Episodios

  • The UK cleaning sector is worth almost £50bn a year to the country’s economy. It employs more than 900,000 people, mostly women. Right now, many are vulnerable. Some feel they won't be able to stop working if they fall ill or have to self- isolate because they can't afford it. Jenni speaks to Katy, a cleaner. Also Maria Gonzalez who's an employment barrister and Janet Macleod who's a Unite representative

    Cassa Pancho set up Ballet Black twenty years ago. It's a professional ballet company for Black and Asian dancers, and from the start its aim was to make the dance world more diverse. As well as Cassa, we also talk to Cira Robinson who performed with Stormzy at last year's Glastonbury. Tonight Ballet Black is part of a new BBC TV series called Danceworks.

    Jackie Kay, the National Poet for Scotland, also known as Maker, discusses her new online poetry and music festival. It's called Maker to Maker and streams via the National Theatre of Scotland's YouTube channel. We also hear from Gerda Stevenson who's a writer, actor, director and singer and is on Jackie's show, plus the singer Claire Brown, who performs a beautiful, traditional Scottish song live.

  • TROOPERS is a new series of ours starting today. It's about the women in our communities who get things done, and many of them are volunteers. We begin with Margaret Johnson who works as a volunteer at Chester Storyhouse which is a cinema, theatre and library. She runs the Chatter and Natter group.

    We've got more on the Dominic Cummings situation and his trip to Durham. Katy Balls from the Spectator and Helen Lewis from the Atlantic discuss things said in last night's press conference which might have leapt out for women especially.

    Following on from yesterday's programme about having a baby during lockdown, today we talk about what postnatal support is there for you. We hear from Linzy Thurlaway who's a midwife, antenatal educator and also runs postnatal and baby massage courses. She founded a Facebook group called Antenatal and Postnatal Education and Support North East.

    The Sunday Times Rich List 2020 includes a record number of women but it's still only 150 out of 1000 people. The number from BAME backgrounds is even lower. We speak to Annabelle Williams, the author of Why Women Are Poorer Than Men and What We Can Do About It.

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  • We hear from you about what it’s like to be pregnant, give birth and look after a new baby in the Covid-19 lockdown.

    Antenatal, labour and post-natal care has had to transform in the last two months, in order to combat the virus. Pregnant women are considered a vulnerable group to Covid and are recommended to self-isolate for their third trimester. Routine face-to-face appointments have been reduced and more is being done by phone. The way you give birth may have had to change, and partners can no longer stay on labour wards beyond the birth itself. And of course for new parents, family and friends haven’t been able to visit in person.

    What has all this meant for you? As well as the challenges, have there been any unexpected upsides? Jane is joined by midwife Leah Hazard and obstetrician Dr Kenga Sivarajah to hear your stories.

    Presenter: Jane Garvey
    Producer: Sarah Crawley
    Interviewed Guest: Leah Hazard
    Interviewed Guest: Dr Kenga Sivarajah
    Interviewed Guest: Ibukun Fisher
    Interviewed Guest: Elsa Rickett-Trueman
    Interviewed Guest: Laura le Masurier
    Interviewed Guest: Kate Duncan
    Interviewed Guest: Lizzie Williams
    Interviewed Guest: Frankie Eshun

  • The soprano Laura Wright tells us about her new single released with The Choir of Royal Holloway, University of London to mark Mental Health Awareness week.

    Baroness Doreen Lawrence discusses why the Labour Party are conducting its own enquiry into why people from black, Asian and minority ethnic communities are more than four times more likely to die as a result of Covid-19 than their white counterparts.

    Two twenty-somethingsJackie Adedeji and Erin Bradshaw tell us how life has changed for them since the pandemic began.

    The author Glennon Doyle tells us about her book untamed which explains why we should all listen to and trust the voice deep inside us.

    Should maternity leave be extended because of the lockdown? The parents of a 6 month old have had more than 200 thousand signatures to a petition asking the government to extend it by three months. We hear from James one of the parents who started the petition and from Cheryl Adams the Executive director of the Institute of Health Visiting on the difficulties faced by new parents at this time.

    Professor Marion Turner an expert on medieval England tells us why The Plague led to increased wages, greater employment, more migration to towns and, ultimately, to greater independence for women.

    What makes someone want to go to see the same musical at the theatre time and time again? We hear from documentary maker Mark Dooley about his film, Repeat Attenders – which follows some of musical theatre’s superfans – including Gudrun Mangel a huge fan of Starlight Express.

    Presenter: Jenni Murray
    Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
    Editor: Lucinda Montefiore

  • The soprano Laura Wright first came to prominence when she won the BBC Radio 2 Young Chorister of the Year in 2005 aged just 15. A lover of sport, she’s well known for her performances at huge sporting events from the FA Cup Final, British Grand Prix, Invictus Games and being England Rugby team’s first ever official anthem singer. She tells Jenni how during lockdown she has been using her voice by working with organisations and charities to address the challenges of isolation. To mark Mental Health Awareness week, she’s released a new single with The Choir of Royal Holloway, University of London in aid of charity.

    Could oestrogen provide some kind of protection against Covid-19? Dr Louise Newson is a GP and menopause specialist. She is working closely with NHS England to see whether women having periods or taking hormonal therapies like the pill and HRT are protected in some way.
    Covid Symptom Study: https://covid.joinzoe.com/

    Professor Heather Viles has been awarded the Royal Geographical Society's prestigious Founder's Medal for her excellence in establishing the field of bio-geomorphology - the scientific study of the physical landscape, and how plants and animals help with those process. She joins Jenni to discuss her career: from researching the contribution of acid rain to the deterioration of English cathedrals, to studying black slime growing on rocks at the Aldabra Atoll in the Seychelles.

    We know that the COVID-19 pandemic has had an enormous impact on the global economy. One area that has been hit particularly hard is the fashion industry. What will be the long term impact and how is Coronavirus forcing us to think differently about fashion? Kenya Hunt is the Fashion Director at Grazia UK. Annie Clarke is a merchandise manager.

    Presenter - Jenni Murray
    Producer - Clare Walker

    Guest - Laura Wright
    Guest - Dr Louise Newson
    Guest - Heather Viles
    Guest - Kenya Hunt
    Guest - Annie Clarke

  • Baroness Doreen Lawrence, Labour’s race relations adviser.

    What will be the long term impact of Covid-19 on women in the workforce?

    Plus as just over 400 prisoners and more than 500 prison staff in England and Wales have tested positive for the virus, how's the pandemic affected the way prison and probation officers carry out their work. We hear from Anita, who’s a prison officer at a male young offenders institute and Ellen who’s a probation officer in Leicester.

    And Jenni talks to the best selling author Glennon Doyle who poses the question" Who were you before the world told you who to be?" in her new book "Untamed"

    Presenter Jenni Murray
    Producer Beverley Purcell

    Guest; Baroness Doreen Lawrence
    Guest; Glennon Doyle
    Guest; Sam Smethers
    Guest; Anna Ritchie Allan
    Guest; Anita
    Guest; Ellen

  • As part of Mental Health Awareness Week, we look at why it’s important to discuss mental health and trauma with young people. The Mental Health Foundation reports that 70% of children and young people who experience a mental health problem have not had appropriate interventions at a sufficiently early age. Why does this matter and what impact can it have on a child’s progression and adulthood? Ebinehita Iyere is a youth practitioner and works with young people who have experienced trauma or grown up in difficult circumstances. Anneli Roberts is a mental health campaigner and blogger.

    Could Covid-19 lead to the end of the some girls' right to an education? Room to Read is a global NGO working in 16 countries supporting literacy programmes and girls in secondary education. Sarah Myers Cornaby , Senior Development Director for Europe and Africa says many of the thousands of girls they mentor may never return to school after the pandemic.

    Woman’s Hour Corona Diaries are creating a unique social record of the thoughts and experiences of women during this extraordinary time. Today listener Polly, who lives in Normandy tells us how her daily online musings help her keep in touch with friends and family back home.

    The Plague in the 14th century took millions of lives. But those who survived led to increased wages, higher employment, migration to towns and, ultimately, to greater independence for women. Professor Marion Turner teaches at Jesus College, University of Oxford and is an expert on medieval England and argues that pandemics and major unexpected events have had some positive consequences.

    Presented by Jenni Murray
    Produced by Jane Thurlow

    Interviewed guest: Ebinehita Iyere
    Interviewed guest: Anneli Roberts
    Interviewed guest: Sarah Myers Cornaby
    Interviewed guest: Marion Turner

  • The parents of a six month old have set up a petition asking the government to extend maternity leave by an extra three months. They believe that the lockdown has meant parents have missed out on the usual things you’d do on maternity, putting them at a disadvantage. There’s already been a parliamentary Q&A about this, and the signatures are still coming in. It’s not know yet whether it’ll be debated in the House of Commons but there will be another Q&A session on Thursday this week. Jane discusses the arguments with the petition's originator.

    After the summer half term holiday, some children will be returning to school. Those in reception and years 1,6, 10 and 12 will be the first to be welcomed back to the classroom in just under two weeks’ time. Many headteachers have begun speaking to parents about their concerns and their likely decision. We discuss the issues that parents are having to weigh up and the pressures that they face.

    In her new book of short stories ‘The Ministry of Guidance and Other Stories’, Golnoosh Nour shares the rich and varied experiences of queer Iranians. She talks to Jane about how her writing was inspired by interviews with her friends, and how she wanted to depict strong Iranian women to counteract their regular portrayal as victims.

    Samaritans volunteers have always been there, 24 hours a day, to listen to people in crisis. But how are they coping with the added strain of coronavirus? Listener Anne from Folkestone talks about her experience for today’s Woman’s Hour Corona Diary.

    Even before lockdown, younger people were turning to gardening in their droves – filling their Instagram feeds with beautifully tended houseplants and waxing lyrical about the therapeutic effects. But now we’re all housebound, more people might be tempted to transform their surroundings. But how easy is it to get gardening for the first time? Alice Vincent and Claire Ratinon give us their advice. Alice is a recent convert, she gardens on a balcony in London and her real time gardening audiobook “Seeds from Scratch” comes out this week. Claire Ratinon wouldn’t have thought twice about growing anything until 5 or 6 years ago – but she now specialises in growing food organically in urban spaces and her book “How to grow your dinner without leaving the house” comes out in August.

    Presenter - Jane Garvey
    Producer - Anna Lacey
    Guest - James Zammit-Garcia
    Guest - Cheryll Adams
    Guest - Katherine Birbalsingh
    Guest - Anne
    Guest - Alice Vincent
    Guest - Claire Ratinon
    Guest - Golnoosh Nour

  • What makes someone want to go to see the same show at the theatre time and time again? We talk to documentary maker Mark Dooley about his film, Repeat Attenders – which follows some of musical theatre’s super-fans – and to Gudrun Mangel who features in the film and has found the confidence to be herself as a huge fan of Starlight Express.

    Most young people are at low risk of catching or falling seriously ill because of COVID-19 but it’s still having a serious impact. From future job prospects to living arrangements, how is the Coronavirus pandemic and lockdown affecting women in their twenties? Jackie Adedeji is 26 and has moved back in with her parents. Erin Bradshaw is 22 and taking her final exams in her third year at university.

    We are currently living through a time when kindness is very much to the fore, frequently commented on and valued. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to spontaneous, widely recognised and (literally) applauded acts of kindness, from individuals and communities across the UK. From the one million-plus volunteers who signed up to assist the most vulnerable, to the donation of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) equipment by businesses. Today the Mental Health Foundation are publishing the results of a poll about attitudes to kindness and mental health as part of Mental Health Awareness Week which this year is focusing on the theme of kindness. Lucy Thorpe is their head of policy.

    Comics are attracting an increasing female readership and is filled with women telling their stories. Trina Robbins is a collector, art historian and one of the pioneering women in the underground comic scene of the late 60s and 70s. She’s the co-creator of a new exhibition ‘Women in Comics: Looking Forward and Back’ in New York. UK Comics Laureate Hannah Berry is undertaking a national survey gathering data to ensure the best representation for comic creators whose voices often aren’t heard. Charlotte Mei is an illustrator whose first narrative comic is being featured in an upcoming publication, featuring an all-female group of artists.

    Presented by Jane Garvey
    Produced by Jane Thurlow

    Interviewed guest: Jackie Adedeji
    Interviewed guest: Erin Bradshaw
    Interviewed guest: Mark Dooley
    Interviewed guest: Gudrun Mangel
    Interviewed guest: Lucy Thorpe
    Interviewed guest: Trina Robbins
    Interviewed guest: Hannah Berry
    Interviewed guest: Charlotte Mei

  • How do you manage to create boundaries between work and home during lockdown? Dr Yasin Rofcanin, of the University of Bath’s School of Management discusses his new research exploring how COVID-19 is impacting our understanding of boundaries. We also hear from Chloë Davies, head of PR and Partnerships at myGwork, and Melanie Eusebe, management consultant and chair of the Black British Business Awards.

    Ida B. Wells was an journalist and campaigner. She's just been honoured with a special Pulitzer Price for her courageous reporting of the violence inflicted on African Americans during the lynching era. Professor Paula J. Giddings, who's written a biography of her, tells us about Ida and all that she achieved.

    How is lockdown affecting people living with dementia, as well as their carers? Linda Clare, Professor of Clinical Psychology of Ageing and Dementia at the University of Exeter, and Philly Hare, Co-Director of Innovations in Dementia discuss.

    Nurse and poet Molly Case reads her poem 'Hold Your Pen Torches High'.

    Listener Nadine tells us how the government advice for over-70s has affected her. Gabrielle Rifkind, psychotherapist and director of the conflict resolution organisation Oxford Process, and Professor Jane Lord, professor of immune cell biology and Director of the Institute of Inflammation & Ageing, University of Birmingham discuss social distancing guidance, and how best to communicate when you see risk differently.

    Cycling is seeing a huge increase in popularity thanks to people avoiding public transport and wanting to get some exercise. We hear from Krysia Williams from the Bristol Bike Project.

    Anna Jones has been described as ‘the kind of cook who makes you want to eat vegetarian food even if you're not vegetarian'. She shares some lunchtime ideas.

    Presenter: Jane Garvey
    Producer: Dianne McGregor

  • At the end of the week when government advice started to ease the lockdown we take stock and look at how relationships between the generations have been affected by social distancing measures and shielding.

    Woman’s Hour listeners tell us how the government advice for over-70s has affected them. We hear how families have responded and how adult children and parents are negotiating their changed roles. And we discuss how best to communicate when you see risk differently.

    With Gabrielle Rifkind, Psychotherapist and Director of the conflict resolution organisation Oxford Process, and Professor Jane Lord, Professor of immune cell biology and Director of the Institute of Inflammation & Ageing, University of Birmingham.

  • Cycling is seeing a huge increase in popularity thanks to people avoiding public transport and wanting to get some exercise. In today’s Woman’s Hour Corona Diaries, Krysia Williams talks about the beauty of cycling in lockdown, and how the Bristol Bike Project – where she works – has been supporting key workers in moving around the city.

    Every year, 55,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer - and 18,000 of those come from screening. Since lockdown there’s been a 70% drop in GP referrals, according to data from Prevent Breast Cancer. Jenni talks to Lester Barr, consultant breast surgeon and founder and chairman of the Prevent Breast Cancer charity, about why early diagnosis is so important and what women should be doing at the moment if they’re worried.

    Shelley Klein grew up in the Scottish Borders in a house designed on a modernist open-plan grid; with colourful glass panels set against a forest of trees. Years later Shelley returns to look after her father, Bernat Klein, an uncompromising and ground breaking textile designer who is now in his eighties.. Shelley joins Jenni to talk about intense father daughter relationships, her deep attachment to the house and surrounding landscape and the challenges of returning home to care for an elderly relative.

    Reported cases of domestic violence in Russia have more than doubled during the country’s coronavirus lockdown, according to the Russian human rights commissioner, She said in a statement last week that complaints and reports made to Russian non-governmental organisations spiked from roughly 6,000 in March to more than 13,000 in April, It’s in stark contrast to what Russian police are saying. Jenni talks to the BBC Russian's women's affairs reporter Nina Nazarova.

  • Ida B. Wells was an journalist and campaigner. She's just been honoured with a special Pulitzer Price for her courageous reporting of the violence inflicted on African Americans during the lynching era. Professor Paula J. Giddings, who's written a biography of her, tells us about Ida and all that she achieved.

    We're talking about dementia during lockdown and how challenging it can be for carers. Research carried out by the University of Exeter shows that many people living with dementia, as well as their carers, already felt isolated and lonely before COVID-19 but now these feelings have intensified. Jane speaks to Professor Linda Clare about the research and to Philly Hare who's Co-Director of Innovations in Dementia CIC. They've worked with people who have dementia and have come up with practical tips.

    Due to COVID-19 midwives all around the world are facing new challenges. We speak to Anneka Knutsson from the UNFPA which works in over 150 countries and also Tania Akter, who's a midwife in a very remote part of Bangladesh.

    And from today, for people in England, restrictions on exercise have been lifted. Now people can do all kinds of sport including fishing! Beaky Allesch-Taylor joins Jane to talk about why she can’t wait to return to the riverbanks for some fly fishing.

  • It’s been seven weeks since the UK went into lockdown, and for many women, the lines between work and home life have become blurred on a day-to-day basis. What’s the best way to create boundaries in order to protect your own mental well-being and a sense of routine? Dr Yasin Rofcanin, of the University of Bath’s School of Management, has worked on new research exploring how COVID-19 is impacting our understanding of boundaries. Chloë Davies is the head of PR and Partnerships at myGwork – a business community for LGBT+ professionals. She’s currently working from home with a four and two year old. Melanie Eusebe is a business professor and a Director at Accenture, a management consulting firm.

    Where The Crawdads Sing, the first novel by Delia Owens, has sold more than 6 million copies. Woman’s Hour listeners have suggested it as a perfect lockdown read. Delia talks to Jane from her home in North Carolina – what does the book have to say about loneliness, resilience and the power of nature?

    The debate continues about whether or when people who don’t need PPE should wear face masks, and we’ve been talking to women round the world who have dragged out their sewing machines. Khedi is from Chechnya and she now lives in Gdansk. Maria Margaronis spoke to her with the help of a translator and to fellow mask-makers including a Polish psychologist.

    On Sunday evening the Prime Minister spoke to the country about the way out of lockdown and yesterday his government published its Covid 19 recovery strategy. Many have complained that the message is unclear, that supporting guidance is not yet ready and that too much is left to appeals to common sense – including the discretion of employers. But many are also anxious to get back to work, to support their families and to get their children back into education and childcare safely. But what account has been made of the economic position of women and including them in plans to rebuild the economy? Anneliese Dodds, Shadow Chancellor and MP for Oxford East discusses her concerns about the government’s plans.

    The teenage years are the ones where young people seek independence. So how is it working out now that they’re cooped up at home with their parents 24/7? In today’s Woman’s Hour Corona Diaries, Kate in Cirencester talks about the changing landscape of her relationship with her twin teenage girls, and how they’re trying to establish new boundaries to suit life in lockdown.


    Presented by Jane Garvey
    Produced by Sarah Crawley
    Interviewed guest: Dr Yasin Rofcanin
    Interviewed guest: Chloë Davies
    Interviewed guest: Melanie Eusebe
    Interviewed guest: Delia Owens
    Interviewed guest: Khedi
    Interviewed guest: Anneliese Dodds
    Interviewed guest: Kate Treadaway
    Reporter: Maria Margaronis

  • Tomorrow marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of Florence Nightingale. The day's also become International Day of the Nurse. We speak to nurse and poet Molly Case and to Ruth May, Chief Nursing Officer in England.

    Childline has new figures about the number of under 11s wanting help because of the coronavirus lockdown. Jane talks to Laverne Antrobus a Child Psychologist at the Tavistock Clinic and to NSPCC campaigns manager, Helen Westerman.

    Coronation Street is dealing with the issue of coercive control between husband and wife in one of its storylines. We hear from Shelley King who plays Yasmeen who's the victim, as well as Lindsay Williams who's one of the script writers on Corrie.

    And she's been described as ‘the kind of cook who makes you want to eat vegetarian food even if you're not vegetarian’. Anna Jones shares some fresh ideas about lockdown lunches and the surprising things we can do with a can of tomato soup. Here's one of her recipes:

    Caper, herb and egg flatbreads / SERVES 2 AS A LIGHT MEAL

    200g thick Greek yoghurt
    1 unwaxed lemon
    2 avocados
    2 organic eggs
    olive oil
    2 medium corn or flour tortillas or wraps (about 12 cm)
    a few sprigs of soft herbs (I use dill and basil, but mint, tarragon, parsley and chives would all work too)
    2 tablespoons small capers
    a few cornichons, roughly chopped
    25g freshly grated Parmesan (I used a vegetarian one)

    First, in a bowl mix the yoghurt with the grated zest and juice of half the lemon, a pinch of sea salt and a good grind of black pepper.
    Cut the avocados into quarters and remove the stones, then cut each one down to the skin in thin slices. Squeeze over the juice from the remaining lemon half and set aside. Beat the eggs in a little cup with a pinch of salt.
    It’s best to cook the tortillas one by one. Heat a frying pan big enough to fit your tortilla over a medium heat. Add a tiny splash of olive oil, then add half the egg and let it set into a kind of pancake for 10-15 seconds. Working quickly, place a tortilla on top of the egg; you want the egg still to be a bit runny so that it will attach itself to the tortilla as it sets. When the egg has set, use a spatula to turn the whole thing over, sprinkle over half the herbs, half the capers and cornichons and half the cheese. Cook until the cheese has melted. Repeat this process for the second tortilla.
    To serve, fold the tortillas in half and top with the yoghurt and slices of the avocado. To make a meal of them, serve with a little lemon-dressed green salad.

  • The conductor and organist Anna Lapwood tells us how she’s trying to get more girls to take up the organ.

    Have women leaders handled the global health crisis of Covid-19 better than the men? And, what might explain why? Rosie Campbell, Director of the Global Institute for Women’s Leadership and Professor of Politics at King’s College London, and Clare Wenham, Assistant Professor in Global Health Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science discuss.

    If lockdown measures are relaxed and children start the process of going back to school how will it work? Are social distancing measures remotely feasible with class sizes of 30? We hear from Dr Emma Kell who trains teachers and works for a pupil referral unit and virologist Professor Jonathan Ball.

    We look at why the number of women experts used in news programmes across all networks has fallen during the Covid-19 pandemic? Emeritus Professor Lis Howell, who directs the Expert Women Project which records and reports the appearance of women authority figures on news programmes, and former cabinet minister Baroness Morgan of Cotes discuss.

    Could your relationship survive one partner’s endurance sport obsession? In her new novel The Motion of the Body Through Space, Lionel Shriver explores the impact of extreme exercise on the ageing body and on one marriage in particular.

    Produced by: Rabeka Nurmahomed
    Presented by: Jenni Murray
    Editor: Jane Thurlow

    Interviewed guest: Rosie Campbell
    Interviewed guest: Clare Wenham
    Interviewed guest: Professor Jonathan Ball
    Interviewed guest: Dr Emma Kell
    Interviewed guest: Anna Lapwood
    Interviewed guest: Baroness Morgan of Cotes
    Interviewed guest: Professor Lis Howell
    Interviewed guest: Lionel Shriver

  • Today marks 75 years since VE day and we remember the end of war in Europe. We speak to Shirley Mann about how her mother’s own war experience inspired her to track down more women’s stories from this time. She shares the stories she discovered of the women who were pilots, wireless operators, and even “plotters” in the Battle of Britain bunker – and what they did next.

    Three women from the Armed Forces are taking legal action against the MOD claiming they are victims of sexual assault and rape. Their cases have already gone through military courts but there were no convictions and they believe justice would be better served if their cases were dealt with through the usual routes: the police and the CPS. We hear from lawyer Emma Norton, director of a new organisation called the Centre for Military Justice, who is representing the three women.

    Is Ireland going through a ‘golden age of literature’ when it comes to women’s writing? Sally Rooney and Anna Burns are hugely popular but what is behind this boom in new writing? Writers Lucy Caldwell and Jan Carson discuss.

    Over the last couple of weeks we’ve been hearing from women around the world who have dragged out their sewing machines to make face masks at home. In the Czech Republic masks are mandatory so Marcela has been doing her bit as she tells Maria Margaronis.

    For some people lockdown has proved the perfect time for some DIY and home improvements - from wallpapering to tiling to even a spot of joinery. How comfortable are you about doing the work yourself? We discuss the dos and don’ts with DIY expert Jo Behari and Sarah Beeny, presenter of HGTV’s ‘Renovate Don’t Relocate.’

  • The leaders of the USA, Brazil, Russia, Spain, Italy and the UK have come in for some criticism over their handling of the Coronavirus pandemic. They all have one thing in common, and it has been widely remarked on – they’re men. From Jacinda Ardern to Angela Merkel, women leaders across the world seem to be coping with Covid-19 better. But is it true? And, what might explain why? Jenni talks to Rosie Campbell, Director of the Global Institute for Women’s Leadership and Professor of Politics at King’s College London and Clare Wenham, Assistant Professor in Global Health Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

    Could your relationship survive one partner’s endurance sport obsession? In her new novel The Motion of the Body Through Space, Lionel Shriver explores the impact of extreme exercise on the ageing body and on one marriage in particular. Since taking aim at the whole concept of cultural appropriation in a speech at the Melbourne Writers’ Festival in 2016, Shriver has become well known for her criticism of identity politics. How does that manifest in the book? She joins Jenni to discuss.

    Over the last couple of weeks we’ve been hearing from women around the world who are making face masks at home for family, health-workers and in this case child refugees in camps in Greece. Rabha Nasr who lives in Greece now spoke to Maria Margaronis, who asked her to choose some music she listens to when she sews.

    Next week marks 200 years since the birth of Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing. We discuss her life, and legacy and impact on nursing in 2020. Anne-Marie Rafferty, Professor of Nursing Policy, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursery, Midwifery and Palliative Care at King’s College, London joins Jenni along with Greta Westwood, CEO of the Florence Nightingale Foundation.

    Presented by Jenni Murray
    Produced by Sarah Crawley
    Interviewed guest: Rosie Campbell
    Interviewed guest: Clare Wenham
    Interviewed guest: Lionel Shriver
    Interviewed guest: Rabha Nasr
    Interviewed guest: Anne-Marie Rafferty
    Interviewed guest: Greta Westwood
    Reporter: Maria Margaronis

  • Anna Lapwood is one of the UK’s few female concert organists. She was the first woman to be awarded an Organ Scholarship at Magdalen College, Oxford, in its 560-year history. She was then appointed the youngest ever Director of Music at Pembroke College at Cambridge University aged just 21. She has used this position to spearhead a number of initiatives including a choir for 11-18 year old girls and the Cambridge Organ Experience for Girls which encourages girls to take up the organ. We hear her Pembroke Chapel Choir performing Media Vita by Karensa Briggs. Anna's also making her presenting debut hosting BBC Four’s coverage of the BBC Young Musician 2020.

    MPs are to try to outlaw the courtroom murder defence of “rough sex gone wrong” during parliamentary debates on the domestic abuse bill, as cases of domestic violence soar during the coronavirus lockdown. Elizabeth Yardley is Professor of Criminology and Director of the Centre for Applied Criminology at Birmingham City University. She tells us about her research into femicide in Great Britain in the 21st Century and what action she thinks needs to be taken to save women's lives and achieve justice for those killed.

    In 1964, June Almeida identified the first human coronavirus at her laboratory in St Thomas' Hospital in London. Her paper to a peer-reviewed journal was rejected because the referees said the images she produced were just bad pictures of influenza virus particles. She died in 2007 and is only now getting recognition. Medical writer, George Winter explains more about how her research helps us in understanding COVID-19.

    Inspired by the tradition of May Queens, the Queens of Industry represented industries like coal mining, railways, wool and cotton. The tradition began in the 1920s and took young women out of their day to day lives to promote their industry and represent their fellow workers. They were celebrated at an exhibition at Leeds Industrial Museum in 2018 and Louise Adamson talked to the exhibition’s curator, John McGoldrick; Deborah Barry, who was Northumbria Coal Queen in 1982 and Doreen Fletcher, née Kerfoot, who was Yorkshire Wool Queen in 1947.

    Another in our series of interviews with women around the world who are sewing face masks at home for family, friends and sometimes health-workers to wear during the pandemic. Sara Fitzell is Maori and lives on the North Island of New Zealand.

    Presented by Jenni Murray
    Produced by Jane Thurlow

    Interviewed guest: Elizabeth Yardley
    Interviewed guest: George Winter
    Interviewed guest: Anna Lapwood
    Reporter: Louise Adamson
    Reporter: Maria Margaronis

  • Many parents have been longing for the the day the kids can go back to school following the lockdown. How are you feeling about sending your children back into the classroom?

    Over the last week, a number of old and offensive posts on Twitter have resurfaced. Many of them were written by influencers, artists and presenters. The majority of them contain abusive language towards dark skinned black women. Now the "court of public opinion" is calling for these individuals to be "cancelled". What's behind highlighting something some one said years ago? And what impact is it having on young black women online? .

    Despite having no experience of crofting or of island life, Tamsin Calidas moves with her husband from London to a remote island in the Scottish Hebrides. It’s idyllic, for a while but as the months wear on, Tamsin finds herself in ever-increasing isolation. She talks to Jane about beginning her journey back from the brink.

    Plus a report out today from the Child Poverty Action Group and the Church of England suggests that tens of thousands of families newly claiming Universal Credit because of the pandemic and shutdown will be affected by the benefit’s two child limit. It means that for claimants with three or more children only those born before 6 April 2017 will be counted in the benefit payment. We hear why they want the cap to be lifted.


    Presenter Jane Garvey
    Producer Beverley Purcell

    Guest Tobí Rachel Akingbadé
    Guest Bella Frimpong
    Guest Tamsin Calidas
    Guest Dr Emma Kell
    Guest Jonathan Ball
    Guest, Louise McGeehan.