Episodit

  • In today's episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join me and Minal Bopaiah as we talk about the goal of her book, Equity: How to Design Organizations Where Everyone Thrives. Minal is a naturally born and raised New Yorker and is a daughter to both immigrant parents. The stories she learned from her parents and the experiences she grew up with helped her find her current field that she now sees as something she can spend the rest of her life and work on. In this episode, Minal talks about her journey, what equality and equity mean to her, model minorities, and mainstream media's role in society. Tune in to our fired-up discussion in this episode!


    The System You're In

    When Minal was in her 20s, going to her 30s, she found herself in a stage where she became more open to how the system works for people of color. For her, the system is rigged. And this is the reason why she's so obsessed with it. Even though Minal grew up in a family and culture where self-improvement is given a big focus, she realized that improving oneself will always be challenging when you're in an environment or society where the system works against you. Most minorities and people of color are likely to connect with this sentiment. This reality motivates her to talk about the issue in all her endeavors—no matter how much people shut her down—something she's no longer new to either. Through her book, she envisions achieving the same purpose; to continue to put the spotlight on the issues behind the curtains.


    Outline of the episode:

    [03:54]Minal Bopaiah – on how she began her journey[04:54]Is diversity not important to other people?[08:33]A culturally specific medical device designed to fight hypothermia in Indian premature babies[12:08]I am not the DEI consultant if your question is 'why?;' I'm the consultant if the question is 'how?'[18:30]"If racism is the language, caste is grammar."[20:30]Equality is not bad, but is it what we need?[24:19]Minal Bopaiah – the stories of immigrant parents working in the medical field[28:03]Divide and conquer is the tool of white supremacy.[32:22]To media: it's not just commercial success; what is your actual impact on society? [37:31]Content creators need to know their message and take responsibility for it.

    Resources:

    Website: https://brevityandwit.com/

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mbopaiah

    Equity: How to Design Organizations Where Everyone Thrives, Book: https://theequitybook.com


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:

    Personal Website: https://tayorockson.com

    UYD Management: https://uydmanagement.com/

    UYD Collective: https://tayorockson.com/uyd-collective

    Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tayorockson 

    Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/TayoRockson


    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • In today's episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join me and Stacey A. Gordon as we talk about how you can approach the unconscious biases in yourself and in your organization. As a woman of color, the main reason why Stacey wrote the book UNBIAS: Addressing Unconscious Bias at Work was because she lived it. Being a subject that is personally close and familiar to her ever since she was young, Stacey expounds why biases aren't easily handled by many, how it exists, and how not to approach it. Tune in and join our discussion on how you can get unbiased in this episode!


    Where can biases take you?

    Stacey believes there is no such thing as one person with not one bias. Each individual will have some type of prejudice in one way or another because of what makes them up as beings. Where you grew up, your culture, your family, your education, and others can all contribute to what composes your bias. Biases can also then motivate other things. One case is what happened to Stacey and her former childhood friend. When they were young, Stacey would always hang and bike around with this boy-neighbor. Regularly, Stacey would wait for this boy so that they could play or ride bikes. Until one time, Stacey waited very long. While on her bike, she stayed longer than usual outside of the boy's house. When her friend finally greeted her outside, he told her that his mom said they could no longer be friends because she was black. And just like that, Stacey no longer had a friend. This experience is an example of where biases can come from and lead to.


    Outline of the episode:

    [02:32]Why did Stacey write a book about unconscious biases?[06:01]Empowered minorities create more equity.[08:27]There is a rush to be reactive and performative.[12:02]When addressing biases in your organization, how do you start?[18:33]How can you make a business or a career shift out of your lived experiences?[21:08]Honor your passion, but also honor your soul.[25:29]Your bias shields you from the alienating experiences of other people.[28:05]This is not my place.[33:23]Education on unconscious biases is an awareness builder.[37:26]There is never just 'one' best candidate for the job. 

    

    Resources:

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/staceygordon

    UNBIAS: Addressing Unconscious Bias at Work, Book: https://www.amazon.com/UNBIAS-Addressing-Unconscious-Bias-Work/dp/1119779049


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:

    Personal Website: https://tayorockson.com

    UYD Management: https://uydmanagement.com/

    UYD Collective: https://tayorockson.com/uyd-collective

    Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tayorockson 

    Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/TayoRockson


    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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  • In today's episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join me and Jubril Agoro as we speak about his ways of reaching his target audience on the internet and the value he's garnered from traveling around the world as the Founder and Innovative Marketer behind Passport Heavy. Through Jubril's program, he showcases the varying possibilities of the life of a digital nomad and how different places aren’t always what they appear to be through mainstream perception. As a successful self-proven digital entrepreneur, Jubril also explains how understanding your audience can ultimately take you to your brand's promised land.


    Through Passport Heavy

    Because of Jubril's travel program, Passport Heavy, he had the opportunity to experience the different cultures and places worldwide beyond what is usually presented in media. Because of this, he also discovered a lot of misconceptions. For instance, Africa. During COVID, with strict protocols and safety measures, Jubril traveled to multiple African countries. Just two of them, Rwanda and Ghana. If we turn to mainstream movies, articles, and news coverage, Rwanda and Ghana would be seen just like every other African country is presented – left behind, third-world, and poor. But for Jubril, who experienced it first hand, it was different. In his own words, "Rwanda was an amazing place." During his stay in the African countries, Jubril boasts one of the most advanced COVID systems and internet connectivity he's ever experienced in the number of places he's visited globally. As proof of the region's quality of life, Social-Media-Giant Twitter recently opened its African headquarter in Ghana… Through Passport Heavy, Jubril aims to accomplish more of this – telling all the different stories that people don't hear about.


    Outline of the episode:

    [04:02]Biggest lesson on eCommerce.[08:37]How do you start engaging copies?[11:58]The power of Facebook and Instagram Ads.[15:50]Your target market isn't just always in one place.[20:38]I like to tell people the stories they don't know.[26:52]Jubril Agoro – people don't need to always understand my narrative.[28:05]Mindset is a daily ritual.[31:08]The Next Thing: Passport Heavy[34:00]What people do not know about Africa.[37:11] I show people the possibilities they're not aware of.

    

    Resources:

    Jubril's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jubril8/

    Passport Heavy Official Site: https://msha.ke/passportheavy/

    Passport Heavy's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/passportHeavy/

    Passport Heavy YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/PassportHeavy


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:

    Personal Website: https://tayorockson.com

    UYD Management: https://uydmanagement.com/

    UYD Collective: https://tayorockson.com/uyd-collective

    Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tayorockson 

    Podcast:

  • In today’s episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join me and my guest, Rita McClenny, as we talk about the state of Virginia’s rich history and the diverse community it fosters today. Rita serves as the president and CEO of the Virginia Tourism Corporation, a state agency charged with marketing the Commonwealth as a premier travel destination and film location. Their mission is to expand domestic and international inbound travel and motion picture production to generate revenue and employment in their state. Today, Rita also shares her thoughts on traveling in 2021 and how Virginia stepped up, becoming a leading destination in the United States. 


    Virginia Is For Lovers

    Rita believes that love always wins over hate. But, for “love” to prevail, we need to pour it out into the world, so it can keep growing. And so, at the Virginia Tourism Corporation, their mission is to tell authentic experiences from the state’s past so that people can learn from them and pass these stories on to future generations. After all, the past becomes a reflection of the future if we choose to ignore it. But once we have acknowledged it, a new and possibly brighter future is born. But again, we have to keep with the circle of love and light for this to be possible. Hence, Rita and her team always make sure that Virginia is a safe place for everyone. They welcome anyone with any combination of travel experience in hopes that they could find something to love in Virginia. There, everyone stands for love, equality, and inclusion. They even have a DEI statement in VTC because they believe in it. And they are always happy to show you through their diverse community and rich history. So, if you are looking to travel to Virginia soon, check out their website in the links below! And soon enough, when you get there, you will see why Virginia is for lovers.


    Outline of the episode:

    [03:33] How Virginia evolved to telling authentic experiences in its history[05:47] How the state became a leading destination, especially for black travelers[06:45] Rita’s plans for the VTC as the travel industry rebounds amid the pandemic[10:45] Virginia being a prime place for filmmakers and storytellers to visualize their stories[12:58] The valuable role of tourism and film in the rehabilitation of the state’s economy[14:32] Where history started and how terrain played a role in America’s growth[16:30] What advice Rita has for female travelers and leaders alike in these trying times[18:19] Her life growing up and what led her to pursue tourism[23:06] The value of word-of-mouth after providing a good experience in tourism[24:56] What the future looks like for people of color in Virginia[26:08] How love always wins despite media choosing to show hateful deeds

    Resources:

    Website: https://www.vatc.org/

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rita-mcclenny-29482186/


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:

    Personal Website: https://tayorockson.com 

    UYD Management: https://uydmanagement.com/ 

    UYD Collective: https://tayorockson.com/uyd-collective 

    Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tayorockson 

    Podcast:

  • In today's episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join Erica Austin and me as we talk about youth empowerment, education, and the ECRA educational program that gears youths to effectively transition to adulthood and entrepreneurship. Erica believes the education system in the U.S. is fragmented. This results in so many communities, despite having prestigious agencies, still fall short in providing quality education that's accessible to the majority. For her, it takes a village of stakeholders to guide the youth in recognizing and reaching their potential. Tune into this discussion on how we can tailor solutions for the development of youth's education in this episode!


    What does it mean to believe in the youth? 

    When Erica was young, she took inspiration from the protagonist of the movie, Harriet the Spy. This inspiration wasn't the typical type, the type that would just eventually fade off. Because of Harriet, writing interest her. Erica took this spark and decided to tell her parents that she wanted to write a book. Fortunately, because her parents were supportive, Erica was given the tools she needed to begin. Because she grew up with a spiritual foundation, she decided to write a book sharing her faith with other children. Erica's first book was entitled, What Every Child Should Know About Prayer: From a Child's Point of View. With the help of her parents, Erica became an author at the very young age of nine. From there, she became a child prodigy in her hometown for being one of the very few child authors in the 90s. As her book gained more attention and recognition, Erica was in different speaking engagements and book signings. Because of her book, she fell into public speaking at a young age and became passionate about youth empowerment, a spark that continues to blaze up until now.


    Outline of the episode:

    [03:03]What did inspire Erica to publish her first book at the age of nine?[06:14]Erica Austin – on the implications of being a child author in the 90s[08:15]Youth empowerment and the relevance of education[11:29]How did the ECRA perform during the pandemic?[13:50]We can leverage what we already have access to…[17:01]Help them transform during their formative years![18:55]What can you expect from the ECRA Youth Entrepreneurship Academy 4-Week Educational Program?[20:34]This is a movement![21:28]The ECRA Educational Program Pilot[22:52]Erica Austin – on the importance of tailoring solutions to the perspective of those who it serves

    Resources:

    Website: https://ericaaustin.com/

    ECRA: https://ecragroup.com/

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EricaforYouth

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/ericaforyouth

    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mseaustin/

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/erica-austin-230a7967/


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:

    Personal Website: https://tayorockson.com

    UYD Management: https://uydmanagement.com/

    UYD Collective:

  • In today's episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join Erica Austin and me as we talk about youth empowerment, education, and the ECRA educational program that gears youths to effectively transition to adulthood and entrepreneurship. Erica believes the education system in the U.S. is fragmented. This results in so many communities, despite having prestigious agencies, still fall short in providing quality education that's accessible to the majority. For her, it takes a village of stakeholders to guide the youth in recognizing and reaching their potential. Tune into this discussion on how we can tailor solutions for the development of youth's education in this episode!


    What does it mean to believe in the youth? 

    When Erica was young, she took inspiration from the protagonist of the movie, Harriet the Spy. This inspiration wasn't the typical type, the type that would just eventually fade off. Because of Harriet, writing interest her. Erica took this spark and decided to tell her parents that she wanted to write a book. Fortunately, because her parents were supportive, Erica was given the tools she needed to begin. Because she grew up with a spiritual foundation, she decided to write a book sharing her faith with other children. Erica's first book was entitled, What Every Child Should Know About Prayer: From a Child's Point of View. With the help of her parents, Erica became an author at the very young age of nine. From there, she became a child prodigy in her hometown for being one of the very few child authors in the 90s. As her book gained more attention and recognition, Erica was in different speaking engagements and book signings. Because of her book, she fell into public speaking at a young age and became passionate about youth empowerment, a spark that continues to blaze up until now.


    Outline of the episode:

    [03:03]What did inspire Erica to publish her first book at the age of nine?[06:14]Erica Austin – on the implications of being a child author in the 90s[08:15]Youth empowerment and the relevance of education[11:29]How did the ECRA perform during the pandemic?[13:50]We can leverage what we already have access to…[17:01]Help them transform during their formative years![18:55]What can you expect from the ECRA Youth Entrepreneurship Academy 4-Week Educational Program?[20:34]This is a movement![21:28]The ECRA Educational Program Pilot[22:52]Erica Austin – on the importance of tailoring solutions to the perspective of those who it serves

    

    Resources:

    Website: https://ericaaustin.com/

    ECRA: https://ecragroup.com/

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EricaforYouth

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/ericaforyouth

    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mseaustin/

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/erica-austin-230a7967/


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:

    Personal Website: https://tayorockson.com

    UYD Management: https://uydmanagement.com/

    UYD Collective: https://tayorockson.com/uyd-collective

    Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tayorockson

    Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/TayoRockson


    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • In today's episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join Dovév Weaver Sr. and me as we talk about the dream cycle philosophy and his full circle of businesses that touch people at the different levels of their life. Here, Dovév explains why it's always essential to give dreams and entrepreneurship a chance. Even though there's nothing wrong with the norm of working in corporate, understanding how dreams can be so valuable may just open for you possibilities that the nine-to-five life can never offer. So tune in and listen to how valuable dreams can be in this episode.


    Profit or wage? 

    Working in corporate is normal, and there's nothing wrong with it. In fact, many business owners had to start with corporate first. The reason why they didn't stay is their dream. It's challenging to keep dreaming if you're working straight hours in a day, spending only an hour for lunch, more hours traveling back home, and with the rest of your day allotted for the much-needed sleep that's going to keep you sane for another cycle of a workday the next morning. To some, this spells d-r-e-a-d-f-u-l. If life is this busy, is dreaming worth anything? This is the reason why Dovév does what he does. One time, when he explained wholesaling to a kid who was interested in starting his own clothing brand, the kid's eyes started lighting up upon understanding the value of his own idea. The satisfaction this gave Dovév was priceless. This is why dreams and entrepreneurship matter; because they can bring change and purpose in people's lives. At the end of the day, if your idea works—with commitment and strategic planning—and you start earning from it more than you're taking from your job, profit becomes better than wage.


    Outline of the episode:

    [03:14]Dovév Weaver Sr. – on changing dreams[04:50]You can't move on with your life without forgiving…[07:27]The three (3) phases you need to go through when chasing your dreams[09:46]A Facebook Memory about dreams, goals, and plans[11:21]Dovév Weaver Sr. – on influences[15:52]How do you build a team?[20:35]Entrepreneurship is problem-solving[26:17]As the middleman giving everybody the services they need[28:53]The Dreamer's Corner Membership[32:04]Dovév Weaver Sr. – on giving people the access he didn't have in the beginning

    Resources:

    Website: https://www.closertoourdreams.com/

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coachdtalks/?ref=page_internal

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/coachdtalks/

    Follow Dovév Weaver Sr. on all social platforms @coachdtalks.

    The Dreamer's Corner Membership: https://www.closertoourdreams.com/offers/69ZHvce9/checkout


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:

    Personal Website: https://tayorockson.com

    UYD Management: https://uydmanagement.com/

    UYD Collective: https://tayorockson.com/uyd-collective

    Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tayorockson 

    Podcast:

  • In today's episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join Orin Davis and me as we talk about positive psychology, self-actualization, and quality of life. With tons of people still in remote work, Orin and I also discuss the lessons we've taken from the pandemic and what it tells us about limitations, cultural and traditional adjustments, and self-compassion. As an Orthodox Jewish, he also shares the story of a Rabbi named Zusya and how his life and death worry relates to the many questions of self-actualization. Tune in closely as we cover more in this episode!


    On Humanity and Endurance 

    How can you remain resilient even if you know that after rising above a current dilemma, another one is probably going to come around? Without oversimplifying, for Orin, there are two things: breakdown and rebuild. When we hear the word 'breakdown,' we often have negative connotations attached. It resembles weakness, vulnerability, and crumbling. Orin confirms it's all of these by essence. And adhering to these traits and allowing repair when there's damage is the vital thing to do. Expecting people to endure without end is an inhumane thing. For us humans, the strength and weakness lie in our fragility. Against so much of nature—eventually—the endurance of someone fragile is bound to crack. This is also the reason why people protest. Because emotion is energy, suppressing so much of it pushes people to rupture, project, and rally. So much 'enduring' is a call-to-action to burst. When this rupture is fulfilled and addressed, it then subsides. The fragility that comes with humanness is the attestation of a person's limits. Without recognition, these limits can only go so far. And when these limits reach their end, with or without the 'break,' the break needs to happen. How you define that 'break' is up to you.


    Outline of the episode:

    [02:39]What is Positive Psychology?[05:58]The pandemic state of mind[09:00]Under abnormal circumstances, you won't get normal results[13:22]What matters more: impact or intent?[18:54]How does one endure when there's always conflict?[24:29]Sometimes creativity stifles[29:00]The fear in Rabbi Zusya's deathbed[32:15]How can you self-actualize?[36:42]God anticipates everything and gives permission[39:07]Orin and Tayo – on the realizations from the pandemic[46:44]Always not what they expected…

    Resources:

    Website: http://qllab.org/pi/

    Medium: https://drorindavis.medium.com/

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/drorindavis?lang=en

    Free Diversity/Inclusion Cheat Sheet: http://qllab.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/QLLDiversityCheatSheet.pdf


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:

    Personal Website: https://tayorockson.com

    UYD Management: https://uydmanagement.com/

    UYD Collective: https://tayorockson.com/uyd-collective

    Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tayorockson

    Podcast:

  • In today's episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, we are joined by the Director of Learning Programs and the students of Learnlife, a community of changemakers that are building an open ecosystem for a new lifelong learning paradigm alongside existing education systems. From the students themselves, we'll hear of the difference Learnlife is making in education compared to traditional schools and what that means to young and evolving learners. As you tune in, takeaway inspiration on how we can rethink teaching and learning from Learnlife in this episode!


    School is not overrated, but... 

    As the students of Learnlife share their thoughts on the traditional education system, we get the gist of what it feels like to be a student in this generation. It's generally strict and creates no freedom for creativity. Because of the pandemic, zoom schools and the lack of student support, instead of stimulating and encouraging learning, make it demoralizing for some learners to develop together with lessons. With the youth catching up on how lagging the education system is becoming in terms of innovation and developments in teaching—college is no longer a thing to look forward to for some students—a fact proven with the decline of college enrollments recorded in the recent months. As this happens, more of the question lies on what value teachers and colleges can offer to students and young professionals. For Devin Carberry, Learnlife's Director of Learning Programs, "We need to fundamentally rethink what value teachers have to offer. If it's just the transfer of information, that's dumb—there's Google! If you can google it, why teach it?"


    Outline of the episode:

    [01:37]Learnlife – on making the most radical paradigm shift in education happen.[04:07]What do students find in Learnlife that sometimes lack in traditional schools?[09:58]Where students of Learnlife come from.[14:10]Barcelona: A soil for change and innovation.[18:08]Why would an 18-year-old choose to stay in Learnlife?[23:53]Opinion: the way traditional schools teach information sometimes makes it hard to visualize lessons in a practical setting.[30:35]Other parts of the world want what Learnlife is doing![34:45]What do educators need to focus on to get the best out of learners?[38:34]Learnlife Mentors even outside of school.[40:48]Students of Learnlife – on the life outside of Learnlife.

    Resources:

    Website: https://learnlife.com/

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/intent/follow?screen_name=wearelearnlife

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wearelearnlife

    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wearelearnlife/

    YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTQAIM9XndJdVTVQeDg4waQ?sub_confirmation=1


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:

    Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tayorockson 

    Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/TayoRockson 

    Personal Website:

  • In today's episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join Elizabeth Grojean and I talk about her awakening to entrepreneurship, BalooLiving, and the many challenges of upcoming brands and of women in business. Before Elizabeth decided to go back to Bali with little left of her savings, she needed to ask herself the reason why she's stepping into, at that time, what felt like the 'unknown' of that stage of her life. Fast forward today, she considers BalooLiving and everything they do as her service and way to connect with other people. Tune in and find inspiration from how Elizabeth mustered the courage to begin a new phase of her life in this episode!


    To live by your own terms

    Despite having done so many things to reinvent herself and give herself a ton of professional experience, Elizabeth was still unfulfilled. But why? The question was not new to her. However, by going through uncomfortable changes in life, she finally decided she can only live on her own terms by starting her own business. Thus, BalooLiving. With her weighted blanket business, Elizabeth found a way to have something for herself that she genuinely believed in and can also serve as a way for her to connect with other people. To compare her as an entrepreneur to her previous self is to be looking at two very different versions. But with courage, she was able to reinvent herself again to a whole new level. The most challenging part for Elizabeth, aside from the business's operations and the systemic factors limiting women, was the self-limitations. Because of her own belief of what was expected from women—especially women in business— for a long time, Elizabeth held herself back from becoming her higher self.


    Outline of the episode:

    [04:29]Elizabeth: On finding experience and going through uncomfortable change[08:32]Not having something to label yourself with can feel off[10:40]How did BalooLiving start?[15:30]A brand about service to others and to the self[18:29]How do weighted blankets work?[21:49]Elizabeth: On the importance of a sustainable business[25:17]The challenges of inventory, forecasting, cash flow, and supply chain to a new business[31:30]Women in entrepreneurship[35:36] Elizabeth is a customer of her own product![37:53]To be a business that puts people and the planet first

    Resources:

    Website: https://balooliving.com/

    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/elizabethmanette/


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:

    Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tayorockson 

    Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/TayoRockson 

    Personal Website: https://tayorockson.com 


    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • In today's episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join Silvy Khoucasian and me to discuss the different styles of attachment, the types of boundaries by Rokelle Lerner, and what she has to say about how to make intentional, genuine connections. Of course, not fully understanding what other people are going through sometimes is understandable. But for Silvy, what's essential at the very least is to learn how to validate the experiences of others even though we're unable to completely empathize. Tune in as Silvy shares more of her wisdom as a Relationship Coach in this episode!


    How to make a connection on the first date?

    Sparking connections with people involve elements that differ from person to person. Especially if it's a romantic relationship in a pandemic where the experience, for most people, is a new context. For a start, Silvy talks about boundaries. Boundaries, for her, need to be discussed before the first meet-up. It'd be awkward to talk about what works and what doesn't as the meet-up happens. That's why it's important to do it before, even if it sounds too serious to talk about at first. Boundaries exist to help both parties feel safe. When safety is established, a lot of things can take off better. It also gives clarity depending on what the intentions for dating are. Exploring is also one thing to remember when dating. Managing your expectations and allowing both to shine is a must to genuinely know each other. It's risk-taking, and it shouldn't always just be about you. For connection to happen, mutuality, reciprocity, and taking risks with vulnerability must take place. Both parties must actively take part in making these happen. If there's no active participation and you just leave things as is, many opportunities will be missed.


    Outline of the episode:

    [04:42]Silvy: On the experience of immigration[07:58]What is it about relationships that are telling of our personalities?[12:11]Relationships may serve as mirrors[16:46]The Attachment Theory and the different attachment formations/styles[22:43]People find themselves in stories and in other people's experiences[24:38]Why do you need to set boundaries?[29:54]The pandemic is a new context to experience – on keeping boundaries[32:33]How do we intentionally spark a connection?[38:51]The back and forth thoughts when connecting with a different attachment style[41:51]Making a connection is an active process

    Resources:

    Website: http://www.silvykhoucasian.com/

    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/silvykhoucasian/?hl=en

    Online Programs: http://www.silvykhoucasian.com/online-programs

    Coaching: http://www.silvykhoucasian.com/coaching


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:

    Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tayorockson 

    Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/TayoRockson 

    Personal Website: https://tayorockson.com 


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  • In today's episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join Juanita Ingram and me to talk about the trailing spouse syndrome, Racism, the pandemic, and 'The Expats: International Ingrams' – the reality tv show that depicts their lives as an African-American family living abroad. Moving to London as a career move for his husband was a total mixed bag of feelings for Juanita as an attorney. From there, she began to unfold an array of realizations that she both struggled with and blossomed from. Tune in and find out how Juanita learned to redefine her life's new and changing seasons in this episode!


    The Conception of The Show: The Expats: International Ingrams

    Juanita is a self-confessed fan of reality shows. But no matter how much she is fond of them, she admits many things are lacking about the majority of the reality shows we see on TV. "…how we're being portrayed, in what's supposed to be reality shows, are impacting how the world sees us as black people," Juanita believes. In this episode, she recalls one gathering that motivated the show, The Expats. The show was born out of the importance of breaking stereotypes and showing positive black images internationally. The idea of a trailing spouse is also a theme that's heavily explored in the show, together with rejecting the common belief that life abroad is a long vacation. Ultimately, for Juanita, black people need to be seen in a different light. Because blacks are rarely seen as doctors, vice presidents, executives, and as families living internationally, Juanita took it upon her as a responsibility to showcase their reality as a black family. As of the moment, 'The Expats: International Ingrams Show' has garnered 78% five-star ratings from Amazon Prime viewers.


    Outline of the episode:

    [04:01]Juanita: Has traveling and living internationally always been in mind?[09:03]A mixed bag of feelings – Juanita's career as an attorney and the experience of having to move abroad.[13:33]Juanita: On going through Trailing Spouse Syndrome.[17:37]Redefining what it means to be a 'trailing spouse' by understanding how wolves work in packs.[25:17]Racism is not new.[27:58]In many places, the pandemic is a political issue instead of being a people issue.[36:14]Reality shows, and shows in general, impact representation.[38:32]Why did 'The Expats: International Ingrams Show' have to be made?[44:21]For the show to be a franchise![47:45]About her books and Juanita Ingram as an author.

    Resources:

    Website: https://www.iamjuanitaingram.com/

    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/iamjuanitaingram/?hl=en

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/iamjuanitaingram/

    YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtrxlM1oEKxmN1KTOFdPeSQ/videos

    Books: https://www.iamjuanitaingram.com/copy-of-beauty-before-ashes

    https://www.iamjuanitaingram.com/copy-of-peace-over-panic

    https://www.iamjuanitaingram.com/ebook

    The Show: https://purpose-streaming.com/


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the...

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • In today's episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join Erica Dhawan and me to talk about what digital body language is, what it means to be inclusive, and the tips for connecting better – digitally. Now that more work-from-home settings are in place communicating may be an obstacle for some. Without the personal experience of body language, understanding how to connect is a challenge. But for Erica, body language didn't disappear—it just evolved. Tune in with us and learn about how Erica sees body language in the digital setting in this episode!


    The Digital Body Language You Already Have 

    Unlike when communicating face-to-face, understanding how someone responds to you through a video call or through chat can be very challenging. Most of the time, you're only limited to judging texts and video calls. When work is concerned, this can be frustrating. But don't lose hope just yet! There are typical examples of digital body language that you're probably just overlooking. If you observe more, you can totally inform yourself on how to better your communication and connection with work and colleagues when work-from-home settings remain. For Erica, body language is not lost when working or communicating digitally. It's just in a different form. How someone structures their email, how fast or slow they answer calls, how they use punctuations, and the frequency of their emojis are all examples of how body language works in a digital situation. They all contribute to the experience and either add or deduct from how someone receives the delivery of the message. They may not be the same with talking face-to-face, but nevertheless, they tell you a thing or two about someone's manner of responding in a digital space.


    Outline of the episode:

    [02:26]What is body language in digital form?[06:46]Digital body language has different styles![08:57]We are all immigrants to the world of digital body language.[11:44]The practical tips to improve your digital body language.[17:03]Erica: On speaking about connection and collaboration in a law firm retreat – A memorable experience on pivoting.[21:02]Every part of communication is always under the spectrum.[24:06]Formality Confusion – A form of anxiety that provokes digital body language.[28:02]Gender differences in digital body language exist; What is Connectional Intelligence?[33:12]Understanding digital body language is an opportunity to be more inclusive and less biased; Tips for virtual job interviews.[37:26]Erica: On deciding not to go down the traditional path.

    Resources:

    Website: https://ericadhawan.com/

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ericadhawan/

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/ericadhawan

    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ericadhawan_/

    YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCo2UXHdLiuhxhS9vwpG_S2g

    Book: https://www.amazon.com/Digital-Body-Language-Connection-Distance/dp/1250246520


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:

    Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tayorockson 

    Podcast:

  • In today's episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join Aubrey Blanche and me as we talk about racialization, equitable leadership, living outside the binary, and more. As someone who opted out from being often white assumed, Aubrey uses her story to teach people about race and privilege. She also talks about the effects of tragedy olympics in this episode and how the game of 'who's pain is worse?' squanders the opportunity for anyone involved to champion empathy. For Aubrey, it's not saying that we shouldn't engage in critique, but we should do so on the grounds of compassion and not on violence and argument. Find out more about how you can live outside of the binary in this episode as you tune in to Aubrey Blanche!


    Everyone Must Find Their Work & Do It!

    For Aubrey, right now, there's so much work to do on our idea that the way we do things is the only way. She thinks that our work is such a function of the privileges we hold that we spend a lot of time actively arguing with each other about what the best way forward is. This type of energy isn't the type that fights the needed fight. Aubrey likes to go back to a quote by Audre Lorde that says: "each of us must find our work and do it." Critique and constantly questioning concepts and things in place should definitely live on. But for Aubrey, the motivation behind and the goal after it needs to be precise. If it's to critique for the sake of argument, then that's not it. She believes that critique must be done on the grounds of compassion for each other in a way that preserves the relationships we have. And that should come with respect. We need to critique, but we don't need to critique with violence against the people who are walking the path with us—because that's a distraction. That's what white supremacy culture wants us to do—fight each other so that we can't fight it. And that's the win they should never get.


    Outline of the episode:

    [02:11]Promote representation, uniqueness, and other identities; lest we…[05:02]By being seen, I help others be seen. [10:04]On going through a process of racialization.[17:39]An experiment that leads to a full-time position that tackled organizational biases.[22:09]The level of secondary trauma typical for leadership roles and roles where it's your job to care.[26:17]Tragedy Olympics is a problem![30:05]The difference between a bullsh***er and a liar.[35:20] What is equitable leadership?[40:11]Allow your privilege to make an impact with the P.A.A. Model.[43:04]"Remember, somebody has to catch the football of our ideas and actions…."

    Resources:

    Website: https://aubreyblanche.com/

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/adblanche/

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/adblanche/

    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adblanche/

    Subscribe to the U.Y.D. Collective: https://tayorockson.podia.com/uydcollective


    Stephen Colbert and Anderson Cooper's beautiful conversation about grief:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YB46h1koicQ


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:

    Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tayorockson 

    Podcast:

  • In today's episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join Michael Roderick and me to discuss the frameworks to developing a referable brand and the approach to relationship building. Often, when people network, all they do is scatter shock. Instead, Michael explains why intention and an effort to spark curiosity are vital when building your connections. Michael also discusses how information can be carried more quickly when it's simple and has an emotional impact in the face of academia that rewards complexity. As someone big on patterns, for Michael, frameworks can be found even in reflection and self-awareness. Find out more about how you can be referable in this episode as you tune in to Michael Roderick!


    The T.C.M. Index 

    When it comes to teaching, most of the time, nothing is being taught within the space of relationship building. If there is, it's always nothing profound. But for Michael, relationship building is an essential topic to factor in if one wants to be an efficient connector. Following that, Michael came up with the T.C.M. Index. The T.C.M. Index is an acronym that stands for Time, Connections, and Money that most individuals don't have in them in one complete package. Michael also found that there are always surplus and deficits present in these resources. And to establish an effective connection, relationship, or partnership—leveraging the differences of these resources is key. The answer to solving any deficit is in the other two things. If you lack time but have the money to invest, someone skilled and available can be a potential partner for your goal. If you're an expert working on a startup, linking up with someone who has connections will make pulling in investors a lot easier for you. Basically, the T.C.M. Index gives the framework to what Michael believes: "the keys to all the doors we need to open are in other people's pockets."


    Outline of the episode:

    [04:11]On teaching and the love for theater.[07:25]Developing your craft and building your network can exist outside of school.[12:47] You need to be intentional about the relationships you're building.[17:27]Are you creating interest, curiosity, or intrigue?[21:59]On the effects of emotional appeal and simplicity.[28:33]Most relationships are built because you listen, not because you talk.[32:44]What we can learn from comedians about market research.[39:58]End your day by asking your G.I.F.T.[45:47] The core behind Small Pond Podcast and Access to Anyone Podcast.[48:23]Reversing the reality on how more subpar ideas get extraordinary marketing.

    Resources:

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-roderick-1161571/

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/MichaelRoderick

    Consult with Small Pond: http://www.smallpondenterprises.com/

    Check out Access to Anyone Podcast: https://www.accesstoanyonepodcast.com/

    Subscribe to the U.Y.D. Collective: https://tayorockson.podia.com/uydcollective


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:

    Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tayorockson 

    Podcast:

  • In today’s episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join me and my guest, Jordan Gross, as we talk about the four distinct mindsets during uncertainties and how behaviors help people cultivate opportunities by navigating change. Jordan shares how development is better taught through parables and fables as someone who leverages the relatability of creative storytelling. From there, he also speaks on his new book “What Happens in Tomorrow World?” and its arcade-like approach to representing the future and life’s uncertainties. There’s a lot to take notes from in this episode, so make sure to tune in to Jordan.


    Personal Development Through Story Telling 

    Instead of a prescriptive approach, Jordan uses a different manner to teaching development through storytelling. He shares that fun and adventure are a must in his life. Which is the reason why stories with zig-zaggy and non-linear flows always resonate with Jordan. For him, this particular nature of parables and fables, if used creatively, can also be a potent tool for teaching lessons and morals, as proven precisely in his latest book. With the emotional appeal of stories that draw people in, readers find it easier to pay attention to details and find themselves in the levels of every character. Storytelling can teach lessons by leaving people with the opportunity to make their own decisions and assessment after the story. Jordan sees this differently from the ‘do this do that’ type of teaching that often lacks relatability. Because stories take a more creative and stimulating approach to connecting with the reader’s mind, people are then allowed to learn different messages from stories using their own imaginations without losing their autonomy.


    Outline of the episode:

    [04:03]On embracing the uncertainties of life.[07:00]The 4 Common Mindsets That Arise During Uncertainties.[11:01]Personal development through creative storytelling.[12:45]Over-optimism can exist too; Is optimism always the answer?[15:05]Toxic positivity and genuine positivity.  [16:55]How can you turn your passion into sustainable business opportunities?[22:59] “Opportunity precedes passion.”[26:51]Is there a correlation between solitude and opportunity?[28:52]What is Tomorrow World?[31:51]Have something you can call “yours only” that can make a difference.

    Resources:

    Website: https://jordan-gross.com/

    Grab your copy of Tomorrow World now: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/195066595X

    Also, check out The Journey to Cloud Nine: https://www.amazon.com/Journey-Cloud-Nine-Confront-Redefine-ebook/dp/B0815S6DY3

    Jordan’s Book Inspiration: https://www.amazon.com/Moved-Cheese-Spencer-Johnson-M-D/dp/0743582853

    Subscribe to the UYD Collective: https://tayorockson.podia.com/uydcollective


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:

    Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tayorockson 

    Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast

    Twitter:

  • In today's episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join Dawn Dickson-Akpoghene and me to talk about the experience of founding multiple businesses and her company, Popcom's technology that helps retailers skyrocket their businesses' product-market fit through brand intelligence. Growing up under business-oriented parents, she found it funny how entrepreneurship was never brought up or taught. And because the school system only teaches kids how to be workers, Dawn learned the hard way to rightly pave her path as an entrepreneur. Tune in and find out what else Dawn has to share about their technology of tomorrow in this episode!


    Going For It Anyway 

    Before accumulating 20 years in entrepreneurship, Dawn had to start by learning her way in. Even though she was a daughter to parents who were into business. "It wasn't a word we talk about," she even said. Growing up in her family, they were taught to only focus on getting into college, finding a corporate job, and retire from that job. For Dawn, it wasn't encouraging at all. In a school system where kids are generally taught the knowledge and skills on how to be workers and not CEOs, Dawn grew this innate solid feeling of wanting to be freer and be more of her own. She wants to call the shots. Eventually, Dawn did just that. In 2001, she founded Urban Star—an online entertainment social platform before social media was even a thing back in the early days. Urban Star focused on listing events, restaurants, concerts, and everything hot and current in central Ohio. They were recognized for featuring local artists and music on their site and did really well by making money from email marketing and hosting online ads. If we think of it, Dawn was a real starter. By the time this episode comes out, she is already the founder of her 5th brand.


    Outline of the episode:

    [03:50]"Entrepreneurship wasn't a word we talk about..."[05:02]Businesses built on experience and the need to solve personal problems.[08:16]What a business, from 20 years ago, teaches you.[10:34]What Popcom does for businesses and the people.[12:48]How did the pandemic affect Popcom?[18:09]On extending Popcom's mission to international markets.[20:06] What is brand intelligence?[21:46] Basically, anyone can invest in Popcom![25:27]On building a community of investors that network and invest in each other.[28:35]"No one else's success is going to affect mine."

    Resources:

    Website: https://www.popcom.shop/

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dawndickson/

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/THEDawnDickson/

    Popcom’s Crowdfunding: https://www.startengine.com/popcom

    Subscribe to the UYD Collective: https://tayorockson.podia.com/uydcollective


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:

    Linkedin:

  • In today’s episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join me and my guest, Scott Shute, as we talk about what happiness and compassion are, the redefinition of success, and the importance of mindfulness in gaining insight into the body and mind. For Scott, compassion has proven to go a long way not only for people – but also for corporate structures. Just as much as he believes that success grows not only within matters of work and career, he believes that a successful company not only heed its shareholders but its stakeholders as well. As LinkedIn’s Head of Mindfulness and Compassion, allow your mind to open as Scott breaks down how compassion is an awareness of others, having the mindset of wishing the best for them, the courage to take action, and many more.


    Next Lesson: Happiness

    In this episode, Scott explains to the listeners how happiness isn’t always all about what happens, as opposed to what others believe. Happiness is in the reaction – for Scott. Let’s take, for example, good and bad days. If you keep close notice, there are days where you wake up, and you absolutely just feel like a winner. That no matter what goes on, you’ll face it all. And then there are days wherein you feel heavy, and down that, you can’t even get out of bed so much so that it confuses you. For Scott, the difference goes back to what happens inside your head. In a striking statement, Scott speaks: “happiness is an inside job!” Often, we are all aware of what that happiness means to us. Imagine how at times, through conversations, our bodies naturally react to what we talk about. When we talk about something that makes us nervous, our bodies tense, jitters, and grows cold. While if we talk about topics that we are passionate about, the body fills with energy, we talk faster, and the ideas come rushing naturally. Using this example tells of a strong message that Scott agrees with. Our body knows what can make it happy. And by learning that, meditating on that, and shaping your life into more of those things that make you feel good –you gain more view into what happiness truly means to you.


    Outline of the episode:

    [03:20]What does it mean to change your world from the inside out?

    [05:13] Four parts to learning optimism and happiness.

    [08:12] On finding contentment despite suppression and hurt.

    [12:22]How can we discover what is important to us?

    [15:56]A successful company is…

    [20:45]Where does genuine compassion start?

    [24:55] Compassion as a strategic advantage.

    [29:26]Success can also happen outside of work.

    [33:06]The journey of becoming LinkedIn’s Head of Mindfulness and Compassion.

    [36:01]Find the environment that cultivates you fully! 


    Resources:

  • In today’s episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join me and my guest, Doni Aldine, as we talk about the cross-cultural superpowers of empathy, vulnerability, and emotional intelligence in creating a sense of belonging. As someone who’s identified with 7 different cultures at the early age of 19, Doni explains the importance of adding emotional intelligence in cross-cultural communication and interaction. In this episode, she also shares about CULTURS Magazine and how the celebration of multicultural identities inculcates in everything they do through media, products, and experiences. Everything cross-culture can’t be explained any better than Doni Aldine herself, so make sure to tune in to everything she shares!


    Being Emotionally Intelligent Through Cultural Mobility 

    For Doni, people of color and multi-cultures are usually those that have the most cultural mobility. It’d only make sense. Because they move from one place to another, they adapt to the environment and culture outside of their own, or their parent’s as they grow. Aside from the culture that they’re born into, living in these in-between spaces also gives them a poly-dimensional POV of people’s background that helps them rise to meet other people’s differences better. But what if an individual hasn’t experienced that level of geographical mobility? Doni elaborates how an individual can still develop emotional intelligence in this scenario. If someone comes from a small and humble town and proceeds with his/her higher education, entering a university can already be a means for cultural mobility that aids in enhancing an individual’s emotional intelligence. As the person co-learns with thousands of individuals coming from various backgrounds in one space, his/her learned culture and emotional intelligence expand even if free from intention. 


    Outline of the episode:

    [03:16]The Americans![05:16] On growing up with multiple varying languages.[08:30]There are many dimensions to being a third-culture individual.[11:31]Third-culture kids/individuals can have delayed adolescence.[14:14]The superpower of most third-culture kids/individuals.[16:06]People with minimal cultural mobility can still widen their emotional intelligence.[20:07]CULTURS Magazine: Celebrating every cross-cultural identity![23:40]“It was less about the format and more about the reach.”[24:17]The Focus on Print: Print is not dead nor dying.[32:40]CULTURS is a global multicultural lifestyle network.[35:03]The differences that create a sense of belonging. 

    Resources:

    Website: https://www.cultursmag.com/doni/

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/CultursMag

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/donnyale/

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/donnyale

    Check out CULTURS Mag: https://www.cultursmag.com/


    Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:

  • In today’s episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join me and my guest, Michael Sharkey, as we talk about the power and importance of storytelling. Michael Sharkey is a podcaster, radio veteran, and coach with vast experience in the audio industry. Now, with the rise of podcast listenership, Michael helps entrepreneurs find their voices by confidently giving them the ability to create unique podcasts. Today, he shares his wealth of knowledge to develop the audience we want using the right tools we need. Also, if you are looking to start a podcast of your own, feel free to check out Michael’s gift in the links below!


    Sharing Your Uniqueness in Service of Others

    Podcasting is not about finding a good microphone and talking into it for hours on end. It is about finding your voice and telling your story. But it is not easy to find your voice when you are just starting. Hence, if you plan on starting a podcast yourself, the best place to start is to know what you want to talk about—and I mean, not just anything under the sun. It should be something you genuinely care about because it will help you find your voice and share a uniqueness you may have never known you had. Michael Sharkey said it best with a quote from Larry Winget, “Find your uniqueness and exploit it in service of others.” To Michael, this quote encompasses the truth of podcasts. In podcasting, everyone has an opportunity to find their uniqueness. But the best part is, when they share that uniqueness, others who identify with it will be inspired to do the same. In the end, everybody deserves a chance to share their story, and who knows, your story might just inspire someone else to share theirs.


    Outline of the episode:

    [03:25] How Michael got started and why he pursued the audio industry.[05:40] The power of storytelling and the importance of critical thinking.[08:29] Why he took a sabbatical after leaving radio and how it changed his life.[11:25] How traveling is essential in self-discovery, learning, and development.[12:30] Finding your voice amid vulnerability and exploiting in service of others.[15:02] A step-by-step discussion on how to start your podcast and the value of knowing your uniqueness.[19:35] How 100% of podcasts evolve and why it is okay to diverge from the initial plan.[22:19] The secret to every great interviewer and why you should treat interviews like any conversation.[24:33] How the only barrier to podcasting is your mindset and why everyone deserves to tell their story.[26:57] Why quality still matters when starting a podcast and how your podcast can sound just like your favorites.[30:47] How Michael Sharkey developed his Podcast Roadmap and why he enjoys sharing information with the world.[35:41] How your podcast can take any shape you want it to be.[39:26] Michael’s advice for aspiring podcasters and storytellers about being proud of your uniqueness and sharing it with the world. [42:56] How Michael uses his difference to make a difference. 

    Resources:

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelsharkeypodcastcoach/ 

    Website: https://yourpodcastcoach.com/tayo

    FREE Podcast Roadmap: https://www.yourpodcastcoach.com/