Episodes

  • Today's guest is Sara Marie Massee, a lead interpreter at George Washington's Mount Vernon. She works with the historic trades department, teaching and actually doing many of the skills and trades that were being practiced around Washington's estate during his lifetime there.  She oversees Mount Vernon's cooking, baking, and textile living history demonstrations to illuminate daily life in the 18th century. Sara Marie has been in the field of living history for 16 years, 14 of them at George Washington's Mount Vernon. She spends her days talking to visitors about Washington's sustainable, innovative farming practices and demonstrating various trades that enslaved people and white, indentured workers would have done on the estate. Her favorite demonstrations are cooking and textile work (spinning, weaving, natural dyeing, and preparing wool, linen, and hemp fibers to be spun). In today’s episode, Dr. Massee shares anecdotes and stories that give us a glimpse of the the textiles industry in the 18th century and the role it played in the economy of George Washington's estate. Tune in to learn more!Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://the-good-dirt.simplecast.com/ (Simplecast), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:The history of textile production at Mount Vernon. 18th-century clothing and linenWorking in the field of living historyResources Mentioned:https://www.mountvernon.org/ (Mount Vernon)Guest InfoConnect with Dr. Massee on Mount Vernon’s https://www.mountvernon.org/ (website)Follow Us:https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)

  • You're in for something a little different this Friday...it's a solo show with Mary and Emma!At Lady Farmer, we're always thinking about ways to shift our thinking to live into a more slow and sustainable lifestyle, and today is a great opportunity to do just that. What if Black Friday became Slow Friday, and what would that look like? Join us on this week’s episode of The Good Dirt as we share a bit about our own Christmas memories and experiences with gift-giving as well as how we're thinking about being more mindful with our consumer habits during the holiday season. Enjoy this week's episode, let us know what you think, and we'll be back with another interview next week!Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://the-good-dirt.simplecast.com/ (Simplecast), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:The negative impacts of consumerism and how to think differently about our consumer habitsThe importance that we have placed on gift-giving and receiving during the holiday seasonSlow Friday ChallengeResources:https://www.amazon.ca/Unplug-Christmas-Machine-Complete-Putting/dp/0688109616 (Unplug the Christmas Tree)https://www.amazon.com/Peter-Spiers-Christmas-Spier/dp/0385245807/ref=sr_1_1?gclid=CjwKCAiA4veMBhAMEiwAU4XRr7y7OM7bV9pGHDn_V-B6Xpc74lnPimmimqYfPVBBfzDbnLdZlizXhhoCNs8QAvD_BwE&hvadid=241916695669&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=1018511&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=5056715609896233840&hvtargid=kwd-11215091201&hydadcr=22561_10346245&keywords=peter+spier+christmas&qid=1637792612&qsid=136-1655374-0927548&sr=8-1&sres=0385245807%2C1732934673%2C0736441697%2C1587172011%2C0385376162%2C0316363502%2C0440409357%2C1622774353%2C0385154844%2C0962175358%2C0399257748%2C1258443155%2CB08DSTHKQB%2C0689853645%2C1680525514%2C1627794166 (Christmas )by Peter SpierFollow Us:https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)https://lady-farmer.com/pages/slow-living-retreat (Join us at the Lady Farmer Slow Living Retreat!)Original Music by John Kingsley @jkingsley1026

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  • This week we will hear from twin sisters Jess Boeke and Sarah Pottle of the Rust Belt Fibershed, a bioregional textile network growing hope and resilience through the use of local fibers. We speak with this dynamic duo on a multitude of topics, touching on ways to shift and expand our mindsets towards a more sustainable paradigm. Jess is an educator and fiber artist who has been working with natural dyes since 2008. Born and raised in Ohio, Cleveland, she is known for engaging and educating communities on the importance of local labor, dyes, and the carbon impacts of our soil-to-soil textile industry. In her teachings, she has inspired others on the promotion of ethical fashion and the importance of regenerative learning. Her twin sister, Sarah has personally coached hundreds of teachers through thousands of lessons in high-quality, equitable instruction. Her desire to create transformational systems change has led her on a daunting journey with her twin sister of slow living and sustainable fashion, spreading awareness on regenerative learning education in the Rust Belt Cities.Today we will learn more about how we can focus our relationships between people and the Earth in order to enable transformation in our society, explore the impact of the clothing and textile industry on climate change and incorporate more environmental teachings in the classroom. We will also speak to Sarah and Jess about what they envision for the future, their hopes and aspirations, and how we can continue to promote regenerative education learning in the classroom.Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5jYXB0aXZhdGUuZm0vdGhlLWdvb2QtZGlydC8 (Google Podcasts), or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:What is regenerative living for modern families?How we can incorporate more environmental teachings in the classroom. The impact of the clothing and textile industry on climate change.Resources Mentioned & Guest Info:http://www.driftlabtextileco.com/about (Drift Lab Dye Studios)https://rustbeltfibershed.com/who-we-are (Rust Belt Fibershed)Connect with Jess and Sarah on their company https://groundedteaching.com/ (website).If you're involved in the educational system (teacher, substitute, principal, para, school counselor, involved parent) and you want to know more about how we're trying to shift the educational paradigm away from a mechanical one towards one that's filled with more life, you can check out their podcast https://groundedteaching.com/podcast (Regenerative Ed).Check out their https://groundedteaching.com/workshops (workshops here.)Follow Sarah & Jess: https://www.instagram.com/groundedteaching/ (@groundedteaching)Follow Us:https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)Credits:Original music by John Kingsley - @jkingsley1026

  • Did you know that Gen Z is using fashion TikTok to fight climate change? Joining us on today’s episode is Sylar Saba, a Gen-Z influencer who shares her low waste sustainability tips by engaging online communities in small, fun, and meaningful ways. She shares her love for the outdoors and nature through her Instagram and TikTok platforms, engaging her community with #COOTD highlights (cute outfits of the day) and conscious outfit inspo, recipes, resources, and more.Skylar Saba is the Founder & CEO of Happy Earth Habits, a major supporter of mamma earth, mindful educator, & sustainability expert. She has grown a community of 40k+ changemakers around the world via Instagram, TikTok, and Pinterest. HEH has become a resource for sustainability education and low waste living. In addition, Skylar is the Founder and CEO of Skylar C Creative, a branding & social media agency for conscious businesses. She strives to connect individuals with the Earth and live more mindfully.Today we learn more about incorporating sustainable habits into our everyday lives, how perfectionism isn't necessary to live a low-waste life, as well as ways to share your favorite eco-friendly tips and tricks on social media. We will also be speaking to her about her hopes for the future and how we can take steps at the individual level to connect more deeply with the natural world. Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5jYXB0aXZhdGUuZm0vdGhlLWdvb2QtZGlydC8 (Google Podcasts), or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:Regenerative lifestyle from the perspective of Gen ZThe difference between fast and slow fashionHow to use social media to inform, educate and inspireInspiring individuals to reconnect with the Earth and live more mindfullyHow low-waste living can help reduce carbon emissionsResources Mentioned & Guest Info:https://www.instagram.com/p/CN0y7LXhdCF/ (Overrated vs underrated) https://us.whogivesacrap.org/products/dream-cloths (Swedish Dish Cloths)https://www.happyearthhabits.com/about (Happy Earth Habits)Follow Skylar on Tik Tok @skysabaFollow Skylar on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/happyearthhabits/ (@happyearthhabits)Follow Us:https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)Credits:Original music by John Kingsley - @jkingsley1026

  • This week's episode is all about honeybees! Did you know that there are 4,000 different bee species native to North America? Honey bees, however, are not native to North America, but were brought here from Europe in the 17th century, and have since become are integral part of our ecosystem. They are efficient pollinators who, along with native bees, allow our food crops and the planet's flora to flourish. Factors in our environment such as climate change, habitat loss, and widespread usage of chemicals in modern-day agriculture are threatening to the bee population, and in turn, to our food supply.
    Bees have always been a part of Tierney Monahan’s life, and her fascination with them has been well-documented in her new book, Beyond Honey. She weaves together beautiful stories about the economic, entrepreneurial, and environmental impacts of bees on our society. Today we will be speaking to her about her fascination with bees and how she has documented them as a writer for the Georgetown Magazine, and as author of her book as an MBA candidate at Georgetown University. Tierney also shares with us her mission of educating individuals on the impact of honey bees on society.
    Join us on this week’s episode as we learn more about the importance of pollinators in ensuring our planet’s biodiversity, how to support local beekeepers and the global impact of Colony Collapse Disorder due to habitat loss and climate change. We will be speaking to her about her personal experiences in beekeeping, how it has enhanced her life and the lives of others, and how we can take steps as individuals to ensure the survival of these essential creatures.
    Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://the-good-dirt.simplecast.com/ (Simplecast), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform.
    Topics Covered:
    How has human activity and interventions affected bee populations?
    Why are bees important and what is the profound impact that bees have on our everyday lives?
    Washington DC’s healthy and robust bee population.
    The difference between honey bees and native bees
    Learn more about Colony Collapse Disorder
    Resources Mentioned:
    https://www.tierneymonahan.com/ (Tierney Monahan)
    http://www.dcbeekeepers.org/dcba-meetings (DC Beekeepers)
    https://www.amazon.com/Beyond-Honey-Tierney-Monahan/dp/163730451X (Beyond Honey)
    https://www.communityfoodrescue.org/ (Community Food Rescue)
    https://suzannesimard.com/finding-the-mother-tree-book/ (Finding the Mother Tree)
    http://www.richardpowers.net/the-overstory/ (The Overstory)
    https://www.instagram.com/kirstenkshockey/?hl=en (Kirsten Shockey @kirstenkshockey)
    https://www.instagram.com/christijay/?hl=en (Christy Johnson @christijay )
    https://www.instagram.com/evakosmasflores/?hl=en (Eva Kosmas Flores @evakosmasflores)
    Original music composed, performed, and produced byhttps://www.instagram.com/jkingsley1026/?hl=en ( John Kingsley @jkingsley1026. )


    Guest Info
    Connect with Tierney on Twitter @TierneyMonahan


    Follow Us:
    https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)
    https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)

  • Today we're talking with Heidi Hannapel, cofounder of the Bluestem Conservation Cemetery, about options for green burial. We're also taking a look at our modern approach to death and the practices that surround it. Heidi and her business partner Jeff Masten are land conservationists and conservation burial specialists, concerned with the degradation of our planet through wasteful burial practices. They are committed to offering an alternative to conventional burial, working on green burial initiatives specifically tied to land conservation, encouraging a way of caring for the dead with minimal environmental impacts. Through the establishment of Bluestem, Heidi and Jeff's vision is to establish the concept of conservation burial as a tool for protecting natural lands, wildlife and plant species, creating healing green spaces and increasing community connections to nature, and creating opportunities for those seeking green burial options for themselves and their loved ones.
    In addition, we talk to Heidi about her personal journey with death practices and conventions, inspired by the time she spent being present to her own mother's illness and death in 2015. This experience left her with the realization that death and loss are shared human experiences worthy of active participation, both before the passing of the loved one and in the sacred space between death and burial. Our modern customs often separate us not only from the process of dying itself, but also from the opportunity to experience the the hours and days after the passing as an opportunity for powerful healing. Modern burial procedures also separate us from the processes of nature, in which remains of the deceased continue to be part of the natural life cycle of the planet. The idea behind rethinking our cultural death practices and considering green burial, and as in the case of Bluestem Conversation Cemetery conservation burial, is that human death be honored and embraced as a sacred passage, "where nature is enough."
    Join us on this week’s episode as we learn more about green burials and how they can contribute to land conservation efforts and lessen our impact on the environment.
    Stay tuned to learn more!
    Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://the-good-dirt.simplecast.com/ (Simplecast), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform.
    Topics Covered:
    Green burial options/reducing environmental impact
    Integration of life and death through conservation areas
    Death doulas
    Home funerals and home burials
    Hybrid cemeteries
    Resources
    https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/browse?contentId=38028 (Learning from Trees)
    https://www.greenburialcouncil.org/ (Green Burial Council)
    https://www.conservationburialallianc (Conservation Burial Alliance)
    https://www.bluestemcemetery.org/ (Bluestem Cemetery)
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/26/well/family/rest-me-in-a-pine-box-and-let-the-fiddle-play.html (Green burial NYT article)
    Original theme music for https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (The Good Dirt) composed and performed by John Kingsley @jkingsley1026
    Guest Info
    https://www.bluestemcemetery.org/ (Bluestem Conservation Cemetery Website)
    https://www.bluestemcemetery.org/resources.html (Bluestem Resources Page)
    https://www.thelandmatters.com/meet-heidi--jeff.html (LANDMATTERS Website)
    Connect with Heidi on Twitter https://twitter.com/hhannapel?lang=en (@hhannapel)
    Follow Us:
    https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)
    https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)

  • On today’s episode of The Good Dirt, we’re chatting with Angela Ferraro Fanning of Axe and Root Homestead, a six-acre farm in central New Jersey. Angela shares the story of how she went from being a graphic designer to a homesteader in 2012, when she told her husband she'd like to trade her job income for time outside growing food they would no longer have to buy. Now she finds herself balancing a life raising two boys with managing a working farm, as well as authoring a cookbook, a children's book series and hosting a homesteading podcast. In this conversation, we discuss not only the benefits of growing your own food, but the many options available to the modern homesteader. Though the concept of homesteading appeals to a lot of people, the reality of shifting to such a lifestyle is often intimidating and seemingly full of obstacles. Angela explains that homesteading doesn't look the same for everyone, and doesn't have to be defined by what you see when you look out your window. She encourages her followers to begin with the smallest task, such as growing one plant, and taking that longing for connection to food and nature just one step at a time. It doesn't have to involve raising and harvesting your own animals, or all of your food, baking artisan bread or keeping bees. There are likely others in your area that can do all of that. Instead, she says to focus on what interests you, and rely on your community for the rest. The homesteading mindset is about hands-on, local, seasonal living.Join us on today’s episode to hear more about the first steps that Angela took in growing her own food, how she got comfortable with the constant trial and error of homesteading, and how she’s slowly expanding her business through writing and online media.Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://the-good-dirt.simplecast.com/ (Simplecast), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:A day in the life of Angela The joys and challenges of farm life Getting back to basics and not relying on machinery Homesteading on a plant-based diet Sharing her story and expertise through writing, podcasting, and online courses Guest Info https://www.axeandroothomestead.com/ (Website) https://www.instagram.com/axeandroothomestead/ (Instagram) https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-definitely-not-simple-life/id1543790060 (The Definitely Not Simple Life Podcast) The Harvest Table: A Collection of Seasonal Plant- Based Recipes Inspired by the Home GardenLittle Country Cottage: An Autumn Treasury of Recipes, Crafts and WisdomFollow Us:https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)

  • On today’s episode of The Good Dirt, we’re speaking with Liz Riffle of Riffle Farm in Preston County, WV, which is a small bison farm raising grass-fed and finished animals.  Owner and Operator Liz is a U.S Navy Nurse Corps veteran and her husband, Jimmie, is currently still serving on active-duty as a Navy Nurse Corps Nurse Practitioner. Jimmie was born and raised in Grafton, WV. In their own words, Jimmie and Liz are homegrown and proud to now serve this great nation by feeding it!  After near extinction in the 1880s bison have made a comeback, and are now thriving on small operations such as Riffle Farm. Liz says she and her husband discovered bison burgers while traveling in Wyoming, and became interested in the idea of raising them. They eventually found a 64-acre spot where they could let bison roam and graze, and opened for business in 2017. Fast forward to today, and they’ve almost doubled their operation. Liz shares with us their journey from those beginnings until now, during which she’s learned much about regenerative agriculture, working with nature, slowing down and listening to the land. Liz believes that she has a responsibility to honorably raise as well as humanely harvest the bison on her farm. The regulatory system is set up for large-scale meat producers and sometimes makes it difficult for small scale farmers to accomplish their sustainability goals. Liz has started a new business, The Honest Carnivore, as a means of teaching other small farmers how to navigate that system, empowering them to continue providing sustainable meat solutions. Join us on this week’s episode to learn more about building trust and transparency in the food chain with bison farmer Liz Riffle. Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://the-good-dirt.simplecast.com/ (Simplecast), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:Daily life of a bison farmer How bison grazing patterns help the local flora and fauna Farming regulations and how they can work against small farmers Certification processes and marketing strategies of large food corporations Keeping it simple when it comes to buying food Resources Mentioned:https://www.thehonestcarnivore.com/ (The Honest Carnivore)Guest InfoConnect with Liz Riffle on her https://www.rifflefarms.com/ (website). Follow Us:https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)Original intro music by John C Kingsley

  • Under A Tin Roof is a mother-daughter company created by today's guest, Kayloa Lobermeier and her mother Jill Haupt, inspiring others, as their motto says, in living a wholesome, simple, historical life by the seasons. Demonstrating the ways of a slower, more intentional lifestyle, Kayla helps others in bringing the best of domestic history and tradition forward to fit the needs of the present day. As a family-owned and operated business, Under a Tin Roof has much to offer both on site and online, including goods from their small handmade shop and their flower farm, to instruction in traditional recipes and food preservation methods on social media and through Kayla's blog, and even providing intimate dining experiences at their farm. Her love for cooking meals from scratch with homegrown and local ingredients continues to be her main passion and motivation.Kayla's shares her love of 18th-19th century homesteading through her hand made goods such as embroidery, soaps, apothecary items and the historic clothing we see her wearing. As a busy mom of two boys, Kayla still finds time to write articles for her blog sharing with subscribers historically inspired country recipes, resources for growing and preserving your own food organically, information on herbal and botanical skincare and remedies, and low waste home ideas.  Join us In this week’s episode, as we discuss with Kayla the joys, challenges, and contradictions in living a simple, historical lifestyle along with the pros and cons of growing a business through social media. It's a great conversation! Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://the-good-dirt.simplecast.com/ (Simplecast), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:Learn more about 18th and 19th-century homestead livingImpact of social media on lifestyleWhat it takes to expand and grow a businessLiving life at a slower pace on a family farmGrowing and preserving your own food organicallyResources Mentioned:https://www.underatinroof.com/about (Under a Tin Roof)https://beekman1802.com/ (Beekman Boys)https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5684868/ (Sustainable Documentary)https://www.amazon.ca/Year-1000-Explorers-Connected-Globalization/dp/1501194100/ref=asc_df_1501194100/?tag=googleshopc0c-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=416352801733&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=17382528650506327417&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9001554&hvtargid=pla-956000852767&psc=1 (The Year 1000 by Valerie Hansen)https://www.gardenista.com/posts/garden-visit-secrets-of-another-century-at-colonial-williamsburg/ (Garden Visit: Secrets of Another Century at Colonial Williamsburg)http://che.umbc.edu/londontown/cookbook/what.html (Foodways at Colonial London Town)https://www.foodtimeline.org/foodcolonial.html (The Food Timeline: History Notes--Colonial America and 17th and 18th Century France)Guest InfoConnect with Kayla on https://www.instagram.com/underatinroof/?hl=en (Instagram).Follow Us:https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)

  • For today's guest Jenny Freeman, what sprouted as an idea to tackle food insecurity during the pandemic has now grown into a fully registered 501(c)(3) organization that offers individuals and organizations the ability to get involved in the local food movement. Her organization, Community FarmShare, is a community-based initiative that connects food-insecure families with local produce farmers in Montgomery County. This organization works by way of donation and is completely volunteer-run, all of the money is put towards purchasing Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) farm shares. These shares are then used to purchase weekly bags and boxes of organically grown produce at one of seven local participating vegetable farms. CSA programs have recently received widespread attention for their ability to provide unique benefits to communities, environments, and economies. In a nutshell, CSAs directly connect consumers and producers to help create a more profitable and transparent local food system. This helps in reducing food insecurity among families that cannot afford organically grown foods. Jenny is passionate about tackling this issue by providing a solution that links families experiencing food insecurity with local vegetable and fruit growers. Jenny shares this mission with the rest of her community in order to create transformative change in her local community. In this week’s episode, we will discuss Jenny’s journey creating Community FarmShare and how you can get involved with her organization. Join us on this week’s episode to find out more about Jenny’s story and learn how you can implement a similar project in your community!Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://the-good-dirt.simplecast.com/ (Simplecast), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:What is a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and how does it work?Learn more about Community FarmShare and Jenny’s story as its founderSupporting Afghan refugees in the United StatesResources Mentioned:https://www.ipcc.ch/ (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change )https://www.communityfarmshare.org/ (Community FarmShare)https://www.communitycheer.org/ (Community Cheer)https://www.communityfoodrescue.org/ (Community Food Rescue)https://suzannesimard.com/finding-the-mother-tree-book/ (Finding the Mother Tree)http://www.richardpowers.net/the-overstory/ (The Overstory)Guest InfoConnect with Jenny on https://www.linkedin.com/in/jennifer-freeman-59a5124/ (LinkedIn).Follow Us:https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)

  • Located in a small town in New England, Wing & A Prayer Farm began as an idea sparked during a trip to England in 2000. Inspired by the many sheep farms dotting the countryside, Tammy and her children decided to start their own sheep farm with a few Shetland rescues. It is now a flourishing farm with a variety of animals and avenues of business.  It is home to Clun Forest, Poll Dorset, Colored Merino, Cotswold, Wensleydale, Teeswater, and Cormo sheep. It is also home to Vermont’s first Valais Blacknose Sheep. Currently, the farm sells fiber for yarn, which is derived from registered Shetland, Cormo, Cotswold, and Merino sheep, registered Angora goats, and alpacas. Along with the fiber, Wing & A Prayer sells fresh eggs, chickens, turkeys, honey, homemade soap and homemade pies! It must be noted, Farmer Tam is more than a fiber farmer. She also has a passion for the making arts--creating unique wood products, naturally hand dyed fiber products and home baked goods on her farm. Her passion as a teacher has also led her to run classes teaching fiber farming and sheep rearing.In this week’s episode, we will discuss Tammy’s journey building a successful business and the hilarious stories of the animals living on her farm. Interested in learning more about Tammy’s personal story? Join us on this week’s episode to find out more. Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://the-good-dirt.simplecast.com/ (Simplecast), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:Farming and sheep rearingWhat is fiber farming?Agriculture and sustainable practicesAnimal caretaking Resources Mentioned:https://www.wingandaprayerfarm.com/ (Wing & A Prayer Farm)Guest InfoConnect with Tammy on her https://www.wingandaprayerfarm.com/ (website.)Follow Us:https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)

  • Lotta grew up in Sweden and began her career as a journalist before immigrating to the US in the ’80s. After settling in Charlottesville, Virginia, she transitioned into graphic design, bringing the Nordic design aesthetic of simplicity, elegance, and clear lines into her work. Like many artists, Lotta dreamed of the creative work she would like to pursue outside of the requests of her clients, and started combining her interests in gardening and natural materials as inspiration. She began leaning away from working with synthetic dyes and paints, aware of both the health and environmental effects of working closely with these toxins. What started as a hobby developed into a production line of linen household items including pillows, napkins, and runners, all using leaves and natural plant materials found outside in her immediate environment.Lotta soon discovered that the natural dyes had benefits beyond the lack of toxic chemicals, finding that she was able to realize colors she could never achieve with the synthetic dyes. Her artwork now extends beyond just textiles to printmaking and book arts, and features an eco-printing technique called "botanical contact printing." Lotta carries her sustainable principles through every part of the artistic process from composting old leaves used in the printing to creating her own processing solution from iron scraps.So much of Lotta’s art and life revolves around the slow principles we espouse at Lady Farmer. She reflects on how growing up in Sweden with the ability to wander freely and explore the natural world has fostered within her a deep, personal connection with nature. When she isn’t in the studio, she is outside cultivating her naturalist garden, tending to the trees and plants grown on her property that will be translated into the design and colors of her artwork. She also incorporates the meditative practice of hand stitching into her art. On this episode of The Good Dirt, Lotta encourages us to find beauty in the natural world all around, and experience the wonder that is everywhere. Join us on this week’s episode to find out more.Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://feeds.captivate.fm/the-good-dirt/ (Captivate), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:Art being informed by one’s personal principles Lotta’s sustainable and biodegradable dyeing process using linen, silk, and woolThe Swedish concept of Allemansrätten, or right of public accessSociety’s pressure to be constantly producingThe meditative practice of hand stitchingFinding beauty in the simple and common natural world around usResources Mentioned:https://www.indiaflint.com/ (India Flint)https://the-school-of-nomad-arts.teachable.com/ (The School of Nomad Arts)https://new.sewanee.edu/ (Sewanee)https://www.shopkdd.com/wheesht (Wheesht: Creative Making in Uncertain Times)Guest Info:Connect with Lotta on her https://www.lottahelleberg.com/ (website).Follow Us:https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)

  • In Kate Kilmurray’s experience, weaving is one of the best practices for mindfulness, grounding ourselves in nature, and returning to who we really are. As our hands get involved with each thread, our mind is free to rest from our conscious stream. In this stillness, we are able to ground ourselves and find our inner center within our tumultuous and chaotic surroundings. Join us on today’s episode as we gain more insight into Kate’s journey and how she teaches weaving as a form of meditation to realign with our inner selves. After graduating with a degree in Art History from the University of Pennsylvania, Kate ran a small textile business and worked for several years at Swan Gallery in Philadelphia. Faced with health challenges, she discovered yoga and meditation, and found herself called to the path of conscious and contemplative living. Kate received a certification in Mindfulness Meditation, and for fifteen years ran the Mystic River Yoga Studio in Medford, MA with her husband, Arthur, helping students slow down, find freedom in movement, and reconnect to their true nature.After a move from the east coast to California, Kate became inspired to begin teaching and presenting her visual art with others. She has developed a line of handwoven potholders and textiles made from a simple 7 x 7 inch metal handloom, which she uses in teaching her “Weaving As Meditation” classes. Kate teaches women the principles of hand weaving, while guiding them to slow down, connect to the breath, and tap into their creative channels. "Women leave my workshops with a new set of skills to create their own inner calm and beauty in their corner of the world," she says. Kate has sold her products at over 100 lifestyle stores across the United States, as well as shops in Canada, Denmark, and Japan. Listen to this week’s episode as we explore how the visual arts can be harnessed as a powerful tool of meditation and mindfulness!Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://feeds.captivate.fm/the-good-dirt/ (Captivate), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:Interconnectedness and how it nurtures one’s creativityNourishing ourselves and growing from healthy soil Reconnecting with our breathUsing weaving as a form of meditation Resources Mentioned:https://www.amazon.ca/Great-Work-Self-Knowledge-Healing-Through/dp/0738744425 (The Great Work)https://www.amazon.ca/Dream-Earth-Preface-Williams-Foreword/dp/1619025329 (Dream of the Earth)Guest Info:Connect with Kate on her https://katekilmurray.com/ (website).Follow Us:https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)

  • Growing flax and processing it into linen is one of the oldest methods of clothing manufacturing on the planet. Sandy Fisher and Durl Van Alstyne have prided themselves in reviving this old craft here in the United States through their company, The Chico Flax Project. Through their work, they are bringing a new industry and social enterprise for fiber production of flax to Northern California in collaboration with local community members, farmers, artisans, and institutions. For Sandy, weaving has always been an important part of her life—beginning as a young child when she learned how to knit. In 2012, a phone call during the Bangladesh fires inspired her to grow flax on her plot to use for weaving clothes. Durl is equally drawn to using natural fibers for clothing, his background coming from teaching at public schools for the past 35 years. Now, he works alongside his wife as a regenerative agricultural flax farmer. In this week’s episode, we will discuss how garments made from flax fibers will create opportunities for employment and for meaningful craft, the process of designing clothes from natural fibers, and how they began The Chico Flax Project. Interested in learning more about Sandy’s and Durl’s story? Join us on this week’s episode to find out more. Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://the-good-dirt.simplecast.com/ (Simplecast), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:Weaving with flax seedsProcess of designing clothes from natural fibersImpact of Covid-19 on agricultureIncreasing the market of domestically grown linenResources Mentioned:https://www.csuchico.edu/regenerativeagriculture/ (Center for Regenerative Agriculture and Resilient Systems)https://chicoflax.com/event-example/ (2021 Field Day)https://www.amazon.ca/Book-Flax-Christian-Johannes-Zinzendorf/dp/0764337157 (The Big Book of Flax by Christian and Johannes Zinzendorf)Guest InfoConnect with Sandy and Durl on their https://chicoflax.com/who-we-are/ (website.)Follow Us:https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)

  • Separately, Dan Miller and Spike Gjerde knew that they needed to find a way to support regenerative farmers and producers using their own natural talents and expertise. Dan’s family had been farming in the Chesapeake Bay since the late 1800s, but he never understood how a region could have what appears to be a thriving agricultural system while also struggling economically. Meanwhile, Spike wanted to start a new restaurant concept that focused on growing seasons and local sourcing. It wasn’t until Dan created Steward, a platform that enables people to fund regenerative agriculture, that the two found each other and realized their shared passion. Dan and Spike define regenerative agriculture as a system of farming principles and practices that seeks to rehabilitate and enhance the entire ecosystem of the farm by placing a heavy premium on soil health. The benefits of this kind of farming practice seem obvious, but individuals and families running regenerative farms often achieve such small profit margins that they can’t invest in the equipment, training, and labor that allows them to scale. Dan hopes Steward will change that by allowing people to make small or large contributions to regenerative farms in their area. In turn, investors receive all of the environmental benefits while also making a competitive return on their investment. When your local farms are thriving, you can taste the difference. That's why Spike has broken with traditional restaurant conventions and plans his menu with the seasons. You won't find lemons in your water at Woodberry Kitchen, but what you will get is food that supports everyone in the production chain. He encourages us to ask "How much does this really cost?" when we are tempted to question the high prices of local goods. Join us in this week’s episode of The Good Dirt Podcast to learn more.Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://the-good-dirt.simplecast.com/ (Simplecast), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:Regenerative AgricultureHuman Scale FarmingCommunity-Supported Agriculture(CSA)Sustainable AgricultureGrower LendingResources Mentioned:https://gosteward.com/ (Steward)https://www.woodberrykitchen.com/ (Woodberry Kitchen)https://www.oregon4biz.com/How-We-Can-Help/Finance-Programs/Aggie-Bond/ (Aggie Bond Program - Business Oregon)https://www.chesapeakebay.net/ (Chesapeake Bay Program)https://fisheyefarms.com/ (Fisheye Farms)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roundup_(herbicide) (Roundup (herbicide) - Wikipedia)Guest InfoConnect with Dan Miller on https://www.linkedin.com/in/dan-miller-0a41357/?originalSubdomain=uk (LinkedIn) and https://twitter.com/GoSteward?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor (Twitter).Connect with Spike Gjerde on https://www.linkedin.com/in/spike-gjerde-13aa08b1/ (LinkedIn) and https://www.instagram.com/woodberrykitchen/?hl=en (Instagram).Follow Us:https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)

  • The greatest secret to mastering the art of cooking? It's' not the recipes, but in using the freshest ingredients that are indigenous to the land. In France, this means buying locally grown, in-season fruits and vegetables from the nearest farmer's market. This is a long-held practice in Gascony, a rural province of southwestern France where "the good dirt" is prized and protected for the preservation of its culinary heritage. The culture of food in Gascony has its own unique flavors and methods. Kate has been collecting recipes for years, gathered from friends and neighbors and even from knocking on the doors of strangers to learn how to cook something new. Kate teaches methods such as oven roasting, braising, emulsifying sauces, and has recently been featured on a "Cooking with Wine" series streaming on Somm TV. But it doesn’t stop there, Kate also intertwines these culinary lessons with in-person road trips in France and Spain. Kate masterfully wears multiple hats in her personal life and profession. She is a cook, teacher, mentor, and wonderful storyteller. In “A Culinary Journey in Gascony: Recipes and Stories from My French Canal Boat'," she tells the story of how she first discovered the region while floating slowly down the Canal de Garonne, and subsequently purchased the 18th-century farmhouse in the area which has been her home and culinary inspiration for the past thirty years.  Interested in learning more about Kate and her personal story? Join us on this week’s episode to find out more. Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://the-good-dirt.simplecast.com/ (Simplecast), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:French gastronomy and its influence on French cultureBuying fresh, locally grown foodThe culture of food in GasconyAppreciating the experience and processes of cookingThe role of food in human cultureResources Mentioned:https://www.amazon.com/Culinary-Journey-Gascony-Recipes-Stories/dp/B007PN08ES (A Culinary Journey in Gascony: Recipes and Stories from My French Canal Boat)https://www.sommtv.com/cooking-with-wine (Cooking with Wine)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gascony (Gascony, France)https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/781787.Out_of_Africa (Out of Africa by Isak Dinesen)https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/89620.French_Dirt (French Dirt by Richard Goodman)https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast/jamie-beck?_pos=1&_sid=123b14a9f&_ss=r (Jamie Beck on The Good Dirt)Guest Info:Connect with Kate on her https://kitchen-at-camont.com/about (website).Follow Us:https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)

  • Nature provides the greatest elixirs: sunshine, water, air, and plants. By harnessing that power and bringing these elements into our everyday beauty routines, we can embrace a simpler, more natural concept of beauty that is free from the questionable ingredients in many commercially available products, allowing these elements to revive the spirit and body.  Nadine Artemis has used plants as her teachers her entire life. Her curiosity and ingenuity led her into this exploration of ingredients at an early age, and since then, she has been challenging conventional notions of beauty and wellness by creating natural beauty products that are supported by extensive research into current science. In 1992, Nadine opened the first North American full concept aromatherapy store namedOsmosis. She now runs Living Libations, a company that provides organic and pure renegade beauty products that honor human health and beauty. Nadine is also the author of Renegade Beauty: Reveal and Revive Your Natural Radiance and Holistic Dental Care: The Complete Guide to Healthy Teeth and Gums, in which she shares her story and message of rethinking conventional notions of wellness. Curious to learn more? Join us on this week’s episode to learn more about Nadine’s story.Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://the-good-dirt.simplecast.com/ (Simplecast), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:Rethinking conventional notions of beauty and wellnessUsing natural remedies to  enhance healthBecoming discerning regarding commercial productsAllowing the elements of nature to revive the bodySynthetic vs. plant-based ingredientsResources Mentioned:https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B06WGNPNZ7/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1 (Renegade Beauty: Reveal and Revive Your Natural Radiance)https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00CCONXH4/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1 (Holistic Dental Care: The Complete Guide to Healthy Teeth and Gums)https://ca.livinglibations.com/pages/nadine (Living Libations)Guest InfoConnect with Nadine on her website https://ca.livinglibations.com/pages/nadine (Living Libations). (Use code LADYFARMER for 10% off!)Follow Us:https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)

  • Where can you find nearly one hundred thousand acres of land protected for food and outdoor recreation this close to a metropolitan area? Not many, except for Montgomery County’s Agricultural Reserve. It is the hidden gem of the Washington DC Metropolitan Area, as it continues to provide economic services, food resilience networks, and environmental services for the region. It has also been heralded as one of the best examples of land conservation policies in the country, and encompasses almost a third of the county’s natural resources. 
     Caroline Taylor, today’s guest and executive director of the non -profit organization Montgomery Countryside Alliance, shares with us the potential of the Ag Reserve in local food production, climate change mitigation and as a resource for people to experience and enjoy natural spaces.  The Agricultural  Reserve has also served to inform and influence the formation of  land-use policies across the country, and has helped to shape the United States’ suburban landscape in a positive way . 
    According to Caroline, more connection with nature and  relationship to our open spaces will lead to increased general wellness, awareness and momentum in seeking meaningful solutions to climate change. Curious to find out more? Join us on this week’s episode to learn all about the Montgomery County Agricultural Reserve, a national model in land use planning for a sustainable future.  
    Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://the-good-dirt.simplecast.com/ (Simplecast), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform.
    Topics Covered:
    Environmental stewardship and creating preservation goals
    Montgomery County’s Agricultural Reserve
    Producing food within the urban and suburban footprint
    Preservation programs and competing interests
    Regenerative solutions to combat climate change
    Resources Mentioned:
    https://montgomeryplanning.org/planning/agricultural-reserve/ (Montgomery County’s Agricultural Reserve)
    http://www.mocoalliance.org/ (Montgomery Countryside Alliance)
    https://defenders.org/regions/washington-dc (Washington DC Defenders of Wildlife)
    Guest Info
    Connect with Caroline on https://www.linkedin.com/in/caroline-taylor-86355384/ (LinkedIn).
    Follow Us:
    https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)
    https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)

  • Linen is a woven and durable fabric that gets pulled out of the closet when summer rolls around or spread across one’s bed as a soft blanket or duvet cover. But the big question remains: how sustainable is linen? We speak to Heidi Barr about how she has worked with reclaimed fabrics to reduce textile waste in the industry. She noticed the need for more sustainable solutions when she saw the urgency for making these changes in order to build a healthy, vibrant future with kitchen products that you will want to use every day.
    Heidi Barr is the founder of The Kitchen Garden Textiles, a line of kitchen textiles made with natural and reclaimed materials sold to support urban agriculture. Her business began by making napkins out of the backs of second-hand men’s shirts and selling them to support her local urban CSA farm.  Now, her company has gained significant traction in the textile industry and is used by some of Philly’s top chefs including Ari Miller, co-owner and chef at Musi BYOB, and by Judy Wicks, environmental activist, author, and founder of the White Dog Cafe.
    As a former dancer turned costume designer, her business combines her love for the environment, fabric, and sewing. Heidi uses this passion to continue to inspire other individuals to live a more environmentally conscious and plastic-free lifestyle. Join us on this week’s episode as we dive into the topics of ethically sourced products, environmental stewardship, and Heidi’s personal journey as an entrepreneur.
    Listen to the episode on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-good-dirt/id1492217846 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2lpelAmHPGbMVdOOpxhxTo (Spotify), https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/the-good-dirt-981565 (Podchaser), https://the-good-dirt.simplecast.com/ (Simplecast), https://podtail.com/en/podcast/the-good-dirt/ (Podtail), or on your favorite podcast platform.
    Topics Covered:
    Replacing single-use plastics with sustainable solutions
    Environmental stewardship
    Ethical business practices
    Affordability and sustainable products
    Greenwashing in the textile industry
    Resources Mentioned:
    https://www.kitchengardentextiles.com/ (The Kitchen Garden Textiles)
    https://weaversway.coop/ (Weavers Way Farms)
    https://weaversway.coop/henry-got-crops-csa (Henry Got Crops)
    http://www.flaxproject.com/ (The Flax Project )
    Guest Info
    Connect with the guest on Heidi’s https://www.kitchengardentextiles.com/ (website) or by email at hello@kitchengardentextiles.com
    Follow Us:
    https://lady-farmer.com/blogs/the-good-dirt-podcast (Our Website)
    https://www.instagram.com/thegooddirtph/ (Instagram)

  • In this week’s episode,  Mary and Emma talk with Amanda Cather from The Million Acre Challenge, a nonprofit organization that helps Maryland farmers build soil health, increase farm profitability, and improve water quality – while making farms resilient and active in the face of climate change. Their farmer-focused collaborative uses soil health science, economics, education, and incentives to achieve their mission.  Amanda's early training in pre-med  led  her from  an interest in equitable food access to a career path in urban agriculture, and ultimately to running her own farm raising grass-fed livestock. Now, alongside the team at Million Acre, the goal is to achieve one million agricultural acres in Maryland using healthy soil techniques by 2030, while sharing best practices and making healthy soil connections throughout the Chesapeake watershed.
     
    Throughout the episode, Amanda shares her  knowledge surrounding the effort. She educates us on the industrial versus ecological models,  and introduces us to the multiple factors that affect the way farmers must approach soil improvement. She stresses the importance of listening to farmer’s voices and supporting their journey, as well as, fighting for systems that reward good stewardship and value biodiversity. She explains there are multi-pathways to healthy soil and no one way to achieve the goal.  The key to progress in this effort  is maintaining curiosity and communication along the way, and remembering that healthy soil (good dirt!)   is the foundation of everything. 
     
     1:30 - Mary and Emma check in to see how Plastic Free July is going! 
    4:00 - Amanda Cather of Million Acre Challenge 
    Let’s get into the episode:
    5:45 - Amanda introduces herself 
    11:00 - What is the Million Acre Challenge? 
    20:30 - Connecting to the issues 
    23:30 - Incentivising soil health and funding the transition 
    27:00 - Nutritional quality of crops 
    34:00 - Equity 
    43:00 - Lobbying to change 
    48:00 - Engaging with farmers 
    50:00 - What does the Good Dirt mean to you? 
    Things Mentioned: 
    https://millionacrechallenge.org/ (Million Acre Challenge )
    IG: @soilchallenge
    https://landinstitute.org/ (The Land Institute )
    https://www.facebook.com/plowandstarsfarm (Plow and Stars Farm)
    https://forainitiative.org/barriers-for-farmers-ranchers/ (Guidelight / Patagonia Report )
    https://pasafarming.org/soil-institute/farm-based-research/soil-health-benchmark-study/ (Pasa Sustainable Agriculture Soil Health BenchMark Study)
    https://cpb-us-e1.wpmucdn.com/blog.umd.edu/dist/a/434/files/2020/01/Organic-Transitions1page-announcement-Jan2019.pdf (UMD Organic Grains Transition Project )
    https://farmland.org/ (American Farmland Trust)
    https://soilhealthinstitute.org/ (Soil Health Institute  )
    https://mda.maryland.gov/resource_conservation/Pages/Soil-Health.aspx (Maryland Department of Agriculture)
    https://www.usda.gov/ (USDA)
    https://foundationfar.org/ (FFAR)
    https://farmsproject.org/ (The Farm’s Project )
    Regen1
    http://www.realfood-project.com/ (The Real Food Project )
    https://pingree.house.gov/netzeroagriculture/ (The Agriculture Resilience Act)
    https://fairfarmsnow.org/take-the-pledge-for-healthy-soil/ (Fair Farms Pledge)
    https://lady-farmer.com/ (Lady Farmer )
    https://lady-farmer.com/pages/the-almanac (The ALMANAC)