Episodios

  •  On the evening of October 6, 1898, forty-eight-year-old George Saxton, brother of First Lady Ida McKinley, was riding his bike to the home of his lady friend Eva Althouse when an assailant dressed in black emerged from the shadows and fired two shots. Wounded, George crawled towards Eva’s house and had just reached the front steps when the shooter approached and fired two more shots, killing him almost instantly.

    Within hours of Saxton’s death, his former mistress, Anna George, was arrested and charged with first-degree murder. For more than a decade, Saxton and George had been carrying on a scandalous relationship that began as an illicit affair until Saxton successfully convinced George to divorce her husband, supposedly with promises to marry her. However, once she was a single woman again, Saxton’s enthusiasm for marriage had cooled and over time his interest in Anna waned. 

    Anna George’s sensational arrest and trial dominated headlines for months and, as Saxton was extremely unpopular, many people sympathized with the accused woman and even reveled in Saxton’s death. After an intense and closely watched three-week trial, Anna George was acquitted of the murder and soon after she faded out of the spotlight, leaving the murder of George Saxton officially unsolved to this day.

    Thank you to the glorious David White, of the Bring Me The Axe Podcast, for research!

    References

    Akron Beacon Journal. 1906. "Former Akron man suicided in Ravenna." Akron Beacon Journal, July 23: 8.

    Bellamy, John Stark. 2011. A Woman Scorned: The Murder of George Saxton. Cleveland, OH: Independent.

    Boston Daily Globe. 1899. "Mintz on Saxton." Boston Daily Globe, April 23: 2.

    —. 1898. "Public sympathy with Mrs. George." Boston Daily Globe, October 9: 1.

    Cincinnati Post. 1898. "Before bar of justice." Cincinnati Post, October 10: 1.

    —. 1898. "Charged with murder of G.D. Saxton." Cincinnati Post, October 11: 1.

    Clinton County Democrat. 1898. "The good people of Canton rejoice that he has been removed." Clinton County Democrat, November 10: 1.

    Coe, Jonathan. 2012. Canton's Great Tragedy the Murder of George D. Saxton, Together with a History of the Arrest and Trial of Annie E. George Charged with the Murder. Detroit, MI: Gale.

    Dayton Daily News. 1899. "Loved to the hour of death." Dayton Daily News, April 8: 1.

    Dayton Herald. 1899. "Relations of Mrs. George and Saxton are told to the jury." Dayton Herald, April 8: 1.

    —. 1899. "Youth claims to have seen the killing of Saxton." Dayton Herald, July 25: 1.

    New York Times. 1899. "Belated evidence heard at Chicago against Mrs. George." New York Times, July 25: 4.

    Scripps-McRae Telegram. 1898. "Out of court noted alienation case was settled." Cincinnati Post, October 5: 7.

    Stark County Democrat. 1899. "Sterling were the remarks of the attorney by the same name." Stark County Democrat, April 27: 1.

    —. 1899. "Testimony being heard at a rapid and exceedingly gratifying pace." Stark County Democvrat, April 13: 1.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • (Part 3) In the spring of 2005, law enforcement officials in southern Louisiana had a growing number of murder victims they had begun to suspect were connected to an unidentified serial killer operating in the area. The victims were all men, mostly in their twenties and thirties, many had histories of drug and alcohol abuse or were known to police as sex-workers, and all had been strangled and dumped in secondary locations.

    Over the course of a decade, Ronald Dominique developed into one of the worst and most prolific serial killers in American history; yet his story and those of his victims remains largely unknown and ignored by the mainstream media. 

    Thank you to the Incredible Dave White of Bring Me the Axe & 99 Cent Renal Podcasts for research!

    References

    Alford, Jeremy. 2005. New information coming soon in local murders. August 24. Accessed March 29, 2023. https://www.houmatoday.com/story/news/2005/08/24/new-information-coming-soon-in-local-murders/27020266007/.

    Armstrong, Shell. 2007. Dominique pleads not guilty to 9 murders. January 17. Accessed March 29, 2023. https://www.houmatimes.com/news/dominique-pleads-not-guilty-to-9-murders/.

    Associated Press. 2005. "Man found in Lafource Parish was from Houma area." Abberville Meridional, May 3: 2.

    —. 2005. "Deaths od five south Lousiana men may be linked, police say." Shreveport Times, April 25: 12.

    —. 1999. "La. deaths may be work of serial killer." Shreveport Times, June 23: 5B.

    —. 2006. "Police look for links between serial suspect, priest's death." Shreveport Times, December 9: 22.

    —. 2006. "Arrest made in serial-killer investigation." Town Talk, December 2: 17.

    —. 2006. "Serial murder suspect was average Joe, says shelter residents." Town Talk, December 3: 8.

    DeSantis, John. 2006. Accused lived on the fringe of two worlds. December 4. Accessed March 26, 2023. https://web.archive.org/web/20210128012212/https://www.houmatoday.com/article/DA/20061204/News/608089983/HC.

    Hunter, Michelle. 2006. "Serial-killer suspect confesses; Trysts led to rapes, strangling, cops told." Times-Picatune, December 6.

    L'observateur. 1999. Beaten teen’s body discovered in Kenner. October 26. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.lobservateur.com/1998/10/26/beaten-teens-body-discovered-in-kenner/.

    —. 1999. Two deaths reclassified as murders in St. Charles Parish. Fdebruary 6. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.lobservateur.com/1999/02/06/two-deaths-reclassified-as-murders-in-st-charles-parish/.

    Morris, Robert. 2006. Mother protests dead son’s link to serial killer. June 19. Accessed March 26, 2023. https://web.archive.org/web/20210131004921/https://www.houmatoday.com/article/DA/20060619/News/608089995/HC.

    Ramage, James. 2005. "Serial killer theory floats around cases." Shreveport Times, May 15: 1.

    Rosen, Fred. 2017. The Bayou Strangler. New York, NY: Open Road Media.

    —. 2018. Uncovering the Truth Behind One of the Bayou Strangler’s Victims. April 10. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://the-line-up.com/uncovering-the-truth-behind-one-of-the-bayou-stranglers-victims.

    St. Charles Heral-Guide. 2006. Mother’s tears for son killed by serial madman Dominique. 12 06. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.heraldguide.com/tragedy/mothers-tears-for-son-killed-by-serial-madman-dominique/.

    The Daily Review. 2002. "Houma man's body found." Daily Review, October 17: 6.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • ¿Faltan episodios?

    Pulsa aquí para actualizar resultados

  • (Part 2) In the spring of 2005, law enforcement officials in southern Louisiana had a growing number of murder victims they had begun to suspect were connected to an unidentified serial killer operating in the area. The victims were all men, mostly in their twenties and thirties, many had histories of drug and alcohol abuse or were known to police as sex-workers, and all had been strangled and dumped in secondary locations.

    Over the course of a decade, Ronald Dominique developed into one of the worst and most prolific serial killers in American history; yet his story and those of his victims remains largely unknown and ignored by the mainstream media. 

    Thank you to the Incredible Dave White of Bring Me the Axe & 99 Cent Renal Podcasts for research!

    References

    Alford, Jeremy. 2005. New information coming soon in local murders. August 24. Accessed March 29, 2023. https://www.houmatoday.com/story/news/2005/08/24/new-information-coming-soon-in-local-murders/27020266007/.

    Armstrong, Shell. 2007. Dominique pleads not guilty to 9 murders. January 17. Accessed March 29, 2023. https://www.houmatimes.com/news/dominique-pleads-not-guilty-to-9-murders/.

    Associated Press. 2005. "Man found in Lafource Parish was from Houma area." Abberville Meridional, May 3: 2.

    —. 2005. "Deaths od five south Lousiana men may be linked, police say." Shreveport Times, April 25: 12.

    —. 1999. "La. deaths may be work of serial killer." Shreveport Times, June 23: 5B.

    —. 2006. "Police look for links between serial suspect, priest's death." Shreveport Times, December 9: 22.

    —. 2006. "Arrest made in serial-killer investigation." Town Talk, December 2: 17.

    —. 2006. "Serial murder suspect was average Joe, says shelter residents." Town Talk, December 3: 8.

    DeSantis, John. 2006. Accused lived on the fringe of two worlds. December 4. Accessed March 26, 2023. https://web.archive.org/web/20210128012212/https://www.houmatoday.com/article/DA/20061204/News/608089983/HC.

    Hunter, Michelle. 2006. "Serial-killer suspect confesses; Trysts led to rapes, strangling, cops told." Times-Picatune, December 6.

    L'observateur. 1999. Beaten teen’s body discovered in Kenner. October 26. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.lobservateur.com/1998/10/26/beaten-teens-body-discovered-in-kenner/.

    —. 1999. Two deaths reclassified as murders in St. Charles Parish. Fdebruary 6. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.lobservateur.com/1999/02/06/two-deaths-reclassified-as-murders-in-st-charles-parish/.

    Morris, Robert. 2006. Mother protests dead son’s link to serial killer. June 19. Accessed March 26, 2023. https://web.archive.org/web/20210131004921/https://www.houmatoday.com/article/DA/20060619/News/608089995/HC.

    Ramage, James. 2005. "Serial killer theory floats around cases." Shreveport Times, May 15: 1.

    Rosen, Fred. 2017. The Bayou Strangler. New York, NY: Open Road Media.

    —. 2018. Uncovering the Truth Behind One of the Bayou Strangler’s Victims. April 10. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://the-line-up.com/uncovering-the-truth-behind-one-of-the-bayou-stranglers-victims.

    St. Charles Heral-Guide. 2006. Mother’s tears for son killed by serial madman Dominique. 12 06. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.heraldguide.com/tragedy/mothers-tears-for-son-killed-by-serial-madman-dominique/.

    The Daily Review. 2002. "Houma man's body found." Daily Review, October 17: 6.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • In the spring of 2005, law enforcement officials in southern Louisiana had a growing number of murder victims they had begun to suspect were connected to an unidentified serial killer operating in the area. The victims were all men, mostly in their twenties and thirties, many had histories of drug and alcohol abuse or were known to police as sex-workers, and all had been strangled and dumped in secondary locations.

    Over the course of a decade, Ronald Dominique developed into one of the worst and most prolific serial killers in American history; yet his story and those of his victims remains largely unknown and ignored by the mainstream media. 

    Thank you to the Incredible Dave White of Bring Me the Axe & 99 Cent Renal Podcasts for research!

    References

    Alford, Jeremy. 2005. New information coming soon in local murders. August 24. Accessed March 29, 2023. https://www.houmatoday.com/story/news/2005/08/24/new-information-coming-soon-in-local-murders/27020266007/.

    Armstrong, Shell. 2007. Dominique pleads not guilty to 9 murders. January 17. Accessed March 29, 2023. https://www.houmatimes.com/news/dominique-pleads-not-guilty-to-9-murders/.

    Associated Press. 2005. "Man found in Lafource Parish was from Houma area." Abberville Meridional, May 3: 2.

    —. 2005. "Deaths od five south Lousiana men may be linked, police say." Shreveport Times, April 25: 12.

    —. 1999. "La. deaths may be work of serial killer." Shreveport Times, June 23: 5B.

    —. 2006. "Police look for links between serial suspect, priest's death." Shreveport Times, December 9: 22.

    —. 2006. "Arrest made in serial-killer investigation." Town Talk, December 2: 17.

    —. 2006. "Serial murder suspect was average Joe, says shelter residents." Town Talk, December 3: 8.

    DeSantis, John. 2006. Accused lived on the fringe of two worlds. December 4. Accessed March 26, 2023. https://web.archive.org/web/20210128012212/https://www.houmatoday.com/article/DA/20061204/News/608089983/HC.

    Hunter, Michelle. 2006. "Serial-killer suspect confesses; Trysts led to rapes, strangling, cops told." Times-Picatune, December 6.

    L'observateur. 1999. Beaten teen’s body discovered in Kenner. October 26. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.lobservateur.com/1998/10/26/beaten-teens-body-discovered-in-kenner/.

    —. 1999. Two deaths reclassified as murders in St. Charles Parish. Fdebruary 6. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.lobservateur.com/1999/02/06/two-deaths-reclassified-as-murders-in-st-charles-parish/.

    Morris, Robert. 2006. Mother protests dead son’s link to serial killer. June 19. Accessed March 26, 2023. https://web.archive.org/web/20210131004921/https://www.houmatoday.com/article/DA/20060619/News/608089995/HC.

    Ramage, James. 2005. "Serial killer theory floats around cases." Shreveport Times, May 15: 1.

    Rosen, Fred. 2017. The Bayou Strangler. New York, NY: Open Road Media.

    —. 2018. Uncovering the Truth Behind One of the Bayou Strangler’s Victims. April 10. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://the-line-up.com/uncovering-the-truth-behind-one-of-the-bayou-stranglers-victims.

    St. Charles Heral-Guide. 2006. Mother’s tears for son killed by serial madman Dominique. 12 06. Accessed March 27, 2023. https://www.heraldguide.com/tragedy/mothers-tears-for-son-killed-by-serial-madman-dominique/.

    The Daily Review. 2002. "Houma man's body found." Daily Review, October 17: 6.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • On the evening of November 1, 1996, Tucson, Arizona real estate developer and businessman Gary Triano got into his car at the La Paloma Country Club intending to head home, where friends and family were waiting for Gary’s surprise birthday party. However, before Gary had even put the key in the ignition, the car exploded in a ball of flame, plunging the club into panic and chaos, and killing Gary instantly. 

    To investigators, the car bomb planted under Gary’s car had all the hallmarks of a professional hit, and with Gary’s business dealings and financial troubles, there were at least a few people who would have benefitted from his death. However, within just a few weeks, suspicion fell to Triano’s ex-wife, Pamela, who’d taken out a life insurance policy on Gary during their marriage that would eventually pay out $2 million dollars.

    Despite being confident that Pamela was involved in Gary’s death, the year-long investigation failed to turn up any conclusive evidence tying her to the murder. Undeterred, investigators continued to pursue the case across the country and eventually around the world and in 2009, more than a decade after his death, the people responsible for Gary Triano’s death were finally arrested, but many years would pass before anyone was held accountable.

    Thank you to David White, of the Bring Me the Axe Podcast for research!

    References

    Bodfield, Rhonda. 1996. "Broke Triano kept optimistic ." Tucson Citizen, November 9: 1.

    —. 1996. "Triano threats srcutinized." Tucson Citizen, November 5: 2.

    CBS News. 2017. "The Hit in Arizona [transcript]." CBS News, July 11.

    Huicochea, Alexis, and Enric Volante. 2006. "'96 bomb slaying is getting a new look." Arizona Daily Star, September 7.

    Innes, Stephanie. 1996. "Gambling link eyed in Triano murder." Tucson Citizen, November 4: 1.

    Limberis, Chris. 2001. "Requiem for a heavyweight ." Tucson Weekly, November 1.

    McNamara, Patrick. 2014. "Conflictring pictures painted of Triano murder suspect." Arizona Daily Star, February 20: A2.

    —. 2014. "Ex-wife going on trial 17 years after bomb death." Arizona Daily Star, February 16: C1.

    —. 2014. "Phillips gets life for fatal bombing." Arizona Daily Star, May 23: 1.

    Miami Herald. 2005. "A TV 'Most Wanted' fugitive is captured." Miami Herald, November 22: 138.

    Pence, Angela, John Rawlinson, and Alexa Haussler. 1996. "Black powder pipe bomb killed Triano." Arizona Daily Star, November 7.

    Sate of Arizona v. Pamela Anne Phillips. 2018. 1 CA-CR 17-0285 (Arizona Court of Appeals, July 10).

    Smith, Kim. 2011. "Additional mental exams for murder suspect denied." Arizona Daily Star, March 8: A2.

    —. 2010. "Life, no parole for killer in Triano case." Arizona Daily Star, May 4: A2.

    —. 2010. "Triano case closing arguments." Arizona Daily Star, March 27: A2.

    State of Arizona v. Ronald Kelly Young. 2012. CR20084012 (Court of Appeals State of Arizona , February 29).

    Teibel, David. 1996. "Blast fragments studied ." Tucson Citizen, November 1: 1.

    Tucson Citizen. 1973. "Realtor seeks seat on council." Tucson Citizen, June 15: 4.

    Volante, Enric. 2006. "Detective: Secret recordings link Triano ex, suspected death plot." Arizona Daily Star, September 8.

    —. 1997. "Triano assassination task force disbanded." Arizona Daily Star, August 2.

    Wagner, Dennis. 1996. "Bombing death puzzles police." Arizona Republic, November 10: 33.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • When twenty-year-old Walter Brooks was found dead from a bullet to the head on Valentine’s Day 1902, suspicion immediately fell on Brooks’ nineteen-year-old sometimes-girlfriend, Florence Burns. The two were known to have a tumultuous relationship and had fought violently on the morning of his death, and there was considerable evidence indicating that Burns had been in the hotel room at the time of Brooks’ murder. However, despite all the evidence indicating guilt, Florence Burns was never brought to trial for Brooks’ murder or even formally charged with a crime, and Walter Brooks murder officially remains an unsolved case in New York.

    While the story of Walter Brooks and Florence Burns is relatively uncomplicated in terms of the crime around which the story is built, the story is a remarkable illustration of the ways in which things like class, gender, and technological advances can influence and even shape how the law is applied in the United States. Indeed, at the time of the murder, the nation was undergoing incredibly social and cultural changes as a result of dramatically expanded transportation and communication technology, giving rise to a youth culture the likes of which had never been seen in the nation prior. That youth culture and the rebelliousness it produced in many young wealthy Americans played a direct role, not only in Walter’s life and death, but also in the socio-cultural perspectives and Victorian beliefs that allowed Florence to get away with murder.

    Thank you to the wondrous Dave White of Bring me the Axe Podcast & 99 Cent Rental for Research!

    References

    Evening World. 1902. "Denised she shot broker in hotel." Evening World, February 15: 1.

    Ferranti, Seth. 2019. The Affluenza Murder Case That Shocked America 100 Years Ago. March 15. Accessed December 11, 2023. https://www.vice.com/en/article/d3meyv/the-affluenza-murder-case-that-shocked-america-100-years-ago.

    McConnell, Virginia A. 2019. The Belle of Bedford Avenue: The Sensational Brooks-Burns Murder in Turn-of-the-Century New York. Kent, OH: The Kent State University Press.

    New York Times. 1902. "Brooks murder case ends." New York Times, May 21: 5.

    —. 1903. "Florence Burns on the stage." New York Times, February 15: 10.

    —. 1902. "Jerome on Burns case." New York Times, March 25: 7.

    —. 1902. "Man shot, girl arrested ." New York Times, February 16: 3.

    New York Tribune. 1910. "Florence Burns again in hands of police." New York Tribune, September 21: 1.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • Holly Madison joins us to give us a sneak peak at one of the cases they are covering on Season Two of the Playboy Murders. We talk about the tragic murder of Christine Schultz and the trial, conviction, and escape of Laurie Bembenek. It's a tragic story that is light on justice for anyone!

    She also chats with us about the second season overall of the Playboy Murders which premiers on January 22nd! You can find it on Investigation ID and stream it on MAX!

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • In March 1977, Arizona businessman Charles Morgan went missing from his home in Tucson, only to turn up three days later in the middle of the night, shoeless, traumatized, and with broken plastic handcuffs on his wrists and ankles. Unable to speak, Charles wrote that he had been drugged by an unnamed individual and kidnapped, but he refused to let his wife call the police or otherwise report the assault. Three months later, Charles Morgan’s body was discovered in the desert with a gunshot wound in the back of his head, one of his teeth wrapped in a handkerchief, and a two-dollar bill pinned to his underwear.

    From the outside, Charles Morgan appeared to live a very normal and decidedly unexciting life. Yet when investigators began digging into his background to find out who would have wanted him dead, they discovered a complicated and bizarre story of supposed government agents, mobsters, and a mystery that one would have expected from a Hollywood screenplay, not the life of a middle-aged Arizona escrow agent. The increasingly bizarre details of Morgan’s life and death comprise a fascinating mystery that remains unsolved to this day and endures as one of Arizona’s most baffling cold cases.

    Thank you to David White, of the Bring Me the Axe podcast, for research assistance

    References

    Bassett, Edward, and David Dykes. 1977. "Mystery death a suicide?" Tucson Citizen, June 22: 1.

    Bassett, Edward, and Richard Wood. 1977. "Slain businessman's bank dealings probed." Tucson Citizen, June 27: 3.

    Flanagan, Ray. n.d. "Did 'hit-man."

    —. 1990. "Did 'hit-man' with ties to region figure in Arizona death case?" Tribune, September 25: 3.

    Heltsley, Ernie, and John Rawlinson. 1979. "1977 shooting ended Tucsonan's two lives." Arizona Daily Star, February 4: 1.

    Jordan, Tracy. 1990. "City residents asked to drop a dime on hit man." Times Leader, October 22: 3.

    Kwok, Abraham. 1992. "Phoenix death a mistaken 'hit'?" Arizona Republic, May 6: 10.

    Matas, Kimberly. 2010. "Strange evidence found in '77 on, near man's body." Arizona Daily Star, March 31: A08.

    1990. Unsolved Mysteries. Directed by John McLaughlin. Performed by John McLaughlin.

    Salkowski, Joe, and Enric Volante. 2002. "Mob faded locally long before key figure died." Arizona Daily Star, May 19: 1.

    Svejcara, Bob. 1977. "Sheriff finds no foul play in Morgan death." Arizona Daily Star, August 11: 13.

    Svejcara, Bob, and Ernie Heltsley. 1977. "Slain businessman seen during 'absence'." Arizona Daily Star, June 23: 1.

    Tucson Citizen. 1977. "Sheriff's probe says Morgan was a sucide." Tucson Citizen, August 11: 4.

    Wood, Richard. 1977. "Slain Tucson executive: solid citizen... mystery man." Tucson Citizen, June 21: 2.

    —. 1977. "Woman says Morgan hid, trying to buy off his life." Tucson Citizen, June 21: 1.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • We're closing out the month of January, and you know what THAT means- Listener Tales! It’s brought to you by you, for you, from you, and ALL ABOUT YOU! In this installment we have tales THE NINETIES! We have camping stories, late night visits from a Jesus imposter, a creepy bathroom poltergeist, and an entire community is treated to a UFO lightshow!

    If you’ve got a listener tale please send it on over to [email protected] with “Listener Tales” somewhere in the subject line :)

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • When a charismatic young doctor announces revolutionary treatments for cancer and HIV, patients from around the world turn to him for their last chance. As medical experts praise Serhat Gumrukcu’s genius, the company he co-founded rockets in value to over half a billion dollars. But when a team of researchers makes a startling discovery, they begin to suspect the brilliant doctor is hiding a secret. From Wondery, the new season of Dr. Death: Bad Magic is a story of miraculous cures, magic and murder. Hosted by Laura Beil.

    Listen to Dr. Death - Bad Magic: Wondery.fm/Dr.Death

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • When Sandy Bird was found dead in her wrecked car in the Cottonwood River in the summer of 1983, everyone assumed the thirty-three-year-old Kansas mother of three had misjudged the turn on the one-lane bridge and gone over the side, her death a tragic accident. Similarly, when Martin Anderson was gunned down on the side of a Kansas state road just a few months later, the residents of Emporia, KS believed he was the victim of robbery gone wrong—the kind of random violence that investigators often struggled to solve. 

    What no one knew at the time was that the ostensibly accidental death of Sandy Bird and the tragic murder of Martin Anderson were in fact linked by a conspiracy of Sandra’s husband, Tom Bird, and his mistress, Lorna Anderson, designed to rid themselves of their respective spouses. Unfortunately, their plot began unraveling just a few weeks after Martin’s murder and both Tom and Lorna were arrested for the murders, along with their co-conspirators, and eventually went to trial. While the murders shocked the communities in rural Kansas, the most unbelievable aspect of the case was that the killers were a Lutheran pastor and his devout secretary.

    Thank you to the wonderful, David White of the Bring Me the Axe podcast, for research assistance!

    References

    Close, Dan. 1984. "Minister is accused of soliciting murder." Wichita Eagle-Beacon, March 22: 1.

    —. 1984. "Minister ordered to stand trial." Wichita Eagle-Beacon, June 1: 1.

    —. 1983. "Slaying victim's wife held." Wichita Eagle-Beacon, November 24: 1.

    —. 1983. "Unanswered questions plague K-177 tragedy." Wichita Eagle-Beacon, November 8: 1.

    Hayes, Jean. 1985. "Jury in bird trial begins deliberations." Wichita Eagle, July 23: 51.

    Hays, Jean. 1985. "Bird's wife described as unhappy." Wichita Eagle, July 12: 15.

    Kraft, Scott. 1986. "‘We Don’t Have These Type of People Out Here’ : Murderous Affair Shocks Kansas Town." Los Angeles Times, March 17.

    —. 2004. "Who Killed Sandy?" Los Angeles Times Magazine, May 2.

    State of Kansas v. Thomas Bird. 1986. 240 Kan. 288 (Supreme Court of Kansas, December 5).

    State of Kansas v. Thomas P. Bird. 1985. 708 P.2d 946 (Supreme Court of Kansas, October 25).

    United Press International. 1985. "At first no one paid uch attention ." United Press International: Domestic News, August 4.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • When it opened in 1894, the Preston School of Industry represented a change in how criminal offenders and wards of the state were treated in American society, shifting towards a more compassionate mission of reform over punishment. However, while the mission may have represented a more progressive approach to reforming young offenders, daily life for the young inmates was often as brutal as it would have been in an adult prison. 

    Thank you to the incredible Dave White of Bring Me The Ax Podcast and 99 Cent Rental for Research!

    References

    California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. 2022. Cemetery Tales Preston holds remains of 18. October 24. Accessed December 22, 2023. https://www.cdcr.ca.gov/insidecdcr/2022/10/24/tales-from-the-cemetery-preston-holds-remains-of-18/.

    Daily News. 1950. "Boys' school housekeeper murdered." Daily News, February 23: 1.

    D'Souza, Karen. 2015. "Castle of shivers." Oakland Tribune, September 13: 67.

    Grandbois, Ruth. 1950. "Housekeep at Preston School found murdered." Stockton Daily Evening Record, February 24: 1.

    —. 1950. "Slaying victim 'like mother' to youths." Stockton Daily Evening Record, February 24: 1.

    Long Beach Press-Telegram. 1950. "3 Ione School Inmates held after slaying ." Long Beach Press-Telegram, February 24: 1.

    Lowery, James F. 1950. "Stained clothes of Ione suspect get blood test." Sacramento Bee, February 25: 1.

    McClatchy Newspaper Service. 1950. "What kind of woman was slain Anna Corbin of Preston?" Sacramento Bee, February 27: 1.

    McClatchy Newspapers Service. 1950. "Witness bares motive behind Preston killing." McClatchy Newspapers Service, June 15: 1.

    —. 1950. "Inmate tells court he saw Preston killing." Sacramento Bee, March 10: 1.

    McClatchy Newspapes Service. 1950. "Employees are cleared in Preston killing." Sacramento Bee, February 28: 1.

    McManis, Sam. 2015. Discoveries: Ione’s Preston Castle opens up about its harsh, haunting past. June 28. Accessed December 21, 2023. https://www.sacbee.com/entertainment/living/travel/sam-mcmanis/article25499146.html.

    Sacramento Bee. 1950. "Chief Preston killing witness changes story." Sacramento Bee, April 6: 41.

    —. 1950. "Murder trial of Eugene Monroe is nearing close." Sacramento Bee, April 28: 1.

    —. 1950. "Preston suspect was grilled in 1947 LA murder." Sacramento Bee, March 6: 1.

    —. 1950. "Prosecutor plans parade of witnesses in Monroe trial." Sacramento Bee, April 26: 10.

    —. 1950. "Youth Authority decides to free Preston inmate." Sacramento Bee, October 20: 1.

    Sacramento Union. 1951. "Eugene Monroe, Preston parole, confesses sex-murder in Tulsa." Sacramento Union, July 28: 1.

    Sacremento Daily Record-Union. 1889. "The reform school." Sacremento Daily Record-Union, February 16: 8.

    San Francisco Examiner. 1894. "Preston School of Industry." San Francisco Examiner, August 6: 3.

    Valley News Service. 1950. "State planning to reopen case against Monroe." Sacramento Union, April 30: 1.

    Wilson, Stanley. 1950. "LA inmate is chief suspect in Ione killing." Sacramento Bee, March 1: 1.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • In the early morning hours of October 31, 1955, millionaire socialite Ann Woodward heard a strange noise in the hallway just beyond her bedroom door in the sprawling estate she shared with her husband, Billy, and their two children. There had been a series of robberies in the wealthy neighborhood that month, so Ann had kept a shotgun next to her bed for safety. Rising from her bed, Ann grabbed the gun and crept towards the door, slowly opening it so as not to attract any attention. Visibility was low in the darkened hallway, but she could see the vague shape of a man moving towards her and without hesitation, Ann raised the shotgun and fired in the direction, striking the figure and cutting him down. With the threat neautralized, Ann moved towards the figure on the floor only to realize she’d shot and killed her husband, Billy Woodward. 

    At least that’s the official version of the story. The investigation moved incredibly quickly, in the way it always seems to for the wealthiest among us, and Ann Woodward was cleared of any wrongdoing in the death of her husband—it was simply an accident. Yet there were many among Ann and Billy’s family and friends who believed Ann had intentionally shot her husband that night in order to prevent him from going forward with a messy divorce that would have brought an end to the glamorous high society lifestyle she spent her entire life working to secure.

    Ann Woodward was never able to escape the rumors and gossip from those she’d once counted as friends, all of which was made exponentially worse by novelist Truman Capote, whose slanderous fiction many believe drove Ann to suicide. Ann’s untimely death meant that many questions would forever go unanswered: did she really kill her husband in order to remain among America’s elite moneymakers?

    Thank you to the amazing Dave White of Bring Me the Ax Podcast for research!

    References

    Associated Press. 1955. "Mrs. Woodward stays in hospital; to miss husband's funeral." Buffalo Evening News, November 1: 10.

    —. 1955. "Mrs. Woodward's father dumbfounded." Buffalo Evening News, November 1: 10.

    —. 1956. "Woodward case burgler sentenced ." Los Angeles Times, February 5: 6.

    Bigart, Homer. 1955. "Woodward left trusts to 2 sons." New York Times, November 10: 36.

    Bracker, Milton. 1955. "Wife kills Woodward, owner of Nashua." New York Times, October 31: 1.

    —. 1955. "Woodward jury finds no crime after widow testifies in shooting." New York Times, November 26: 1.

    —. 1955. "Woodward proweler now admits being on estate at time of killing." New York Times, November 8: 1.

    Braudy, Susan. 1992. This Crazy Thing Called Love. New York, NY: A.A. Knopf.

    Kashner, Sam. 2012. "Capote's Swan Dive." Vanity Fair, November 15.

    Knickerbocker, Cholly. 1955. "Violent scenes marked Woodward marriage." San Francisco Examiner, November 11: 9.

    Montillo, Roseanne. 2022. Deliberate Cruelty: Truman Capote, the Millionaire's Wife, and the Murder of the Century. New York, NY: Atria Books.

    New York Times. 1955. "Prowler dsicusses Woodward case aid." New York Times, November 9: 36.

    Randolph, Nancy. 1955. "N.Y. society shocked by shooting." Los Angeles Times, March 30: 7.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • When Priscilla Davis filed for divorce from her husband, Cullen Davis, in 1974, she had no idea that her actions would have such tragic consequences. Less than two years later, on the same day the divorce was finalized and the terms of the alimony were settled, a man wearing a disguise broke into Priscilla’s home and killed her twelve-year-old daughter, then waited for Priscilla to return. When she arrived a short time later, the intruder said hello to Priscilla and her new boyfriend before shooting them both, wounding Priscilla and killing her companion.

    Cullen Davis was immediately suspected of the murders and taken into custody, leading to one of the most sensational and captivating trials the country had ever seen. The wealthiest man to ever be tried for murder in the United States up to that point, Cullen Davis was said to be the primary influence for the villainous J.R. Ewing, the main antagonist on the hit television series Dallas, and he more than lived up to the role. Davis’s wealth and status allowed him to control the narrative of the trial, which quickly became an indictment of his former wife, who, despite being the victim of a horrible crime, was vilified by the press and the defense as the real villain in the case.

    Although it is nearly five decades in the past, the marriage of Priscilla and Cullen Davis, and the murder trial that followed, are emblematic of many of the issues that the American justice system (and the public) continues to struggle with today including who is and isn’t a victim, and how power and money can control the pursuit and application of justice.

    Thank you to David White, of the Bring Me the Axe podcast, for research assistance

    References

    Brown, Greg. 2016. Texas Tragedy: The Story of Priscilla Davis: A True Story of Money, Murder and Survival. Dallas, TX: CreateSpace.

    Cartwright, Gary. 1977. "Rich Man, Dead Man." Texas Monthly, March 1.

    Cochran, Mike. 1977. "Davis trial: Haynes says Farr target of shooting." Denton Record-Chronicle, October 25: 5.

    Fort Worth Star-Telegram. 1977. "DA's narration to Davis jury detailed but brief." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, August 21: 2.

    —. 1976. "Judge defends bond on Davis." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, August 4: 1.

    Guzzo, Glenn. 1977. "Davis cries tears of joy after acquittal." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, November 18: 1.

    —. 1977. "Davis' fate now in jurors' hands." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, November 17: 1.

    —. 1977. "Final arguments begin." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, November 16: 1.

    —. 1977. "His innocence avowed, Davis doubts provocation." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, July 7: 1.

    —. 1977. "Questioning nets no jurors." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, March 1: 1.

    Hollandsworth, Skip. 2001. "Survivor's gilt: convinced that it was her husband who tried to kill her, the Texas socialite devoted herself to the best revenge." New York Times Magazine, December 30.

    —. 2000. "Blood Will Sell." Texas Monthly, March 1.

    McConal, Jon, and Mark Nelson. 1977. "Few surprised by Davis verdict." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, November 18: 1.

    Moore, Dick. 1976. "Slain man was liked by fans, teammates." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, August 3: 1.

    Moore, Evan. 1976. "Davis jailed without bond." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, August 20: 1.

    —. 1977. "Picture of Priscilla, Rufner not allowed as evidence by judge." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, August 24: 1.

    Stiteler, Rowland. 1976. "Blood-spattered white foyer tells story of slayings." Fort Worth Star-Telegram , August 3: 6.

    —. 1976. "Davis jailed after slayings." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, August 3: 1.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • On the afternoon of September 3, 1878, twenty-two-year-old Mary Stannard d left her home in Madison, Connecticut, telling her father she was going blackberry picking and would be back before dark. When night came and Mary hadn’t returned, her father went out to look for her and eventually found her body by a creek in the woods. The investigation into her murder was truly wild and remains TECHNICALLY unsolved.

    Thank you to the amazing Dave White of Bring Me The Axe Podcast for research!

    References

    Bendici, Ray. 2015. "The CT files: the 'unsolved murder of Mary STAN-ard." Cennecticut Magazine, August 23.

    Foote, William. 1970. "Mary STAN-ard, she was murdered." Hartford Courant, March 5: 16.

    Hartford Courant. 1878. "Hayden re-arrested." Hartford Courant, October 9: 3.

    —. 1878. "Strong circumstantial evidence against a clergyman." Hartford Courant, September 7: 2.

    —. 1878. "The Madison murder." Hartford Courant, September 6: 3.

    Hayden, Herbert. 1880. The Reverend Herbert Hayden: An Autobiography. Hartford, CT: Press of the Plimptron Manufacturing Co.

    New York Times. 1878. "A young woman's ruin and death." New York Times, September 6: 1.

    —. 1878. "Is Rev. Mr. Hayden guilty." New York Times, September 14: 5.

    —. 1879. "Mary STAN-ard's death." New York Times, November 7: 5.

    —. 1878. "Mrs. Hayden's testimony." New York Times, September 21: 1.

    —. 1880. "The Hayden case: beginning of the closing arguments." New York Times, January 15: 5.

    —. 1879. "The long murder trial." New York Times, November 21: 2.

    Pearson, Edmund. 1927. "Mary STAN-ard and the Reverend Mr. Hayden." Vanity Fair, March 01.

    Unknown author. 1879. Poor Mary STAN-ard: A Full and Thrilling Story of the Circumstances Connected with Her Murder. New Haven: Stafford Printing Company.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • Part 2/2 - On March 19, 1969, thirty-eight-year-old Houston socialite Joan Robinson Hill died at Sharpstown General Hospital from what doctors at the time believed was flu-related symptoms. Hill’s body was quickly taken to the mortuary and embalmed before an autopsy could be performed, violating Texas law and undermining any attempts determine the cause of Joan’s death. Nevertheless, Joan’s father, a wealthy oil tycoon, believed his daughter’s death to be a homicide, used his influence to have her remains exhumed and had not one, but two additional autopsies performed to determine the cause of death. 

    Despite conflicting reports from the pathologists regarding a cause of death, Joan’s father was eventually successful in convincing the district attorney that her death was no accident, but was in fact murder committed by her husband, John Hill. After two unsuccessful attempts to convince a grand jury of John’s guilt, the district attorney finally convinced a third grand jury that John Hill had intentionally contributed to Joan’s death and he was charged with “murder by omission,” a first in the history of the Texas courts.

    John Hill was put on trial for the murder of his wife in the winter of 1971, but the jury would never get a chance to weigh in on his guilt or innocence. In September of 1972, after one mistrial and several delays leading up to a re-trial, John Hill was murdered by an intruder who’d broken into his home. Although investigators believed Hill’s murder to have been a robbery gone wrong, many in Houston suspected Joan’s father, believing his son-in-law had evaded justice, had paid to have John Hill killed, leaving the deaths of Joan and John Hill an enduring mystery.

    As always, thank you to the fantastic David White, of Bring Me the Axe Podcast, for research assistance 

    References

    Associated Press. 1971. "Doctor 'hated' first wife." Corpus Christi Times, February 26: 1.

    —. 1972. "Houston doctor slain at home." Corpus Christi Times, September 25: 13.

    —. 1969. "Meningitis said fatal to socialite ." Corpus Christi Times, October 11: 13.

    —. 1971. "Judge calls mistrial in Houston slaying." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, February 27: 12.

    —. 1970. "Panel indicts doctor in death of wife." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, May 23: 3.

    —. 1973. "District judge clamps lid on Houston doctor's murder." Odessa American, April 27: 3.

    —. 1971. "Testimony continues in trial of physician." Odessa American, February 23: 2.

    Gonzalez, J.R. 2009. 40 years later: Joan Robinson Hill. March 19. Accessed November 7, 2023. https://blog.chron.com/bayoucityhistory/2009/03/40-years-later-joan-robinson-hill/.

    New York Times. 1977. "Oilman is cleared in Houston murder of his son-in-law." New YorkTimes, October 22: 1.

    Thompson, Thomas. 1976. Blood and Money: A True Story of Murder, Passion, and Power. New York, NY: Doubleday.

    United Press International. 1980. "Heiress may have been toxic shock victim." United Press International, November 23.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • On March 19, 1969, thirty-eight-year-old Houston socialite Joan Robinson Hill died at Sharpstown General Hospital from what doctors at the time believed was flu-related symptoms. Hill’s body was quickly taken to the mortuary and embalmed before an autopsy could be performed, violating Texas law and undermining any attempts determine the cause of Joan’s death. Nevertheless, Joan’s father, a wealthy oil tycoon, believed his daughter’s death to be a homicide, used his influence to have her remains exhumed and had not one, but two additional autopsies performed to determine the cause of death. 

    Despite conflicting reports from the pathologists regarding a cause of death, Joan’s father was eventually successful in convincing the district attorney that her death was no accident, but was in fact murder committed by her husband, John Hill. After two unsuccessful attempts to convince a grand jury of John’s guilt, the district attorney finally convinced a third grand jury that John Hill had intentionally contributed to Joan’s death and he was charged with “murder by omission,” a first in the history of the Texas courts.

    John Hill was put on trial for the murder of his wife in the winter of 1971, but the jury would never get a chance to weigh in on his guilt or innocence. In September of 1972, after one mistrial and several delays leading up to a re-trial, John Hill was murdered by an intruder who’d broken into his home. Although investigators believed Hill’s murder to have been a robbery gone wrong, many in Houston suspected Joan’s father, believing his son-in-law had evaded justice, had paid to have John Hill killed, leaving the deaths of Joan and John Hill an enduring mystery.

    As always, thank you to the fantastic David White, of Bring Me the Axe Podcast, for research assistance 

    References

    Associated Press. 1971. "Doctor 'hated' first wife." Corpus Christi Times, February 26: 1.

    —. 1972. "Houston doctor slain at home." Corpus Christi Times, September 25: 13.

    —. 1969. "Meningitis said fatal to socialite ." Corpus Christi Times, October 11: 13.

    —. 1971. "Judge calls mistrial in Houston slaying." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, February 27: 12.

    —. 1970. "Panel indicts doctor in death of wife." Fort Worth Star-Telegram, May 23: 3.

    —. 1973. "District judge clamps lid on Houston doctor's murder." Odessa American, April 27: 3.

    —. 1971. "Testimony continues in trial of physician." Odessa American, February 23: 2.

    Gonzalez, J.R. 2009. 40 years later: Joan Robinson Hill. March 19. Accessed November 7, 2023. https://blog.chron.com/bayoucityhistory/2009/03/40-years-later-joan-robinson-hill/.

    New York Times. 1977. "Oilman is cleared in Houston murder of his son-in-law." New YorkTimes, October 22: 1.

    Thompson, Thomas. 1976. Blood and Money: A True Story of Murder, Passion, and Power. New York, NY: Doubleday.

    United Press International. 1980. "Heiress may have been toxic shock victim." United Press International, November 23.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • It’s Listener Tales 81 and you know the drill…..! It’s brought to you by you, for you, from you, and ALL ABOUT YOU! In this installment we have haunted clown sightings, almost run ins with the most notorious serial killers, spooky choirs& creepy men abroad. If you’ve got a listener tale please send it on over to [email protected] with “Listener Tales” somewhere in the subject line :)

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • This episode is a fan favorite that was originally published as Episode 281…

    For this Holiday week, we wanted to bring you a lighter (?) episode, although it’s really not so light at all! Alaina’s kids have gotten super into the Wizard of Oz and so she decided to do dive into the dark happenings during filming. All kinds of atrocities went down and we are pretty confident that you’ll never watch this movie the same! Sorry…. we mean you’re welcome!

    References:

    -https://www.amazon.com/Making-Wizard-Oz-Aljean-Harmetz/dp/1613748329/ref=sr_1_2?crid=TWGV0EMUDT2P&keywords=the+making+of+the+wizard+of+oz+book&qid=1637775119&sprefix=the+making+of+the+wiza%2Caps%2C161&sr=8-2" target="_blank"

    -The Making of the Wizard of Oz By Aljean Harmetz</a> (Be wary that this book is fascinating but uses some outdated language when referencing certain people)

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

  • On May 20, 1947, decorated army veteran Jack Kettlewell and his friend Ronald Barrie barely escaped a devastating housefire at Ronald’s cabin along the Severen River in rural Ontario, Canada. One day later, Jack’s twenty-two-year-old wife, Christina Kettlewell, was discovered dead a short distance from the cabin, lying face down in a pool of shallow water and still wearing the pajamas she had on the night of the fire. During the autopsy, it was discovered that Christina’s lungs were clear of smoke and her body was free of any burns or other signs of violence; rather, as unbelievable as it seemed, the cause of death was drowning. 

    Christina and Jack had married in a secret ceremony held just eight days before the fire, leading many to wonder whether her new husband had something to do with her death. Was it a crime of passion? A calculated murder to cash-in on a life insurance policy? Or was it truly just a tragedy? And what of Ronald Barrie’s presence on the trip? If it was indeed a honeymoon of sorts, why had the young newlyweds brought along a friend? 

    In the months that followed, Christina Kettlewell’s mysterious death captivated the residents of eastern Canada. With each new day, a piece of the puzzle seemed to fall into place, indicating that the mystery might soon be solved. Yet by mid-summer, a police investigation and the coroner’s inquest had failed to provide an explanation for Christina’s death or a satisfactory conclusion to the case. Today, more than seventy-five years later, the death of Christina Kettlewell remains one of Ontario’s most enduring mysteries.

    Thank you to the wonderful David White, of the Bring Me the Axe Podcast, for research assistance!

    References

    Isai, Vjosa. 2017. What happened to Toronto's 'eight-day bride?'. July 4. Accessed November 27, 2023. https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/what-happened-to-toronto-s-eight-day-bride/article_1a09012b-13fa-5931-b512-7cc331d56ed4.html.

    Kingston Whig-Standard. 1947. "Coroner's jury to view place bride died." Kingston Whig-Standard, June 25: 1.

    North Bay Nugget. 1947. "Open verdict is returned in Kettlewell case." North Bay Nugget, June 26: 1.

    Owen Sound Daily Sun-Times. 1947. "Possibility of suicide in drowning of bride investigated by police." Owen Sound Daily Sun-Times, mAY 23: 1.

    Sun Times. 1947. "Open verdict is returned by Kettlewell case jury as no decision reached." Sun Times, June 26: 1.

    —. 1947. "Open verdict is returned by Kettlewell case jury as no decision reached." Sun Times, June 26: 1.

    Toronto Daily Star. 1947. "Police report distrubance before Christina married." Toronto Daily Star, May 28: 2.

    —. 1947. "Suicide notes bride's expert tells inquest." Toronto Daily Star, June 20: 1.

    Windsor Star. 1947. "Police hint at foul play in mystery." Windsor Star, May 22: 1.

    —. 1947. "Probe for missing cash in honeymoon mystery." Windsor Star, May 26: 1.

    —. 1947. "Statement of Ronald Barrie reveals some strange events." Windsor Star, June 21: 8.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.