Episodes

  • Many companies have regular performance reviews for their employees. If done well, reflecting on your work is a great way to improve and refresh your professional momentum. Even though it’s not mandated by a higher-up, we should still take similar time as creators to reflect on our work and performance.

    When there’s no boss behind your shoulder or fear of firing, we as creators and solopreneurs need systems in place to hold us accountable and keep our aspirations on track.

    In this episode, Haley and Miguel break down the beats of purposeful and intentional reflection. It’s a system embraced at ConvertKit, and a system we encourage everyone to implement as their creator journeys evolve.

    “Honesty is a really big part of measuring your growth as a creator, or professional, or anything else. Because you’re not going to grow from something that you’re not even acknowledging is a problem.” ~ Miguel Pou

    Main takeaways

    [07:28] Purposeful and regimented reflection holds you accountable. Because as creators, no one else is there to do it for you. Start by breaking up lofty goals into small pieces. [11:17] If you approach tasks with the mindset that you’re a learner rather than the expert, then nothing you do is wrong and everything you do is teaching you something valuable. [17:27] Learning from your mistakes is great, but don’t forget to celebrate the wins too. [18:00] To improve your areas of weakness, you have to be honest about them and aware of what they are. [28:21] You can’t succeed as a creator if you’re not growing personally. Don’t just track professional milestones and metrics like subscribers, clicks, and revenue. If you’re learning a lot, that’s just as much of an accomplishment as gaining 1,000 subscribers or earning $1,000.

    Connect with our hosts

    Miguel PouHaley Janicek

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTube15FiveCreator SessionsMy Brothers And IJames ClearCraft & Commerce Conference1% Better Every Day - James Clear at ConvertKit Craft + Commerce 20174 Personal Growth Skills Content Creators Should MasterThe Future Belongs To Creators 114: 1,000 True FansMatt RaglandThe Future Belongs To Creators 104: Making the Leap to Full-Time CreatorAlexis TeichmillerThe Future Belongs To Creators 123: Launching Your First Newsletter with Daniel BeasleyJudah & The LionJudah AkersSam WilliamsAlt Bloom

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  • Taking a leap of faith is never easy. If you’ve ever thought about starting a newsletter, what’s holding you back? Whether it’s your grueling 9-5, the daunting task of building a website, or starting with zero followers, there always seems to be something standing in the way.

    But, as Daniel Beasley says, take it one small step at a time. Director of Customer Experience at ConvertKit and former business owner, Daniel has always juggled lots of ideas. When he came up with the idea to create content about remote work and traveling post-pandemic, he knew that starting small and focusing on adding value would allow his side hustle to grow without becoming overwhelming.

    In this episode, Charli, Miguel, and Daniel discuss steps for starting a newsletter, overcoming the hurdles of a side hustle, and the features that make newsletters fun and valuable resources for your subscribers.

    “Most people have a thousand ideas, and all the ideas equal, ‘how do I make money from it?’ And so what I want to do with this is actually switch that mindset and say, ‘how do I create value?’” ~ @danielbeasley

    Main takeaways

    [10:32] If you’re thinking of starting a newsletter, curating content is a great place to start. Newsletters with curated lists are invaluable because they cut through the information-saturated web.[16:28] Make your newsletter something you would click on and something you would be excited to engage with, not just what you think people want.[23:01] You don’t need lofty goals when you’re first starting a newsletter. Your initial goals should be to stay consistent and to slowly try new things with a growing audience.[27:01] All you need to get started with a newsletter is a landing page. Don’t worry about creating an entire site right out of the gate.

    Connect with our hosts

    Charli PrangleyMiguel PouDaniel Beasley

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeSubscribe to Venture RemoteVenture Remote on FacebookVenture Remote on InstagramThe Future Belongs To Creators 122: Building Your Network by Sharing Your Process with Teddy Williams Teddy WilliamsAirbnbSubscribe to Charli’s newsletterWebflowWordPressFlywheel


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  • How do you go from casual listener of a show to colleague of a creator all in the comment section of a live stream? Ask Teddy. A staple of The Future Belongs To Creators podcast, Teddy’s here (almost) every week to ask questions and keep the conversation fun.

    In today’s episode, Teddy chats with Charli, Haley, and Miguel about his success working from the comment section and finding his audience as an emerging creator. They discuss everything from overcoming the fear of asking that first question to a creator and if building in public is really worth potential scrutiny. They also discuss the acceptability of shameless networking.

    Stepping into the spotlight can be nerve-wracking. But for people like Teddy, the professional benefits have outweighed the potential downside.

    “If your favorite YouTuber for fashion is like, ‘Hey I’m doing a live stream,” don’t just show up and watch it. Show up and ask a question. Participate in the chat and get that started.” ~ @TeddyWilliamsW

    Main takeaways

    [09:28] When it comes to perfectionism, sometimes you have to get out of your own way. Finishing something and creating it in public will lead to more opportunities. Don’t wait around for the work to be perfect. [19:33] Even a small interaction can mean a lot to a fan or follower. Networking doesn’t have to be a huge gesture to be successful. A series of small connections is a fantastic way to build relationships.[23:45] There’s no shame in intentional networking. Plan for who you’re going to connect with at a networking event or elsewhere to make the most of your time.[28:46] When you engage with creators, you’re actually serving them. Interacting with and applying their content helps show that they are accomplishing the mission they set out to.[37:11] As a creator with an audience, remember to recognize the fans or followers that show up repeatedly.

    Connect with our hosts

    Charli PrangleyMiguel PouHaley JanicekTeddy Williams

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeTeddy on YouTubeWhy I Watch My Favorite Podcast Live Stream on YouTubeTeddy on TwitterSign up for Teddy’s newsletterTeddy’s Webinar Flow Recap tweetCharli’s video about her promotionNathan BarryBarrett BrooksSean McCabeFigmaThe Future Belongs To Creators 121: The Impact of Twitch on the Creator EconomyThe Future Belongs To Creators 114: 1,000 True FansTwitchGrayscaleRafal TomalFarm To ClosetKygoSteph CurryNoah from ProvocaTeachMelanie GriesemerRyan de Metz

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  • While an app filled with live streaming gamers may be the last thing you associate with 2021’s highest-paid influencers, much of what makes up our modern creator economy originated on Twitch.

    At least according to a recent article, Twitch Turns 10, and the Creator Economy Is in Its Debt. In this episode, Charli, Haley, and Miguel dig into live streams, the game craze, opportunities from the app, challenges Twitch perpetuates, and why creators today should take a page from the gaming space for a healthy career doing what they love.

    “Streamers have huge, very very passionate audiences because of the live component of the content that they create, more so than perhaps an influencer on Instagram who is posting very curated photos of their space or their outfit or whatever. I think people really like the reality of seeing someone live and their live reactions.” ~ @charliprangley

    Main takeaways

    [10:54] Are gamers considered creators? They create content for an audience, which is exactly what artists and YouTubers do.[23:11] Don’t rely on third-party tools to build a relationship with your audience, whether that be YouTube, Instagram, or Twitch. You should always be steering your audience to a platform that you own. [25:59] Given its emphasis on unedited live streams, some may argue that Twitch has contributed to the rise in “relatability” and authenticity. [28:33] At the very least, Twitch is another opportunity for your audience to find and interact with your content. In that sense, platforms like Twitch add to the accessibility of becoming a full-time creator.[34:01] If you’re a creator, try out live. Live streaming can strengthen the bond you have with your audience and add authenticity and humanity to your online persona.

    Connect with our hosts

    Charli PrangleyMiguel PouHaley Janicek

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeTwitchTwitch Turns 10, and the Creator Economy Is in Its DebtPatreonOnlyFansThe New Rules of the “Creator Economy”The Future Belongs To Creators 116: How Platforms Are Changing in Response to the Creator EconomyNinjaLudwigCharli D’AmelioWhy I Watch My Favorite Podcast Live Stream on YouTube

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  • In today's Q&A episode, Charli, Haley, and Miguel share secrets and insights from their experience balancing work, life, side passions, and, of course, hosting a creator podcast. Stay tuned for answers on charging for sponsorships, knowing your limits as a freelancer, recovering from creative ruts, and more.

    “You have to know your audience so well to understand your value. Because if you have an unengaged audience, then your value is not going to be there.” ~ @HaleyJanicek


    Today’s Questions

    [03:45] Why is Charli so transparent about her income? [12:05] What are the biggest lessons you’ve learned from doing this podcast?[20:06] What do you do when you’re feeling creatively uninspired or unmotivated?[26:37] How do you handle growth and momentum on your side gig when you can’t give it the attention it needs?

    Connect with our hosts

    Charli PrangleyMiguel PouHaley Janicek

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeCreator SessionsCharli on YouTubeSean McKay2021 income streams report - I DOUBLED my side hustle income!How much do web designers earn? [Real salary numbers]How to create a gallery wallAlexis TeichmillerChoosing The Right Medium For Creating with Ben SchoefflerThe Realities of Trying to Make It in Music with Josh LoganHappy Happy HouseplantWorking With a Virtual Assistant as a Creator with Chloe AnnaTinLun Studios

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  • When you build a side hustle from the ground up, you do everything by yourself, nurturing each aspect of your passion project as it grows. When it’s finally time to hire your first employee and start delegating, it can feel daunting and difficult. Especially if it’s someone you’re meeting for the first time who lives thousands of miles away. While challenging, it’s better not to wait until you’re completely overwhelmed to hire a helping hand.

    As a virtual assistant specializing in creative work, Chloe Anna is an expert at organization and time management, two skills creative people often need help with. While your creativity may have gotten you this far, your business needs people like Chloe if it’s ever going to survive and thrive.

    In this episode, Charli, Haley, and Miguel talk with Chloe about everything VA-related — when it’s time to hire, what to look for, how to delegate, and why VAs can save your side hustle.

    “You need to make two lists. The first list is your skillset that you can’t hand over. So that’s the thing you sell, the thing that makes you talented and creative. And then the other list is for everything else. Even in those tasks you do and are your skillset, there are likely still tasks around them that you can offload.” ~ @chloeannava

    Main takeaways

    [08:04] Find a VA you can relate to on a personal level. This is someone you’ll be entrusting with your business, and having a personal relationship can make it a better experience.[09:55] When interviewing VAs, it’s important to nail down their availability, and be honest with the time commitment you’re expecting.[17:53] Great VAs need exceptional time and project management skills, organizational skills. And if you’re doing creative work, they need an eye for art as well. [20:56] A great benefit of VAs is their ad-hoc status. You can bring them into special projects or quick tasks — it’s not the same level of responsibility as hiring a full-time employee. [25:37] Instagram is a great place to find VAs. [29:27] Virtual assistants and personal assistants are two different things. There is some crossover, but you should not be hiring a VA to do personal tasks and remain on-call 24-7.

    Connect with our hosts

    Charli PrangleyHaley JanicekMiguel PouChloe Anna

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeChloe’s WebsiteChloe on InstagramCharliMarieTVThe cold email that got Chloe hired

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  • As creators and entrepreneurs, our instinct is almost always to do everything, all at once, all by ourselves. We aspire toward a dream life and are willing to put in the work to live it. In this episode, Charli and Haley talk with Angel Marie, Creator Educator at ConvertKit, and a creator in her own right.

    Over the past year, Angel has learned a thing or two about balance, hustle, and doing it all. She worked full-time, traveling constantly, and managed to expand her side hustle along the way. In addition to her personal and professional aspirations, Angel wanted to give back whenever she could, volunteering on the weekends and investing in the communities she visited.

    If you’re a creator who wants to do it all but still keep your day job (plus a few side gigs), Angel breaks down the lessons she's learned about service, priorities, and developing as a creator, while paving the way for traveling entrepreneurs.

    “One of those things that I realized was, at the end of the day, we can be our worst critic. I am my worst critic. And I realized that even though I wasn’t doing coaching programs while I was traveling, I was still building my side hustle by prioritizing my own growth as a coach and a leader.” ~ @angelmarieofficial

    Main takeaways

    [13:11] When balancing travel with work, it’s important to stay organized and always have a backup plan for WiFi and a workspace. [18:39] Though we can try, it’s impossible to balance everything. Be aware of and intentional with your priorities. [22:48] You don’t have to give up your side hustle to travel and work full-time. Simply pick and choose the parts of your side hustle that you plan to prioritize in this season of your life. [23:57] Stay in a place for at least one month if you’re balancing work and traveling. Give yourself enough time to enjoy and explore each new location. Otherwise, you’ll feel rushed and the experience won’t be worth it. [26:20] Do not allow yourself to fall into a vacation mindset. You won’t stay productive if you relax into the newness of each spot. [28:09] Give yourself grace while balancing traveling and work. You won’t see everything and that’s ok. Whatever the location, it’s not going anywhere.

    Connect with our hosts

    Charli PrangleyHaley JanicekAngel Marie

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeBeauty In The MakingNathan Lowell

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  • Nowadays, it seems like every creator has a podcast. So what’s stopping you from buying a mic, sitting down, and starting a podcast of your own? If you’re afraid to take the leap for fear of failure, stage fright, or those dreaded awkward silences on a live podcast, hopefully, this episode quells those worries and inspires you to hit record.

    In this episode, Miguel and guest Ben Schoeffler chat about all things podcast creation. A product specialist at ConvertKit, Ben also knows a thing or two about hosting a podcast. With three different podcasts under his belt and years of experience on YouTube, he’s here to share insider tips for success and some of the mistakes he’s made along the way.

    As a creator, it’s important to share your voice. It may be the medium of the moment, but it’s undeniable that podcasting is one of the easiest (and most cost-effective) ways to speak up.

    “It’s a really good way to build a connection with your audience and get people to know, like, and trust you. So if you are selling something, podcasts are one of the best ways to go. ” ~ @BenSchoeffler

    Main takeaways

    [08:36] Don’t be afraid to break the “best practices” in podcasting. There are really no rules when it comes to podcasting. What makes you different might make you successful so don’t focus on being perfect. [24:45] If you don’t want to commit to show notes, create a landing page for a specific episode to collect your followers’ information and market to those people.[26:48] Don’t tell yourself podcasting is hard. The barrier to entry is low for podcasting and repetition will make anything easier. [27:58] Consider a live podcast. It allows you to interact with an audience and feel like you’re speaking to an audience rather than pressing record and talking into an empty void. [28:40] Don’t be afraid of talking to an empty room. View those first few episodes as an opportunity to practice. [33:04] If you want to be better at coming up with ideas for your podcast, read about copywriting.

    Connect with our hosts

    Miguel PouBen Schoeffler

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeBen On YouTubeShut Up, BrainMysterious UniverseStreamYardZencastrThe Future Belongs To Creators 116: How Platforms Are Responding To The Creator Economy The New Rules of the “Creator Economy”Tested Advertising Methods by John Caples

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  • Times are changing. As our culture slowly begins to normalize full-time creatorship, the economy is responding. Some shifts feel unexpected while others feel more predictable. Regardless, one thing is for certain: as creators, paying attention to these shifts is important to maintaining our creative freedom and loving the lifestyle we’ve built.

    In this episode, Charli and Haley examine the sometimes puzzling moves made by companies capitalizing on creators, the parts of creatorhood finally valued by our modern economy, and the powers that fuel it.

    “What this shows really though — this fight to get creators to be exclusive on a platform — it shows how valuable creators are, right? And it shows how much these companies need creators in order to be successful.” ~ @charliprangley

    Main takeaways

    [04:05] Companies are trying to figure out the best way to incentivize creators to create exclusively on their platforms — but what’s the end game? Why is it important for creators to be exclusive on a platform? [07:46] When a company pays a creator to be exclusive, it almost forces that creator to work for the company rather than for themselves. That creator is suddenly held more accountable and may ultimately lose creative freedom. [10:46] Companies continuously focusing on exclusivity dilutes the ability for creators to easily diversify their streams of income. [13:52] There’s been a snowball effect of one company after another recognizing the creator economy as something that’s collectively driving us forward. [15:25] Companies are also recognizing the value of owning your audience. It will be interesting to see how companies outside of ESPs support that end goal. [17:53] Platforms aren’t helping the creator middle-class succeed. Instead, they’re perpetuating the handful of highly successful creators.

    Connect with our hosts

    Charli PrangleyHaley Janicek

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeCreator SessionsThe New Rules of the “Creator Economy”The Future Belongs To Creators 114: 1,000 True FansSpotifyArmchair ExpertValkyraeDesign LifeApple PodcastsMailchimpAWeberFlodeskThe Future Belongs To Creators 115: The Realities of Trying to Make It in Music with Josh LoganCharlie D’amelio SubstackTweet at ConvertKit

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  • In a world obsessed with fame, fortune, and “making it,” the path to becoming a successful musician can feel daunting. But there are ways to realistically forge a career as a musical creator, and no one knows that journey better than Josh Logan.

    Josh always knew music was his destiny. But he wasn’t ready to jump head-first into life as a full-time performer. So he went to business school and landed a job in music management. As his career grew, he expanded into other areas, writing for professional musicians and even writing his own work. Eventually, Josh left life as a manager behind and began his career as a full-time musician.

    In this episode, Charli, Haley, Miguel, talk with Josh about the steps you can take to monetize your passion, how to handle the inevitable hardships, and why connecting with fans is the ultimate end goal.

    “I think art is the hardest when you have all these pressures. If I didn’t have another job and I had to go to a writing session every week, knowing in the back of my head that if I didn’t write something special enough to make money, that I would have to quit this — one, that would be horrible, and two, I don’t think the art would be as good because you have some insane pressure on you all the time. And when you can create an environment for your art to grow under a little less pressure, that’s when you’re going to find the most success.” ~ @Josh_Logan

    Main takeaways

    [05:44] Try having multiple things going at once in a way that’s manageable. Generating multiple streams of income or multiple outlets for creativity gives certain aspects of your career the financial means (and time) to grow. [12:30] Our culture is terrible at celebrating the small wins. If you’re ever going to feel satisfaction as a musician (or creator of any kind) you have to learn to celebrate the successes rather than always looking for the next big thing. Sometimes that means detaching the sentimental wins from the financial.[17:46] Diversifying your income takes away this pressure to become a perfect and successful creator as fast as possible. [24:26] Having a side hustle is nothing to be ashamed of. Letting your career fund your creativity is what allows you to take that side hustle to the next level.[26:22] Patreon is one of the best revenue generators for upcoming musicians. [32:58] Having 1,000 true fans is difficult but possible if you put in the time.

    Connect with our hosts

    Charli PrangleyHaley JanicekMiguel Pou

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeJosh’s PatreonJosh’s WebsiteJosh on TwitterJosh on FacebookJosh on InstagramSonglandAndry GrammerRed GrammerPosition MusicCreator SessionsWillie Jones on writing his American Dream | Creator Sessions1,000 True FansJana KramerDarius RuckerRachel PlattenBrittney SpencerGrand Ole OpryPatreon

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  • What do you need to earn a living as a creator? What milestone must you hit before your life can revolve around your passions rather than a 9-5? While that milestone often feels obscure, an essay by Kevin Kelly outlines one straightforward rule for success: 1,000 true fans.

    In this episode, Charli, Haley, and Miguel discuss what it means to have 1,000 true fans, what defines a true fan, the benefit of quality over quantity, and why relationships always matter when it comes to fans.

    While you may have hundreds of thousands of subscribers on Youtube or one million followers on Instagram, do you really have 1,000 true fans? And is that number really what determines creator success?

    “It makes this concept of being a creator really attainable to people that don’t understand how you actually earn a living as a creator. And I think that’s the big question mark. How do people earn a living as a creator?” ~ @HaleyJanicek

    Main takeaways

    [07:38] Be intentional when building your subscriber list by focusing on your niche and giving the most value possible to people interested in that niche. So often we focus on quantity over quality, and the 1,000 true fans concept proves the value of quality. [10:20] Having quality subscribers is beneficial for brands as well because they want influencers to have more engaged followers who are more likely to buy an endorsed product. [19:26] The creators of which most people consider themselves true fans, are creators they feel a personal connection to, and relationship with. So building that relationship is essential for developing true fans. Most of the time, that aspect of your job as a creator can’t be outsourced. [26:57] True fans are the source for generating more fans. They introduce new people to your work, so even if they’re not directly paying you for your products or services, they’re helping you generate revenue indirectly. [28:40] There’s more to success than reaching a certain number. There’s a nuance to your income source as a creator, such as the products you develop, the price you sell it for, and the content you continue to create. [35:27] People’s tastes and interests naturally change over time. Your true fans from five years ago may not be the same true fans you have today. In sum, never stop trying to generate new fans, no matter where you are in your journey.

    Connect with our hosts

    Charli PrangleyHaley JanicekMiguel Pou

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeCreator SessionsCraft & Commerce Conference 1,000 True FansMariah CozJulie SolomonLady GagaTim McGrawMatt RaglandTyrone WellsCreator Sessions: Musical Performance by Tyrone WellsChris McAllisterEverlaneFigmaFall Out BoyFrom BoiseSketchnote AcademyDan PettyHeath CeramicsUrtext Films

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  • Do you cringe at the thought of networking? If you’re a creator who values authentic connections, maybe you do. But networking doesn’t have to be a sales-first interaction. In fact, networking effectively usually means focusing on the connection before the capital gain.

    In this episode, Charli, Haley, and Miguel discuss the best ways to network as a creator, how to shift your mindset for success, and helpful tools for creators looking to connect. If you approach it the right way, networking can be something to look forward to rather than something you actively avoid. And while it may take some practice, networking is an important skill to master. Because the right conversation can transform your career.

    “The wrong time to make a connection with someone is when you need something from them. You should be building up a network with like-minded people, people who are doing the same things as you, people who are doing interesting things. Before you know what you need from them is the best time to be doing it. Because then when something arises, you’re going to have a group of people who you can lean on for support and for advice.” ~ @charliprangley

    Main takeaways

    [07:25] Set success metrics for your networking and focus on quality over quantity when you create them. For example, set a goal to connect with one person before an event. [08:27] Setting success metrics before networking events is crucial because you’re less likely to be disappointed or feel discouraged. [13:03] It’s never a good idea to approach a potential collaborator with a sales pitch or other business-related venture. You have to build real relationships with people for your network to pay off. [16:34] You also don’t have to connect or look for the end outcome. You can (and should) chat with people about things completely unrelated to business. [18:59] Twitter is a fantastic and underutilized place for creators to network. [28:15] Prepare for networking events before you go. Look up who you may be talking to. This will help calm your nerves. [29:43] If you want to get to know people but feel awkward, remind yourself that everyone wants to get to know people. Especially at an event, it’s not weird to walk up to someone and introduce yourself. Just be yourself and focus on building a connection.

    Connect with our hosts

    Charli PrangleyHaley JanicekMiguel Pou

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeCreator SessionsCraft & Commerce Conference World Domination Summitseanwes ConferenceTeddy WilliamsFrom Boise

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    We'd love to have you on the show to talk about successes or failures you've experienced on your creator journey. Submit your story here!


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  • Launching a newsletter sounds simple enough — until it’s week three and you’ve run out of content ideas. Or until your subscribers start falling away and you can’t figure out why.

    In today’s episode, Charli and Miguel discuss tips and tricks for building a successful newsletter that keeps loyal subscribers scrolling and attracts new fans outside your niche. From launching a product, to picking a theme, to figuring out the technical parts in the middle, Charli and Miguel walk through the basics of running a newsletter that actually moves the needle.

    “Part of the reason for starting this newsletter is so that I’m not just emailing my list when I have some action I want them to take. I’m giving them value weekly so that hopefully when I do have the thing to pitch, they’re more interested in it and they don’t feel like they’re just being sold to.” ~ @charliprangley

    Main takeaways

    [08:15] The best newsletters typically have a theme. [11:06] The hardest part of running a newsletter is pumping out content each week. Consistency is critical to success, but if you’re feeling burned out, consider bringing on a guest editor from time to time. [15:54] Deciding on intervals for your newsletter can be tricky. Maintaining a weekly newsletter can feel overwhelming. But on the other hand, if you only send once per month, there’s added pressure for that one monthly newsletter to be fantastic. [18:09] Sending a newsletter weekly is just as valuable for you as it is for your audience because the habitual act of creating and shipping helps you build up that skill set. [22:30] Newsletters aren’t right for every creator. To figure out if it’s right for you, consider your audience. What do they want to see? Who are you trying to help? And think of creators similar to you. What type of content would you want to see from them? [27:49] Newsletters are a great way to keep your email list clean because they sometimes weed out the unengaged or uninterested.

    Connect with our hosts

    Charli PrangleyMiguel Pou

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeMarketing Design DispatchGrayscaleNotionConvertKit’s Paid Newsletter Challenge 2021

    Got a story to tell on The Future Belongs to Creators podcast?

    We'd love to have you on the show to talk about successes or failures you've experienced on your creator journey. Submit your story here!

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    With ConvertKit landing pages, you can build a beautiful page for your project in just a few minutes. Choose colors, add photos, build a custom opt-in form, and add your copy. All without writing any code! Check out landingpages.new to get started.

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  • ConvertKit’s mission is to help creators reach their audience and make a living doing what they love. That includes musicians – possibly the most mainstream of creators. If you’ve been following along, you may have caught wind that ConvertKit recently acquired FanBridge, an email marketing company geared toward musicians.

    In today’s episode, Charli, Haley, Miguel, and ConvertKit CEO Nathan Barry discuss the why behind ConvertKit’s acquisition, why emerging musicians need email, and why email is much deeper than Spotify and so much more than simply another marketing tool in your musical belt.

    “As an artist, you should own the relationship with your fans, just like you should own the masters to your songs, rather than the record label, Spotify, or relying on the algorithms from Instagram, and YouTube, and others. In email, there’s no algorithm. You own that directly.” ~ Nathan Barry

    Our Favorite Creators

    [10:01] Musicians are the creators many people admire the most. They also fuel our culture. Adding musicians to ConvertKit’s portfolio takes our message of supporting creators mainstream.[16:35] Email is not a discovery platform, it’s a connection platform. Emerging artists simply aren’t able to connect with fans and new listeners on sites like Spotify. Not to mention, emails can help you earn a living – selling merch, selling tickets – outside of the slice of revenue you earn for every Spotify stream. [18:21] Email is where your superfans live and the email conversion rate is so much higher than the conversion rate on social media. Casual fans follow on social media. Superfans sign up for your email list. [19:29] Owning your audience is hugely important and you can only own your audience via email. You can’t control when Spotify or Instagram will change the algorithm and delete your fanbase. [22:52] Musicians can use email to foster those one-on-one conversations with fans, build stronger connections, and show off their voice. Given that most musicians are strong writers, writing emails is probably an undiscovered strength for musicians.[28:31] Every artist who is excelling or has excelled in email, has had an experience that has pushed them to start email. Don't wait for something to happen. Be proactive and start building your email list today.

    Connect with our hosts

    Charli PrangleyMiguel PouHaley JanicekNathan Barry

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeBehind-The-Scenes Of Our First AcquisitionCreator SessionsMandy Moore Performs on Creator Sessions After a Decade Long Music HiatusCraft & Commerce Conference Pharrell Williams Masterclass with Students at NYU Clive Davis InstituteAmong UsCORPSETaylor SwiftJohnnyswimSongs With StrangersConvertKit Plans to Bring Newsletters to Music Industry With FanBridge AcquisitionSubstackArnold Schwarzenegger’s NewsletterJenna KutcherKevin HartI Can’t Make This Up: Life Lessons by Kevin HartMailChimpSalesForce Marketing CloudFanBridgeSpotify

    Got a story to tell on The Future Belongs to Creators podcast?

    We'd love to have you on the show to talk about successes or failures you've experienced on your creator journey. Submit your story here!

    Start building your audience for free

    With ConvertKit landing pages, you can build a beautiful page for your project in just a few minutes. Choose colors, add photos, build a custom opt-in form, and add your copy. All without writing any code! Check out landingpages.new to get started.

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  • As creators, we’re always fueled and inspired by other talented creators. Sometimes we’re even surprised by the ones who move us. Because it doesn’t matter what their specialty or background or audience size looks like – when someone speaks to you, it’s very hard not to listen. So who speaks to you?

    In today's episode, Haley and Miguel discuss the creators they love and the reasons these creators have a special place in their hearts and their feeds. From authors to woodworkers, athletes and teachers, these are the people who inspire us online and give creators a good name.

    “This particular creator is talking about sinkholes. 10 million views is a lot of views, that’s not like a niche topic. There are a lot of people that were interested in that! When you think about being a creator, you don’t think about being a geologist or whatever his technical background is, creating videos about sinkholes — you think about posting a photo on Instagram.” ~ @HaleyJanicek

    Our Favorite Creators

    [01:57] James Clear [08:13] Ana White [11:03] Alexis Teichmiller[11:29] Victoria Garrick[14:30] WheezyWaiter[17:23] Dr. Michael Gervais[23:15] Grady Hillhouse[27:36] Sharon Says So[30:18] Bear Rinehart[35:04] Bourbon Moth Woodworking

    Connect with our hosts

    Miguel PouHaley Janicek

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeJames ClearAtomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones by James ClearCraft & Commerce Conference Ana WhiteAlexis TeichmillerDeeper Life Creating safe spaces for our mind and body with Victoria GarrickVictoria GarrickThe Hidden OpponentReal PodAthletes and Mental Health: The Hidden Opponent | Victoria Garrick | TEDxUSCDear MediaWheezyWaiterDr. Michael GervaisFinding MasteryCompete to CreateWarriors EdgePete CarrollArmchair Expert (Dax Shepard)The Skinny ConfidentialPractical EngineeringHow Do Sinkholes Form? Sharon Says SoSharon’s WorkshopsCreator SessionsBear Rinehart Opens Up About Being An Artist on Creator SessionsBear RinehartNEEDTOBREATHEDistroTubeLinuxCodie SanchezThe Nathan Barry Show 029: Codie Sanchez - The Key to Becoming a Future BillionaireBourbon Moth Woodworking

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    We'd love to have you on the show to talk about successes or failures you've experienced on your creator journey. Submit your story here!

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    With ConvertKit landing pages, you can build a beautiful page for your project in just a few minutes. Choose colors, add photos, build a custom opt-in form, and add your copy. All without writing any code! Check out landingpages.new to get started.

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  • Everyone has a passion. But what happens when you take your passion public and start building an audience? Corey Miller is doing just that. Corey makes music under the name Season Cove, and he’s bringing his audience into his creative process in a unique way.

    In today's episode, Charli, Haley, and Miguel chat with Cory about his decision to open up that creator journey, his creative philosophy, and how he balances passion with the pressure of producing music in public.

    “Stories matter more than anything. I would say the pinnacle of the human experience is found in music and in story. And when you can combine those two, you really have something magical.” ~ @corydhmiller

    Main takeaways

    [05:45] It’s helpful to have an internal or personal drive when it comes to creativity. Creating to sell your creativity is fine, but if you’re creating for your own personal gain, that removes some of the pressure and can give you space to just create. [13:51] Deciding to pursue your passion as your side-gig rather than a full-time money-maker can take away the pressure to create for anyone besides yourself. [15:26] On the flip side, pressure can be a good thing when it comes to productivity and producing consistent work. [27:27] Sending an evergreen newsletter is a great way for new subscribers to quickly become integrated into your community.

    Connect with our hosts

    Charli PrangleyMiguel PouHaley JanicekCory Miller

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeSeason CoveCory on YouTubeCreator SessionsDermot KennedyNoah GundersonIngrid AndressBear RinehartWillie JonesU2Desert TripBring Me the HorizonEric Friedensohn

    Got a story to tell on The Future Belongs to Creators podcast?

    We'd love to have you on the show to talk about successes or failures you've experienced on your creator journey. Submit your story here!

    Start building your audience for free

    With ConvertKit landing pages, you can build a beautiful page for your project in just a few minutes. Choose colors, add photos, build a custom opt-in form, and add your copy. All without writing any code! Check out landingpages.new to get started.

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  • Starting to create can feel like a lost cause when we compare ourselves to already-successful creators. So how do we push through imposter syndrome and take the creative plunge anyway?

    In today's Q&A episode, Charli and Miguel answer your questions about overcoming imposter syndrome, balancing authenticity with the desire for likes and views, and the best way to kickstart a successful newsletter.

    “Part of the journey, the fun part, is discovering what my niche can be. What’s the thing that’s really specific to me that I really enjoy? And my hope would be that I would create something hyper-specific that’s super fun for me and then discovering that other people out there have that same interest or I just met that need for a bunch of people.” ~ Miguel Pou


    Today’s Questions

    [02:15] Why diversify platforms? [04:42] How do you even begin with creating fun/educational content when you look at amazing creators online and feel like your work would just disappear in a sea of content? [10:11] How do you balance staying authentic and creating content you’re passionate about with the temptation to just make content other people will like and want to see? [20:04] What’s the best way to start an email newsletter? What are the technical things to know about starting one? [26:42] Can you make custom HTML and CSS templates on ConvertKit?


    Connect with our hosts

    Charli PrangleyMiguel Pou


    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeTwitchSara DietschyCharli’s YouTube ChannelSteal Like An Artist by Austin Kleon: 10 Things Nobody Told You About Being Creative by Austin KleonStreamYardMarketing Design DispatchSlackThe Future Belongs To Creators 106: The Responsibility A Creator Has To Do Right By Their Audience

    Got a story to tell on The Future Belongs to Creators podcast?

    We'd love to have you on the show to talk about successes or failures you've experienced on your creator journey. Submit your story here!

    Start building your audience for free

    With ConvertKit landing pages, you can build a beautiful page for your project in just a few minutes. Choose colors, add photos, build a custom opt-in form, and add your copy. All without writing any code! Check out landingpages.new to get started.

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  • Most of us have experienced burnout in some form. Whether it’s fatigue or overwhelm from the chaos of 2020 or just being overworked and worried this unproductive rut will keep you stranded forever, there are practical tips and mindset shifts to help you get through it. And sometimes those shifts are just admitting you’re burned out and taking a much-needed breather.

    In this episode, Charli, Haley, and Miguel talk about creative burnout and their strategies for overcoming the inevitable creative block. As creatives and side hustlers, it can be hard to slow down and even harder to say no. But if you’re looking for long-term success, here are a few reasons why saying no can help you say yes to the things that matter the most.

    “Where are you overloaded? Where are you trying to do too much? And what do you really care the most about at the end of the day? Because if you try to keep doing everything, nothing’s going to move forward.” ~ @charliprangley

    Main takeaways

    The harder you struggle against burnout, the deeper you’ll fall into it. So sometimes the answer is to simply turn everything off and step away.Going on a walk to clear your head or just unplugging for a while is a great way to reset.To prevent burnout, seek out mentors and coaches and build positive relationships in your field so you have a support system to fall back on when burnout strikes. These relationships can offer support and advice when the going gets tough. Automate processes and systems whenever possible. If you can backload your content and take away the pressure to create every single week or every single day, you’re carving out the space to deal with burnout. You can’t be great at everything but you can be great at a few things. Do less better.


    Connect with our hosts

    Charli PrangleyMiguel PouHaley Janicek


    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeDesign LifeInside Marketing DesignChristina MaslachHappy Happy HouseplantCreator SessionsThe Future Belongs to Creators 101: Choosing The Right Medium For Creating with Ben SchoefflerIsa AdneyBasecampHenry Thong on InstagramHenry Thong on YouTubeAt-Home with Documentary Filmmaker - Henry Thong on Creator Sessions

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    We'd love to have you on the show to talk about successes or failures you've experienced on your creator journey. Submit your story here!


    Start building your audience for free

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  • Chances are, you began creating for yourself. Your work was a labor of love and touched people as a result. But now that you’ve got an audience who tunes in daily or checks your feed every few hours, who are you creating for? And how must your mindset shift now that people are looking to you for advice and inspiration?

    In this episode, Charli, Haley, and Miguel dive into the responsibilities we have as creators and how taking responsibility for past slip-ups can help your audience trust you.

    “As a consumer of content and also as a creator, you have to be mentally prepared for, not just what you’re receiving, but how your work is received. You need to iterate on that, learn from it when possible, and then use that to get better at what you do. You’re not always going to do the perfect thing.” ~ Miguel Pou

    Main takeaways

    Every creator with an audience has a responsibility to their audience. The bare minimum responsibility is to do no harm. However, the audience also has a responsibility to do their research rather than trusting the word of one online influencer. Owning your mistakes after-the-fact will boost trust between yourself and your audience. And reminding your audience that you don’t know everything will make them more likely to listen.When you endorse others or let others use your platform to share their voice, you’re essentially co-signing their platform and inadvertently telling your audience that you share the same message. That’s why it’s beneficial to provide a counterpoint if you don’t agree with everything someone says rather than choosing to stay silent. In this instance, it’s your responsibility to be an advocate for your audience.

    Connect with our hosts

    Charli PrangleyMiguel PouHaley Janicek

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeTeddy WilliamsPerformance Painter, Patcasso, and DJ Steady Rock breakdown their work on Creator SessionsSharon McMahonGwyneth Paltrow x Adam Grant: Think AgainSteve RamseyCreating Art for What Others Want vs. What You Wan‪t‬Influencers vs Creators

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    We'd love to have you on the show to talk about successes or failures you've experienced on your creator journey. Submit your story here!


    Start building your audience for free

    With ConvertKit landing pages, you can build a beautiful page for your project in just a few minutes. Choose colors, add photos, build a custom opt-in form, and add your copy. All without writing any code! Check out landingpages.new to get started.


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  • At ConvertKit, we speak directly to creators, helping them build an online presence and make money doing the things they love. But what distinguishes a creator from an influencer? Can you be both? Neither? Understanding where you fall can be essential to growing your business, speaking to brands, and cultivating an intentional career.

    In this episode, Charli, Haley, and Miguel unpack what it means to influence versus create. Because whether or not you like the word influencer, having an online following means you influence. And with great influence comes great responsibility.

    “We all, every single person who is a part of the creator economy, has a responsibility for the reputation of the creator economy. And (influencers) are a part of that and they are having an impact on the creator economy.” ~ @charliprangley

    Main takeaways

    Regardless of why you have an audience, if you have one, you influence people and therefore carry the responsibilities that come with being “an influencer.” Sometimes people use “influencer” in a way that’s derogatory to undermine the work that goes into gaining an influence. Many people who aspire to be an influencer don’t understand the work that goes into the content that ultimately fuels someone’s ability to influence. Is your motivation to create content or to make money and gain a following? Your motivation can determine your classification. Whether we call followers an audience or a community or simply, followers, that distinction depends on how the creators speak to their followers. Communities are more of a collaborative experience.

    Connect with our hosts

    Charli PrangleyMiguel PouHaley Janicek

    Links

    Watch The Future Belongs to Creators on YouTubeChallenge Winners!James SmithJames ClearI Am A BloggerGood Influence(r)Chris Loves JuliaCharlie D’Amelio

    Got a story to tell on The Future Belongs to Creators podcast?

    We'd love to have you on the show to talk about successes or failures you've experienced on your creator journey. Submit your story here!


    Start building your audience for free

    With ConvertKit landing pages, you can build a beautiful page for your project in just a few minutes. Choose colors, add photos, build a custom opt-in form, and add your copy. All without writing any code! Check out landingpages.new to get started.

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