Episodios

  • Contributor(s): Professor Michael R. King, Richard Nesbitt, Ghela Boskovich, Vineet Malhotra, Brenda Trenowden | Join us for a panel discussion on The Technological Revolution in Financial Services: How Banks, Fintechs and Customers Win Together, edited by Michael R. King and Richard W. Nesbitt.
    Financial services is going through a global transformation. Structural changes are being driven by three forces: regulation, technology, and demographics. This combination is changing the competitive landscape by lowering barriers to entry and increasing competition from outside the industry.
    These new entrants are leveraging technology to gain a foothold in financial services, with many of them following the disruption playbook and building a foothold at the bottom end of the market by targeting underserved customers. Rather than being threatened by Fintech startups, banks will be more threatened by global technology companies like the Chinese Techfins Alibaba and Tencent and the bigtech companies Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google. These tech companies have platform ecosystems that embed financial services, including payments, lending, investing, and insurance. Technology companies will prove to be the real threats to incumbents over the next decade.
    You can order the book at The Technological Revolution in Financial Services: How Banks, Fintechs, and Customers Win Together.
    Meet our speakers and chair
    Ghela Boskovich (@GhelaBoskovich) is a self-proclaimed Fintech fanatic, and Founder of FemTechGlobal™, a network dedicated to challenging the status quo, and improving the inclusiveness and diversity in Financial Services. She is also Head of Europe for the Financial Data and Technology Association.
    Michael R. King is the Lansdowne Chair in Finance at University of Victoria’s Gustavson School of Business. Prior to UVic, Michael was at Ivey Business School (2011-2019), where he held the Tangerine Chair in Finance and co-founded the Scotiabank Digital Banking Lab – Canada’s first FinTech research centre. He is the co-author of The Technological Revolution in Financial Services: How Banks, Fintechs and Customers Win Together (with Richard W. Nesbitt).
    Vineet Malhotra is MD and Head of Retail and Alternate Solutions Group at CIBC Capital Markets. Vineet is also Head of Simplii, an online bank serving Canadian customers. The Retail Solutions Group manufactures and delivers Global Markets products, including Foreign Exchange, Fixed Income, Precious Metals, and Structured Solutions for CIBC Capital Markets’ 6 million retail clients in Canada.
    Richard Nesbitt is an Adjunct Professor of the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto. Richard is working with the London School of Economics and Political Science as Chair of a new research institute “The Inclusion Initiative at LSE”. Richard was Chief Operating Officer of CIBC until September 2014. From 2004 to 2008 Richard was Chief Executive Officer of Toronto Stock Exchange. Richard is an alumnus of LSE.
    Brenda Trenowden (@BTrenowden) is a Partner at PwC leading the Inclusive Culture, Diversity and Purpose consulting practice. As Global Chair of the 30% Club, Brenda worked with Chairs, CEOs and leaders around the world. Brenda was listed as one of the 100 Most Influential Women in Finance for 3 years running and in 2018, was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List for services to the financial sector and gender equality.
    Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England.
    More about this event
    The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world.

  • Contributor(s): Mandu Reid, Bell Ribeiro-Addy, Mary-Ann Stephenson, Dr Clare Wenham | This is an event shortcast, a digested version of our live online public events series. This event was recorded on March 3rd 2021. A full version is available to download on the LSE player.

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  • Contributor(s): Naïm Abou-Jaoudé, Sharan Burrow, Rathin Roy, Dr Rhian-Mari Thomas | This is an event shortcast, a digested version of our live online public events series. This event was recorded on March 2nd 2021. A full version is available to download on the LSE player.

  • Contributor(s): Dr Weeam S Hammoudeh, Dr Omar Dewachi, Dr Ghassan Abu-Sittah | Regional politics in the Middle East continues to have a cumulative impact on health, affecting health systems capacity and delivery of services. Conflicts in the region are deeply influenced by historical, ethnic, cultural and political factors. This event will discuss the geopolitical barriers to strengthening health systems in the region, presenting a country case study comparison of Palestine, Lebanon and Iraq.
    Panellists will also discuss how COVID-19 has exacerbated existing health insecurities and threats.
    Meet our speakers and chair
    Ghassan Abu-Sittah is a British-Palestinian Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon. In 2012 he became Head of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the AUBMC and in 2015 co-founded and became director of the Conflict Medicine Program at Global Health Institute at the American University of Beirut.
    Omar Dewachi (@Khanabat) is Associate Professor at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Trained in medicine and anthropology, Omar works at the intersections of global health, history of medicine and political anthropology. He focuses on the human and environmental manifestations of decades of conflict and military interventions in Iraq and the broader Middle East.
    Weeam S Hammoudeh (@Whammoudeh) is Assistant Professor at the Institute of Community and Public Health, and coordinator of the mental health unit. She holds a PhD and MA in Sociology from Brown University, and an MPH in Community and Public Health from Birzeit University.
    Tiziana Leone (@tizianaleone) is an Associate Professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Tiziana’s research agenda is focused around maternal and reproductive health, including a lifecourse approach to women’s health.
    More about this event
    The Global Health Initiative (@LSEGlobalHealth) is a cross-departmental research platform set up to increase the coherence and visibility of Global Health research activity across the School, both internally and externally. It provides support for interdisciplinary engagement and showcases LSE’s ability to apply rigorous social science research to emerging global health challenges.
    The LSE Middle East Centre builds on LSE's long engagement with the Middle East and North Africa and provides a central hub for the wide range of research on the region carried out at LSE. The Middle East Centre works to enhance understanding and develop rigorous research on the societies, economies, politics and international relations of the region.
    This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

  • Contributor(s): Dr Michael Fullilove | COVID-19 originated in Wuhan, China’s authoritarian system enabled it to contain the virus even as the United States became a global epicentre of disease. Does this point to a long-term shift in international relations? Or will the traditional strengths of liberal nations reassert themselves? And how should the West respond to the China challenge?
    Meet our speaker and chair
    Michael Fullilove (@mfullilove) is the Executive Director of the Lowy Institute. He previously worked as a lawyer, a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC, and an adviser to Prime Minister Paul Keating. He is Nonresident Senior Fellow at Brookings and serves on the Advisory Council of the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) in London. Dr Fullilove writes widely on foreign policy in publications including The New York Times, Financial Times and The Atlantic.
    Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme.
    More about this event
    The Ralph Miliband Programme (@rmilibandlse) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
    This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

  • Contributor(s): Professor Judy Wajcman, Professor David Autor | How will technological innovation change the workplace? How can we harness technological advances for social benefit? Join leading economist David Autor in discussion with Judy Wajcman as we explore the relationships between emerging technologies and the future of work in America and beyond.
    Meet our speakers and chair
    David Autor (@davidautor) is Ford Professor of Economics and Associate Department Head of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Economics. He is Co-Director of the MIT Task Force on the Work of the Future and the National Bureau of Economic Research Labor Studies Program. Professor Autor has written extensively on labor-market impacts of technological change and globalization’s effects on wages, inequality and electoral politics.
    Judy Wajcman (@jwajcman1) is the Anthony Giddens Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She is the Principal Investigator on the Women in Data Science and Artificial Intelligence research project at the Alan Turing Institute, a member of the AI100 Standing Committee, and a Fellow of the British Academy. Professor Wajcman has published widely in the fields of work and organizations, science and technology studies and feminist theory.
    Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Professor of International Relations, and Director of the US Centre at LSE and Associate Fellow at Chatham House.
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    The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States.
    This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

  • Contributor(s): Ken Benoit, Andrew Murray, Seeta Peña Gangaradhan, Alison Powell, Bernhard von Stengel | Computer algorithms shape our lives and increasingly control our future. They have crept into virtually every aspect of modern life and are making life-changing choices on our behalf, often without us realising. But how much power should we give to them and have we let things go too far? Joanna Bale talks to Ken Benoit, Andrew Murray, Seeta Peña Gangaradhan, Alison Powell and Bernhard Von Stengel.
    Research links: Hello World by Hannah Fry;
    Information Technology Law: The Law and Society by Andrew Murray;
    Explanations as Governance? Investigating practices of explanation in algorithmic system design by Alison Powell (forthcoming).

  • Contributor(s): Professor Philippe Aghion |
    Philippe Aghion, Professor at the Collège de France and LSE, offers a cutting-edge analysis of what drives economic growth and a blueprint for prosperity under capitalism.
    With the launch of his book, of which he is a co-author, The Power of Creative Destruction, Philippe Aghion draws on cutting-edge theory and evidence to examine the roots of growth and inequality, competition and globalisation, the determinants of health and happiness, technological revolutions, secular stagnation, middle-income traps, climate change, and how to recover from economic shocks. He shows that we owe our modern standard of living to innovations enabled by free-market capitalism. We hear more and more calls for radical change, even the overthrow of capitalism. Aghion suggests the answer is to create a better capitalism by understanding and harnessing the power of creative destruction—innovation that disrupts, but that over the past two hundred years has also lifted societies to previously unimagined prosperity. The Power of Creative Destruction shows that a fair and prosperous future is ultimately ours to make.
    Meet our speaker and chair
    Philippe Aghion is Professor at the Collège de France and the London School of Economics and Political Science and was previously Professor of Economics at Harvard. His new book The Power of Creative Destruction, is co-authored with Céline Antonin and Simon Bunel.
    Steve Pischke has been in the Economics Department at LSE since 2000, is an associate in the CEP, and currently Head of the Department. His key expertise is in Labour Economics, Economics of Education, and Applied Econometrics.
    More about this event
    The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at LSE, is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching.
    This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
    You can order the book, The Power of Creative Destruction - Economic Upheaval and the Wealth of Nations, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

  • Contributor(s): Muna Luqman, Fatou Bensouda, Hamsatu Allamin | Focusing on the escalating violence and ongoing kidnappings of women and girls in Nigeria and the continued targeting of civilians in Yemen, for this fourth session of the Coming of Age of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda series Sanam Naraghi Anderlini will be in conversation with Hamsatu Allamin, founder of the Allamin Foundation for Peace Development in Maidugiri, Nigeria; Fatou Bensouda, Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC); and Muna Luqman, leading peacebuilder and founder of Food4Humanity in Yemen. 
    Reflecting on their personal experiences and journeys into their fields of expertise, this discussion will draw attention to the growing challenge of failed governance by states, the emergence of ungoverned and ‘alternatively governed’ spaces, and the implications for civilians. The panellists will also discuss the role of the ICC when states are implicated in violence against their own citizens, and what can be done when the state is absent and new entities emerge, with no respect for international norms.
    Meet our speakers and chair
    Hamsatu Allamin is an educator by profession, with 32 years’ experience in teaching, public administration, and project management. She is a gender activist and human rights defender, who initiated the creation of the Network of Civil Society for Peace in Borno and Yobe states in Nigeria.
    Fatou Bensouda is the first woman to serve as Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC), having assumed office in 2012. In 2011, she was elected by consensus by the Assembly of States Parties to serve in this capacity. Through her work, she has strived to advance accountability for atrocity crimes, highlighting in particular the importance of addressing traditionally underreported crimes such as sexual and gender-based crimes, mass atrocities against and affecting children, as well as the deliberate destruction of cultural heritage within the Rome Statute framework.
    Muna Luqman (@munaluqman) is the Founder and Chairperson of Food4humanity. She is an activist for women, peace and security; co-founder of the Women Solidarity Network; and member of the Women’s Alliance for Security Leadership.
    Sanam Naraghi-Anderlini (@sanambna) is the Director of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security.
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    The Centre for Women, Peace and Security (@LSE_WPS) is a leading academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists, policy-makers and students to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation of women in conflict-affected situations around the world.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWPS

  • Contributor(s): Professor Amartya Sen, Bee Rowlatt |
    Join two great minds in exploring the themes of justice and equality: Amartya Sen and Enlightenment hero Mary Wollstonecraft, as Amartya Sen gives the inaugural Wollstonecraft Society Lecture.
    Mary Wollstonecraft claimed human rights for all. She overcame limited education and a background of domestic violence to become an educational and political pioneer, and one of the greatest thinkers of the eighteenth century. As well as her intellectual audacity, it is Wollstonecraft’s love for humanity, her self-proclaimed “ardent affection for the human race” that continues to inspire. This event explores how, despite a savage pandemic, economic downturn, and increasing isolation in both political and individual life, there is a counter-story of community building and education, of optimism and hope.
    Meet our speakers and chair
    Bee Rowlatt (@BeeRowlatt) is a writer and public speaker, and a programmer of events at the British Library. Her most recent book In Search of Mary retraced Wollstonecraft’s 1795 treasure hunt over the Skagerrak sea. She led the campaign for the Wollstonecraft memorial sculpture and is chair of the Wollstonecraft Society.
    Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University and an LSE Honorary Fellow. His research has ranged over social choice theory, economic theory, ethics and political philosophy, welfare economics, theory of measurement, decision theory, development economics, public health, and gender studies. Amartya Sen’s books have been translated into more than thirty languages and his awards include the Nobel Prize in Economics. He was Professor of economics at LSE from 1971 to 1977, and he taught part-time at the School from 1978 to 1982. His memoir, Home In The World, will be published in July by Penguin. LSE announced the Amartya Sen Chair in Inequality Studies in 2019.
    Alpa Shah (@alpashah001) is Associate Professor of Anthropology at LSE and leads the International Inequalities Institute research theme on Global Economies of Care. Her most recent book is the award winning ‘Nightmarch: Among India’s Revolutionary Guerrillas’.
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    The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
    The Wollstonecraft Society (@TheWollSoc) is a registered charity carrying Mary Wollstonecraft’s legacy of human rights, equality and justice into young people’s lives. It delivers learning materials and experiences, inspired by Wollstonecraft’s work, for young people who might not have heard of her. The annual WS lecture features an outstanding speaker on themes related to her work, and each year it awards a state-educated student the Wollstonecraft Prize for Political Engagement. This lecture is also part of a week-long celebration of events around Mary Wollstonecraft organised by the Newington Green Meeting House.
    This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
    This event will have live captioning and BSL interpreters.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

  • Contributor(s): Professor Kehinde Andrews | Coretta Phillips will be in conversation with Kehinde Andrews to discusses his new book, The New Age of Empire. A book that offers no easy answers to critical questions, The New Age of Empire presents a new blueprint for challenging age-old systems. Andrews argues that the "West is rich because the Rest is poor", and that reforming a racist global order calls for radical solutions.
    Meet our speaker and chair
    Kehinde Andrews (@kehinde_andrews) is Professor of Black Studies at the School of Social Sciences at Birmingham City University. Kehinde led the development of Europe’s first Black Studies undergraduate degree. He is also director of the Centre for Critical Social Research, founder of the Harambee Organisation of Black Unity, and co-chair of the Black Studies Association.
    You can order the book, The New Age of Empire: how racism and colonialism still rule the world, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney.
    Coretta Phillips is Professor of Criminology and Social Policy in the Department of Social Policy at LSE. Author of the award-winning book The Multicultural Prison, she researches race, ethnicity, crime, criminal justice and social policy. Her current multi-disciplinary project will provide the first systematic, comprehensive and historically grounded account of the crime and criminal justice experiences of Gypsies and Travellers in England since the 1960s.
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    The Department of Social Policy (@LSESocialPolicy) is an internationally recognised centre of research and teaching in social and public policy. From its foundation in 1912 it has carried out cutting edge research on core social problems, and helped to develop policy solutions.
    This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

  • Contributor(s): Professor Paul Dolan | Listen to a preview of a new podcast by Professor Paul Dolan, which explores the problem of polarisation.
    LSE Professor Paul Dolan has spent years researching happiness. Can he find a way through the divisions that make us miserable?
    In this podcast series Paul brings together friends from the different worlds he straddles in his own life to work through the issues that most divide us - COVID, freedom of speech, class and lifestyle choices. He uses insights from behavioural science to explain why we’re split and how we might fix it.
    Listen now: Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0zUaiarx2SxILYha3gAtGE
    Acast: https://play.acast.com/s/duck-rabbit/duck-rabbit
    This podcast series forms part of LSE's Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative. A Mother Come Quickly production.
     

  • Contributor(s): Professor Gurminder Bhambra, Dr Jens Lerche, Dr Sanjay G. Reddy, Professor Diego Sánchez-Ancochea, Dr Nora Waitkus, Professor Thomas Piketty | This event will debate Thomas Piketty’s urgent new book, Capital and Ideology, and will feature an interdisciplinary panel of experts. The conversation will probe his views on race and slavery, the nature of capitalism, the impact of political divides, and the contours of long-term social change. Piketty, in conversation with interlocutors, will present the book’s framework and his historically-informed approach for understanding and combating inequalities today.
    This discussion is linked to a just-published special issue of The British Journal of Sociology, featuring a wide-ranging, interdisciplinary set of responses to Piketty.
    Meet our speakers and chair
    Gurminder Bhambra (@GKBhambra) is Professor of Postcolonial and Decolonial Studies in the School of Global Studies at the University of Sussex.
    Jens Lerche (@JensLerche) is Reader in Agrarian and Labour studies in the Department of Development Studies at SOAS.
    LSE alumnus Thomas Piketty (@PikettyLeMonde) is Professor at EHESS and the Paris School of Economics.
    Sanjay G. Reddy (@sanjaygreddy) is Associate Professor of Economics at The New School for Social Research.
    Diego Sánchez-Ancochea (@dsanco) is Professor of the Political Economy of Development, University of Oxford.
    Nora Waitkus (@nora_wait) is Research Officer at the International Inequalities Institute at LSE and Assistant Professor at Tilburg University.
    Poornima Paidipaty (@paidipaty) is an LSE Fellow in Inequalities.
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    The Department of Sociology (@LSEsociology) seek to produce sociology that is public-facing, fully engaged with London as a global city, and with major contemporary debates in the intersection between economy, politics and society – with issues such as financialisation, inequality, migration, urban ecology, and climate change.
    The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
    The British Journal of Sociology (@BJSociology) is a leading international sociological journal, with a focus on the social and democratic sociological questions of our times, the journal leads the debate on key methodological and theoretical questions and controversies in contemporary sociology.
    This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
    This event will have live captioning and BSL interpreters.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

  • Contributor(s): Professor Richard Bradley, Professor Justin E. H. Smith | Julian Le Grand will talk with Justin E. H. Smith about his new book, Irrationality - A History of the Dark Side of Reason.
    Irrationality ranges across philosophy, politics, and current events. Challenging conventional thinking about logic, natural reason, dreams, art and science, pseudoscience, the Enlightenment, the internet, jokes and lies, and death, the book shows how history reveals that any triumph of reason is temporary and reversible, and that rational schemes, notably including many from Silicon Valley, often result in their polar opposite. The problem is that the rational gives birth to the irrational and vice versa in an endless cycle, and any effort to permanently set things in order sooner or later ends in an explosion of unreason. Because of this, it is irrational to try to eliminate irrationality. For better or worse, it is an ineradicable feature of life.
    Meet our speaker and chair
    Justin E. H. Smith (@jehsmith) is Professor of the history and philosophy of science at the University of Paris 7–Denis Diderot. His books include The Philosopher: A History in Six Types.
    Richard Bradley is Professor of Philosophy in the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research is concentrated in decision theory, formal epistemology and the theory of social choice but he also works on conditionals and the nature of chance. His book Decision Theory with a Human Face, recently published with Cambridge University Press, gives an account of decision making under conditions of severe uncertainty theory suitable for rational but bounded agents.
    Julian Le Grand has been Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science since 1993. From 2003 to 2005 he was seconded to No 10 Downing St to serve as Senior Policy Adviser to the Prime Minister. He is the author, co-author or editor of over twenty books, and more than one hundred refereed journal articles and book chapters on economics, philosophy, and public policy.
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    The Marshall Institute (@LSEMarshall) works to improve the impact and effectiveness of private action for public benefit through research, teaching and convening.
    You can order the book, Irrationality - A History of the Dark Side of Reason, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIrrationality

  • Contributor(s): Professor Etienne Balibar | A cosmopolitics that allows it for mankind to address its common interests is clearly needed, as demonstrated again by the COVID-19 pandemic. It is even urgent, a matter of life and death for millions, and survival for the planet as a livable environment.
    But there can exist no cosmopolitics without a cosmopolitan idea. From this point of view, we find ourselves in an extremely contradictory situation: always an “essentially contested concept” throughout history, cosmopolitanism today appears squeezed between powerful nationalisms competing for global or local hegemony, and utopian ideals in search of their capacity to rally the multitude. The lecture does not offer a blueprint, it traces a genealogy and delineates some possibilities for the future which is already our actuality.
    Meet our speaker and chair
    Etienne Balibar is Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Paris-Nanterre, and Anniversary Chair of Contemporary European Philosophy at Kingston University, London. He is also visiting professor at Columbia University in the City of New York.
    Ayça Çubukçu (@ayca_cu) is an Associate Professor of Sociology at LSE and co-director of LSE Human Rights.
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    LSE Human Rights (@LSEHumanRights) is a trans-disciplinary centre of excellence for international academic research, teaching and critical scholarship on human rights.
    The Department of Sociology (@LSEsociology) seek to produce sociology that is public-facing, fully engaged with London as a global city, and with major contemporary debates in the intersection between economy, politics and society – with issues such as financialisation, inequality, migration, urban ecology, and climate change.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECosmopolitanisms

  • Contributor(s): Dr Daphne Nicolitsas | Putting available talent to its best use is key for the welfare of individuals and of the society to which they belong. Unequal access to opportunity in education and labour markets tampers with the allocation of talent leading to more inequality, poverty traps and lower welfare for all. This lecture reviews recent evidence on the misallocation of talent by economic class and gender in different settings, highlighting how temporary shocks - such as the current pandemic can have permanent consequences.
    Meet our speakers and chair
    Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is the Sir Anthony Atkinson Professor of Economics at LSE, and a fellow of the British Academy, the Econometric Society, CEPR, BREAD and IZA. She is co-editor of Econometrica, vice-president of the European Economic Association, and director of the Gender, Growth and Labour Markets in Low-Income Countries (G²LM|LIC) programme. She serves on the council of the Econometric Society, on board of the International Growth Centre and as vice-president of the Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    Aristides N. Hatzis is Professor of Philosophy of Law and Theory of Institutions at the University of Athens. He is the Director of Research at the Center for Liberal Studies-Athens, a Fellow of the Institute for Research in Economics and Fiscal Issues-Paris, and a member of the Advisory Board of the Society of European Contract Law, the Steering Committee of the European Network for Better Regulation and the Editorial Board of the European Review of Contract Law.
    Daphne Nicolitsas is, since Feb 2014, an Assistant Professor at the Department of Economics of the University of Crete. Prior to that she worked in economic policy related jobs and in the financial sector. Her main research interests lie in labour economics and in industrial organization, fields in which she has publications in international journals. Currently, she is co-ordinating an EU-funded project, with partners from top EU Universities, on the structure and conduct of Employers’ Associations in the EU.
    Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics and the Director of the Hellenic Observatory.
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    The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute.
    The National Bank of Greece (@NationalBankGR), backed by its 179-year participation in the country's economic and social life, is one of the leading Greek financial organisations, with strong tradition and noteworthy contribution to the economic and social transformation of Greece. The Bank’s broad customer base, respected brand name, strong market share in deposits and enhanced capital adequacy ratios secure it with the liquidity needed to finance Greek businesses and reflect the long-standing relationship of trust it enjoys with its clientele.
    This event forms part of the Hellenic Observatory Athens Lecture Series, co-organised with the National Bank of Greece and supported by the LSE Hellenic Alumni Association.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEAthensLectures

  • Contributor(s): Professor Naila Kabeer | Join us for this first lecture in our new series organised in memory of Sylvia Chant which will be delivered by Naila Kabeer.
    Professor Kabeer will use a feminist economic lens to analyse a range of different impacts associated with COVID-19 and to explore the kinds of policies that such a lens would suggest for a more resilient and equitable future.
    Meet our speaker and chair
    Naila Kabeer (@N_Kabeer) is Professor of Gender and Development at the Department of Gender Studies and Department of International Development at LSE.
    Eric Neumayer is Professor of Environment and Development and Pro-Director (PVC) Planning and Resources at LSE.
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    The Sylvia Chant Lectures are organised in memory of Sylvia Chant, Professor of Development Geography.
    The Department of Geography and Environment (@LSEGeography) is a centre of international academic excellence in economic, urban and development geography, environmental social science and climate change.
    LSE Gender (@LSEGenderTweet) pioneers intersectional, interdisciplinary and transnational teaching and research, addressing the tenacity of gendered power relations and gendered inequalities in times of global transformations. Established in 1993, LSE Gender is the largest Department of Gender Studies in Europe.
    This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

  • Contributor(s): Baroness Shafik, Juan Manuel Santos, Professor Amartya Sen | What should a social contract for the 21st century look like?
    Launching her new book, What We Owe Each Other, LSE Director Minouche Shafik draws on evidence from across the globe to identify key principles for a social contract for every society. She will be in conversation with Juan Manuel Santos and Amartya Sen.
    The social contract governs all aspects of society, from politics and law to our families and communities. Accelerating changes in technology, demography, climate and global health, as we have seen over the last year, will reshape our world in ways we have yet to fully grasp. How do we pool risks, share resources and balance individual with collective responsibility? What part do we each have to play?
    You can order the book, What We Owe Each Other: a new social contract, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney.
    Meet our speakers and chair
    Minouche Shafik is Director of LSE. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. An economist by training, Baroness Shafik has spent most of her career straddling the worlds of public policy and academia. After completing her BSc in economics and politics at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, she took an MSc in economics at LSE before completing a DPhil in economics at St Antony’s College at the University of Oxford. In 2020 the UK Government announced that she would be made a Life Peer in the House of Lords.
    Juan Manuel Santos Calderón (@JuanManSantos) is the former President of the Republic of Colombia, serving two terms, from 2010 to 2018. He was Colombia’s first Foreign Trade Minister, has been Minister of Finance and before being elected President, was Minister for National Defence. Prior to entering politics, President Santos was deputy director of El Tiempo newspaper, and wrote a weekly opinion column. He was awarded the King of Spain International Journalism Award and named president of the Freedom of Expression Commission for the Inter American Press Association (IAPA). In 2016 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He is a member of The Elders and a Honorary Graduate of LSE. President Santos studied for a Master of Science in the Department of Economics at LSE in 1975.
    Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University and an LSE Honorary Fellow. His research has ranged over social choice theory, economic theory, ethics and political philosophy, welfare economics, theory of measurement, decision theory, development economics, public health, and gender studies. Amartya Sen’s books have been translated into more than thirty languages and his awards include the Nobel Prize in Economics.
    Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. He is also a member of the National Infrastructure Commission. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and British Academy. He is also a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Economic Association and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • Contributor(s): Professor Jim Sidanius | The Black Lives Matter and #MeToo movements have led to a renewed focus on the persistence of inequality along the lines of race, gender, and their intersection. Political psychology attempts to shed light on this through connecting individual behaviour to wider institutional and ideological dynamics. On the eve of the completion of an updated edition of his now classic text, Social Dominance: An Intergroup Theory of Hierarchy and Oppression, political psychologist Jim Sidanius will present some of his latest ideas on the psychological foundations of intergroup inequality, followed by a conversation on their relevance to twenty-first century struggles for social justice.
    Meet our speaker and chair
    Jim Sidanius is the John Lindsley Professor of Psychology in memory of William James and of African and African American Studies at Harvard University.
    Jennifer Sheehy-Skeffington (@jsskeffington) is an Assistant Professor in the department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE.
    More about this event
    The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world.

  • Contributor(s): Professor Odd Arne Westad |
    In this series of four lectures, the Elihu Professor of History and Global Affairs at Yale, Odd Arne Westad, discusses the concept of empire and why it is still relevant today.
    Even if the Europeans had deemed the 19th century a “long peace”, the world had changed tremendously between 1800 and 1900. Of the 1800 powers only a few remained strong, and they were all European. But, at the same time, the concept of empire was changing, and new forms of anti-imperial resistance was starting to grow. This third lecture will discuss high imperialisms, their relationship to globalising capitalism, and how a destabilised European world initiated the tragedies of the 20th century.
    Meet our speaker and chair
    Odd Arne Westad is the Engelsberg Chair for 2020/21 at LSE IDEAS. He is currently the Elihu Professor of History and Global Affairs at Yale, and is a former director of LSE IDEAS.
    Christopher Coker is Director of LSE IDEAS.
    More about this event
    A podcast of the first lecture can be found at Empires Past & Present: the idea of empire.
    The second lecture, Empires Past and Present: empire around 1800, took place on 26 January, a podcast is available.
    LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEngelsberg