Episodes

  • “For nature and natural beauty to survive, people have to want it. If they don’t ever experience it, why should they want it? What could see of value in it, something that you not only have never experienced but don’t ever expect to. We intellectually know that the Amazon is an important thing because it stores carbon and it’s home to many species, but I’ve been there. That’s a different thing entirely to be able to appreciate it on that level and care about it for the sheer beauty and magic and joy of being in a place that’s still so big and so wild. So that I think is the most important thing for the next generation.”

    Rob Pringle is a professor of ecology, biodiversity, and conservation at Princeton University. He’s fascinated by nearly all facets of ecology and conservation and his research in his lab addresses a correspondingly broad sweep of questions. His work on these questions is motivated by curiosity. The questions are united by a single goal: to understand how wild ecosystems work by studying their modular components and emergent properties.

    · https://pringle.princeton.edu

    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org
    · www.creativeprocess.info

  • Rob Pringle is a professor of ecology, biodiversity, and conservation at Princeton University. He’s fascinated by nearly all facets of ecology and conservation and his research in his lab addresses a correspondingly broad sweep of questions. His work on these questions is motivated by curiosity. The questions are united by a single goal: to understand how wild ecosystems work by studying their modular components and emergent properties.

    · https://pringle.princeton.edu
    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org
    · www.creativeprocess.info

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  • "I have a strong feeling that at the moment, especially in the United States, people are much more interested in the culture and backgrounds of minorities than they are in the cultures where those minorities originally came from. I think it’s a sign of people drawing inwards more and more. That goes for the Right Wing populists and White Supremacists just as much. They’re also drawing the wagons around what they see as their identity, and I think that’s exactly not the way to go…I can only emphasize that in terms of education is that everything should be fostered to open people’s minds. Open minds to the past, to other cultures and not to have minds closed by limiting ourselves more and more to the circumstances of our birth.”

    Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including A Tokyo Romance, The Churchill Complex,Their Promised Land, Year Zero, The China Lover, Murder in Amsterdam, Occidentalism and God’s Dust. He teaches at Bard College and is a columnist for Project Syndicate and contributor to The New Yorker,
The New York Times, and other publications. He was awarded the 2008 Erasmus Prize for making "an especially important contribution to European culture" and was voted one of the Top 100 Public Intellectuals
by the Foreign Policy magazine.

    
· www.bard.edu/faculty/details/?id=153

    · www.creativeprocess.info

  • Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including A Tokyo Romance, The Churchill Complex,Their Promised Land, Year Zero, The China Lover, Murder in Amsterdam, Occidentalism and God’s Dust. He teaches at Bard College and is a columnist for Project Syndicate and contributor to The New Yorker,
    The New York Times, and other publications. He was awarded the 2008 Erasmus Prize for making "an especially important contribution to European culture" and was voted one of the Top 100 Public Intellectuals
    by the Foreign Policy magazine.
    · www.bard.edu/faculty/details/?id=153

    · www.creativeprocess.info

  • “You can criticize many things in the United States, but there are taboos and the number one taboo is that you cannot criticize Capitalism. That is equated with disloyalty…This story about Capitalism being wonderful. This story is fading. You can’t do that anymore. The Right Wing cannot rally its troops around Capitalism. That’s why it doesn’t do it anymore. It rallies the troops around being hateful towards immigrants. It rallies the troops around “fake elections”, around the right to buy a gun, around White Supremacists. Those issues can get some support, but “Let’s get together for Capitalism!” That is bad. They can’t do anything with that. They have to sneak the Capitalism in behind those other issues because otherwise, they have no mass political support.”

    Richard D. Wolff is Founder of Democracy at Work and host of the show Economic Update. Professor of Economics Emeritus, University of Massachusetts, Amherst where he taught economics from 1973 to 2008. He is currently a Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School University, New York City. Earlier he taught economics at Yale University (1967-1969) and at the City College of the City University of New York (1969-1973). In 1994, he was a Visiting Professor of Economics at the University of Paris (France), I (Sorbonne). Wolff was also regular lecturer at the Brecht Forum in New York City. He is the author of The Sickness is the System: When Capitalism Fails to Save Us from Pandemics or Itself.

    · www.rdwolff.com
    · www.democracyatwork.info
    · www.creativeprocess.info
    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org

  • Richard D. Wolff is Founder of Democracy at Work and host of the show Economic Update. Professor of Economics Emeritus, University of Massachusetts, Amherst where he taught economics from 1973 to 2008. He is currently a Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School University, New York City. Earlier he taught economics at Yale University (1967-1969) and at the City College of the City University of New York (1969-1973). In 1994, he was a Visiting Professor of Economics at the University of Paris (France), I (Sorbonne). Wolff was also regular lecturer at the Brecht Forum in New York City. He is the author of The Sickness is the System: When Capitalism Fails to Save Us from Pandemics or Itself.

    · www.rdwolff.com

    · www.democracyatwork.info
    · www.creativeprocess.info
    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org

  • “The kelp plant itself can grow to 30 meters easily, and sometimes 40 meters, so it’s a huge plant…When people look around the world today, seeing the news, making the world a better place is getting increasingly important. People have to pay attention to what they can do as individuals to make the world a better place. The world is not going to become a good place on its own. If there weren’t for thousands and millions of people, phenomenal sacrifices that people make. When you see what some people do and the risks they take. I have basically found my job for the remaining years that I have on the earth to try to make the world a better place.”

    Brian Wilcox is the chief engineer and co-founder of Marine BioEnergy, Inc.  Marine BioEnergy was founded to grow plants in the open ocean to provide carbon-neutral fuels so that eventually fossil fuel use can be eliminated. Previously, Brian spent 38 years at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory working on robots for planetary exploration and other extreme environments. At NASA, he was the Supervisor of the Robotic Vehicles Group for over 20 years, and Manager of the Space Robotics Technology Program for another nearly 15 years.

    · www.marinebiomass.com

    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org

    
· www.creativeprocess.info

  • Brian Wilcox is the chief engineer and co-founder of Marine BioEnergy, Inc.  Marine BioEnergy was founded to grow plants in the open ocean to provide carbon-neutral fuels so that eventually fossil fuel use can be eliminated. Previously, Brian spent 38 years at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory working on robots for planetary exploration and other extreme environments. At NASA, he was the Supervisor of the Robotic Vehicles Group for over 20 years, and Manager of the Space Robotics Technology Program for another nearly 15 years.
    · www.marinebiomass.com
    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org
    · www.creativeprocess.info

  • “The good thing about our species is that we create our own environment. What we’ve been doing so far is creating an environment where we’re much more successful. We live a lot longer, we’re much healthier than we have been in the past. There are many, many more of us, so we’re very successful as a species and that’s been at the expense of other ecosystems, but what’s happened is we are now dominating the planet to a dangerous degree, but we are also self-aware. We’re capable of understanding that.”

    Gaia Vince is a science writer and broadcaster interested in the interplay between humans and the planetary environment. She has held senior editorial posts at Nature and New Scientist, and her writing has featured in newspapers and magazines including the Guardian, The Times and Scientific American. She also writes and presents science programmes for radio and television. Her research takes her across the world: she has visited more than 60 countries, lived in three and is currently based in London. In 2015, she became the first woman to win the Royal Society Science Book of the Year Prize solo for her debut, Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made. She is author of Transcendence: How Humans Evolved Through Fire, Language, Beauty & Time.

    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org
    · www.creativeprocess.info

  • Gaia Vince is a science writer and broadcaster interested in the interplay between humans and the planetary environment. She has held senior editorial posts at Nature and New Scientist, and her writing has featured in newspapers and magazines including the Guardian, The Times and Scientific American. She also writes and presents science programmes for radio and television. Her research takes her across the world: she has visited more than 60 countries, lived in three and is currently based in London. In 2015, she became the first woman to win the Royal Society Science Book of the Year Prize solo for her debut, Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made. She is author of Transcendence: How Humans Evolved Through Fire, Language, Beauty & Time.
    · www.wanderinggaia.com
    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org
    · www.creativeprocess.info

  • "I think any time we are closer to the earth, we can feel the struggles of other human beings as well. I encourage young women to find whatever it is they are passionate about and invest their entire soul in it and go for it! Because you’ll be happy if you’re passionate about your work." –Mary Edna Fraser

    "Southern Africa, south of the Sahara, they’re expecting within this century 200 million climate refugees. Where are they going to go? Who wants those refugees. We have the same thing happening in Central America. Where are they going to go? All over the world, we’re seeing because of climate change we’re seeing vast changes affecting all aspects of society. It’s very worrisome and that’s something that we’ve not been able to face politically. We need to do that.” – Orrin H. Pilkey

    Duke University Professor Emeritus Orrin H. Pilkey is one of the rare academics who engages in public advocacy about science-related issues. His collaborator, Mary Edna Fraser, is an artist who highlights environmental concerns in large silk batiks and oils. They are the co-authors of A Celebration of the World’s Barrier Islands and Global Climate Change: A Primer. Their traveling exhibits, “Our Expanding Oceans” and “Shifting East Coast Barrier Islands” creatively merge science and art.

    · www.maryedna.com
    · www.deleteapathy.com
    · https://sites.nicholas.duke.edu/orrinpilkey
    
· www.creativeprocess.info
    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org

  • Duke University Professor Emeritus Orrin H. Pilkey is one of the rare academics who engages in public advocacy about science-related issues. His collaborator, Mary Edna Fraser, is an artist who highlights environmental concerns in large silk batiks and oils. They are the co-authors of A Celebration of the World’s Barrier Islands and Global Climate Change: A Primer. Their traveling exhibits, “Our Expanding Oceans” and “Shifting East Coast Barrier Islands” creatively merge science and art.

    · www.maryedna.com
    · www.deleteapathy.com
    · https://sites.nicholas.duke.edu/orrinpilkey
    · www.creativeprocess.info
    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org

  • Wetlands naturally absorb twice the amount of carbon than all the world’s forests combined.

    “I think everybody at school learns about the water cycle. That rings a bell with everybody. Maybe this is a good hook to show the place of wetlands in capturing and purifying and the story of water. And then in turn how this links to what we’re seeing every year: droughts, floods, fires, heat waves which are devastating and life-threatening. I think this may be one of the easiest routes in educating people, connecting wetlands with water and the direct impact of that.”

    Jane Madgwick is an ecologist and author with 30 years of experience of working internationally on the science, policy and practice of wetlands and water management. Since 2004, she has been CEO of Wetlands International, leading a network of 20 offices operating in over 100 countries. Wetlands International works to mobilise the conservation and restoration of wetlands, connecting science, policies and practices for biodiversity, resilient communities and reduced climate risks.

    · www.wetlands.org
    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org
    · www.creativeprocess.info

  • Jane Madgwick is an ecologist and author with 30 years of experience of working internationally on the science, policy and practice of wetlands and water management. Since 2004, she has been CEO of Wetlands International, leading a network of 20 offices operating in over 100 countries. Wetlands International works to mobilise the conservation and restoration of wetlands, connecting science, policies and practices for biodiversity, resilient communities and reduced climate risks.

    · www.wetlands.org
    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org
    · www.creativeprocess.info

    Photo by Pieter van Eijk

  • “There’s a wide range of reasons that we really need to understand the root causes of a lot of our social ills and environmental ills. I think we need to continue to come back to this question of how we heal this imposed divide between the natural world and human social constructs. And that healing is key to how we’re going to really unwind the perilous moment that we face right now. How do we reconnect with the natural world? Not just intellectually, but in a very embodied way.”

    Osprey Orielle Lake is the Founder and Executive Director of the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International dedicated to accelerating a global women’s climate justice movement. She works nationally and internationally with grassroots and Indigenous leaders, policy-makers and scientists to promote climate justice, resilient communities, and a just transition to a decentralized, democratized energy future. She serves on the Executive Committee for the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature and Osprey is the Co-Director of the Indigenous Women's Divestment Delegations, and actively leads WECAN’s advocacy, policy and campaign work in areas such as Women for Forests, Divestment and Just Transition, Indigenous Rights, a Feminist Agenda for a Green New Deal, and UN Forums. Osprey is the author of the award-winning book,"Uprisings for the Earth: Reconnecting Culture with Nature."

    · Global Women's Assembly for Climate Justice: Solutions from the Frontlines and the Protection and Defense of Human Rights and Nature
https://www.wecaninternational.org/womens-assembly

    · WECAN COP26 Analysis Blog: Despite Government Failures at COP26, Peoples' Movements Continue Rising to Transform our World - https://www.wecaninternational.org/post/despite-government-failures-at-cop26-peoples-movements-continue-rising-to-transform-our-world

    · WECAN Programs: https://www.wecaninternational.org/our-work

    - WECAN Women Speak Storytelling Database: https://womenspeak.wecaninternational.org/  

    · Join the WECAN Network: https://www.wecaninternational.org/join-the-network

    · WECAN Social Media Handles:

    Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/WECAN.Intl/

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/WECAN_INTL

    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wecan_intl/

    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org

    · www.creativeprocess.info

  • Osprey Orielle Lake is the Founder and Executive Director of the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International dedicated to accelerating a global women’s climate justice movement. She works nationally and internationally with grassroots and Indigenous leaders, policy-makers and scientists to promote climate justice, resilient communities, and a just transition to a decentralized, democratized energy future. She serves on the Executive Committee for the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature and Osprey is the Co-Director of the Indigenous Women's Divestment Delegations, and actively leads WECAN’s advocacy, policy and campaign work in areas such as Women for Forests, Divestment and Just Transition, Indigenous Rights, a Feminist Agenda for a Green New Deal, and UN Forums. Osprey is the author of the award-winning book,"Uprisings for the Earth: Reconnecting Culture with Nature."

    · Global Women's Assembly for Climate Justice: Solutions from the Frontlines and the Protection and Defense of Human Rights and Nature
https://www.wecaninternational.org/womens-assembly

    · WECAN COP26 Analysis Blog: Despite Government Failures at COP26, Peoples' Movements Continue Rising to Transform our World - https://www.wecaninternational.org/post/despite-government-failures-at-cop26-peoples-movements-continue-rising-to-transform-our-world

    · WECAN Programs: https://www.wecaninternational.org/our-work

    - WECAN Women Speak Storytelling Database: https://womenspeak.wecaninternational.org/  

    · Join the WECAN Network: https://www.wecaninternational.org/join-the-network

    · WECAN Social Media Handles:

    Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/WECAN.Intl/

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/WECAN_INTL

    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wecan_intl/

    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org

    · www.creativeprocess.info

  • "Humans have been partnering with fungi for an unknowably long time, no doubt for longer than we’ve been humans. Whether as foods, eating mushrooms, as medicines, dosing ourselves with moulds and other mushrooms that might help, parasites or others helpers with infection, mushrooms as tinder or ways to carry a spark, this very important thing that humans needed to do for a very long time, and as agents of fermentation, as in yeasts creating alcohol. So humans have partnered with fungi to solve all sorts of problems and so fungi have found themselves enveloped within human societies and cultures for a long time."

    Merlin Sheldrake is a biologist and bestselling author of Entangled Life: How Fungi Make Our Worlds, Change Our Minds, and Shape Our Futures. Merlin received a Ph.D. in tropical ecology from Cambridge University for his work on underground fungal networks in tropical forests in Panama, where he was a predoctoral research fellow of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. Entangled Life won the Wainwright Prize 2021, and has been nominated for a number of other prizes. Merlin is a research associate of the Vrije University Amsterdam, Head of Science and Communications Strategy for the Society for the Protection of Underground Networks, and sits on the advisory board of the Fungi Foundation.



    · www.merlinsheldrake.com


    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org


    · www.creativeprocess.info

  • Merlin Sheldrake is a biologist and bestselling author of Entangled Life: How Fungi Make Our Worlds, Change Our Minds, and Shape Our Futures. Merlin received a Ph.D. in tropical ecology from Cambridge University for his work on underground fungal networks in tropical forests in Panama, where he was a predoctoral research fellow of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. Entangled Life won the Wainwright Prize 2021, and has been nominated for a number of other prizes. Merlin is a research associate of the Vrije University Amsterdam, Head of Science and Communications Strategy for the Society for the Protection of Underground Networks, and sits on the advisory board of the Fungi Foundation.



    · www.merlinsheldrake.com


    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org


    · www.creativeprocess.info

  • “It’s true. In Haiti, to a large degree more women were involved in the Revolution, in the war, in the fighting for the nation for the very simple reason that women had more opportunities. After a certain time, we became invisible. Once you’re in your 60’s, you are missing a few front teeth, in fact, some of the women used to take a stone and break up their front teeth so that they wouldn’t be noticed anymore. ‘That’s just an old lady with no front teeth. Okay, she goes about her business, nobody looks at her. She can do nothing.’And those were the fighters–the greatest fighters of our revolution.”

    Professor Bayyinah Bello is a Afrodescendant Ourstorian, Educator, Writer and Humanitarian. With over 50 years of wisdom and extensive research, Professor Bello specializes in Ayitian Ourstory and linguistics.
    She has taught in many parts of Africa, Ayiti, and America from the primary to the university level, including the State University of Haiti. She is the founder of Fondation Marie-Claire Heureuse Félicité Bonheur Dessalines, popularly known as FONDASYON FELICITEE (FF), named after the Empress consort of Ayiti and wife of the revolutionary leader and founder of Ayiti (Hayti, Empire of Freedom), Jean-Jacques Dessalines, Emperor 1st of Hayti. As an author she publishes in Ayitian, English and French. Her latest work, Sheroes of the Haitian Revolution, highlights the lives of ten women in the Ayitian Ourstory who played a significant role in the nation’s journey to freedom. Professor Bello is based in Ayiti and serves as advisor to key eldership councils.
    · www.marugekundi.org/SHEROES
    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org
    · www.creativeprocess.info

    Song credit: Jean Amédé Caze

  • Professor Bayyinah Bello is a Afrodescendant Ourstorian, Educator, Writer and Humanitarian. With over 50 years of wisdom and extensive research, Professor Bello specializes in Ayitian Ourstory and linguistics.
    She has taught in many parts of Africa, Ayiti, and America from the primary to the university level, including the State University of Haiti. She is the founder of Fondation Marie-Claire Heureuse Félicité Bonheur Dessalines, popularly known as FONDASYON FELICITEE (FF), named after the Empress consort of Ayiti and wife of the revolutionary leader and founder of Ayiti (Hayti, Empire of Freedom), Jean-Jacques Dessalines, Emperor 1st of Hayti. As an author she publishes in Ayitian, English and French. Her latest work, Sheroes of the Haitian Revolution, highlights the lives of ten women in the Ayitian Ourstory who played a significant role in the nation’s journey to freedom. Professor Bello is based in Ayiti and serves as advisor to key eldership councils.
    · www.marugekundi.org/SHEROES
    · www.oneplanetpodcast.org
    · www.creativeprocess.info

    Song credit: Jean Amédé Caze