Episodios

  • The US has been convulsed by nationwide protests over the death of an African-American man in police custody. George Floyd, 46, died after being arrested outside a shop in Minneapolis, Minnesota. But what are black parents here saying to their youngsters about some of the images coming from America and about the protests about racism in the UK? We hear from parents Teiko Dornor, Ama Ocansey and Iesha Small.

    We hear from Carol Cooper, a diversity lead within the NHS, about race issues in the nursing profession and the way that race is being responded to as a risk factor as the NHS tackles Covid-19.

    How are our attitudes towards dating changing as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic? Has it changed how people feel about meeting prospective partners in real life – now couples can meet for physically distanced dating? We hear from listeners Katie, Rachael and Gina and from Oloni a sex and relationship content creator and Zoe Strimpel the author of Seeking Love in Modern Britain.

    The physicist and oceanographer Dr Helen Czerski tells us about her documentary Ocean Autopsy on BBC Four.

    We hear how disabled women, who are shielding at home because they are considered ‘extrememely clinical vulnerable’ to Covid-19, are finding this experience. Katie Pennick talks to Fi Anderson, Sarabajaya Kumar and Amy Kavanagh.

    And ‘The Other One’ is new comedy about a girl called Catherine Walcott. And another girl called Catherine Walcott. Half-sisters who had no idea the other existed until their father died. We hear from the creator Holly Walsh and one of the stars taking on the role of Catherine - Ellie White.

    Presented by Jenni Murray
    Produced by Rabeka Nurmahomed

  • Carol Cooper was awarded Nursing’s Diversity and Inclusion Champion of the Year award in 2019, she is a Regional NHS Head of equality, diversity and human rights and is the a Royal College of Nursing expert lead for BME Suicide Awareness, Equality, Diversity and Human Rights. She is also a Registered Nurse.
    She talks to Jenni Murray about race issues in the nursing profession and the way it's being responded to as a risk factor, as the NHS tackles Covid-19.

    More in our series celebrating the women who get things done – the Troupers. Today, Louise Kershaw, the treasurer of the Flixton Social Lites WI in Cheshire

    Plus ahead of World Oceans Day on Monday, the physicist, oceanographer and bubbles enthusiast, Dr Helen Czerski, talks about her time on board the Pelagia, a Dutch Oceanographic research vessel and her mission to perform a comprehensive health check on the North Sea.

    And as we celebrate Desert Island Discs Day on Radio 4, Danelle Pettman tells us about the track that’s made all the difference to her life in lock down.


    Presenter Jenni Murray
    Producer Beverley Purcell

    Guest; Carol Cooper
    Guest; Louise Kershaw
    Guest; Dr Helen Czerski,
    Guest; Danelle Pettman

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  • As we move to ease lockdown restrictions in this country, and look ahead to the “new normal”, there are a large number of people who are still very much in lockdown. Many people with medical conditions that make them “extremely clinically vulnerable” to COVID-19 are “shielding” for a minimum of 12 weeks. Shielding means staying in your home and not leaving for any reason, not even for exercise or to get food. How are disabled women finding this experience, and are they getting the support they need? Katie Pennick is a disability activist and journalist. She spoke to three other disabled women – Fi Anderson, Sarabajaya Kumar and Amy Kavanagh - to see how they have been affected.

    The next in our series celebrating the women who get things done – the Troupers. They are very bad at blowing their own trumpets so we are doing it for them. Mairi MacLean was born in the village of Morar in the Scottish Highlands. She has been campaigning for years to provide somewhere to play for the local children. Her friend Alison Stewart is keen she gets recognition for her efforts.

    And the rape and murder of a 22 year old microbiology student in a church in Benin City Nigeria has caused outrage across the country. Uwaila Omozuwa, who was using the church as a quiet place to study, was rushed to hospital after the attack but died last Saturday. A march protesting her death took place in Benin on Monday and #JusticeforUwa has been trending on Twitter. Amnesty International says that Nigeria government’s response to rape continues to be woefully inadequate. So what needs to be done to prevent sexual violence against women in the country? Jenni is joined by Osai Ojigho, Country Director of Amnesty International in Nigeria.

  • While the world has gone into lockdown and economies have crashed, one type of business has been seeing double-digit growth – direct selling. Independent consultants for big names such as Body Shop at Home, Forever Living, Avon, Usborne Books at Home and Arbonne have been reporting huge increases in sales and recruitment in response to regular shops closing their doors. But while proponents of ‘multi-level marketing’ or ‘direct to consumer’ selling say it provides an opportunity for women to earn money on their own terms, critics say that the business model sits precariously close to being a pyramid scheme. So what do women need to know? Jenni talks to Susannah Schofield, the DG of the Direct Selling Association; Hannah Martin of the Talented Ladies Club; and Clare from Hertfordshire, who talks about her experience of working in the industry.

    Meg Learmonth was just 18 when she was appointed drummer for the Stormzy collaborator Mura Masa. She describes how drumming was “love at first hit”, the tale behind her broken foot, touring before lockdown and her part in a 21 day drumming marathon to raise money for the NHS. Meg's 12 hour drumming shift is being streamed this Thursday, 4th June.

    What is it like coping with lockdown while living with an eating disorder? For today’s Woman’s Hour Corona Diaries, listener Jennie talks about her experience – including how being forced to stay at home has led to her making positive steps towards recovery.

    The Other One is new comedy on BBC1. It’s all about a girl called Catherine Walcott. And another girl called Catherine Walcott. Half-sisters who had no idea the other existed until their father died. Jenni talks to its creator Holly Walsh and one of the stars taking on the role of Catherine - Ellie White.

    Presented by Jenni Murray
    Produced by Jane Thurlow

    Interviewed guest: Susannah Schofield
    Interviewed guest: Hannah Martin
    Interviewed guest: Meg Learmonth
    Interviewed guest: Holly Walsh
    Interviewed guest: Ellie White

  • The US has been convulsed by nationwide protests over the death of an African-American man in police custody. George Floyd, 46, died after being arrested by police outside a shop in Minneapolis, Minnesota. But what are black parents here saying to their youngsters about some of the images coming from America, such as the arrest footage itself, then the violent demonstrations and the angry confrontations between protesters and the police? And how does what happens there relate to how things are here?

    Could Neanderthal genes be influencing the fertility of modern humans? New research shows that one in three women in Europe have inherited sections of Neanderthal DNA that make them have fewer bleedings during pregnancy, fewer miscarriages and give birth to more children. Dr Hugo Zeberg from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany explains what it might mean for future fertility research.

    How are attitudes towards dating changing as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic? Has it changed how people feel about meeting prospective partners in real life? And now couples can meet for physically distanced dating, how confident will people feel about getting physically intimate once restrictions are lifted further? Zoe Strimpel is the author of Seeking Love in Modern Britain: Gender, Dating and the Rise of ‘the Single’. Oloni is a sex and relationships content creator.

    Coronavirus has made visible an often forgotten group of people – volunteers. Thousands have signed up to help the NHS, local residents’ groups have got together to help those who can’t get to the shops, or to call people who might be experiencing severe isolation. Before lockdown, Woman’s Hour began interviewing women who volunteered in all sorts of areas – from community cafes to food banks and working with the homeless. They're women who see a gap or a problem to be solved, and just get on with it – Troupers. They told their stories to Laura Thomas. Today it’s the turn of Sandy Collver, a volunteer nurse with St Johns Ambulance Sussex Homeless Service.

  • More from our series that celebrates the women who get things done – the Troupers. They're very bad at blowing their own trumpets so we're doing it for them. Today we hear from Annie Taylor and Wendy Robinson the founders of the Profanity Embroidery Group in Whitstable.

    After building up credit card debt of £25,000 Clare Seal decided she had to do something drastic to deal with it. She set up an Instagram account to make herself accountable. Posting anonymously she shared her story and offered advice and solidarity to a growing community of people. She’s now written a book with tips and advice for others in a similar situation. It’s called Real Life Money: an honest guide to taking control of your finances

    Plus two midwives from Kent Kent midwives - Sally Sidhu and Jan Gatehouse - who've just an award for their work on promoting colostrum tell Jane all about the benefits of so called "liquid gold" especially for premature babies.

    And as some children in England return to school how do you deal with a child who still needs to be shielded.

    Presenter Jane Garvey
    Producer Beverley Purcell

    Guest; Annie Taylor
    Guest; Wendy Robinson
    Guest; Clare Seal
    Guest; Sally Sidhu
    Guest; Jan Gatehouse

  • An editorial in the British Medical Journal reported that one in five harmful and dependent drinkers got the help they needed, and now the proportion will be lower. How do you cope with an alcohol problem under lockdown? We hear the experience of a listener, the journalist Catherine Renton who has been sober for over 3 years, and from Julia Sinclair, professor of Addiction Psychiatry, University of Southampton and consultant in alcohol addiction. She’s also chair of the Royal College of Psychiatry’s addiction faculty.

    It is fifty years since the Equal Pay Act became law. However, it’s proved tricky over the years for women to find out what their male comparators were earning. It’s also proved tricky for women without financial and legal support to use the law. However, cases have been brought over the years and as the law has been strengthened. Frances O’Grady, General Secretary of the TUC and Jane Hannon, Employment partner at the law firm DLA Piper discuss.

    The writer Michele Roberts discusses her memoir Negative Capability - written after the rejection of a novel by her publisher caused hurt and depression.

    Lizzie tells her story of giving birth during lockdown. We also hear from the obstetrician Dr Kenga Sivarajah.

    Council cuts have meant that there are 50% fewer public toilets than a decade ago. Coronavirus has caused even more closures – albeit temporarily. But where does that leave people who need urgent access to the loo? Jo Umbers from the Bladder and Bowel community explains how this issue is affecting women of all ages. Raymond Martin, from the British Toilet Association, discusses the economic and health importance of public toilets in a post-Covid world.

    Jackie Kay, the National Poet for Scotland, discusses her new online poetry and music festival Makar to Makar, which is streaming via the National Theatre of Scotland's YouTube channel. We also hear poetry from Gerda Stevenson and music from Claire Brown, who are both performing in the festival.

    Presenter: Jane Garvey
    Producer: Dianne McGregor

  • It’s fifty years since the Equal Pay Act became law, though employers were given a couple of years to prepare for the change to take effect. The legislation followed the strike of a group of women machinists at the Ford factory in Dagenham who wanted to be paid just as a man would for doing skilled work. It set out that an individual can claim equal pay for work of equal value. However, it’s proved tricky over the years for women to find out what their male comparators were earning. It’s also proved tricky for women without financial and legal support to use the law. However, cases have been brought over the years and as the law has been strengthened. Last year, Glasgow City Council agreed to pay out a reported £548 million in compensation to thousands of women who were paid less than men working in jobs on the same grade. Jane is joined by Frances O’Grady, General Secretary of the TUC and by Jane Hannon, Employment partner at the law firm DLA Piper

    Health visiting is one of those professions that most people think is a bit of a non-job. After 40 years in the NHS and 30 as a health visitor, Rachael Hearson tells us why this is not the case. She’s written about her experiences and explains how the role has changed and why it’s needed more now than ever before. Her book is called Handle With Care.

    Public toilets have been a well-known victim of council cuts, leaving the UK with 50% fewer toilets than a decade ago. Coronavirus has caused even more closures – albeit temporarily. But where does that leave people who need urgent access to the loo? Jo Umbers from the Bladder and Bowel community explains how this issue is affecting women of all ages. Raymond Martin, from the British Toilet Association, discusses the economic and health importance of public toilets in a post-Covid world.

    Producer: Louise Corley
    Editor: Karen Dalziel

  • Last week an editorial in the BMJ reported that before Covid-19 only one in five harmful and dependent drinkers got the help they needed, and now the proportion will be lower. There is concern for those struggling with dependence and those on the brink of dependence. How do you cope with an alcohol problem under lockdown? And what support is out there? We hear the experience of a listener, the journalist Catherine Renton who has been sober for over 3 years and from Julia Sinclair, professor of Addiction Psychiatry, University of Southampton and consultant in alcohol addiction. She’s also chair of the Royal College of Psychiatry’s addiction faculty.

    Jenny Colgan's latest novel is called Five Hundred Miles From You. It's about a nurse in London and a nurse in the Scottish Highlands. It explores everything they've seen in their careers and whether or not they can help each other.

    Coronavirus has made visible a group of people who were often invisible – volunteers. Thousands of people signed up to help the NHS as a volunteer. Local residents’ groups have got together to help those who can’t get to the shops, or to call people who might be experiencing severe isolation. Before lockdown, Woman’s Hour began interviewing women who volunteered in all sorts of areas – community cafes, at food banks, working with the homeless. Women who see a gap, or a problem to be solved, and just get on with it – Troopers. They told their stories to Laura Thomas. Today Annie Taylor and Wendy Robinson, the founders of the Profanity Embroidery Group in Whitstable.

    How do authors cope with the rejection of the books they are writing? Struggling after her latest novel was rejected by publishers Michèle Roberts decided to write down everything that had happened. In the resulting memoir of a year, Negative Capability, Michèle reckons with the hurt and depression caused by the rejection. She rewrites and edits her novel, reconnects with and loses treasured friends, ultimately finding acceptance and understanding.

    Presented by Jenni Murray
    Produced by Sarah Crawley
    Interviewed guest: Catherine Renton
    Interviewed guest: Julia Sinclair
    Interviewed guest: Jenny Colgan
    Interviewed guest: Annie Taylor
    Interviewed guest: Wendy Robinson
    Interviewed guest: Michèle Roberts
    Reporter: Laura Thomas

  • The UK cleaning sector is worth almost £50bn a year to the country’s economy. It employs more than 900,000 people, mostly women. Right now, many are vulnerable. Some feel they won't be able to stop working if they fall ill or have to self- isolate because they can't afford it. Jenni speaks to Katy, a cleaner. Also Maria Gonzalez who's an employment barrister and Janet Macleod who's a Unite representative

    Cassa Pancho set up Ballet Black twenty years ago. It's a professional ballet company for Black and Asian dancers, and from the start its aim was to make the dance world more diverse. As well as Cassa, we also talk to Cira Robinson who performed with Stormzy at last year's Glastonbury. Tonight Ballet Black is part of a new BBC TV series called Danceworks.

    Jackie Kay, the National Poet for Scotland, also known as Makar, discusses her new online poetry and music festival. It's called Makar to Makar and streams via the National Theatre of Scotland's YouTube channel. We also hear from Gerda Stevenson who's a writer, actor, director and singer and is on Jackie's show, plus the singer Claire Brown, who performs a beautiful, traditional Scottish song live.

  • TROOPERS is a new series of ours starting today. It's about the women in our communities who get things done, and many of them are volunteers. We begin with Margaret Johnson who works as a volunteer at Chester Storyhouse which is a cinema, theatre and library. She runs the Chatter and Natter group.

    We've got more on the Dominic Cummings situation and his trip to Durham. Katy Balls from the Spectator and Helen Lewis from the Atlantic discuss things said in last night's press conference which might have leapt out for women especially.

    Following on from yesterday's programme about having a baby during lockdown, today we talk about what postnatal support is there for you. We hear from Linzy Thurlaway who's a midwife, antenatal educator and also runs postnatal and baby massage courses. She founded a Facebook group called Antenatal and Postnatal Education and Support North East.

    The Sunday Times Rich List 2020 includes a record number of women but it's still only 150 out of 1000 people. The number from BAME backgrounds is even lower. We speak to Annabelle Williams, the author of Why Women Are Poorer Than Men and What We Can Do About It.

  • We hear from you about what it’s like to be pregnant, give birth and look after a new baby in the Covid-19 lockdown.

    Antenatal, labour and post-natal care has had to transform in the last two months, in order to combat the virus. Pregnant women are considered a vulnerable group to Covid and are recommended to self-isolate for their third trimester. Routine face-to-face appointments have been reduced and more is being done by phone. The way you give birth may have had to change, and partners can no longer stay on labour wards beyond the birth itself. And of course for new parents, family and friends haven’t been able to visit in person.

    What has all this meant for you? As well as the challenges, have there been any unexpected upsides? Jane is joined by midwife Leah Hazard and obstetrician Dr Kenga Sivarajah to hear your stories.

    Presenter: Jane Garvey
    Producer: Sarah Crawley
    Interviewed Guest: Leah Hazard
    Interviewed Guest: Dr Kenga Sivarajah
    Interviewed Guest: Ibukun Fisher
    Interviewed Guest: Elsa Rickett-Trueman
    Interviewed Guest: Laura le Masurier
    Interviewed Guest: Kate Duncan
    Interviewed Guest: Lizzie Williams
    Interviewed Guest: Frankie Eshun

  • The soprano Laura Wright tells us about her new single released with The Choir of Royal Holloway, University of London to mark Mental Health Awareness week.

    Baroness Doreen Lawrence discusses why the Labour Party are conducting its own enquiry into why people from black, Asian and minority ethnic communities are more than four times more likely to die as a result of Covid-19 than their white counterparts.

    Two twenty-somethingsJackie Adedeji and Erin Bradshaw tell us how life has changed for them since the pandemic began.

    The author Glennon Doyle tells us about her book untamed which explains why we should all listen to and trust the voice deep inside us.

    Should maternity leave be extended because of the lockdown? The parents of a 6 month old have had more than 200 thousand signatures to a petition asking the government to extend it by three months. We hear from James one of the parents who started the petition and from Cheryl Adams the Executive director of the Institute of Health Visiting on the difficulties faced by new parents at this time.

    Professor Marion Turner an expert on medieval England tells us why The Plague led to increased wages, greater employment, more migration to towns and, ultimately, to greater independence for women.

    What makes someone want to go to see the same musical at the theatre time and time again? We hear from documentary maker Mark Dooley about his film, Repeat Attenders – which follows some of musical theatre’s superfans – including Gudrun Mangel a huge fan of Starlight Express.

    Presenter: Jenni Murray
    Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
    Editor: Lucinda Montefiore

  • The soprano Laura Wright first came to prominence when she won the BBC Radio 2 Young Chorister of the Year in 2005 aged just 15. A lover of sport, she’s well known for her performances at huge sporting events from the FA Cup Final, British Grand Prix, Invictus Games and being England Rugby team’s first ever official anthem singer. She tells Jenni how during lockdown she has been using her voice by working with organisations and charities to address the challenges of isolation. To mark Mental Health Awareness week, she’s released a new single with The Choir of Royal Holloway, University of London in aid of charity.

    Could oestrogen provide some kind of protection against Covid-19? Dr Louise Newson is a GP and menopause specialist. She is working closely with NHS England to see whether women having periods or taking hormonal therapies like the pill and HRT are protected in some way.
    Covid Symptom Study: https://covid.joinzoe.com/

    Professor Heather Viles has been awarded the Royal Geographical Society's prestigious Founder's Medal for her excellence in establishing the field of bio-geomorphology - the scientific study of the physical landscape, and how plants and animals help with those process. She joins Jenni to discuss her career: from researching the contribution of acid rain to the deterioration of English cathedrals, to studying black slime growing on rocks at the Aldabra Atoll in the Seychelles.

    We know that the COVID-19 pandemic has had an enormous impact on the global economy. One area that has been hit particularly hard is the fashion industry. What will be the long term impact and how is Coronavirus forcing us to think differently about fashion? Kenya Hunt is the Fashion Director at Grazia UK. Annie Clarke is a merchandise manager.

    Presenter - Jenni Murray
    Producer - Clare Walker

    Guest - Laura Wright
    Guest - Dr Louise Newson
    Guest - Heather Viles
    Guest - Kenya Hunt
    Guest - Annie Clarke

  • Baroness Doreen Lawrence, Labour’s race relations adviser.

    What will be the long term impact of Covid-19 on women in the workforce?

    Plus as just over 400 prisoners and more than 500 prison staff in England and Wales have tested positive for the virus, how's the pandemic affected the way prison and probation officers carry out their work. We hear from Anita, who’s a prison officer at a male young offenders institute and Ellen who’s a probation officer in Leicester.

    And Jenni talks to the best selling author Glennon Doyle who poses the question" Who were you before the world told you who to be?" in her new book "Untamed"

    Presenter Jenni Murray
    Producer Beverley Purcell

    Guest; Baroness Doreen Lawrence
    Guest; Glennon Doyle
    Guest; Sam Smethers
    Guest; Anna Ritchie Allan
    Guest; Anita
    Guest; Ellen

  • As part of Mental Health Awareness Week, we look at why it’s important to discuss mental health and trauma with young people. The Mental Health Foundation reports that 70% of children and young people who experience a mental health problem have not had appropriate interventions at a sufficiently early age. Why does this matter and what impact can it have on a child’s progression and adulthood? Ebinehita Iyere is a youth practitioner and works with young people who have experienced trauma or grown up in difficult circumstances. Anneli Roberts is a mental health campaigner and blogger.

    Could Covid-19 lead to the end of the some girls' right to an education? Room to Read is a global NGO working in 16 countries supporting literacy programmes and girls in secondary education. Sarah Myers Cornaby , Senior Development Director for Europe and Africa says many of the thousands of girls they mentor may never return to school after the pandemic.

    Woman’s Hour Corona Diaries are creating a unique social record of the thoughts and experiences of women during this extraordinary time. Today listener Polly, who lives in Normandy tells us how her daily online musings help her keep in touch with friends and family back home.

    The Plague in the 14th century took millions of lives. But those who survived led to increased wages, higher employment, migration to towns and, ultimately, to greater independence for women. Professor Marion Turner teaches at Jesus College, University of Oxford and is an expert on medieval England and argues that pandemics and major unexpected events have had some positive consequences.

    Presented by Jenni Murray
    Produced by Jane Thurlow

    Interviewed guest: Ebinehita Iyere
    Interviewed guest: Anneli Roberts
    Interviewed guest: Sarah Myers Cornaby
    Interviewed guest: Marion Turner

  • The parents of a six month old have set up a petition asking the government to extend maternity leave by an extra three months. They believe that the lockdown has meant parents have missed out on the usual things you’d do on maternity, putting them at a disadvantage. There’s already been a parliamentary Q&A about this, and the signatures are still coming in. It’s not know yet whether it’ll be debated in the House of Commons but there will be another Q&A session on Thursday this week. Jane discusses the arguments with the petition's originator.

    After the summer half term holiday, some children will be returning to school. Those in reception and years 1,6, 10 and 12 will be the first to be welcomed back to the classroom in just under two weeks’ time. Many headteachers have begun speaking to parents about their concerns and their likely decision. We discuss the issues that parents are having to weigh up and the pressures that they face.

    In her new book of short stories ‘The Ministry of Guidance and Other Stories’, Golnoosh Nour shares the rich and varied experiences of queer Iranians. She talks to Jane about how her writing was inspired by interviews with her friends, and how she wanted to depict strong Iranian women to counteract their regular portrayal as victims.

    Samaritans volunteers have always been there, 24 hours a day, to listen to people in crisis. But how are they coping with the added strain of coronavirus? Listener Anne from Folkestone talks about her experience for today’s Woman’s Hour Corona Diary.

    Even before lockdown, younger people were turning to gardening in their droves – filling their Instagram feeds with beautifully tended houseplants and waxing lyrical about the therapeutic effects. But now we’re all housebound, more people might be tempted to transform their surroundings. But how easy is it to get gardening for the first time? Alice Vincent and Claire Ratinon give us their advice. Alice is a recent convert, she gardens on a balcony in London and her real time gardening audiobook “Seeds from Scratch” comes out this week. Claire Ratinon wouldn’t have thought twice about growing anything until 5 or 6 years ago – but she now specialises in growing food organically in urban spaces and her book “How to grow your dinner without leaving the house” comes out in August.

    Presenter - Jane Garvey
    Producer - Anna Lacey
    Guest - James Zammit-Garcia
    Guest - Cheryll Adams
    Guest - Katherine Birbalsingh
    Guest - Anne
    Guest - Alice Vincent
    Guest - Claire Ratinon
    Guest - Golnoosh Nour

  • What makes someone want to go to see the same show at the theatre time and time again? We talk to documentary maker Mark Dooley about his film, Repeat Attenders – which follows some of musical theatre’s super-fans – and to Gudrun Mangel who features in the film and has found the confidence to be herself as a huge fan of Starlight Express.

    Most young people are at low risk of catching or falling seriously ill because of COVID-19 but it’s still having a serious impact. From future job prospects to living arrangements, how is the Coronavirus pandemic and lockdown affecting women in their twenties? Jackie Adedeji is 26 and has moved back in with her parents. Erin Bradshaw is 22 and taking her final exams in her third year at university.

    We are currently living through a time when kindness is very much to the fore, frequently commented on and valued. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to spontaneous, widely recognised and (literally) applauded acts of kindness, from individuals and communities across the UK. From the one million-plus volunteers who signed up to assist the most vulnerable, to the donation of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) equipment by businesses. Today the Mental Health Foundation are publishing the results of a poll about attitudes to kindness and mental health as part of Mental Health Awareness Week which this year is focusing on the theme of kindness. Lucy Thorpe is their head of policy.

    Comics are attracting an increasing female readership and is filled with women telling their stories. Trina Robbins is a collector, art historian and one of the pioneering women in the underground comic scene of the late 60s and 70s. She’s the co-creator of a new exhibition ‘Women in Comics: Looking Forward and Back’ in New York. UK Comics Laureate Hannah Berry is undertaking a national survey gathering data to ensure the best representation for comic creators whose voices often aren’t heard. Charlotte Mei is an illustrator whose first narrative comic is being featured in an upcoming publication, featuring an all-female group of artists.

    Presented by Jane Garvey
    Produced by Jane Thurlow

    Interviewed guest: Jackie Adedeji
    Interviewed guest: Erin Bradshaw
    Interviewed guest: Mark Dooley
    Interviewed guest: Gudrun Mangel
    Interviewed guest: Lucy Thorpe
    Interviewed guest: Trina Robbins
    Interviewed guest: Hannah Berry
    Interviewed guest: Charlotte Mei

  • How do you manage to create boundaries between work and home during lockdown? Dr Yasin Rofcanin, of the University of Bath’s School of Management discusses his new research exploring how COVID-19 is impacting our understanding of boundaries. We also hear from Chloë Davies, head of PR and Partnerships at myGwork, and Melanie Eusebe, management consultant and chair of the Black British Business Awards.

    Ida B. Wells was an journalist and campaigner. She's just been honoured with a special Pulitzer Price for her courageous reporting of the violence inflicted on African Americans during the lynching era. Professor Paula J. Giddings, who's written a biography of her, tells us about Ida and all that she achieved.

    How is lockdown affecting people living with dementia, as well as their carers? Linda Clare, Professor of Clinical Psychology of Ageing and Dementia at the University of Exeter, and Philly Hare, Co-Director of Innovations in Dementia discuss.

    Nurse and poet Molly Case reads her poem 'Hold Your Pen Torches High'.

    Listener Nadine tells us how the government advice for over-70s has affected her. Gabrielle Rifkind, psychotherapist and director of the conflict resolution organisation Oxford Process, and Professor Jane Lord, professor of immune cell biology and Director of the Institute of Inflammation & Ageing, University of Birmingham discuss social distancing guidance, and how best to communicate when you see risk differently.

    Cycling is seeing a huge increase in popularity thanks to people avoiding public transport and wanting to get some exercise. We hear from Krysia Williams from the Bristol Bike Project.

    Anna Jones has been described as ‘the kind of cook who makes you want to eat vegetarian food even if you're not vegetarian'. She shares some lunchtime ideas.

    Presenter: Jane Garvey
    Producer: Dianne McGregor

  • At the end of the week when government advice started to ease the lockdown we take stock and look at how relationships between the generations have been affected by social distancing measures and shielding.

    Woman’s Hour listeners tell us how the government advice for over-70s has affected them. We hear how families have responded and how adult children and parents are negotiating their changed roles. And we discuss how best to communicate when you see risk differently.

    With Gabrielle Rifkind, Psychotherapist and Director of the conflict resolution organisation Oxford Process, and Professor Jane Lord, Professor of immune cell biology and Director of the Institute of Inflammation & Ageing, University of Birmingham.