Episodios

  • Lynn and Lucy is a new film about the lives of two best friends in a close-knit community in Essex whose relationship is tested after a tragedy happens. It stars Nichola Burley and Roxanne Scrimshaw in her first acting role. Roxanne joins Jenni to discuss female friendship, community, motherhood and the depiction of working class women on screen.

    The Domestic Abuse Bill 2020 is currently making its way through Parliament, and will reach the House of Lords by the end of July. For the first time there will be a statutory definition of domestic abuse. The Centre for Women’s Justice is asking for an amendment to the Bill, to create a free-standing offence of non-fatal strangulation or asphyxiation. Nicole Jacobs, the first domestic abuse commissioner for England and Wales, explains why she is supporting them.

    Professor Linda Scott’s book "The Double X Economy" describes how women are excluded from the global economy in myriad ways, in both developing and developed countries. She claims that the global economy's wealth would be £160 trillion higher if the gender pay gap were closed. Linda explains how empowering women economically could not only resolve gender equality but also help address many of humankind’s most pressing problems.

    And there are a record number of women in employment – and that includes women slowly but surely increasing their presence in senior management positions and professions that have traditionally been dominated by men. But has ‘being in the room’ really led to changes in attitudes towards women’s capabilities? Or is gender bias still alive and well? Jenni is joined by Professor Michelle Ryan, the author of a new study about gender bias from the University of Exeter and Carina White who works in sports marketing.

  • The stereotypical view of a gamer is a socially-isolated teenager who could be doing something better with their time. Liz Vickers is a 74 year old gamer from Manby, Lincolnshire, and so is her good friend, Bridget Odlin, aged 75, from Louth, Lincolnshire. They’ve been playing together, and separately, for almost more than 20 years. Lotta Haegg, an avid gamer herself, speaks to them.

    A new government report in Ireland shows that 6666 women accessed abortions there in 2019. This is the first annual report to be published since medical abortion became legal in Ireland up to twelve weeks of pregnancy. This followed the result of the May 2018 referendum on the Eighth Amendment of the Constitution. What do the figures tell us about abortion care in Ireland now? Jenni speaks to Ellen Coyne, a journalist at the Irish Independent newspaper and Dr Trish Horgan, a GP in Cork City and member of START - Southern Taskgroup on Abortion and Reproductive Topics.

    The novelist Amanda Craig joins Jenni to discuss her ninth novel - 'The Golden Rule'; inspired by both Patricia Highsmith’s classic, 'Strangers on a Train', and the fairy-tale, 'Beauty and the Beast'.

    Leading women in theatre have sent an open letter to Oliver Dowden, the secretary of state for digital, culture, media and sport. They are asking the task force, responsible for cultural renewal following the coronavirus pandemic, to develop their plans using a “gender lens” to ensure gender equality is considered and ensured. Maureen Beattie OBE, president of equity and Jennifer Tuckett, director of university women in the arts and literary director of Sphinx Theatre, discuss their concerns that gender inequality will increase in straitened, risk-averse conditions.

    Presenter: Jenni Murray
    Producer: Kirsty Starkey

    Interviewed Guest: Ellen Coyne
    Interviewed Guest: Dr Trish Horgan
    Interviewed Guest: Liz Vickers
    Interviewed Guest: Bridget Odlin
    Reporter: Lotta Haeg
    Interviewed Guest: Amanda Craig
    Interviewed Guest: Maureen Beattie
    Interviewed Guest: Jennifer Tuckett

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  • Dawn Bilbrough is a critical care nurse from York who in the early stages of COVID-19 posted an emotional video on social media that went viral. She was appealing to the public to stop panic buying as she was unable to get the basics in her supermarket after her shift ended. She joins Jane to discuss the impact of the video and what it has been like working on the frontline.

    This week Woman's Hour is focusing on women and gaming – and today we hear from cyberpsychologist Dr Daria Kuss who's been investigating the links between game-play and well-being. Our reporter Lotta Haegg also speaks to Emma Brown from Oxford, who's discovered a new-found motivation for exercise thanks to a virtual reality headset, and Lucy Hull from Birmingham who plays video games to forget her complex health problems.

    Last month information on the NHS website about the use of puberty blockers was changed. It had previously said that the drugs used to supress hormones at the onset of puberty in children experiencing gender dysphoria were fully reversible. The NHS now offers the cautious advice that: “Little is known about the long-term side effects of hormone or puberty blockers in children with gender dysphoria”. NICE, the body which provides evidence-based guidance for the NHS is currently examining the latest clinical guidance on puberty blockers and cross sex hormones as part of a review of current policies. Deborah Cohen, Health Correspondent for BBC Newsnight explains what medical questions there are about the use of puberty blockers and what the current review means.

    Poulomi Basu is an Indian artist, photographer and activist, whose work advocates for the rights of women. Her new book Centralia takes the reader deep into the forests of central India, where a little known and under reported conflict between an indigenous tribal people and the Indian state has been simmering for more than four decades. Poulomi went to the region and was embedded with female guerrillas who shared their documents and stories with her.

    In the final part of our series 'Troupers' - which celebrates the many and varied ways in which volunteers support our communities - we meet Sarah Burrows. She talks about her efforts to help families protect and support children affected by a parent being sent to prison. The reporter is Laura Thomas.

  • Last week Johnson & Johnson announced it will cease production on two lines of skin-lightening products sold in countries across Asia and the Middle East. At the same time, Unilever, who own the skin-lightening cream Fair & Lovely, have announced that they will change the product’s name. How significant are these moves? And why does the skin-lightening industry continue to be so popular, despite the dangers and controversy? Nimmi Dosanjh is Indian-Kenyan and light-skinned. Her 11 year old daughter is dark-skinned. Geeta Pandey is the Editor of BBC News Online, India Women and Social Affairs. Linasha Kotalawala is a lifestyle and beauty blogger.

    Over the next few days we’re going to be looking at women and gaming - the stereotype that only adolescent boys play video games doesn’t tally with the figures, which show women make up almost 50 per cent of those that play. And, women over 40 are among the fastest growing group of people who regularly engage in smartphone, video, or computer games. Our reporter, Lotta Haegg, a gamer herself, has been speaking to women who are changing the culture of the industry and refusing to accept the stereotypes. Rhianna Pratchett is a video game writer and journalist.

    Panama implemented a state-enforced lockdown to combat the spread of COVID-19 which was sex-segregated. In this, women are allowed out of the house on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, and men on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. On these days, individuals were only able to go to the supermarket or pharmacy. Clare Wenham, Assistant Professor in Global Health Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science tells us how it worked out.

    Four single mothers have launched legal proceedings against the government over the child maintenance support system which they say is failing them and their children. The women are being supported by the campaign group Gingerbread – Victoria Benson is their Chief Executive. Natalie has struggled to get maintenance payments for her sons for the last five years. But first we speak to Selaine Saxby, Conservative MP for North Devon and a member of the Work and Pensions Select Committee.

    Presenter: Jane Garvey
    Producer: Kirsty Starkey

    Interviewed Guest: Nimmi Dosangh
    Interviewed Guest: Geeta Pandey
    Interviewed Guest: Linasha Kotalawala
    Interviewed Guest: Rhianna Pratchett
    Reporter: Lotta Haegg
    Interviewed Guest: Clare Wenham
    Interviewed Guest: Selaine Saxby
    Interviewed Guest: Victoria Benson

  • How might our relationship with our bodies and appearance change after the pandemic? As part of the BBC's Rethink series, Laura Bates, the founder of the Everyday Sexism project, Kate Lister, Lecturer in the School of Arts and Communication at Leeds Trinity University, and Shahidha Bari, Professor of Fashion Cultures and Histories at the London College of Fashion discuss.

    Dr Amanda Brown has been working as a GP at Bronzefield, a women-only prison. In her new book. The Prison Doctor: Women Inside, she shares the stories of many of the women she has met inside the prison.

    Some medics have expressed concerns over a possible future rise in stillbirths and harm to babies because pregnant women in need of attention may have avoided seeking professional help during the pandemic. Dr Maggie Blott, Consultant Obstetrician and Lead for Obstetrics at the Royal Free in London and spokesperson for the Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology explains.

    Theresa May has made a million pounds on the speaker circuit since she stood down as Prime Minister just under a year ago. The big fee paying events are still relatively male dominated, so how can women succeed at public speaking? Viv Groskop, author and podcast presenter of 'How to Own the Room', and Professor Heather McGregor, Executive Dean of Edinburgh Business School at Heriot Watt University discuss.

    How to Cook the Perfect… Beetroot leaf rolls with buckwheat and mushrooms with Ukrainian chef, food writer and stylist Olia Hercules.

    The new BBC1 drama 'I May Destroy You' centres around a writer called Arabella who is drugged and sexually assaulted but has no recollection of the assault except in flashbacks and has to piece together what happened to her. We hear from Weruche Opia who plays Arabella’s best friend, Terry, Zing Tsjeng, executive editor of Vice UK and the poet Vanessa Kisuule.

    Presenter: Jane Garvey
    Producer: Dianne McGregor

  • Today’s Rethink essay comes from the musician and artist Brian Eno, he asks what the response to the pandemic has taught us about leadership, and how what we want and need from our future leaders might have changed. To discuss the future of leadership Jane speaks to Dame Heather Rabbatts, Chair of Time’s Up UK, Inga Beale, former CEO of Lloyds of London and Professor Ngaire Woods, founding Dean of the Blavatnik School of Government at Oxford University.

    A new Netflix documentary – Athlete A – explores the physical, mental and sexual abuse of young women within the United States of America Gymnastics; including at the hands of former USA Gymnastics national team doctor Larry Nassar. Former artistic gymnast and writer Jennifer Sey tells Jane about her career and the culture within gymnastics that she believes allowed this to happen.

    Presented by Jane Garvey
    Produced by Sarah Crawley
    Interviewed guest: Dame Heather Rabbatts
    Interviewed guest: Inga Beale
    Interviewed guest: Professor Ngaire Woods
    Interviewed guest: Jennifer Sey

  • Michaela Coel’s new drama “I May Destroy You” on BBC 1 is receiving rave reviews on Twitter and in the papers. The story centres around a writer called Arabella who is drugged and sexually assaulted but has no recollection of the assault except in flashbacks and has to piece together what happened to her. How effective is the way the story is told and what questions does it raise about consent, relationships and the portrayal of women’s everyday lived experience on screen? To discuss the series, Jenni is joined by Weruche Opia who plays Bella’s best friend, Terry, Zing Tsjeng, executive editor of Vice UK and the poet Vanessa Kisuule.

    The children’s charity Barnardo’s has seen a 44% increase in the number of children who need foster care during the coronavirus pandemic. This, coupled with a fall in potential foster carers coming forward, is creating what they call a ‘state of emergency’. Vulnerable children who may have experienced neglect or abuse are now having to wait to be placed in foster families. What can be done? Jenni speaks to Brenda Farrell, Head of Fostering at Barnardo’s.

    Ukrainian chef, food writer and food stylist, Olia Hercules tells the story of a part of Ukraine’s culinary history that is disappearing. Summer kitchens are little buildings in the vegetable garden where produce is prepared and eaten during the warmer months, and surplus food is pickled and preserved for the long winters. Olia joins Jenni to talk about the food of her childhood and discuss how to Cook the Perfect… Beetroot leaf rolls with buckwheat and mushrooms.

    Covid 19 has introduced a number of new terms to public debate - the key worker is perhaps the most important one. It turns out that the most essential workers are predominantly women, and many of them employed in low paid work in health and social care as well as cleaning and supermarkets. In her new book, Feminism and the Politics of Resilience, the sociologist Angela McRobbie argues that these and other disadvantaged women have become increasingly trapped in low-paid and casualised work which offers no possibility for progression or promotion. And the kind of feminism we’ve seen promoted in the last decade, which has emphasised individual resilience, hasn’t helped. Middle class and often white women have been exulted to lean in and achieve more at work and in motherhood, while low-paid women to be shamed for lacking resilience. So, have we become distracted from recognising the social and economic forces that shape women’s lives? Jenni discusses with Angela McRobbie and Zoe Williams, Guardian columnist.

    Producer: Louise Corley
    Editor: Karen Dalziel

  • Rethink is a series of essays and discussions across BBC Radio 4, 5 Live and the World Service that looks at how the world might change after the coronavirus pandemic. Today's essay features the political philosopher Clare Chambers who considers how our relationship with our bodies, and our appearance has been affected by the lockdown. To discuss Jenni is joined by Laura Bates, the founder of the Everyday Sexism project, Kate Lister, Lecturer in the School of Arts and Communication at Leeds Trinity University, and Shahidha Bari, Professor of Fashion Cultures and Histories at the London College of Fashion.

    The American crime writer Karin Slaughter has sold over 35 million books worldwide. Her stories are violent and gritty and she writes frankly about the impact of violence against women and the long-lasting effects of trauma. She hopes people will see her books as an honest telling of stories we do not often hear about… survivors, fighters, mothers, daughters, sisters, wives, friends and rogues. She joins us to talk about her latest book, The Silent Wife.

    Presenter: Jenni Murray
    Producer: Dianne McGregor

  • Theresa May has made a million pounds on the speaker circuit since she stood down as Prime Minister just under a year ago. We discuss how she’s done it and whether she might have a long career ahead of her doing it.
    Working parents of primary-aged children often rely on out-of-school childcare for the school run and long summer holidays. But thanks to Covid-19, many of these providers are facing an uncertain future. A recent survey by the Out of School Alliance found that 40% of respondents were unsure they’d be able to re-open in September – meaning that around 250,000 childcare places could be at risk. So where will children go if parents have to return to work and grandparents remain off-limits?
    Dr Amanda Brown has been working as a GP at Bronzefield, a women-only prison since December 2015. She has just written her second book, The Prison Doctor: Women Inside, in which she shares the stories of many of the women she meets inside.
    Since April, the British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS) has seen a 15% rise in consultations for terminations and is now carrying out around 480 a day. What’s access to contraception been like during lockdown and how can we help to support women?

    Presenter: Jane Garvey
    Interviewed guest: Viv Groskop
    Interviewed guest: Professor Heather McGregor
    Interviewed guest: Catherine Wrench
    Interviewed guest: Sue Smith
    Interviewed guest: Dr Amanda Brown
    Interviewed guest: Clare Murphy
    Interviewed guest: Deborah Evans
    Interviewed guest: Dr Louise Skioldebrand
    Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

  • Today Radio 4 launches Rethink - a series of essays and discussions right across BBC Radio that ask how the world might change after the pandemic. We begin with an essay from Stirling Prize winning architect Amanda Levete asking how we could design the world around us differently. Has being confined to our homes and immediate communities taught us new things about what we need and want from them? How will more remote working change the role of the office? How might we now start to build for better and more equal societies? Jane is joined by architect Elsie Owusu OBE, economist Kate Raworth and 2019 Stirling Prize winner Annalie Riches, all with their own ideas of how Covid-19 could transform our homes and communities.

    Some medics have expressed concerns over a possible future rise in stillbirths and harm to babies because pregnant women in need of attention may have avoided seeking professional help during the pandemic. Jane speaks to Dr Maggie Blott, Consultant Obstetrician and Lead for Obstetrics at the Royal Free in London and spokesperson for the Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

    Trichotillomania is often referred to as “hair-pulling disorder”. It’s thought it affects 1 in 50 people, with 80% of them women. Why do people do it? And what can be done to help people stop? Jane discusses the condition with Roisin Kelly, who is a journalist at the Sunday Times Style magazine and has written about her personal experience, and Louise Watson, Chartered Counselling Psychologist and Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapist, and Hattie Gilford who has her own dedicated Instagram account @my_trich_journey.


    Producer: Louise Corley
    Editor: Karen Dalziel

  • Naomi Campbell the model, icon, and activist, who’s been at the summit of the fashion industry for over three decades tells us how she believes the fashion and beauty industry needs to play its part in bringing about change when it comes to racial equality.

    Who is doing the most when it comes to childcare and chores in heterosexual couples, and how might lock-down be changing things? We hear from Ali Lacey, a PhD researcher from Sussex University which is looking into this subject, Mary Ann Stevenson of the UK Women’s Budget Group and Francine Deutsch Emeritus Professor of Psychology and Education at Mount Holyoke College in the US.

    The Science journalist Debora Mackenzie tells us about her book: COVID-19: the pandemic that never should have happened, and how to stop the next one.

    As two black British women writers - Bernadine Evaristo and Reni Eddo-Lodge - top the UK fiction and non-fiction bestseller charts for the first time, we hear from best-selling author of Queenie, Candice Carty-Williams and Sharmaine Lovegrove founder of Dialogue Books about the way the publishing industry treats black writers and readers.

    We hear why self-employed women are receiving less government support during coronavirus if they’ve taken maternity leave between April 2016 and March 2019. This is because maternity pay isn’t taken into account when calculating payments under the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme. The group Pregnant Then Screwed is threatening the Chancellor with indirect sex discrimination. We speak to founder Joeli Brearley and the freelance journalist, Alex Lloyd.

    Susie Dent is a lexicographer, etymologist and linguist. She has appeared in Dictionary Corner on Channel 4's Countdown since 1992. She tells us how language has evolved and about her new podcast with Gyles Brandreth.

    Presenter: Jenni Murray
    Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
    Editor: Jane Thurlow

    Interviewed guest: Naomi Campbell
    Interviewed guest: Ali Lacey
    Interviewed guest: Mary Ann Stevenson
    Interviewed guest: Francine Deutsch
    Interviewed guest: Debora Mackenzie
    Interviewed guest: Candice Carty-Williams
    Interviewed guest: Sharmaine Lovegrove
    Interviewed guest: Joeli Brearley
    Interviewed guest: Alex Lloyd
    Interviewed guest: Susie Dent

  • Bernadine Evaristo’s bestseller Girl, Woman, Other is on plenty of reading lists after winning the 2019 Booker Prize, but what books are getting her through lockdown? One of them is Darling by Rachel Edwards - who joins Jenni to tell her all about her debut novel.

    Research shows that in lockdown, in heterosexual couples, women still do the majority of the childcare and chores. However, there has been a modest increase in the time men spend on these tasks overall. So could this be an opportunity to improve equality in the home? In April we ask you to get involved with research into how lockdown is affecting the well-being of families. The team at Sussex University now have their first set of preliminary results. PhD researcher Ali Lacey discusses their findings along with Mary-Ann Stephenson, Director of the UK Women’s Budget Group and Francine Deutsch, Emeritus Professor of Psychology and Education at Mount Holyoke College in the US, and editor of Creating Equality at Home – How 25 Couples Around the World Share Housework and Childcare.

    You may have read in the papers this week that there are worries about the way the police are extracting and using information taken from mobile phones. Of particular concern was the use of such information where rape is alleged and there appears to be evidence that where a victim refuses to hand over a mobile, investigations are being brought to a halt. A report by the Information Commissioner’s Office argues that current mobile phone extraction practices and rules risk negatively affecting public confidence in the criminal justice system we hear from the Victims Commissioner for England and Wales, Dame Vera Baird QC.

    Plus explorer Vanessa O’Brien, the first woman in the world to reach Earth’s highest and lowest points, on why she wants o inspire other women to take on challenges.

    Presenter Jenni Murray
    Producer Beverley Purcell

    Guest; Rachel Edwards
    Guest; Vanessa O’Brien
    Guest; Ali Lacey
    Guest; Mary-Ann Stephenson
    Guest; Prof. Francine Deutsch
    Guest; Dame Vera Baird QC

  • Naomi Campbell is an actress, an innovator, an icon, an activist, and a philanthropist who’s been at the summit of the fashion industry for over three decades. When Pat McGrath signed her up to be the global face of her makeup brand she said “she’s an inspiration to women, especially women of colour. She demonstrates that anything is possible”. Jenni talks to her about the collaboration, her reaction to the death of George Floyd and how the fashion and beauty industry needs to play its part in bringing about change.

    In just under five months’ time US voters will go to the polls. President Donald Trump and his Vice President Mike Pence are set to face Joe Biden whoever he picks as his running mate. Biden has already said he will pick a woman – and in the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests, following the death of George Floyd, there is much speculation about the possible Black women he might pick. So how might this impact on the presidential election? And what will shape the key messages of Democrats and Republicans to women voters as the impact of the Covid 19 pandemic continues?

    Pork in cyder, grilled grapefruit and cheese scones, fruit salad with gherkins …just some of the dishes Georgie Williams has cooked in the last year as she’s worked her way through an old recipe book. She found it after buying a second hand sideboard – 365 recipes written in a 1968 diary which she’d like to reunite with the person who wrote it. Georgie shares pictures and videos of these culinary treats on her @forgottendelights Instagram account.

    The Welsh Government’s Farming Connect scheme is running online events all this week aimed at giving women the confidence and knowledge they need to help develop both their personal and business skills. Research shows that women’s development in agriculture is vital to increasing the size of the skilled workforce, as well as unlocking talent to help drive the industry forward. So what practical steps can be taken to start breaking down the barriers faced by women and to inspire them to reach their full potential? Joyce Campbell is a hill farmer on 5,500 acres in the north coast of Sutherland, Scotland and was co-chair of the Women in Agriculture Taskforce for Scotland. Anna Truesdale is a dairy farmer in Northern Ireland and Telerie Fielden is a shepherdess managing Llyndy Isaf, a 600 acre upland hill farm owned by the National Trust in Snowdonia.

    Presenter Jenni Murray
    Producer Clare Walker

  • Self-employed women are receiving less government support during coronavirus if they’ve taken maternity leave between April 2016 and March 2019 – because maternity pay isn’t taken into account when calculating payments under the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme. The group Pregnant Then Screwed is now threatening the chancellor with indirect sex discrimination. It’s estimated between 75,000 and 80,000 women are affected. We speak to founder of Pregnant then Screwed, Joeli Brearley and the freelance journalist, Alex Lloyd who says the support she’s getting is about half what it could have been if average earnings had included maternity pay.Casey Stoney MBE is Former Captain of England and now Head Coach of Manchester United Women. We see the return of the men’s Premier League tonight, while the women’s season was ended early in May, and Casey joins Jenni to talk about the women’s game.Science journalist Debora Mackenzie talks about her book 'Covid-19: the pandemic that never should have happened & how to stop the next one’.There are concerns that covid lockdowns could be pushing up child marriage and violence against girls in Nepal. According to Voluntary Service Overseas the lockdown is reinforcing traditional gender roles and girls living in rural areas are especially affected. We hear from Geeta Pradham, their Global Gender Adviser.The writer and broadcaster Sali Hughes has been talking to women about objects in their lives that are important to them. Today it’s the turn of Nadia Shireen.Presenter Jenni MurrayProducer Beverley PurcellGuest; Joeli Brearley Guest; Alex LloydGuest; Casey StoneyGuest; Debora MackenzieGuest; Geeta PradhamGuest; Nadia Shireen

  • Some reports suggest the government won’t now go ahead with the reform of the Gender Recognition Act. If true, this means that people won’t be able to self-declare their gender. What will this mean for the wider debate? Jane speaks to Helen Belcher, co-founder of Trans Media Watch and chair of the national LGBT charity Consortium, and Joan Smith, Chair of the Mayor of London’s Violence Against Women and Girls Board and author of ‘Home Grown: How Domestic Violence Turns Men Into Terrorists’.

    Susie Dent is a lexicographer, etymologist and linguist. She has appeared in Dictionary Corner on Channel 4's 'Countdown' since 1992, and can also be seen on 8 out of 10 Cats does Countdown, or ‘Catsdown’ as she calls it. She can also be heard alongside Gyles Brandreth on the award-nominated podcast Something Rhymes With Purple. She joins Jane to talk about how her love of words began with shampoo bottles, her research into modern tribes, 90s rap music lyrics and the meaning of cacoethes.

    For the past month Woman's Hour has been celebrating women who get things done – the Troupers. Today it’s the turn of Preethi Manuel who talks about the life of her daughter, fostering, and her role in campaigning for disabled children to have access to mainstream education.

    Non-essential retail shops are beginning to reopen, but will we actually want to go back? New technology is using artificial intelligence to make the experience of online shopping more fulfilling and more personalised. BBC Click reporter Lara Lewington tells Jane more.

  • As two black British women writers – Bernadine Evaristo and Reni Eddo-Lodge - top the UK fiction and non-fiction book charts for the first time, Jane asks bestselling author of Queenie, Candice Carty-Williams and Sharmaine Lovegrove founder of Dialogue Books, what publishing houses should be doing to make the trend last. The hashtag #publishingpaidme has shown that in many cases globally black women were paid smaller advances than their white counterparts – could we now see a step-change in the way the publishing industry treats black writers and readers?

    Iranian film maker Mina Keshavarz on her new documentary The Art of Living in Danger – which follows female lawyers in Iran campaigning to make domestic violence illegal. Mina also talks about her grandmother who’d taken her own life after suffering domestic abuse – and how she inspired the film.

    In the latest instalment of our series Troupers we speak to Calina Toqir, a well-known figure in Glasgow’s Roma community, brought to our attention by the Govanhill Housing Trust.

    This week Education Secretary Gavin Williamson will apparently be setting out plans for pupils in England to attend Summer Schools after abandoning plans to get all primary pupils back to school for a month before the summer break. Will they reach the pupils who really need them? Susannah Hardyman is chief executive of the education charity Action Tutoring; Natalie Perera is executive director at the Education Policy Institute, an independent research charity; and Dave McPartlin is headteacher of Flakefleet Primary in Lancs - how do they think it could work?

    Presented by Jane Garvey
    Produced by Jane Thurlow

    Interviewed guest: Candice Carty-Williams
    Interviewed guest: Mina Keshavarz
    Interviewed guest: Calina Toqir
    Interviewed guest: Susannah Hardyman
    Interviewed guest: Natalie Perera
    Interviewed guest: Dave McPartlin

  • The scientist Marie Skłodowska Curie is recognised throughout the world but how much do you really know about her and her ground breaking Nobel prize winning discoveries? The Oscar nominated star of Gone Girl on playing the Nobel prize winning scientist in the film Radioactive.

    The debt advice charity, Step Change, warned that British households are expected to rack up debts worth a combined £6bn because of the health emergency as they fell behind with their bills. And it looks like this will disproportionately impact on women. Jude Kelly, Founder of the Women of the World Festival who is involved in the Insuring Women’s Futures programme, Zubaida Haque, Interim Director of the Runnymede Trust and a member of the Independent Sage and a commissioner for the Women’s Budget Group and Amy Cashman, CEO of Kantar’s Insights Division discuss.

    Protests are expected this weekend across the UK. What do you do if your child wants to go? We hear from Monique Bouffé who is a member of the Black Protest Legal UK Support team, as well as Talja Parkinson who has three sons..

    Fertility clinics were told last month that they could reopen as long as social distancing measures were in place. Being without access to fertility treatment has left thousands of couples – as well as single women – worried that they might run out of chances to conceive. We hear from Dr Zeynep Gurtin, Lecturer at the Institute for Women's Health at University College London, Rachel Cuttings from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, and Seetal Savla who has just restarted her fertility treatment.

    The historian Bettany Hughes talks about her new Channel 5 series A Greek Odyssey where she retraces the steps of Odysseus from the coast of Turkey where the mythical Trojan War took place to the island of Ithaca in the West of Greece.

    Florence Given is a 21-year-old artist, writer and feminist. In 2019 she was named Cosmopolitan’s Influencer of the Year. She has just written her first book, Women Don’t Owe You Pretty. She tells us why girls and women don’t owe prettiness to anyone.

    Presenter: Jane Garvey
    Producer: Dianne McGregor

  • Candice Brathwaite set up the group called Make Motherhood Diverse in order to set right a wrong. When pregnant, she didn't recognise anything in books and online that she could relate to. So she set up the group to reflect a broader spectrum of motherhood. She tells us about her debut book I Am Not Your Baby Mother, a guide to life as a Black British mum.

    Protests are expected this weekend across the UK. So what do you do if your child wants to go? What conversations should parents be having beforehand? What do children need to know about their rights and safety? We hear from Monique Bouffé who's a member of the Black Protest Legal UK Support team as well as Talja Parkinson who has three sons: her oldest, who's 16, has been protesting with his friends.

    The link between misogyny and domestic violence will be discussed by MPs next week as part of their line-by-line examination of the Domestic Abuse Bill. Some people want misogyny to be classed as a hate crime. Will it happen?

    Photo credit: Zoe Timmers

  • A picture is slowly emerging of what has happened to women’s personal finances since the Covid 19 pandemic began. The debt advice charity, Step Change, warned that British households are expected to rack up debts worth a combined £6bn because of the health emergency as they fell behind with their bills. And it looks like this will disproportionately impact on women. Jenni talks to Jude Kelly, Founder of the Women of the World Festival who is involved in the Insuring Women’s Futures programme, Zubaida Haque, Interim Director of the Runnymede Trust and a member of the Independent Sage and a commissioner for the Women’s Budget Group and Amy Cashman, CEO of Kantar’s Insights Division.

    The historian Bettany Hughes tells Jenni about her new series A Greek Odyssey where she retraces the steps of Odysseus from the coast of Turkey where the mythical Trojan War took place to the island of Ithaca in the West of Greece. Sailing through the Greek islands, she makes new archaeological discoveries, visits iconic sites and uncovers the truth around the myths and legends of the ancient world; including iconic women such as Hera, Helen, Calypso and Iphigenia. A Greek Odyssey with Bettany Hughes launches tomorrow, Friday 12 June, at 9pm on Channel 5.

    Coronavirus has made visible a group of people who were often invisible – volunteers. Thousands of people signed up to help the NHS as a volunteer. Local residents’ groups have got together to help those who can’t get to the shops, or to call people who might be experiencing severe isolation. Before lockdown, Woman’s Hour began interviewing women who volunteered in all sorts of areas – who see a gap, or a problem to be solved, and just get on with it – Troupers. They told their stories to Laura Thomas. Today it’s the turn of Jacqui Shimidzu, who runs the Hill Station Café in South London.

    Berta Cáceres – a celebrated Honduran environmental activist and indigenous leader – was murdered in 2016. She had dedicated her life to fighting for the land and water rights of indigenous Lenca communities in the west of the country. But after a relentless stream of threats, intimidation and harassment failed to deter her, Berta was brutally killed. Nina Lakhani was the only Western journalist to follow the trial and has herself faced threats and defamation campaigns in her quest to bring Berta’s story to a global audience. She talks to Jenni.

    Producer: Louise Corley
    Editor: Karen Dalziel

  • Fear of becoming homeless is one of the factors that stops women leaving an abusive relationship. That’s according to the charity Women’s Aid which carried out research before covid, and collected evidence of women sofa-surfing, staying with friends or having difficulty getting a place in a refuge if they did leave. But now we're in lockdown have things got better or worse?

    In our latest Corona Diary we speak to ex-pat, Carol. She lives in Australia but was planning to move her whole family back to the UK. She wants to be closer to her elderly parents, but the complications of coronavirus have put a spanner in the works.

    Lockdown may be lifting at different rates around the UK, but for some people it still may be a long time before they see others from different households and what's more. touch them. Henrietta Harrison speaks to three women about missing touch, and how they're getting around it.

    Penny Wincer has written about caring. In her new book called Tender, she combines her own experiences as a carer with the experiences of others. She offers hints, guidance and support.