Episodios

  • Today we're digging deep into the Vault to bring you this slightly alternative view from Dr Oliver Liou. We can get very focused on being high achievers and all round awesomeness, but is that always good for us? In this Vet Vault quickie Oliver talks about the flip side of being exceptional, and how to deal with the fallout of becoming 'too good' at your job. 

  • In this episode we tackle a subject that is not necessarily directly veterinary related, or is at least not limited to our profession, but still a critical topic to discuss because of the impact that it will have on all of us, and more importantly, because of the impact that veterinarians can have on it: climate change.
    If you’ve ever looked around your workplace and thought to yourself: “ This can’t be good for the environment. I really should do something about it.”, or if you are concerned about climate change, but you’re not sure where to start, then this episode is for you. 
    We speak to Ben Cox, a founder and a driving force behind an exciting new charity called Veterinarians for Climate Action. Ben comes from a sustainability, engineering and business background and is passionate about climate change because of the impact it will have on future generations and the natural environment.  He helped to create Veterinarians for Climate Action as his tool for taking action and inspiring others to do so. 
    VfCA’s mission statement is to inspire the veterinary profession to advocate for and achieve climate action within and beyond our industry. This will benefit both our profession and the animals we care for, ensuring a sustainable future for all. 
    In this episode Ben explains to us why we as vets are important in this arena, and how we can be particularly valuable and have a big impact in the push for action on climate change. We talk about what they are doing through the charity; what we can do, including how to have conversations about climate change; what influences the public’s opinion on the matter and how we can change it, and what we can do on a practical level in our own workplaces. 
    Ben is practical, pragmatic and hopeful, and definitely someone who you can put your support behind. 
    Please enjoy, Ben Cox, and get ready to make a change. 
    Check out Ben and his team here (https://www.vfca.org.au/home), and follow them on Facebook. 
    For the episode show notes or to explore  our guests’ favourite books, podcasts and everything else we talk about in the show, click on the webpage link on the episode page wherever you listen to us, or visit the podcast website at https://thevetvault.com/
    If you have a question that you’d like us to answer with the help of our guests you can leave us a voice message by going to our episode page on the anchor app (https://anchor.fm) and hitting the record button, via email at thevetvaultpodcast@gmail.com, or just catch up with us on Instagram. (https://www.instagram.com/thevetvault/) We love to hearing from you!
    If you like what you heard, then please help us to spread the word by subscribing to the podcast (it’s free!), and by telling your friends about us. 

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  • We were introduced to Dr. Dan Markwalder when we interviewed to Dr. Cody Creelman, who kept referring to him as one of the best mentors out there. Seeing as we’re all about mentoring here we knew that we had to have him on the show, and Dr. Dan certainly has the experience to make him an absolute mentoring guru:

    He founded his first hospital at age 28, and has grown that business into an eighteen practice success story with the help of good partnerships and through fantastic mentoring relationships. He still practices in the clinics that he owns, and he is still passionate about mentoring veterinarians of all ages in all aspects of their careers. Dan speaks throughout the United States to veterinarians and practice managers on the importance of developing a culture of mentoring at a practice level, and frequently lectures to both SCVMA and VBMA chapters at numerous veterinary colleges throughout the United States. 

    He also the Mark in Markroy Consulting - a consulting service that offers coaching and workshops on aspects of practice management like leaderships skills, bridging generational gaps the practice, and team culture. Dan’s most recent venture, Vet Mentor Solutions, aims to share the mentoring model that has been so instrumental in assisting many new graduate veterinarians to achieve their individual goals, as well as help them in raising their personal production, with the greater global veterinary community though an on-line mentoring platform (vetmentorsolutions.com) 

    Dan’s insights in this interview on what mentoring actually means, and how we can, and should, apply it in our own workplaces has given me a lot to think about in my own workplace. And if you’ve ever wondered about whether you should consider practice ownership you really need to hear what Dan has to say on the topic. He discusses topics like choosing your business partner, setting the culture of your practice, what it looks like to be a good practice owner, and much much more.

    To see the show notes or to check out our guests’ favourite books, podcasts and everything else we talk about in the show, click on the webpage link on the episode page wherever you listen to us, or visit the podcast website at https://thevetvault.com/.

    If you have a question that you’d like us to answer with the help of our guests you can leave us a voice message by going to our episode page on the anchor app (https://anchor.fm) and hitting the record button, via email at thevetvaultpodcast@gmail.com, or just catch up with us on instagram. (https://www.instagram.com/thevetvault/) We’d love to hear from you!

    And if you like what you hear, then please help us to spread the word by subscribing to the podcast (it’s free!), and by telling your friends about us. 

  • For people who are feeling overwhelmed: that’s normal. One of the main messages I want to get out to the vets is to normalise the enormity and the depth of emotion that they’re going to experience. Because it’s new. And to not pathologise it. 

    We live in a world where when we have an emotion we almost want to give it a Broadway musical: “Why am I feeling sad today? Let’s focus on that sadness.”  But in actual fact - it’s not a healthy way to deal with day tot day emotions. So when people are going to bed and they are reliving what they’ve experienced and they are fatigued and they’re thinking:  “My goodness, I’ve get to get up and face this again tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow…” and on top of that they’ve lost their own properties, or they’re still at risk of loosing their properties.

    To feel overwhelmed - can I just say: A HUNDRED PERCENT NORMAL!

  • Welcome to our third and final episode talking about dealing with trauma, loss and grief in a crisis situation, and specifically as it relates to the bushfire catastrophe that we are currently experiencing in Australia, with our super-star social worker Liz Crowe. In this episode Liz speaks to us about the weeks and months after the firestorm has passed: what happens once the crisis has abated and the world has stopped talking about it, but the victims, and those who went to help them, are left to pick up the pieces and deal with what they had experienced? The advice from this episode goes far beyond this particular situation: Liz gives some invaluable input into burnout and compassion fatigue in everyday life, and how to deal with it. 

    Here are those resources again if you want to read more about Liz' work:

    https://lizcrowe.org/about/

    https://www.stemlynsblog.org/wellbeing-for-the-broken-part-1-liz-crowe-for-st-emlyns/

    https://www.stemlynsblog.org/wellbeing-for-the-broken-part-2-st-emlyns/

    Treatment advice for burn wounds and smoke inhalation: https://www.animalemergencyservice.com.au/news/vetapedia/emergency-burns-info/

    The Australian Veterinary Association Benevolent Fund to provide assistance to affected veterinarians: https://www.ava.com.au/donate/

  • Welcome  to the next installment of our bushfire special series with Liz Crowe. 

    In part two Liz tells us how we can best support someone who is caught up in a challenging situation, like the fires that our Aussie vets and thousands of other workers are currently dealing with. Watching our friends an colleagues give so much of themselves is inspiring, but sometimes we feel powerless to help if we aren’t right there on the front lines. Liz gives us the best answer I’ve heard so far on how we can be useful from afar.

    Here are those resources again for listeners who need help during this challenging time:

    Treatment guidelines for burn wounds and smoke inhalation:  https://www.animalemergencyservice.com.au/news/vetapedia/emergency-burns-info/

    Liz's blog on wellbeing, part one:  https://www.stemlynsblog.org/wellbeing-for-the-broken-part-1-liz-crowe-for-st-emlyns/

    Part two:  https://www.stemlynsblog.org/wellbeing-for-the-broken-part-2-st-emlyns/

    And if you want to help your colleagues financially - The Australian Veterinary Association's Benevolent Fund:  https://www.ava.com.au/donate/

    Liz Crowe is  an Advanced Clinician Social Worker who has worked extensively for 20 years with individuals, families and children impacted by grief, loss, trauma, crisis and bereavement. She’s worked in intensive care, emergency departments, cancer wards and all areas associated with children’s health.  In her current job in a children’s intensive care unit she is exposed daily to death, violence, trauma and illness and is now recognised as one of the most experienced counsellors in this field in Australia. Liz is passionate about assisting the community to understand the breadth of loss and grief and how to support yourself, your children, partners, family and friends during times of change and sadness. 

    https://lizcrowe.org/about/

  • This is a special episode that we’re rushing out as a resource to our colleagues who are caught in the apocalyptic bushfire crisis that Australia is currently experiencing, but also for anyone who wants to support those in the crisis but feel unequipped to do so. Beyond the current crisis - we also believe that the advice from this episode’s spectacular guest will be a valuable resource to anyone who ever finds themselves in a crisis situation, or regularly deals with traumatic situations that puts them at risk of  compassion fatigue, burnout, and dark days in general. 

    Our guest is Liz Crowe. Liz is  an Advanced Clinician Social Worker who has worked extensively for 20 years with individuals, families and children impacted by grief, loss, trauma, crisis and bereavement. She’s worked in intensive care, emergency departments, cancer wards and all areas associated with children’s health.  In her current job in a children’s intensive care unit she is exposed daily to death, violence, trauma and illness and is now recognised as one of the most experienced counsellors in this field in Australia.  Liz is passionate about assisting the community to understand the breadth of loss and grief and how to support yourself, your children, partners, family and friends during times of change and sadness, which is why we really needed to speak to her at this time. 

    As expected from someone with such a depth of knowledge in their field we had a lot to talk about. We wanted to make sure that anyone who is currently in the thick of the action with limited leisure time for things like listening to podcasts could snatch a few moments to listen to this, so we’re deviating from our usual long form format and chopping the podcast into shorter episodes, starting with what to do while you are in the midst of a catastrophe such as this one. 

    A few useful resources:

    Treating burn wounds and smoke inhalation: https://www.animalemergencyservice.com.au/news/vetapedia/emergency-burns-info/

    Liz' blog on dealing with grief and burnout = part one:  https://www.stemlynsblog.org/wellbeing-for-the-broken-part-1-liz-crowe-for-st-emlyns/

    Part two:  https://www.stemlynsblog.org/wellbeing-for-the-broken-part-2-st-emlyns/

    More about Liz:   https://lizcrowe.org/about/

  • Carolyne Crowe worked for 11 years as an equine vet both in the UK and in New Zealand before deciding to shift her energy from primarily helping animals to helping people by becoming  an award winning personal performance coach, mentor, international speaker, researcher and lecturer.She has a Master's degree in Workplace Health and Wellbeing and continues to research this field. She is a master trainer in DISC behavioural profiling, a CPCAB trainer in Stress management and Wellbeing, a certified trainer in Resilience, a Mental Health First Aider, and an Honorary Lecturer of the University of Liverpool. She was awarded “Life Coach of the year 2015” at the International Coaching Awards, became an honorary Fellow of The Coaching Academy in 2016 and a founding member of the Coaching of Excellence accreditation in 2019.  So basically - when it comes to building a fulfilled career in veterinary science, or anywhere for that matter - you'll want to hear what Carolyne has to say.Carolyne is passionate about helping others equip themselves with the tools and strategies to get the most out of their personal and professional lives. After successfully running her coaching and training business for several years, Carolyne now works as a training consultant with the Veterinary Defence Society training team in the UK developing, training and coaching individuals, teams and practices to be the best they can be and to thrive both personally and professionally.
    In 2017 she proved  how much she loves a challenge by running 10 marathons in 10 days raising over £100,000 for the Brooke charity. Not bad for someone who only ran her first marathon in September 2016! Outside of work Carolyne is a wife of a vet, mother of 2 small children and what she describes as “a keen runner’.
    We cover a wide range of topics in our conversation with Carolyne, like some the most common problems that she encounters with her clients and her favourite solutions to these problems, building resilience and self- awareness, why coaching is important and who it’s for, and of course: how to prepare for running 10 marathons in 10 days when you have a business to run and two young kids, and, more importantly, why you’d want to do it in the first place.  Carolyne also answers a tricky listener question about a situation that many of our listeners will have to deal with at some point in their careers.
    To see the show notes or to check out our guests’ favourite books, podcasts and everything else we talk about in the show, click the webpage link on the episode page wherever you listen to us, or visit the podcast website at https://minivetguide.com/podcast/. If you have a question that you’d like us to answer with the help of our guests you can leave us a voice message by going to our episode page on the anchor app (https://anchor.fm) and hitting the record button, via email at thevetvaultpodcast@gmail.com, or just catch up with us on Instagram. (https://www.instagram.com/thevetvault/) We’d love to hear from you! And if you like what you heard, then please help us to spread the word by subscribing to the podcast (it’s free!), and by telling your friends about us.
    More about Carolyne: https://www.carolynecrowe.co.uk
    https://www.vds-training.co.uk
    Carolyne’s ten marathons in ten days challenge: http://www.ten2london.co.uk
    Carolyne’s favourite podcast: Beast of Man  https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/kevin-pietersen-beast-of-man/id1462286114
    Book recommendations 
    ‘Start With Why’,  Simon Sinek:  https://simonsinek.com/product/start-with-why/
    ‘Mindset’, Carol Dweck https://www.amazon.com/Mindset-Psychology-Carol-S-Dweck/dp/0345472322
    ‘Black Box Thinking’, ‘Bounce’, and others, Matthew Syed: https://www.matthewsyed.co.uk
    ‘Drive’, Daniel Pinkhttps://www.danpink.com/drive./




  • Helga Kausel, better known as the Travelling Vet, is best known for her inspirational Instagram account, where she shares her veterinary journey and real life journeys. When Helga is not being the travelling vet she is an equine vet in Germany, and when she is travelling she uses her skills, influence and the money that she generates through her social media accounts to improve animal welfare wherever she can. Check out her incredible adventures and the impact that she’s had at travelling_vet on Instagram, or on her blog, travellingvet.blog. 
    On her blog Helga describes herself as a dreamer, a fighter, and an asshole. In this interview Helga tells us about her journey so far - how she made her career choices, how she built up her confidence as a young vet, about the time she wanted to quit veterinary science, and how she became the travelling vet. We talk about some of her amazing travel experiences, her views on money, narcissism in social media, and how she uses her public profile to do good. Dreamer and fighter for sure, but not a trace of a-hole!
    Please enjoy, Helga Kausel - the Travelling vet. 

    To see the show notes or to check out our guests’ favourite books, podcasts and everything else we talk about in the show, click the webpage link on the episode page wherever you listen to us, or visit the podcast website at https://minivetguide.com/podcast/. 
    If you have a question that you’d like us to answer with the help of our guests you can leave us a voice message by going to our episode page on the anchor app (https://anchor.fm) and hitting the record button, via email at thevetvaultpodcast@gmail.com, or just catch up with us on Instagram. (https://www.instagram.com/thevetvault/) We’d love to hear from you!
    If you like what you heard, then please help us to spread the word by subscribing to the podcast (it’s free!), and by telling your friends about us. 

    More about Helga: https://travellingvet.blog/2018/11/18/who-is-travelling_vet/
    Travelling Vet instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/travelling_vet/?hl=en
    Helga’s fundraising page:  https://www.instagram.com/donate_a_postcard/?hl=en
    Some of the international charities that Helga has worked for: 
    https://www.meruanimalwelfare.org
    https://theculturetrip.com/south-america/brazil/articles/the-10-best-books-by-paulo-coelho-you-must-read/
    Helga’s book recommendations: 
    The Zahir - Paolo Coelho https://www.harpercollins.com/9780060832810/the-zahir/
    John Grisham novels:  https://www.jgrisham.com/books/
    The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/77203.The_Kite_Runner

  • Dr Olivia James is one of the leaders in the field of equine dentistry. She is months away from finishing her  diplomate examinations, which will make her a specialist, and the highest qualified equine dentist in the Southern Hemisphere. Olivia  has worked in veterinary practices in regional Australia both in mixed and equine hospitals since graduating from the University of Sydney with honours in 2003. In 2010, when her second son was just one year old, she  started her own equine practice, sold in 2018 to concentrate  on her studies and start her current business, Australian Veterinary  Equine Dentistry. In this role she travels across Australia to treat  both first opinion and referral dentistry cases. She is also about to launch a very exciting new online education resource for veterinary equine dentistry. 
    Our  conversation with Olivia covers a lot of ground. She gives us advice on  starting your own practice and making it profitable, the importance of  focusing on personal development, how to build of group of peers that  inspires you, and of course she gives us some practical tips on how to  raise children while starting a new practice, studying and even specialising.
    Please enjoy, Dr. Olivia James.

    To see the show notes or to check out our guests’ favourite books, podcasts and everything else we talk about in the show, click on the webpage link on the episode page wherever you listen to us, or visit the podcast website at https://minivetguide.com/podcast/. 
    If you have a question that you’d like us to answer with the help of our guests you can leave us a voice message by going to our episode page on the anchor app (https://anchor.fm) and hitting the record button, via email at thevetvaultpodcast@gmail.com, or just catch up with us on Instagram. (https://www.instagram.com/thevetvault/) We’d love to hear from you!
    If you like what you heard, then please help us to spread the word by subscribing to the podcast  and by telling your friends about us. 

  • Since  starting the podcast we’ve had some amazing feedback from some of our listeners. I love hearing about how other  people are inspired by our guests, but one question that pops up time and  time again is some variation of: “I don’t feel like I can focus on my career, because I have young kids.” And I totally agree - I often feel torn  apart in the tug of war between career and parenting. So  here at the Vet Vault we’ve made it one  of our missions to speak to vets who are finding ways to create fulfilling  careers, while still being engaged parents and husbands or wives, and to  ask them how the hell they do it.
    When we started asking around for some guest ideas of people who seem to have solved this problem, our guest for today was one the first names that popped up: Dr Abbie Elise Tipler BVSc, MANZCVS (Surgery) is a small animal surgeon. She graduated from Massey University in 2005 and soon after graduation discovered her passion for small animal surgery. This took her to London where she worked for several years in a combined general practice/orthopedic referral practice. In 2011 she moved to Sydney and sat her ANZCVS Memberships in Small Animal Surgery and in 2016 was elected as head examiner for Memberships in Small Animal Surgery for the ANZCVS. 
    In 2017 she founded the Small Animal Surgery Discussion Page for world-wide surgery discussion which has over 6500 Veterinary Members. In 2018 she was the recipient of the ANZCVS travel grant for services to the Surgery Chapter. She has been actively involved in charities such as Pets in the Park, Elephants Rhinos People, Greyhound Rescue and Cantoo. Currently, she is a second year surgical resident at Veterinary Specialist Services. She lives in Saint Lucia with her husband and two young children.
    Join us as we find out from Abbie how she managed to create a rewarding career despite the commitments of raising a young family. She tells us about her journey into residency in what is a very competitive environment, how to not limit yourself based on other’s expectations of you, how to go from a nervous surgeon to a total surgical boss, and much much more. 



  • For this episode we're trying something new. We've had so many valuable insights from our guests that we thought it would be well worth it to review some of our favourite bits. Join us as we dig deeper into  the topics that we think can make a big impact on your career. 

    In this episode we explore some important themes from Dr Oliver Liyou, our guest from episode 4.  Oliver shared some hard-earned wisdom that can be career-, or even life-saving . If you missed Oliver the first time, or if you need a refresher, please join us as we review Oliver's 7 rules for surviving veterinary science. 

  • When we started organising this episode with our guest he was neck-deep, or shall we say shoulder-deep, into clinical cow practice. However, the last few weeks have seen some major changes in the life of Dr. Cody Creelman, Cow Vet. 
    Up until about 3 weeks before we recorded this episode Cody Creelman was a veterinarian, multiple practice owner, and digital storyteller based in Alberta, Canada. Cody shares his story in real-time on social media by creating entertaining and educational videos of his daily adventures. With over 20 million video views, he has created a very loyal following of ranchers, veterinary professionals, and the general public, and it's easy to see why: his videos are tonnes of fun, and his can-do positive attitude towards work is truly inspiring. 
    So it was a total shock to his fans (and to anyone trying to research him for a podcast!) when he announced that he was quitting clinical work and pursuing new adventures. 
    Join us for an insightful conversation about change, passion, fun, fear, and to hear what the future holds for Dr Cody Creelman. Enjoy!

  • Dr. Justine Lee, the one and only VETgirl, is best known for the hugely popular on-line veterinary education resources that she produces through the vet girl on the run website, podcast, and pretty much anywhere where you find your continuing education. 
    Currently, Dr. Lee is one of approximately 450 board certified veterinary specialists world wide in emergency and critical care, and is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care. She is also board-certified in toxicology and is a Diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology. She’s been published in numerous veterinary journals and books, and has been aired on radio and television to promote preventative medicine, animal health, and the overall well-being of pets. 
    Justine is the author of two humorous pet reference books, entitled It’s a Dog’s Life… but It’s Your Carpet and It’s a Cat’s World… You Just Live In It, and has co-edited and co-authored Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology (Wiley-Blackwell 2011). She is one of the editors for the Veterinary Clinics of North America Small Animal Emergency Medicine textbook. (Elsevier 2013).
    She has been a regular recipient of Speaker of the Year Awards for her talks on emergency, critical care, and toxicology, and she was the co-host and veterinary analyst on Nat Geo Wild‘s Animal ER LIVE. Dr. Lee still works as a criticalist at Animal Emergency & Referral Center, a specialty referral hospital in the Twin Cities, Minnesota.  And because she wasn’t quite busy enough, 3 years ago she became a mom. So how in the world does she do all of this?!
    Join us in our conversation with this whirlwind of efficiency and impact as she shares with us her ideas about career, parenting , money, time management and much, much more. 

  • I’ve been a big fan of guest for today’s episode ever since seeing him deliver a keynote speech at a big-ticket vet conference. I knew immediately that I wanted to hear more about what he had to say. His message resonated strongly with me personally, and with the entire audience of vets there that day. It’s a message that we here at the Vet Vault think will be very valuable to all of you, our listeners, so we were thrilled when he agreed to spend some time with us. 

    Nigel Marsh is a Management consultant, communications specialist, author  and entrepreneur. 

    He is best known for his creative pursuits. As well as the author of three books – Fat, Forty and Fired, Overworked and Underlaid  and Fit, Fifty and Fired-Up – he is also the co-founder of Earth Hour and the founder of the Sydney Skinny. Fat, Forty and Fired is currently being developed into a major TV series. He also has a hit podcast of his own called 'The Five Of My Life.'

    The other side to Nigel’s career is his 30+ years experience in the commercial sector. Over that time Nigel has worked with a huge variety of organisations. From the highest profile (McDonalds, Canon, Pepsi, P&G, Virgin, Mars, Fiat, Colgate), to national governments and local enterprises. Whether dealing with big business issues or social engineering, Nigel has provided strategic counsel and impressive results in almost every category imaginable.

    Highly in demand as a public speaker Nigel travels the globe regularly giving speeches to major corporations on both his business and personal views. His TED speech on work/life balance remains the most viewed ever given outside of America with well over four million hits. 

    And this,  dear listeners, is why we are talking to Nigel on our veterinary podcast: because us vets are not always that great at finding that elusive work life balance. We’ve had some interesting discussions with other guests on this podcast on this topic: what is work life balance, does it even exist, and is it something that we should be pursuing?

    So we’ve called in the big guns: please join us in this highly insightful discussion all about balance and finding meaning in your career with one of today's leading thinkers on the topic.

  • Most vets would agree that excellent communication skills are one of the most important tools that we need to develop for a happy veterinary career, and it's a topic that we've always wanted to feature here, so we were thrilled when one of the leading minds in veterinary communication training agreed to join us on the Vet Vault.
    Cindy Adams is a Professor in the Department of Veterinary Clinical and Diagnostic Sciences at the University of Calgary, where she teaches in the Clinical Communication and Professional Skills programs. She works to improve communication practices in veterinary medicine and education. Professor Adams has developed evidence-based communication curricula and methods for teaching, learning and evaluating communication skills across North America, UK, and Australia. Today her work forms the basis for communications skills training in many leading vet schools. Her co-authored book: 'Skills for Communicating in Veterinary Medicine,' was released in 2016 and has earned widespread recognition in veterinary medical practice and education around the globe.
    In this episode Cindy tells us why we really need to increase our efforts in improving our communication skills, how to rapidly gain client trust, and how to set yourself up for the perfect consult.  I guarantee you that this is not just for new grads: it doesn’t matter where you are in your vet career - you are bound to learn something new here. 
    We talk about agenda setting, listening, perceptual skills and how to have those difficult conversations about money, and Cindy answers a few burning listener questions about tricky communication situations. 
    Make sure to check out the show notes for the resources that Cindy mentions in the episode. There’s some very useful information on talking about money, discussing medical errors and how to run internal training programs for better communication.


  • One of our criteria for selecting guests here at the vet vault is to find people from across varied and interesting parts of our profession to showcase all doors that can open to you with your veterinary degree. Well, today’s guest is the poster boy for veterinary career diversity!

    Dr Guy Weerasinghe has covered more ground in the veterinary profession than many of us will do in a lifetime. He’s been in diary vet in New Zealand, a small animal shelter vet for the RSPCA - Australia’s largest veterinary charity, he’s worked in government doing field surveillance and policy, and has spent time in general small animal practice.

    During this time he gained a masters degree in Veterinary Public Health, and then became a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Preventative Medicine: in other words - he’s a certified Veterinary Public Health specialist.

    While he was doing all of this he co-founded an online employment agency, served as the President of Australian Veterinarians in Public Health, was a branch president for the Australian Veterinary Association, co-authored the AVA’s official position statement on climate change, and became a regular speaker at a range of global conferences on the subjects of zoonoses and preventative medicine.

    A career like this does not go unnoticed, and Guy was elected as the World Small Animal Veterinary Associations’ young veterinarian of the year for 2018.

    He is currently a veterinary officer with the Northern Australia Quarantine Strategy under the Department of Agriculture - in other words: he’s a Veterinary Public heath government vet, and, to top off a big decade, he became a dad 18 months ago.

    All of this in less than 10 years! As you can imagine - we had a lot to talk about.

    Join us to hear about how to take off your blinkers to be able to see all the opportunities that are out there for vets, about how to recognise your limitations and identify your skills, and about the joy of dealing with clients, even when they don’t like you!
    Guy also tells us about the pathway into a career in veterinary public health, and of course what life as a government vet is like, and much much more.

    Please enjoy - Dr Guy Weerasinghe.


  • We’ve always known that as part of our guest list we wanted to talk to vets from outside of clinical practice to provide us with some insights about parts of the profession that neither of us knows anything about. When it came to choosing who we should interview from the world of industry, today's guest was at the top of both of our lists. 
    Dr. Mina Hamilton is a smiling bundle of energy and enthusiasm who took her talents out of clinical practice and into life as an industry vet a few years ago when she decided to work for one of the leading pet food companies. When you watch Dr. Mina doing her thing at work you’re immediately struck by how much she makes it look like a lot of fun, which is exactly why we wanted to talk to her. We wanted to find out if it really is fun, and dig a bit into the whys, the hows, and the pros and cons. 
    Our conversation with Mina covers a wide range of topics. We talk about how you know whether or not a job is for you, about making the decision to stay or go in your job, and how to approach leaving when it is time to move on. Mina tells us what she loves about life as a technical vet, about the skills she’s learned in her role, about how to break bad habits, why holidays are so important, and much much more

  • James Greenwood is a practicing veterinary surgeon living and working in Bristol in the UK.  Originally from a farming family in Yorkshire, James inherited the family trait and devoted himself to a life spent in the company of animals. Since graduating from Bristol University in 2007, James has worked in mixed, equine and then for the last few years in companion animal practice. 

    Throughout his life he has shared his passion for science with his passion for art.  Although taught originally to paint, James’ creativity has developed into a deep love for ceramics.  He was invited to compete on the first series of BBC2’s 'The Great Pottery Throwdown’, which led to further television work, including the hit CBBC children's television series 'The Pets Factor'.  He has also developed his own ceramics business, writes for various platforms and delivers talks on how his passion for science and art have influenced his life.

    Gerardo spent the day with James and Oliver, the famous one-eyed Labrador, in their home. We had a great time picking his brain about his early work experiences, about finding himself out of his depth and dealing with imposter syndrome, and how he tries to achieve that ever-elusive balanced life. He tells us how he took stock of his career and how he made veterinary science work for him. We also talk about competence, confidence and courage, his life as a TV vet, and the absolute necessity of having things in your life that you love doing. 

    We had a lot of fun recording this episode, and I think you’ll have the same experience listening to James’ with his infectious enthusiasm.

    Please enjoy - Dr James Greenwood.