation Mission is a trio of synthetic aperture radar satellites that will be used for maritime surveillance, disaster management and ecosystem monitoring. The trio of satellites are currently scheduled to launch on Wednesday, June 12 at 10:17 a.m. EDT on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from the Vandenberg Air Force base in California. The mission has been 15 years in the making.

    Listen in.

  • My guest today on the SpaceQ podcast is former Canadian astronaut Dr. Robert Thirsk who was recently hired back by the CSA on a contract basis to help with their efforts in defining Canada’s potential role in healthcare in deep space.

    Canadian Healthcare in Deep Space: Advancing our country’s leadership in autonomous care in space and on Earth report. Credit: Canadian Space Agency.
    Dr. Thirsk went on two missions in space, including a long duration stay on the International Space Station in 2009.

    Prior to rejoining the agency, Dr. Thrisk was part of an expert group tasked by the CSA to look at the potential Canadian healthcare and biomedical roles for Deep Space Human Spaceflight. 

    In March the expert groups report was released in hard copy. The report is called Canadian Healthcare in Deep Space: Advancing our country’s leadership in autonomous care in space and on Earth. The report is not yet available online but SpaceQ did receive a hard copy. Dr. Thirsk and I discuss the recommendations of that report while also discussing other related medical issues here on Earth, and even the distant possibility of human colonies on other worlds or on human made O’Neil type colonies.

    Listen in.

  • My guest today is Mike Gold, Vice President, Regulatory and Policy at Maxar Technologies. For this podcast we’re going to talk to Mike about his other role. That of Chair of NASA’s Advisory Council Regulatory and Policy Issues Committee.

    The committee was created in the summer of 2018 to look at how NASA could further commercialize its activities. Mike is one of 15 members, mostly from industry, that meet several times a year including with NASA’s other Advisory Council committees.

    Committee members include long time space players such as Northrup Grumman and Lockheed Martin to new space companies SpaceX and Blue Origin to name a few. In its first meeting last November the committee published its first observations, findings, and recommendations. The committee tackled a board range of ideas from export controls, intellectual property, supporting space-based commercial development, private sector habitats, logos, advertising, astronaut endorsements and space research.

    Listen in.

  • On Monday, May 13, NASA contacted the media on short notice late in the afternoon saying a teleconference was being scheduled for the early evening. Scheduling a teleconference in the evening is not something NASA normally does. Whatever the substance of the call, it must be important. As it turns out the call with media was to outline a budget amendment for the Fiscal Year 2020 to provide additional funds to the Trump administration newly mandated plan for NASA to land U.S. astronauts on the moon in 2024 instead of 2028. The call with the details would in of itself be important, but at the end of the teleconference, after answering questions from the media, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine added a little something that would put the call into the NASA history books. Bridenstine announced that NASA had selected the name Artemis for the human return to the moon program. In Greek mythology, Artemis was the twin sister of Apollo and the name of NASA’s famed 60’s moon program which saw humans land on the moon for the first time in 1969. Now 50 years later, the Artemis Program will be an international effort, though led by the US, that plans to create the infrastructure for a permanent moon base at the south pole.

    Listen in.

    The NASA Fiscal Year 2020 Budget Amendment documents are available here:
    https://www.nasa.gov/news/budget/index.html

  • Today we’re featuring a Future In-Space Operation teleconference with Steve Clarke from the NASA headquarters where he is the Deputy Associate Administrator for Exploration in NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. Steve spoke about NASA’s Exploration Campaign Overview providing an update on the program and where it’s headed.

    The teleconference was held on April 17th after the Trump administration had mandated that NASA put Americans on the moon within 5 years.

    The presentation mentioned in the podcast is available on the SpaceQ website.

    Listen in.

  • On April 12 Western University held its annual Space Day. One of the more interesting events was a panel discussion on Space Resources: The Next Frontier in Exploration.

    The discussion was moderated by Mellisa Battler, a Western grad and current Chief Science Officer at Mission Control Space Services. The panelists were a diverse group including;

    -Michael Winter, a lawyer and a Market Conduct Investigator, London Life Insurance Company
    - Holly Johnson, President’s Business Manager, MDA
    - Mike Villeneuve, Director Central Canada Division, Geological Survey of Canada
    - Neil Banerjee, Industrial Research Chair in Advanced Mineral Exploration, Western University
    - Tim Haltigin, Senior Mission Scientist - Planetary Exploration, Canadian Space Agency
    - Charles Nyabeze, Vice-President Business Development, Centre for Excellence in Mining Innovation

    It was a fascinating discussion on how we’ll use resources we find in space to what companies in this area should consider as they execute the longer term goal of enabling use of these resources.

    Listen in.